Southeast Asia in Global Context

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Roundtable discussion series


Situated between India and China, along the busiest maritime sea routes in the world, Southeast Asia remains today at the crossroads of ideas, commerce, migration, language, religion, and law, as it has for centuries. With a total population greater than that of the European Union, the countries of Southeast Asia have been working through the ASEAN—the Association of Southeast Asian Nations—to integrate their economies and cooperate politically and economically on matters of common concern, increasing the region’s influence on global affairs. This roundtable series situates contemporary Southeast Asia in Asia and the wider world, examining the many ways the pressing issues in the region affect us all.


Upcoming Roundtable: 

Malacca Strait, Falco Emert via Flickr

Canada, Southeast Asia, and the Indo-Pacific Strategy: Engaging a Critical Region

3 March 2023

The Indo-Pacific—and the region around the two oceans is now increasingly known—has become a critical node in regional security and geopolitics. Released in November 2022, Canada’s new Indo-Pacific Strategy, Canada’s first foreign policy white paper in 19 years, notes the “rising influence of the Indo-Pacific region is a once-in-a-generation global shift that requires a generational Canadian response.” It sets out five priorities: (1) promote peace, resilience and security; (2) expand trade, investment and supply chain resilience; (3) invest in and connect people; (4) build a sustainable and green future; and (5) Canada as an active and engaged partner to the Indo-Pacific. This one-day conference, consists of three roundtable panels focussing on the implications of the Indo-Pacific Strategy for Southeast Asia. The first panel, Canada’s Indo-Pacific Strategy and Southeast Asia, provides an overview of those implications for Canada’s relationship with the region. The second panel focuses on climate, sustainability, and trade. The third panel zooms in on the security Implications for Canada and Southeast Asia and the wider region.

In the spirit of this roundtable series, this conference brings together thought leaders from the academy, government, industry, and civil society organizations—from Canada and Southeast Asia—to explore the implications of the strategy.

CAPI gratefully acknowledges the support of Canada's Department of National Defence through its Targeted Engagement Grant Fund

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Schedule

Roundtable schedule will be announced shortly

 

Past Roundtables

XIV. Economy, Climate, Security in the Shadow of Covid-19 [March 2022]

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Economy, Climate, Security in the Shadow of Covid-19

31 March 2022

The 14th instalment of CAPI’s ongoing Southeast Asia in Global Context roundtable series featured a distinguished panel of international experts on the challenges and decisions facing Southeast Asian countries as they emerge from the latest waves of the Covid-19 pandemic and adjust to the new regional and global landscape.

Participants considered how health and environmental priorities have affected trade and investment flows in the region, with particular attention to the pandemic’s potential long-term impact on Southeast Asia’s economy, trade patterns, and budget priorities, in the context of the Indo-Pacific region. If countries are prioritising economic growth, what will the impact be on the use of fossil fuels and green energy plans, and what are the implications for climate change commitments? How will rising public expenses relating to healthcare and social welfare be addressed and prioritised? The participants also explored the traditional security issues in the Indo-Pacific and the power dynamics in different parts of Southeast Asia.

CAPI gratefully acknowledges the support of Canada's Department of National Defence through its Targeted Engagement Grant Fund (Grant title: Canada, Southeast Asia, and the Indo-Pacific: Engaging a Critical Region) and the session was held under a modified version of the Chatham House Rule, such that views and comments of individual participants were not to be attributed.

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Participants

Panellists:

  • Lorraine Elliott, Professor Emerita, International Relations, Australian National University
  • Mina Hoofar, Professor and Dean of Engineering, University of Victoria, Canada
  • Erik Kuhonta, Associate Professor, Political Science, and Director, Institute for the Study of International Development, McGill University, Canada
  • Pavida Pananond, Professor, International Business, Thammasat Business School, Thammasat University, Bangkok
  • Sharon Seah Li-Lian, ISEAS Yusof–Ishak Institute, Singapore

Concluding remarks:

  • Peter Lundy, Director General, Southeast Asia, ASEAN, APEC, Global Affairs Canada

Chairs:

  • Phil Calvert, CAPI Senior Research Fellow and former Canadian Ambassador to Thailand, Cambodia, and Laos
  • Victor V. Ramraj, CAPI Director and Chair in Asia-Pacific Legal Relations and Professor of Law, University of Victoria

