Students

Current LLM students

 


Antwi Frimpong

Antwi Frimpong

Antwi has a strong interest in clinical legal education and technology for access to justice in developing countries such as Ghana. He has worked with the Ghana Legal Aid Scheme where he developed interest in mechanisms for access to justice. Antwi holds his Bachelor of Laws degree from the Kwame Nkrumah University of Science and Technology. His LL.M thesis explores how British Columbia is using clinical legal education for access to justice, and what lessons the province may provide for Ghana to enhance its justice system.


Christina Gray

Christina Gray

Listen to an interview with Christina on CBC Ideas (April 2019).

Under the supervision of Dr. Valerie Napoleon, Christina's LLM research will explore the praxis of Indigenous constitutionalism and the intersection of Indigenous legal orders in human rights cases at provincial and federal tribunals. She is the recipient of the Law Society of British Columbia's Indigenous Scholarship for 2018.

Christina is Ts'msyen from Lax Kw'alaams as well as Dene and Metis from Lutsel K'e. She has a Bachelor of Arts (Art History) and Juris Doctor degree from the University of British Columbia Peter A. Allard School of Law. She is called to the bar with the Law Society of Ontario and she is also a former member of the British Columbia Law Society. She articled at Aboriginal Legal Services in Toronto, worked as a human rights lawyer in Toronto, and Senior Research Associate at the Centre for International Governance and Innovation in Waterloo, Ontario. She currently holds the position of Secretary with the Indigenous Bar Association's Board of Directors.


Toluwalope Kolawole

Toluwalope Kolawole

Before joining Uvic, I worked as an Associate in a leading commercial law firm in Nigeria where we had to advise clients on the viability of mini grids in rural Nigeria.

After obtaining my LL.B in from the University of Ibadan, I was called to the Nigerian Bar and completed a Master's degree in Energy Law at the Centre for Petroleum, Energy Economics and Law, University of Ibadan.

I found the nexus between the power sector and the environment very interesting during an internship with the Abuja Electricity Distribution Company PLC where I acquired experience in the power sector and completed a research paper examining the legal regime for addressing the environmental impacts of electricity distribution and transmission projects in Nigeria.

I am fascinated by global sustainable energy initiatives and in 2017 I attended the International Summer School on Energy Systems in Germany.

Prof Val Napoleon will be supervising my LL.M research work which borders on developing climate change adaptation standards for hydro power generation in Nigeria.


Maria Carolina Marinho Ribeiro

Maria Carolina Marinho Ribeiro

Maria Carolina Marinho Ribeiro finished her Bachelor of Laws at the Universidade Federal de Pernambuco (UFPE-Brazil) in 2016 and became a member of The Brazilian Bar Associati.

In 2018 she finished her Postgraduate Program in Public Law at the Universidade Estácio de Sá/CERS (Brazil), where she wrote a thesis about violence against women: a constitutional approach to the violation of human rights due to gender inequalities and the competence of the public power in acting positively to repress such violations.

From 2016 to 2018 she worked as a Civil and a Labour Lawyer in brazilian Law Firms such as Urbano Vitalino Advogados and LRF Líderes. She also counseled clients about legal options and represented them in a wide variety of litigation matters, including court proceedings.

In her LLM at The University of Victoria she intends to delve deeper into the study of violence against women and rape culture, being committed to social change in the local and global community.


Jonathan Minnes

Jonathan Minnes

Jonathan studied History at Wilfrid Laurier University, where he received a BA in 2007 and an MA in 2010. His Masters in History was funded by the Joseph-Armand Bombardier Canadian Graduate Scholarship (SSHRC) and focused on war and society and international relations during the First and Second World Wars. His Major Research Project focused on a Canadian Parliamentary Inquiry on war profiteering during the First World War. He obtained his LLB from Queen Mary University of London in 2013 during which time he was Editor-in-Chief of the Queen Mary Law Journal. His current work examines the interplay between current and former Canadian Forces members, their families and the Canadian legal system. His research focuses on the unique challenges military members face in various areas of the law, including Criminal, Family and Pension law. Jonathan benefits from the generous support of the Law Foundation of British Columbia 2014 Graduate Fellowship.


