Researchers

Victor V. Ramraj

Victor V. Ramraj

Director; Chair in Asia-Pacific Legal Relations

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Dr Victor V. Ramraj was appointed as Director of the Centre for Asia-Pacific Initiatives in September 2017 and has been a Professor in the Faculty of Law and CAPI Chair in Asia-Pacific Legal Relations since 2014.

His research interests include comparative constitutional and administrative law, transnational regulation, and the history of and regulatory challenges arising from state-company relationships in Asia. He is a regular participant in international workshops on comparative constitutional and administrative law.

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  • Keynote presentation at Hong Kong University Faculty of Law online talk | Commentary on the launch of the book "China’s National Security: Endangering Hong Kong’s Rule of Law?" [28 September 2020]
Guoguang Wu

Guoguang Wu

China Chair

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Guoguang is a Professor at the University of Victoria, teaching in both the Departments of Political Science and History. He received his BA from Peking (Beijing) University in China, an MA from the Graduate School of the Chinese Academy of Social Sciences (Beijing), and an MA and a PhD in Political Science from Princeton University.

His research interests include comparative politics and international relations with an emphasis on East Asia, particularly China, Hong Kong, and Taiwan. Thematically his research interests cover institutional transition from communism, the political economy of globalization, liberalization and democratization, the politics of authoritarian mass media, and foreign-domestic linkages in foreign policy and regional security.

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Neilesh Bose

Neilesh Bose

Senior Research Fellow

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Dr. Bose's research and teaching interests include the history of modern South Asia (the Indian subcontinent), the British Empire, decolonization, and the history of diasporas and migrations. Additionally, he hold interests in theater, performance studies, and popular culture. His first book examined the intersections between linguistic identity and Muslim religious community formation in late colonial Bengal. His current project explores the history of religious reform in colonial India and ways that Indian religious reformers studied local religious practices in the service of a broader universalism. Dr. Bose joined the University of Victoria in 2015 as Tier II Canada Research Chair in Global and Comparative History.


 

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Phil Calvert

Phil Calvert

Senior Research Fellow

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Philip Calvert served from 2012-2016 as Canada's ambassador to Thailand, Cambodia and Laos. He previously served as Deputy Head of Mission in the Canadian Embassy in Beijing (2004-2008). From 2008-2012, as Director General in Ottawa, he managed Canada’s overall trade and political relations with North Asia (China, Japan, Korean peninsula, Hong Kong, Mongolia and Taiwan). He holds a PhD in Chinese history.

Marlea Clarke

Marlea Clarke

Senior Research Fellow

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Marlea specialises in comparative politics and the Global South (particularly Africa). Her broad research interests are globalisation, employment and labour market restructuring from a comparative and feminist political economy perspective, regional (African) clothing production networks, and south-south labour migration and investment (specifically Asia-Africa). Her current, SSHRC-funded, five-year research project focuses on changing patterns of trade and global production of clothing, especially regional production networks and labour standards in sub-Saharan Africa. This research includes an exploration of the role of Asian migrant workers in clothing production in Lesotho and Mauritius, and Asian investment in African clothing and textiles industries.

Helen Lansdowne

Helen Lansdowne

Associate Director

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Helen Lansdowne has a BA and an MA in Pacific and Asian Studies from UVic and has been with CAPI since late 1998. She brings expertise in rural China state-society relations. Her most recent area of study includes mainland Southeast Asia, with a particular focus on development and gender.

Her work at CAPI includes assisting with the Centre's ongoing project work and is in charge of overall administration of CAPI's programs. Helen Lansdowne also teaches courses on Southeast Asia and Developmental Theory in the Department of Pacific and Asian Studies at UVic and in the Department of Social Sciences at Camosun College.

jordan stanger-ross

Jordan Stanger-Ross

Project Director, Landscapes of Injustice

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Jordan Stanger-Ross is the project director for Landscapes of Injustice, a seven-year, multi-partner research project housed at CAPI exploring the forced dispossession of Japanese Canadians during the Second World War. He is associate professor of history at the University of Victoria. He is a former Chair of the Canadian Committee on Migration, Ethnicity, and Transnationalism, which is affiliated with the Canadian Historical Association, and founded UVic’s Committee for Urban Studies, which initiated the interdisciplinary lecture series, The City Talks.

Feng Xu

Feng Xu

Editor-in-Chief, Migration, Mobility & Displacement journal

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Dr. Feng Xu is Associate Professor in the Department of Political Science at the University of Victoria. She specializes in Comparative politics and the Global South (China). Her current research interests concern feminist political economy, migration and urbanization, and labor market. 

She is the editor-in-chief of Migration, Mobility & Displacement, CAPI's online, open access academic journal. She also serves on CAPI's Steering Committee.

Jessica Ball

Jessica Ball

  • Faculty affiliation: UVic School of Child and Youth Care
  • CAPI Associate since 2013

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Jessica Ball is a professor in the School of Child and Youth Care at the University of Victoria, Canada.  Dr. Ball has written and taught countless courses on child and youth health and development, including teaching in universities in Canada, the United States, Malaysia, Singapore and Bangladesh.  At UVic, she was a founding faculty member in UVic’s Early Childhood Development Virtual University, teaching initial cohorts of leaders in Africa and the Middle East. She teaches upper level undergraduate courses on mental health and addictive behaviours and graduate courses on social determinants of child development.  Her program of research includes a range of projects centring on cultural and policy contexts of child wellness, early learning, and development. Dr. Ball is the author or co-author of three books and over 120 journal articles, monographs, and book chapters. Dr. Ball has presented at over 300 conferences, symposia, policy roundtables, and workshops in Canada and internationally.  Her achievements have been recognized by awards for teaching, knowledge mobilization, contributions to Indigenous children’s well-being, and research in service of communities.