Reflection on the discussion

| By Dulma Karunarathna, visiting CAPI Post-Doctoral Research Fellow, and Panch Rishi Dev Sharma, UVic Law PhD student

The 14th instalment of CAPI’s Roundtable Series on Southeast Asia in Global Context brought together a distinguished panel of academics, researchers, and diplomats on Economy, Climate and Security in the Shadow of Covid-19 in the region. The roundtable’s interdisciplinary discussion focused on the coexistence of energy justice and environmental security with post-pandemic priorities for the region on economy, trade, and global supply chains. The roundtable also addressed issues of national security, political economy and regional politics in the wider framework of geopolitics and current international developments.

Participants were invited to consider three sets of interdependent questions: (1) As countries in Southeast Asia are emerging from Covid-19, how have health and environmental priorities affected trade and investment flows in the region? (2) If countries are prioritizing economic growth, what will be the impact on the use of fossil fuels and green energy plans, and what are the implications for climate commitments (and rising healthcare costs)? (3) How have competing public priorities affected — or destabilized — institutions, domestic or international?

The first part of the discussion focused on the effects of the Covid-19 pandemic on larger issues of environmental, economic, and social policy-making by bringing a human dimension to existing vulnerabilities in ASEAN. One participant stressed that investment is not value-neutral and also not simply a transactional modality, so questions of energy policy need to be linked to climate change and sustainability. Another participant identified three dimensions of economic recovery in the region: moderating globalization with a reduced reliance on global trade and investment by concentrating on resilient regional supply chains; prioritizing health and environmental concerns of economic recovery within the prism of green growth; and taking precautionary economic efforts in the context of the Russia-Ukraine war and other security risks that disrupt global supply chains.

Many Southeast Asian countries, panelists observed, were not planning a green recovery because of the absence of a collective climate change strategy and because of the massive dependency on global energy supply chains. Southeast Asian states have shown some isolated positive efforts, such as retiring aging coal-fired power plants, but ASEAN governments need to collaborate more effectively on regional energy connectivity, and on a regional regulatory framework to realize its climate goals. The panel stressed the importance of diversifying short-term technological strategies such as blending natural gas with hydrogen and long-term technological strategies such as solar, wind, and tidal energy. The competition to develop semiconductors and lithium batteries as the short-term strategies has also caused environmental concerns, including mining of rare earth materials, so states should rationally prioritize short-term and long-term technological strategies for a green energy transition.

One panelist highlighted regime change in Southeast Asia as a political consequence of the pandemic, focusing on autocratic regimes in the Philippines, Cambodia, and Myanmar. The panel also discussed how the pandemic presented an opportunity for governments to use extraordinary emergency powers such as the Anti-terrorism Law in Philippines in 2020, and the Emergency Law and Precautionary Law for Covid-19, along with detentions and curtailing of civil liberties in Cambodia. The roundtable concluded with general reflections Canadian foreign policy in the region.

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Screenshot of roundtable participants on Zoom call

XIII. AUKUS, Southeast Asia, and the Indo-Pacific: Realignment, Conflict, or Cooperation? [November 2021]

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AUKUS, Southeast Asia, and the Indo-Pacific: Realignment, Conflict, or Cooperation?

18 November 2021

The 13th instalment of CAPI’s ongoing Southeast Asia in Global Context roundtable series featured a distinguished panel of international experts examining the implications of the new AUKUS (Australia-United Kingdom-United States) alliance for traditional and non-traditional security issues. Participants considered how the emerging geopolitical realignment complicates the ability of countries in the region and great powers to cooperate on ongoing global challenges such as Covid-19 recovery and the climate crisis. The session sought to raise awareness of Southeast Asia generally as a critical node in the Indo-Pacific region, one deserving of close attention in understanding the balance of geopolitical power and and the consequences of rising tensions for human security, ethical economic development, and environmental protection. This particular roundtable  was featured as part of the University of Victoria's Global Days 2021 a new series of events focused on global issues relating to sustainability.