Chinwendu Nwanisobi

Chinwendu Nwanisobi

Chinwendu C. Nwanisobi holds an LLB degree from the Nnamdi Azikiwe University, a BL from the Nigerian Law School and has also been called to the Nigerian Bar. Chinwendu practiced environmental law and worked at Nigeria’s foremost anti-corruption agency before leaving for Canada. She is currently pursuing her LLM at the University of Victoria under the supervision of Professor Deborah Curran. Her research proposal focuses on Environmental Regulation and Sustainable Development. She is a member of the Institute of Fraud Examiners of Nigeria, a graduate of the Young African Leaders Initiative, Emerging Leaders Program. She is an active member of prestigious foundations, which includes the Clinton Foundation, the Obama Foundation, and LEAP Africa. Chinwendu has also volunteered at some not-for-profit organizations primarily centered on children’s rights and access to food, shelter, and vaccines.


Celia Pinette

Celia received her Juris Doctor in 2017 from the University of Victoria. Under the supervision of Professor Michelle Lawrence, Celia is studying the impact of the investigatory and legal processes for the determination of allegations of excess or lethal force by police officer, with particular attention on institutional frameworks and practices in place in British Columbia. Celia is particularily interested in the perspectives of citizens affected by police violence, and whether the investigatory and legal processes enhance the confidence and trust of those affected, or if they are contribute to a climate of growing distrust in law enforcement actors and oversight bodies.

Current PhD students


Tamara Amoroso Gonsalves

Tamara Amoroso Gonsalves

Tamara Amoroso Gonsalves is a PhD student at the Law and Society Program at the University of Victoria and a Fellow at the Centre for Global Studies. She is also a research associate at the Simone de Beauvoir Institute in Montreal (Concordia University).

Tamara’s research focuses on the disputes around the Brazilian consumer law which defines discriminatory advertising as ilegal, focusing specially on the gender dimension of those disputes.

Tamara has been part of the feminist movement in Brazil for more than 12 years, through national and international networks , such as CLADEM/Brazil (Latin American and Caribbean Committee for the Defense of Women’s Rights) and Rede Mulher e Mídia (Women and the Media Network). She also worked for the Brazilian Federal Government with consumer national public policies and with non-governmental organizations engaged with Human Rights in general and Children’s Rights in particular.

She has published a book in Brazil in which she analyses cases about women’s rights violations presented to the Inter-American Commission of Human Rights. She also has other relevant publications such as book chapters and articles in journals; exploring themes related to children’s and women’s rights as human rights, in particular, advertising to children and its effects; women’s and girl’s trafficking for sexual exploitation; violence against women and sexual and reproductive rights. Some of her published works can also be accessed here: https://independent.academia.edu/TamaraGonsalves


Rebeca B. Macias Gimenez

Rebeca is a PhD student in the UVic Law and Society Program. She practiced law in Brazil and worked in a government program using mediation in shantytowns of Minas Gerais state. She has a bachelor in law from UFMG (Brazil) and a LL.M from the University of Calgary. She is interested in aspects of social justice intersected with sustainable development. Her dissertation proposal focuses on environmental justice principles applied to expose the influence of marginalization on the location and scale of impacts caused by hydropower and to point out to aspects in which environmental impact assessment and decision-making about large hydropower projects could be improved. Rebeca is one of the recipients of the Law Foundation of BC scholarship and the International Law Research Program scholarship, from the Centre for International Governance Innovation.


Keith Cherry

Keith Cherry

Keith studied political science at the University of Ottawa, where he received a BA in 2010 and an MA in 2012. While working on his Master’s thesis, which focused on making theories of judicial interpretation more sensitive to the normative and epistemic repercussions of judicial decisions, Keith developed a research interest in legal pluralism. Eventually, this would bring Keith to UVic’s Law and Society program to study under Dean Jeremy Webber. His current work examines how Indigenous and Canadian legal systems might interact, drawing on emerging trends between European legal orders to develop an arrangement that is attentive to both the autonomy of the parties and persistence of complex interconnections between them. Keith benefits from the generous support of a Joseph-Armand Bombardier Canadian Graduate Scholarship (SSHRC).


