Canadian Alcohol Policy Evaluation (CAPE)

 
Total Alcohol Policy Implementation Score* by Province and Territory, 2017

CISUR and CAMH have led a national evaluation of alcohol policies across all provinces and territories in Canada. This project, also known as "The implementation of evidence-based alcohol policies in Canada: a national knowledge translation project," updates a previous evaluation report released in 2013. The results of this research will be used to inform evidence-based alcohol policies in Canada to reduce and prevent alcohol-related harms. 

View the CAPE infographic.

2019 Provincial and Territorial CAPE Reports and Summaries

2019 Federal CAPE Report

Presentations and infographics

Webinars

2013 Provincial CAPE Reports

Journal articles

Related news stories and media releases

Related alcohol policy evaluation publications

Other resources

About the 2019 Provincial and Territorial CAPE Project

The Provincial and Territorial Canadian Alcohol Policy Evaluation Project is a rigorous assessment of the extent to which evidence-based alcohol policies have been implemented in all 13 jurisdictions in Canada. The study design is based on a similar model conceived of and implemented by MADD Canada assessing the progress of policy measures to reduce impaired driving (see 2015 Provincial Impaired Driving Report). The types of alcohol policies being evaluated at the provincial and territorial level include those with direct evidence of direct effectiveness as a means of reducing population level consumption of alcohol and/or related harms such as: pricing and taxation; physical availability of alcohol; impaired driving countermeasures; marketing and advertising controls; minimum legal drinking age laws; screening, brief intervention and referral programs; and liquor law enforcement. We also assess evidence-based strategies that more indirectly facilitate implementation of the direct policies mentioned above. These strategies include: control systems for the distribution and sale of alcohol; provincial and territorial alcohol strategies; monitoring and reporting of alcohol related harms; and health and safety messaging. A report card will be available for each jurisdiction and comparisons made with a previous national exercise completed in 2013, which was also based on the MADD Canada design.

About the 2019 Federal CAPE Project

The Federal Canadian Alcohol Policy Evaluation Project is a rigorous assessment of the extent to which evidence-based alcohol policies have been implemented by the federal government in Canada. The study design is based on a similar model conceived of and implemented by MADD Canada assessing the progress of policy measures to reduce impaired driving (see 2015 Provincial Impaired Driving Report). The types of alcohol policies being evaluated at the provincial and territorial level include those with direct evidence of direct effectiveness as a means of reducing population level consumption of alcohol and/or related harms such as: pricing and taxation; physical availability of alcohol; impaired driving countermeasures; marketing and advertising controls; minimum legal drinking age laws; and screening, brief intervention and referral programs. We also assess evidence-based strategies that more indirectly facilitate implementation of the direct policies mentioned above. These strategies include: control systems for the distribution and sale of alcohol; a national alcohol strategy; monitoring and reporting of alcohol related harms; and health and safety messaging. A report card will be available for the federal government.

About the 2013 Provincial CAPE Project

The 2013 alcohol policy evaluation report provided an initial systematic and comparative review of policies and programs across all Canadian provinces which have the potential to reduce the considerable health and social harms from alcohol. The overall objective was to encourage greater uptake of these practices and thereby improve public health and safety in Canada. The study design was based on a similar model conceived and implemented by MADD Canada assessing the progress of policy measures to reduce impaired driving (see 2015 Provincial Impaired Driving Report)

Funding bodies

  • 2019 Provincial and Territorial CAPE Project: Health Canada, Substance Use and Addictions Program
  • 2019 Federal CAPE Project: Public Health Agency of Canada
  • 2013 Provincial CAPE Project: Canadian Institutes of Health Research

Researchers

  • Dr. Tim Stockwell ((PI) Director, Canadian Institute for Substance Use Research, University of Victoria)
  • Norman Geisbrecht ((Co-PI), Emeritus Scientist, Centre for Addiction and Mental Health, Toronto, ON )
  • Ashley Wettlaufer (Research Coordinator, Centre for Addiction and Mental Health, Toronto, ON )
  • Kate Vallance ( Research Associate, Canadian Institute for Substance Use Research, Victoria, BC)
  • Clifton Chow (Research Affiliate, Canadian Institute for Substance Use Research, Victoria, BC)
  • Nicole April (Medical Consultant, Institut national de santé publique du Québec, Québec City, QC )
  • Mark Asbridge (Associate Professor, Dalhousie University, Halifax, NS )
  • Russell Callaghan (Scientist, Canadian Institute for Substance Use Research, Victoria; Professor, University of Northern British Columbia, Prince George, BC)
  • Samantha Cukier (Post-Doctoral Research Fellow, Dartmouth College, Hanover, NH )
  • Geoff Hynes (Manager, Canadian Institute for Health Information, Ottawa, ON)
  • Robert Mann (Senior Scientist, Centre for Addiction and Mental Health, Toronto, ON )
  • Kara Thompson (Assistant Professor, St. Francis Xavier University, Antigonish, NS)
  • Robert Solomon (rofessor Emeritus, Western University, London, ON)
  • Robert Strang ((Knowledge User) Chief Medical Officer of Health for Nova Scotia )
  • Gerald Thomas ((Knowledge User) Collaborating Scientist, Canadian Institute for Substance Use Research; Director, BC Ministry of Health, Victoria, BC )
  • Andrew Murie ((Knowledge User) Chief Executive Officer of MADD Canada)