CAPI gratefully acknowledges the support of Canada's Department of National Defence through its Targeted Engagement Grant Fund and the session was held under the Chatham House Rule

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Participants

Panellists:

  • John Blaxland, Professor of International Security, and Intelligence Studies and former Head of the Strategic and Defence Studies Center, Australian National University
  • Mely Caballero-Anthony, Professor of International Relations and Head of the Centre for Non-Traditional Security Studies; President’s Chair in International Relations and Security Studies, Nanyang Technological University, Singapore
  • Joanna Chiu, Vancouver-based senior journalist covering both Canada-China relations and current affairs on the West Coast for the Toronto Star; author of China Unbound: A New World Disorder
  • Kai Ostwald, Associate Professor, School of Public Policy & Global Affairs and the Department of Political Science; Director, Institute of Asian Research, University of British Columbia

Chairs

  • Phil Calvert, CAPI Senior Research Fellow and former Canadian Ambassador to Thailand, Cambodia, and Laos
  • Victor V. Ramraj, CAPI Director and Chair in Asia-Pacific Legal Relations and Professor of Law, University of Victoria

Reflection on the discussion

| By Dulma Karunarathna, visiting CAPI Post-Doctoral Research Fellow

This roundtable session convened another distinguished panel of national and international experts to discuss the implications of the new AUKUS alliance, consisting of Australia, the United Kingdom, and the United States. This new alliance potentially raises the stakes for conflict and recalibrates the prospects for cooperation on other pressing global issues. This roundtable examined how the evolving geopolitical realignment complicates the ability of countries in the Southeast Asian region and great powers to cooperate on ongoing global challenges such as the Covid-19 pandemic and the climate crisis. The session sought to raise awareness of Southeast Asia as a critical node in the Indo-Pacific region, one deserving of close attention in understanding the balance of geopolitical power, and its important role in striving for greater human security, ethical economic development, and environmental protection.

The discussion was framed around three sets of questions: (1) What are the implications of AUKUS for security and trade alliances in the region, especially the Quad, the Five Eyes, and the CPTPP? What are the implications more generally for geopolitics and the trade agenda? (2) What are the implications of the new alliance for Southeast Asia and ASEAN? What are the implications for Canada’s engagement with that region? (3) How does the new alliance affect the prospects for international cooperation on the Covid-19 pandemic and climate action?

The panel began with a discussion of the implications of AUKUS for Canada, Southeast Asia, and global politics generally. One panelist suggested that AUKUS was not necessarily a new alliance for Australia but a technical agreement to share nuclear propulsion technology and to assist Australia in bolstering instability; it strengthens many elements of existing agreements and arrangements for sharing advanced technologies, the development of nuclear submarines for Australia. But beyond this  “technical” perspective, the geopolitical tensions and narratives around AUKUS reflected existing traditional and non-traditional security challenges for Southeast Asia, such as the strategic autonomy of many countries within ASEAN. Other challenges highlighted by the panelists included growing tensions between major powers, possible marginalization by great power contestation, the relative hierarchy among the members of the AUKUS alliance, and the risk of misperception or miscalculation of threats. Panelists also noted the importance of acknowledging the vast diversity of views in Southeast Asia and ASEAN, between and within its member countries.

The implications of AUKUS for great power contestation of the Indo-Pacific was a recurring theme in the discussion. One panelist drew the attention to the symbolism behind the term “Indo-Pacific” instead of “Asia-Pacific,” which is seem by some as an attempt to challenge China’s influence in the region and strengthen India’s position. On Canada’s role of Canada in Southeast Asia, Canada's exclusion from the AUKUS alliance was considered. Some panelists noted that Canada’s soft power in the region and its influence shaping multilateralism in the region, was highly appreciated and  would be welcome. A final theme that emerged from the discussion was the importance of separating and “cabining” geopolitical security issues from other issues such as the climate crisis and the Covid-19 pandemic, to allow for collaboration on these issues in the region. However, the panelists also stressed the importance of working together under a proper crisis management plan to preventing miscalculation.