Anne-Marie Delagrave

Anne-Marie Delagrave

Anne-Marie completed her LLB (with honours) and LLM at Laval University and was called to the Quebec Bar in 2007. Her LLM thesis (Le contrôle de l’apparence physique du salarié à la lumière de la Charte des droits et libertés de la personne) was written under the supervision of Professor Christian Brunelle and was published in 2010 at Les Éditions Yvon Blais. Since 2011, she has been a lecturer in the Faculty of Law at Laval University where she teaches Human Rights. As a recipient of the Joseph-Armand Bombardier Canadian Graduate Scholarship (SSHRC), Anne-Marie is currently pursuing a doctoral degree in law under the supervision of Professor Judy Fudge. Her thesis examines the regulation of physical appearance in the workplace in Canada, and her research interests mainly include human rights, employment and labour law, sociology and the law, and feminist approaches to law.


Nima Dorji

Nima Dorji is a PhD student at the Law and Society Program at the University of Victoria and a Canadian Queen Elizabeth II Diamond Jubilee Advanced Scholar (QES-AS). Nima Dorji is a Senior Lecturer and one of the founding faculty members at the Jigme Singye Wangchuck School of Law, the Bhutan’ first law school founded by His Majesty the King Jigme Khesar Namgyel Wangchuck. Nima has been working with the project since 2014, which lead up to opening of the Law School on 3rd July 2017 by welcoming the first batch of law students to the campus. Before joining JSW, Nima worked as a Legal Officer at Bhutan National Legal Institute (BNLI). He was one of the founding staff members of BNLI, and since then managed UN funded activities and legal dissemination programs. He received his B.A., LLB (Hons.) Degree from NALSAR University of Law, India, in 2009, his Postgraduate Diploma in National Law (PGDNL) from Royal Institute of Management, Bhutan, in 2010, and his Master of Laws (LLM) from University of Canberra, Australia, in 2014. Nima’s PhD research will focus on the nature of Bhutan’s evolving approach to constitutionalism and constitutional monarchy, and how does it relate to the concept of Gross National Happiness (GNH), as an inclusive approach to sustainable socio-economic development. GNH has been the subject of considerable discussion and study in a diverse range of academic fields, both within and outside Bhutan. However, thus far no attempt has been made in the literature to show whether the 2008 Constitution of Bhutan embraces a governance system that is tailored to achieve GNH. Therefore, he is interested in exploring the extent to which it has influenced the Bhutanese Constitution; conversely, to also examine the extent to which the decade-plus of constitutional democracy has influenced GNH in light of the travaux preparatoires and relevant constitutions of other jurisdictions. Nima is also interested in Election law, constitutional (fundamental) rights and duties, Buddhism and law, and intellectual property law. His LLM thesis paper and other seminar papers were the Constitutional Validity of Compulsory Voting in Bhutan, the Environmental Policy and the Law – Bhutanese Perspective, the Protection of Folklore – Intellectual Property Rights Perspective, and the Election Law of Bhutan.


David Taylor Gill

David Gill was born in Calgary, Alberta. He has always been drawn to the west coast, and moved to Vancouver on his own as a teenager. He moved further west to attend law school at the University of Victoria, the only school to which he applied. Law was meant to be an alternative to graduate studies, but in the end he could not escape and headed to Trinity College in Dublin to pursue an LL.M.. He is overjoyed to be returning to Victoria for his PhD (again, his first and only choice of schools). He lives in a little house with seven chickens, two cats, and one human partner.

David was very close to his maternal grandfather, who was Omushkegowuk from Opaskwayak Cree Nation in northern Manitoba. David's family has roots there as well as in the nearby Kinosao Sipi Cree nation in Norway House. David's family has been disconnected from their communities in the intervening years, but his grandfather reconciled with his Indigenous identity later in life, and David has continued that journey of reconnection, particularly through his exploration of Indigenous law and history in law school. He entered law school expecting to develop a career in criminal law, but soon realized that his interests lay in critiquing the criminal justice system, not practicing it. He is excited to begin an exploration of alternatives to criminal law in both Canadian and Indigenous legal orders.


