Dr. Kerry Delaney

Dr. Kerry Delaney
Position
Professor
Biology
Contact
Office: CUN 259a

Areas of research focus

  • Neuroscience
  • Synaptic physiology
  • Behaviour
  • Rett syndrome
  • Neural circuits

Our laboratory is primarily interested in synaptic physiology which results in a wide diversity of projects and opportunities for trainees with a variety of interests and experience.

For all our work we combine a variety of electrophysiological and optical techniques. These include whole cell patch clamp, sharp microelectrode and field potential recordings combined with widefield CCD and 2-photon laser scanning imaging, mostly using Ca2+ indicator dyes.

We apply our studies of synapses to understand basic properties of neural transmission as well as specific dysfunctions that are associated with disorders such as Rett syndrome.

Delaney Lab

  • BIOL 367 Neurobiology: Molecules to behaviour
  • BIOL 448 Neuroethology
  • BIOL 409B Neurobiology laboratory
  • NRSC 500 Neuroscience 

Leung J, McPhee DM, Renda A, Penty N, Farhoomand F, Nashmi R and Delaney KR (2017) MeCP2-deficient mice have reduced α4 and α6 nicotinic receptor mRNA and altered behavioral response to nicotinic agonists. Behav Brain Res 330:118-126  doi:10.1016/j.bbr.2017/.05.0211

Badr BM, Somogyi-Cszimazia R, Leslie P, Delaney KR and Dechev N (2017) Design of a wireless measurement system for use in wireless power transfer applications for implants. Wireless Power Transfer 21-32 doi.org/10/1017/wpt.2016.12   

Reitveld L, Stuss DP, McPhee D and Delaney KR  (2015) Genotype-specific effects of MeCP2 loss of function on morphology of Layer V pyramidal neurons in heterozygous female Rett syndrome mice.  Front Cell Neurosci 9:145 doi 10.3889/fncel.2015.000145

Feketé A, Johnston J and Delaney KR (2014) Presynaptic T-type Ca2+ channels modulate dendrodendritic mitral-mitral and mitral-periglomerular connections in mouse olfactory bulb. J Neurosci 34(42): 14032-45. doi: 10.1523/JNEUROSCI.0905-14.2014.

Johnston J and Delaney KR (2010) Synaptic activation of T-type Ca2+ channels via mGluR activation in the primary dendrite of mitral cells. J Neurophysiol 103(5): 2557-69.