 

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XII. Water Governance in Southeast Asia: A Roundtable Discussion on the Mekong River Basin [March 2021]

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Water Governance in Southeast Asia: A Roundtable Discussion on the Mekong River Basin

18 March 2021

Participants

Opening remarks:

  • Kevin Hall, President, University of Victoria

Panellists:

  • Pianporn DeetesRegional Campaigns and Communications Director, Southeast Asia Program, International Rivers
  • Brian EylerSenior Fellow and Director, Southeast Asia program, Stimson Centre, Washington DC
  • Melissa MarschkeAssociate Professor, International Development and Global Studies, University of Ottawa, Canada
  • Carl MiddletonDirector of the Center for Social Development Studies, Faculty of Political Science, Chulalongkorn University, Thailand

Chairs:

  • Phil Calvert, CAPI Senior Research Fellow and former Canadian Ambassador to Thailand, Cambodia, and Laos
  • Victor V. Ramraj, CAPI Director and Chair in Asia-Pacific Legal Relations and Professor of Law, University of Victoria

XI. US Election Debrief: Implications for Southeast Asia [November 2020]

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US Election Debrief: Implications for Southeast Asia

19 November 2020

Participants

Panellists:

  • Nirmal Ghosh, US Bureau Chief, The Straits Times
  • Ratana Ly, PhD candidate, UVic Law; Researcher, Center for the Study of Humanitarian Law, Cambodia
  • Kai OstwaldAssistant Professor, UBC Political Science and School of Public Policy & Global Affairs; Director, UBC’s Centre for Southeast Asia Research
  • Thitinan PongsudhirakExecutive Director & Professor, Institute of Strategic and International Studies, Chulalongkorn University, Thailand
  • Bridget WelshHonorary Research Associate, University of Nottingham Asia Research Institute Malaysia; Senior Research Associate, Hu Feng Center for East Asia Democratic Studies, National Taiwan University; Senior Associate Fellow, The Habibie Center

Chairs:

  • Phil Calvert, CAPI Senior Research Fellow and former Canadian Ambassador to Thailand, Cambodia, and Laos
  • Victor V. Ramraj, CAPI Director and Chair in Asia-Pacific Legal Relations and Professor of Law, University of Victoria

X. Justice for the Rohingya: The Role of Canada [May 2020]

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Photo: UN Women/Allison Joyce / Flickr

Justice for the Rohingya: The Role of Canada

21 May 2020

In a special international virtual roundtable of experts, CAPI, in collaboration with UVic Law, Canadian Senator Marilou McPhedran, and the Human Rights Research and Education Centre at the University of Ottawa convened about 75 invited experts from Canada, the United States, the United Kingdom, Bangladesh, South Korea, and Australia, to consider the role of Canada in seeking justice for the Rohingya.

Featured speakers: 

  • Honourable Marilou McPhedran, Independent Senator, Parliament of Canada; 
  • Her Excellency Jacqueline O’Neill, Ambassador for Women, Peace, and Security, Canada; 
  • Honourable Bob Rae, Special Envoy on Humanitarian and Refugee Issues, appointed by the Prime Minister of Canada; 
  • Prof. Payam Akhavan, Member of the Permanent Court of Arbitration, The Hague; Faculty of Law, McGill University; Counsel for The Gambia at the ICJ in the case of The Gambia v. Myanmar; 
  • Prof. Yanghee Lee, United Nations (UN) Special Rapporteur on the situation of human rights in Myanmar (May 2014 to 30 April 2020);
  • Prof. Susan Breau, Dean, Faculty of Law, University of Victoria, Canada; 
  • Prof. Christine Chinkin, Emerita Professor of International Law, London School of Economics, UK; 
  • Prof. Victor V. Ramraj, Faculty of Law and Director, Centre for Asia Pacific Initiatives, University of Victoria, Canada;
  • Prof. John Packer, Associate Professor of Law, Director of the Human Rights Research and Education Centre (HRREC) & Neuberger-Jesin Professor of International Conflict Resolution, University of Ottawa, Canada;
  • Ms. Razia Sultana, Chairperson, Rohingya Women’s Welfare Society, Cox’s Bazar, Bangladesh;
  • Ms. Wai Wai Nu, Rohingya/Burmese founder, Women’s Peace Network, Yangon, Myanmar;
  • Ms. Akila Radhakrishnan, President, Global Justice Center, New York, USA;
  • Ms. Mavic Cabrera Balleza, Founder and Chief Executive Officer, Global Network of Women Peacebuilders, New York, USA.

Read the summary report

IX. Southeast Asia: Recent Trends and Perspectives [November 2019]

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Southeast Asia: Recent Trends and Perspectives

29 November 2019 at the University of Ottawa

CAPI was pleased to collaborate with The Asian Studies Network at uOttawa’s Centre for International Policy Studies (CIPS/CÉPI) to present a special roundtable discussion on Southeast Asia in Global Context in the nation's capital. In this session, our expert panel examined three broad regional themes: (1) Ethno-Religious Nationalism; (2) Livelihoods, Precarious Labour & Climate Refugees; and (3) Investment, Human Rights, and Security.