Alan Hanna

Alan Hanna

Alan is a PhD student, and a lawyer in Victoria, British Columbia. He practices a range of Aboriginal law matters including rights and title, administrative law, and litigation research. In 2014 Alan earned a JD from the University of Victoria, where he was an active member of the Indigenous Law Students Association. During his legal studies, Alan participated as an editor of the UVic Student Law Journal Appeal: Review of Current Law and Law Reform, and served a clinical law term at the Law Centre providing legal services to low income individuals in downtown Victoria.

Alan has a MA in Anthropology (2011), in which he provided a comparative analysis of British Columbia’s modern treaty process and Aboriginal title litigation in terms of jurisdiction and land, as mechanisms by which the Canadian state conceives of its relationships with First Nations. In 2012, Alan was a researcher on the joint "Accessing Justice and Reconciliation" (AJR) project, conducted in partnership with the Indigenous Bar Association, University of Victoria, and the Truth and Reconciliation Commission, and funded by the Law Foundation of Ontario. In the AJR project, Alan worked with several First Nation communities on identifying and articulating their legal traditions addressing intra- and inter-community harm. He has taught classes on Indigenous laws and Indigenous studies. His interest areas include Indigenous laws, First Nations jurisdiction, governance, rights and title, and environmental protection and sustainability, which brought him back to university to pursue doctoral studies. Under the supervision of professors Val Napoleon, Michael Asch and John Borrows at the University of Victoria, Alan’s dissertation focuses on the application and implementation of Indigenous legal traditions in today’s world.


Benjamin Lawrence

Benjamin Lawrence

Ben holds a BA in American Studies from the University of Leicester and an MA in International and Comparative Legal Studies from the School of Oriental and African Studies (SOAS), University of London. His current research, which is being supervised by Professors Victor Ramraj and Simon Springer, focuses on the discourses of constitutionalism in contemporary Cambodia. Currently based in Phnom Penh, where he is partnered with the Cambodian Development Reserach Institute (CDRI), Ben is the grateful recipient of a year-long Study Abroad Studentship from the Leverhulme Trust, and has also benefitted from the generous support of the Centre for Asia-Pacific Initiatives (UVic).  In addition to his work in Cambodia, Ben has interests in comparative constitutional law and socio-legal studies, with a regional focus on Southeast Asia.


Michael Litchfield

Michael Litchfield is a lawyer, educator and management consultant and is the Managing Director of Thinklab Legal Education and Training. Michael's professional practice is focused on the the delivery of educational consulting and corporate training services to clients in a range of industries. Michael also teaches at a variety of academic institutions including the University of Victoria, the University of British Columbia and Royal Roads University. Michael is a member of the Property Assessment Appeal Board and the Civil Resolution Tribunal and holds a Bachelor of Arts and a Juris Doctor from UBC and a Master of Laws from the University of Victoria.


Qian Liu

Qian is a Ph.D. candidate at the Faculty of Law, University of Victoria. Her research interests include gender and China, legal consciousness, feminist legal theory, and qualitative research. Her doctoral dissertation investigates the impacts of both state law and non-state law on women’s choices in family formation. Qian is the recipient of IDRC Doctoral Research Award from the International Development Research Centre, Canada. Her work has been published in the Asian Journal of Law and Society and Asian Journal of Women’s Studies, among other publications. Her doctoral research has been featured by BBC World News in 2017.


Katherine Llorca

Katherine Llorca

Katherine comes from a multidisciplinary background in Politics, Philosophy, Economics (BA Oxford), and Law (PGDip London and MRes, EUI Florence). After a long stint teaching Economics and Sociology in her home country, France, she is returning to the academic fold to research degrowth. In her PhD, she hopes to show that environmental law is doomed to failure as a tool for engaging ecological transition. Not only is its approach piecemeal but that it is inevitably biased *against* the environment insofar as it is embedded in a economic-growth-oriented legal framework. She aims to use - and hopefully contribute to - Green Legal Theory by suggesting that a change of (the growth) paradigm is a necessary condition for ecological transition. If she still has the stamina, she will also try and show how.


Lana Lowe

Lana is Dene from the Fort Nelson First Nation in northeastern BC. She holds a Master's degree in Indigenous Governance from the University of Victoria. Lana has worked extensively on Indigenous land and water governance issues on behalf of her community, including inter-governmental and industry relations, community-based research and monitoring, and strategic policy and program development. Lana has been Director of the Fort Nelson First Nation Lands Department since 2009 and is currently on leave from her position to complete her coursework.