CAPI gratefully acknowledges the support of the Department of National Defence Canada Defence Engagement Program

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Participants

  • Susan Gregson, Senior Fellow, Graduate School of Public and International Affairs, UOttawa, and former ADM Asia-Pacific with Global Affairs Canada
  • Helen Lansdowne, CAPI Associate Director
  • Melissa Marschke, Associate Professor, International Development and Global Studies, UOttawa
  • Kai Ostwald, Director, Centre for Southeast Asia Research, and Assistant Professor, Department of Political Science and the School of Public Policy & Global Affairs, UBC
  • Phil Calvert, CAPI Senior Research Fellow and former Canadian Ambassador to Thailand, Cambodia, and Laos
  • Victor V. Ramraj, CAPI Director and Chair in Asia-Pacific Legal Relations and Professor of Law, University of Victoria

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VIII. Financial Innovation, Systemic Risk and Climate Crisis in Asia [October 2019]

Financial Innovation, Systemic Risk & Climate Crisis in Asia

17 October 2019

In this, the 8th instalment of CAPI’s ongoing “Southeast Asia in Global Context” roundtable discussion series, we convened an interdisciplinary panel of international experts to examine issues in green finance as well as financial regulation/systemic risk, especially as they relate to climate issues and political instability in the region and beyond (e.g., Hong Kong, Brexit).

The discussants considered whether countries such as Hong Kong and Singapore (and Canada) can take credit for their relatively mild experience of the 2008 global financial crisis, and whether there would have been a global financial crisis if Islamic banking principles had been in operation. Finally, the panel considered how financial institutions are adjusting to the climate crisis.

Participants

Panellists:

  • Meyer Aaron, CEO, 3Pi Capital Advisory Inc; former Policy Advisor,Bank of Canada
  • Ravipal Bains,Associate, McMillan LLP, Vancouver
  • Adhiti Gupta,Manager, Design Funding, Convergence Blended Finance, Toronto
  • Christian Hofmann,Assistant Professor, Faculty of Law, National University of Singapore (via video-link)
  • Daromir Rudnyckyj,Associate Professor, Anthropology, University of Victoria

Chairs

  • Phil Calvert, CAPI Senior Research Fellow and former Canadian Ambassador to Thailand, Cambodia, and Laos
  • Victor V. Ramraj, CAPI Director and Chair in Asia-Pacific Legal Relations and Professor of Law, University of Victoria

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VII. The South China Sea: What is Now and What is Next? [March 2019]

The South China Sea: What is Now and What is Next?

21 March 2019

The 7th in CAPI’s ongoing Southeast Asia in Global Context roundtable series convened another distinguished panel of international experts to discuss the simmering issues in the highly contentious South China Sea region.

Discussion topics included:

  • Overview/Background. What is the current geopolitical status of and tensions in the South China Sea? In particular, how have the tensions in the region affected ASEAN and intra-Southeast Asia relations?
  • US-China Relations. What is the status of the Freedom of Navigation Operations in the region? To what extent is the US-China relationship influenced by the geopolitics of the South China Sea? How close have we been and are we to a military conflict in the region?
  • International Law & Institutions. What are the important legal developments since the 2016 decision of the Permanent Court of Arbitration? What role can international law and formal international institutions play in responding to developments in the region? 

CAPI gratefully acknowledges the support of the Department of National Defence Canada Defence Engagement Program

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Participants

Panellists:

  • Nirmal Ghosh, US Bureau Chief, The Straits Times, Washington DC, USA
  • Nong Hong, Executive Director & Senior Fellow, Institute for China-America Studies, Washington DC, USA
  • Ted L McDorman, Professor, Faculty of Law, University of Victoria, Canada
  • Giles Norman, Executive Director, Defence and Security Policy, Global Affairs Canada
  • Thitinan Pongsudhirak, Executive Director & Professor, Institute of Strategic and International Studies, Chulalongkorn University, Bangkok, Thailand (via video-link)
  • Jeff Reeves, Vice-President, Research, Asia Pacific Foundation, Vancouver, Canada
  • Brett Witthoeft, Royal Canadian Navy Indo-Pacific Security Analyst, Maritime Forces Pacific, Victoria, Canada 

Chairs

  • Phil Calvert, CAPI Senior Research Fellow and former Canadian Ambassador to Thailand, Cambodia, and Laos
  • Victor V. Ramraj, CAPI Director and Chair in Asia-Pacific Legal Relations and Professor of Law, University of Victoria

Reflection on the discussion

“A Fine Dance”: A Reflection on The South China Sea, What is Now and What is Next?

| By Frances Ankenman, J.D. Candidate, UVic Faculty of Law 

In the latest roundtable event of the Southeast Asia in Global Context series, CAPI welcomed interdisciplinary experts from both Asian and North American institutions to explore contemporary trends in the Pacific Ocean’s most pressing maritime and territorial dispute: the South China Sea. As one of the world’s most biologically, economically and strategically significant marine environments, the South China Sea is a geopolitical hotspot with implications for security, trade, and balances of power at a global scale.

As a centuries-old conflict engaging nations both within and far beyond the region, the ongoing international dispute mirrors the South China Sea itself: old and deep, whose currents flow to the rest of the world. Discussion centered on the evolving relationships among claimants and key strategic players, with a particular focus on the relationships between the United States, China and the Association of Southeast Asian Nations (ASEAN). Panelists agreed the dispute has reached a fragile equilibrium between China and US superpowers, with the US continuing to conduct uninterrupted Freedom of Navigation Operations (FONOPS) patrols and China asserting sovereignty through a strong military presence and surveillance of maritime activity in the region.

While there have been relatively few state-driven conflicts in the region in recent years, panelists agreed that close proximity situations in the South China Sea, whether between military or non-military vessels, could easily escalate. Some expressed low confidence in the region’s ability to de-escalate a complex conflict with existing tools, owing to growth in domestic pressures in claimant countries, densification of military presence, sophistication of weapons, and progressively rapid cycles of action and reaction. Nationalism and jingoism in claimant states could also flare in the face of an international conflict and complicate de-escalation efforts, though governments in China and Southeast Asia have generally limited nationalist movements to the extent that they threaten economic relations with other states.

Panelists debated whether US involvement in the South China Sea has shifted under Trump administration, with a general consensus that it is louder and lacking in strategic focus compared to engagement under Obama administration. ASEAN states broadly find themselves caught between superpowers and have chosen, in the words of one panelist, to ‘swim in the middle’. There will likely be more pressure on ASEAN states moving forward to align their security and economic interests with one of the superpowers, which may fracture the association as a whole.

Next, panelists examined the role of public international law a tool to promote international cooperation and manage conflict in the South China Sea. Panelists pointed to the Permanent Court of Arbitration decision, which was rejected by China, as an example of the limited effectiveness of non-binding international law. The Code of Conduct (COC), under negotiation, is seen as a significant opportunity to create a binding, long-lasting agreement among nations in the region. Importantly, from China’s perspective a COC could support peripheral stability, one of its long-term primary strategic goals.

In South China Sea: What is Now, What is Next?, panelists dove deep into the murky waters of the South China Sea dispute to critically examine the large-scale strategic adjustments driving complex, multifaceted and interwoven relationships among the world’s most powerful nations. Gathering experts with diverse perspectives and experiences, this event produced a vibrant and stimulating dialogue on the latest chapter – and those yet to be written - of the story of the South China Sea.

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VI. Ethno-Religious Nationalism and Authoritarianism in Southeast Asia [October 2018]

Ethno-Religious Nationalism and Authoritarianism in Southeast Asia

25 October 2018

What are the major flashpoints and key indicators for authoritarianism in Southeast Asia and what are the underlying societal conditions that have given rise to the political shifts we are witnessing in the region?

In the latest of our ongoing “Southeast Asia in Global Context” roundtable series, a distinguished panel of international experts will consider questions about trends in human rights, democracy, and enthno-religious nationalism in Southeast Asia.