Ratana Ly

Ratana completed her LLB at Royal University of Law and Economics, Cambodia, and LLM at Nagoya University, Japan. Her LLB and LLM theses focused on the International Criminal Court. Since September 2014, Ratana has worked as a human rights researcher at the Center for the Study of Humanitarian Law, Cambodia, and has authored a number of articles on labor migration, refugees, and acceptance of international criminal justice. Her current research interest at UVic is on the Legal obligations of deporting countries to permanent residents. Ratana is also interested in business and human rights, labor migration, and international criminal law.


Johnny Mack

Johnny Mack

Johnny was one of 14 doctoral students across Canada awarded a prestigious Pierre Elliot Trudeau Scholarship in 2011. Johnny’s research interests include Indigenous legal traditions, Indigenous constitutionalism, democratic constitutionalism, postcolonial theory, critical legal studies, and legal pluralism. His dissertation is tentatively titled “From Liberation to Liberalism: Nuu-chah-nulth Constitutional Politics in Historical Perspective”. It will assess the manner in which the Aboriginal rights and title framework in Canada carry forward the momentum of colonial policy by continuing to dispossess indigenous peoples of their land base and the domesticating their sociopolitical and legal orders. His LLM thesis, entitled Thickening Totems and Thinning Imperialism, provided a critical analysis of the Maa-nulth Treaty Agreement.


Aaron Mills

Aaron Mills

Aaron Mills (Waabishki Ma’iingan, Baatwetung) is a Bear Clan Anishinaabe from Couchiching First Nation, Treaty #3 Territory and from North Bay, Ontario, Robinson-Huron Treaty territory.  He obtained a JD from U of T in 2010 during which time he was Editor-in-Chief of the Indigenous Law Journal and sat on the board of directors of Aboriginal Legal Services of Toronto.  In 2011 he completed articles at Olthuis Kleer Townshend LLP and in 2012 he earned an LLM at Yale Law School as a Fulbright Scholar. Currently Aaron is a Vanier Scholar and doctoral student at UVic Law where he’s developing a theory of Anishinaabe legal order under the supervision of Professors John Borrows and Jim Tully.  He sits on the Board of Directors of the Indigenous Bar Association.


Ngozi Sunday Nwoko

Ngozi S Nwoko

Ngozi’s thesis seeks to understand the nexus between Transnational Corporations that are operating in the extractive industries in sub-Saharan Africa and conflicts, corruption, bad governance, and environmental degradation.

He completed his LL.M at Osgoode Hall Law School, Toronto and LL.B (Honours) in Abia State University, Uturu, Nigeria - where he served as the Speaker of Students' Union Government. He is a member of the Nigerian Bar. He practised oil & gas and tax laws in ExxonMobil Nigeria where he won the Upstream Business Services; Star of the Month; award for January, 2012. His research interests include natural resource extraction, transnational corporations, environmental law, Third World Approaches to International law, transparency and good governance, human rights, self-determination.


Olatunji Ademiju Adebola

Olatunji Ademiju Adebola

Olatunji was awarded a LLB degree at the Obafemi Awolowo University in Nigeria in 2005 and was called to the Nigerian bar in 2006. She spent the last decade prior to her time at Uvic prosecuting economic and financial crimes. Her LLM dissertation examined the impact of extra-territorial jurisdiction in fighting corruption in Nigeria.

Her Ph.D research seeks to chart a scope of the law and structure for the proposed International Anti-Corruption Court.

Her research interests include international criminal law, human rights and corruption studies.


Songkrant Pongboonjun

Songkrant Pongboonjun

Songkrant is a PhD student at the Law and Society Program at the University of Victoria and a Canadian Queen Elizabeth II Diamond Jubilee Advanced Scholar (QES-AS). Songkrant was an environmental lawyer who practiced law in Thailand for ten years and then shifted to teach law at Chiang Mai University, Thailand, since 2016. His worked was about empowering local people to protect their environment, natural resources, and their health and also encouraging young lawyers to engage in public interest lawyering, especially in environmental field. He is interested in the interaction between formal legal institutions, such as legal texts, judiciary, and informal institutions such as local communities, public interest lawyers, academy that leads to create law in action, in order to find the best way to expand civil liberties and civil rights. His tentative thesis title is “Creating Rights from the Bottom: The Case of Environmental Public Interest Lawyers in Thailand”. This work will investigate the roles and impacts of public interest lawyers in developing environmental rights in the context of developing country like Thailand.