CAPI gratefully acknowledges the support of the Department of National Defence Canada Defence Engagement Program

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Participants

Panellists

  • Vitit Muntarbhorn, Faculty of Law, Chulalongkorn University, Thailand, and UN Independent Expert on violence and discrimination based on sexual orientation and gender identity
  • Phil Robertson, Deputy Director, Asia Division, Human Rights Watch
  • Shane Barter, Director of the Pacific Basin Research Center, Soka University of America
  • Kai Ostwald, Director, Centre for Southeast Asia Research, UBC
  • Helen Lansdowne, Associate Director, CAPI
  • Melissa Crouch, Faculty of Law, University of New South Wales [by videolink]

Chairs

  • Phil Calvert, CAPI Senior Research Fellow and former Canadian Ambassador to Thailand, Cambodia, and Laos
  • Victor V. Ramraj, CAPI Director and Chair in Asia-Pacific Legal Relations and Professor of Law, University of Victoria

Reflection on the discussion

By Frances Ankenman, J.D. Candidate, UVic Faculty of Law 

The Ethno-Religious Nationalism and Authoritarianism in Southeast Asia roundtable event invited cross-sector experts to join in a series of interwoven and evolving conversations about trends in human rights, as understood through shifting relationships among religion, the state and the political economy in Southeast Asia. 

The discussion began with an acknowledgement of the highly variable human rights record in Southeast Asia, explained by the diverse political systems, legal traditions and ethno-religious compositions within and among states in the region. Panelists noted both localized examples of advancements in human rights and broader regional trends of increasing state constraints on a range of fundamental human rights such as freedom of speech, freedom of assembly, freedom of religion, and minority protection. Some noted that although liberal democracies often have strong human rights records, the democratic/autocratic divide may not be an informative predictor of human rights protections in Southeast Asia, where there are several contemporary examples of human rights violations under democratic systems, and human rights advancements under authoritarian regimes.

Beyond state-driven trends in human rights, panelists discussed the roles of inter-state, international and non-state actors in the region. Some characterized human rights protection at the Association of Southeast Asian Nations (ASEAN) level as weak, with no mechanism for human rights protection or cooperation on migrant and refugee issues. Beyond the region, panelists cited the United States’ decreased presence in Southeast Asia and shifting balance of global powers as a cause of reduced international pressure for state-driven human rights protection. Panelists also identified a trend of shrinking space for civil society to advance human rights agendas in both authoritarian regimes and democracies in the region. Despite these top-down challenges, panelists pointed to optimistic stories of peace-building initiatives led by civil society, such as interfaith groups established at the village level, that continue to meaningfully advance human rights efforts.

The discussion of human rights led panelists to consider the close and interconnected relationships between religion, ethnicity and the state across the region, and the concerning trend of political instrumentalization of ethnoreligious issues. While this trend is widespread throughout the region, panelists pointed to the Rohingya crisis in Myanmar and the relationship between the state and Buddhism in Cambodia as key examples of the intentional use of religion and ethnicity as state instruments to maintain power, control and popular support. 

Participants examined trends in the political economy, cautioning that while there are many signs that economies in Southeast Asia are growing, resource distribution is a pressing issue in Southeast Asia that is driving some of the trends in politics and human rights protection. Beyond the region, panelists considered the role of Chinese investment in shifting the regional economic balance and reimagining international economic and political relations. 

Raising topics of immediate significance within and beyond Southeast Asia, the Ethno-Religious Nationalism and Authoritarianism in Southeast Asia roundtable event laid a strong foundation for continued conversations about shifting trends in state-religious interactions, the evolving role of the political economy, and the future of human rights in Southeast Asia.

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V. Connectivity and Borders in Southeast Asia [March 2018]

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Connectivity and Borders in Southeast Asia

15 March 2018

The ASEAN Economic Community has entered into force, and we hear much about ASEAN’s connectivity agenda. At the same time, we are witnessing rising religious and other forms of nationalism in the region, and border tensions persist. How do ASEAN countries navigate this landscape, and what does it mean for politics, security, migration and infrastructure development in the region?

How does it tie into larger questions of nationalism and globalization? What, indeed, does a border mean in Southeast Asia—both land and maritime borders. In this context, how to manage conflicts arising from the realities of geography and borders?

Panellists

  • Don Bobiash, Assistant-Deputy Minister Asia-Pacific, Global Affairs Canada
  • Jonathan Head, Southeast Asia Correspondent, BBC News, Bangkok
  • Kai Ostwald, Director, Centre for Southeast Asia Research, UBC
  • Renée Mulligan, ​Board, Lawyers' Rights Watch Canada
  • Scott Watson, Associate Professor and Chair, Political Science, UVic

Chairs

  • Phil Calvert, CAPI Senior Research Fellow and former Canadian Ambassador to Thailand, Cambodia, and Laos
  • Victor V. Ramraj, CAPI Director and Chair in Asia-Pacific Legal Relations and Professor of Law, University of Victoria

IV. Canada and Southeast Asia: Exploring the Challenges and Opportunities [November 2017]

9 November 2017

Southeast Asia is one of the world’s fastest growing economies, and for several decades Canada has taken a keen interest. But the region is not without its challenges, which Canadian businesses and diplomatic representatives continue to navigate. This session will examine Canada’s current opportunities and challenges in the region, including trade, investment, and human rights. It will discuss key questions, including what are the prospects for a Canada-ASEAN free trade agreement? How do NAFTA discussions affect Canada’s relationship with Southeast Asia? What are the opportunities for Canada, and how should Canada respond? Does Canada have the human capacity to engage with Southeast Asia? What are the geopolitical and human rights challenges of engaging with ASEAN? How should Canada balance its engagement with Southeast Asia and its commitment to human rights and social responsibility?

Panellists

  • Marie-Louise Hannan, Ambassador of Canada to the Association of Southeast Asian Nations (via video link)
  • Hugh Stephens, Distinguished Fellow with the Asia Pacific Foundation and Principal at Trans-Pacific Connections; CAPI Associate
  • Jim Boutilier, Special Advisor on Asia-Pacific, Maritime Forces Pacific; CAPI Associate
  • Dominique Spragg, VP Strategic Planning, Viking Air
  • Andrew Doherty, Canada Director, Canada-ASEAN Business Council
  • Kai Ostwald, Assistant Professor in the School of Public Policy and Global Affairs & the Department of Political Science, and Faculty Associate at the Institute of Asian Research, UBC
  • Robyn Fila, International Programs Manager, Centre for Asia-Pacific Initiatives, University of Victoria
  • Thanh Phan, PhD Candidate in Law & Society, Faculty of Law, and CIGI Doctoral Fellow, University of Victoria
  • Theressa Etmanski, LLM Candidate in Law & Society, Faculty of Law, University of Victoria

Chairs

  • Phil Calvert, CAPI Senior Research Fellow and former Canadian Ambassador to Thailand, Cambodia, and Laos
  • Victor V. Ramraj, CAPI Director and Chair in Asia-Pacific Legal Relations and Professor of Law, University of Victoria

III. Ethnic Conflict and Peace-Building in Mynamar: The Rohingya Crisis and Beyond [April 2017]

II. The South China Sea and US-China-ASEAN Relations [February 2017]

The South China Sea and US-China-ASEAN Relations

02 February 2017

The South China Sea has steadily become a flashpoint in world politics, with China, the United States, and the member states of ASEAN having legal, political, economic, commercial, and military interests in the region. This session examined the background to the rising tensions in the region, beginning with a discussion of the South China Sea Arbitration Award on 12 July 2016, the rising tensions between the US, China, and ASEAN, and the legal, political, and economic implications of rising instability in the region two weeks into the Trump Administration in the United States.

Panellists

  • Phil Calvert, CAPI Associate and former Canadian Ambassador to Thailand
  • Gordon Houlden, Director of the China Institute, University of Alberta
  • Ted McDorman, Professor of Law, University of Victoria
  • Thomas J. Schoenbaum, Harold S. Shefelman Professor of Law, University of Washington
  • Cindy Termorshuizen, Embassy of Canada to China, Beijing
  • Brett Witthoeft, Maritime Forces Pacific, Department of Defense, Government of Canada
  • James Boutilier, Maritime Forces Pacific, Department of Defense, Government of Canada

Chair

  • Victor V. Ramraj, CAPI Director and Chair in Asia-Pacific Legal Relations and Professor of Law, University of Victoria


View the event poster:

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I. Thailand's Political and Constitutional Future [November 2016]


CAPI's Southeast Asia in Global Context series is led by Phil Calvert, CAPI Senior Research Fellow and former Canadian Ambassador to Thailand, Cambodia, and Laos, and Victor V. Ramraj, CAPI Director and Chair in Asia-Pacific Legal Relations.

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