Himaloya Saha

Trained in Corporate Governance and Financial Regulation (LL.M.) from the University of Warwick in UK, Ms. Himaloya Saha has an experience of nearly five years in the field of academia. Prior to her joining at North South University, she had lectured at the Department of Law and Justice, Southeast University, Dhaka. She possesses an undergraduate degree in Law, from BRAC University and a graduate degree in Criminology and Criminal Justice from Dhaka University. She has been involved with the research wing of 'Desh, We're Concerned', a non-profit civil society organization that works towards public policy reforms and matters of public interest, since its inception.

Himaloya plans on making further academic contributions on Employment laws and corporate governance.

http://www.northsouth.edu/faculty-members/shss/law/himaloya.saha.html


Jennifer Smith

Jennifer Smith

Jennifer received a BSc (Psychology) from the University of Calgary. She attended law school at the University of Victoria, where she received the Davis Prize in Environmental Law. Jennifer also completed her LLM at the University of Victoria's Faculty of Law. Her LLM thesis, Sustainable Governance in Voluntary Forest Carbon Standards, was supervised by Professors Chris Tollefson (UVic) and Meinhard Doelle (Dalhousie). Jennifer is now working on a PhD in the area of environmental displacement of human populations and the concept of climate change refugees.


Kathryn E. Thomson

Kathryn Thomson

Kathryn is a doctoral student in Law at the University of Victoria studying the introduction of technology and electronic systems into court and dispute resolution processes and its impact on access to justice, most particularly for self-represented litigants and others who are unable to participate due to access barriers.  Kathryn has been a practicing lawyer in British Columbia for 25 years and maintains a practice located out of Victoria.  For the past 12 years, she has specialized in legal technology and electronic justice issues (such as electronic legal filing systems and electronic court) working with the provincial government and judiciary.  Prior to this work, Kathryn worked and volunteered for non-government agencies on law reform and legal education (Law Foundation of British Columbia, West Coast LEAF), and practiced law in Vancouver with Shrum, Liddle and Hebenton (McCarthy Tétrault). Kathryn’s research (supervised by Jerry McHale, Q.C., Lam Chair in Law and Public Policy at the University of Victoria) will support the development of models and principles for introducing technology into dispute resolution processes in ways that enhance access to justice. 


Mary Anne Vallianatos

Mary Anne is a PhD student in UVic's Law and Society Program. She received a J.D. from Dalhousie University and an LL.M. Columbia Law School. She previously practiced Aboriginal law in Vancouver. Mary Anne’s doctoral research examines colonial laws and policies that institutionalized anti-Asian racism in Canada and identifies where this past remains entrenched in modern jurisprudence. Mary Anne’s research interests include critical race theory, decolonization, legal history, and comparative constitutional law.


Mark Zion

Mark Zion

Mark (BSc Alberta, JD Alberta, LLM Victoria) focuses in his present work on law’s relation to ecology. His background is in natural science, cultural studies, and critical legal thought. His Masters work on homeless law and politics drew on the radical democratic theory of Jacques Rancière to problematize mainstream “normative” Canadian legal scholarship on “the right to shelter.” Presently, he asks broader questions related to the material-symbolic features of neoliberal law (and, against all warnings, contending “radical sublime” practices) in the proposed epoch of “the anthropocene,” although he prefers almost any other name (misanthropocene, capitalocene, chthulucene, thanatocene, etc). He is involved with an ongoing Deleuze and Guattari reading group, as well as an interdisciplinary grad student and faculty reading group on “new and hot” theoretical texts, including those in the areas of ecology, Indigeneity, critical legal thought, and radical politics. Seek him out to discuss poststructural theory (e.g. Rancière, Foucault, Brown, Deleuze, Derrida), ecological materialities (e.g. Haraway, Bonneuil, Bennett), Thomas Pynchon, The Wire, or the imperiled conditions of possibility for critical thought in the neoliberal academy.