Dr. Ball spent 12 years, from 1984 to 1996, in Southeast Asia, working as a professor for a consortium of US universities delivering undergraduate education in Malaysia, and then for Nanyang Technological University in Singapore. She also worked with community service agencies and government ministries on research and programs involving mental health, youth health risk behaviours, and all levels of education from post-graduate to preschool.

Upon joining the faculty at the University of Victoria in 1996 as a Visiting Associate Professor in Psychology, Dr. Ball played a key role in creating a practicum in psychological assessment of children and youth through an ongoing service contract between the Department of Psychology graduate clinical training program and the Ministry for Children and Family Development. Shifting to the School of Child and Youth Care in 2001, for 10 years Dr. Ball was Co-Coordinator and subsequently Coordinator of the First Nations Partnership Programs, an award-winning innovation in delivering a community-based child and youth care diploma through partnerships with communities (www.fnpp.org). She led an evaluation of seven program deliveries in which a generative curriculum approach incorporated Euro-Western and Indigenous knowledges, earning the program an award from the Lawson Foundation and UNESCO recognition as a Best Practice incorporating Indigenous Knowledge to build community capacity.

Sikata Banerjee

Sikata Banerjee

  • Faculty affiliation: UVic Gender Studies
  • CAPI Associate since 2017

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Sikata Banerjee is Professor of Gender Studies at the University of Victoria, Canada. Her work focuses on gender and nationalism in India.  She is the author of Warriors in Politics:  Hinduism, Nationalism, Violence, and the Shiv Sena in India (Westview 2000); Make Me a Man!  Masculinity, Hinduism, and Nationalism in India (SUNY 2005); Muscular Nationalism: Gender, Violence, and Empire in Ireland (NYU 2012); and Globalizing Muscular Nationalism: Gender, Nation and Popular Film in India (Routledge 2016).
Melia Belli Bose

Melia Belli Bose

  • Faculty affiliation: UVic Art History & Visual Studies
  • CAPI Associate since 2017

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Melia Belli Bose is Associate Professor of Asian Art History at the University of Victoria. She earned her Ph.D. from the University of California, Los Angeles and MA from the University of London. Dr. Belli Bose’s research focuses on South Asian visual cultures from the early modern to contemporary periods. She is the author of Royal Umbrellas of Stone: Memory, Politics, and Public Identity in Rajput Funerary Art (2015), editor of Women, Gender and Art in Asia, c. 1500-1900 (2016), as well as author of several articles and book chapters on topics including: gender, memorialization, and public art in India, Pakistan, and Bangladesh.
James Boutilier

James Boutilier

  • CAPI Associate since 2000

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Dr. James Boutilier is the Special Advisor (Policy) at Canada’s Maritime Forces Pacific Headquarters in Esquimalt, British Columbia. He is responsible for advising the Commander of Maritime Forces Pacific on matters of defence and foreign policy and maritime security in the Asia-Pacific region. Prior to his appointment at MARPAC, Dr. Boutilier spent twenty-four years on staff at the Royal Roads Military College in Victoria as Head of the History Department and then as Dean of Arts. During his time at RRMC, he was instrumental in establishing the military and strategic studies degree program at the college and taught courses on naval history, contemporary Asia, the history of the Pacific, and strategic issues. He is also an adjunct professor of Pacific and Asian Studies at the University of Victoria and the President of the Maritime Awards Society of Canada.

Dr. Boutilier was born in Halifax, Nova Scotia, and attended Dalhousie University (BA History: 1960), McMaster University (MA History: 1962), and the University of London (PhD History: 1969). Dr. Boutilier served in the Royal Canadian Navy Reserve from 1956 to 1964 as a navigating officer and in the same capacity in the Royal Navy Reserve from 1964 to 1969. After completing his time with the RN, Dr. Boutilier taught at the University of the South Pacific in Suva, Fiji, from 1969 to 1971.

Dr. Boutilier’s field of expertise is Asia-Pacific defence and security, particularly with regards to maritime issues. He has published widely on international defence and security issues, including RCN in Retrospect (1982), and articles in professional monographs as well as the Asia-Pacific Defence Reporter and Canadian Institute of International Affairs journals. Some of his recent lectures have focused on the Canadian Navy’s role in the Asia-Pacific, the new Asian security architecture, Northeast Asian security issues, and the new naval order in Asia. Dr. Boutilier lectures frequently at the NATO Defense College, the Canadian Forces College, the Australian Defence College, and the National Defense University of the Philippines. Dr. Boutilier participates on a regular basis in the International Maritime Defence Exhibition (IMDEX), the ASEAN Regional Forum Conference on National Defence Colleges, and the Asia-Pacific Roundtable. He contributes regularly to print and electronic media, including written articles and television interviews.

Dr. Boutilier belongs to a variety of professional organizations including the Canadian Consortium on Asia-Pacific Security, the Council on Security Cooperation in Asia-Pacific, the Maritime Museum of British Columbia, the Pacific People’s Partnership, and several local advisory boards. Dr. Boutilier participates in and promotes the coordination of community events and public forums that raise the general awareness of MARPAC and the Canadian Navy.

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Leslie Butt

  • Faculty affiliation: UVic Anthropology
  • CAPI Associate since 2020
  • CAPI Visiting Scholar: 2012-2017

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Leslie Butt is a medical anthropologist with strong interests in the social and cultural anthropology of Southeast Asia. Over the past two decades, her team-based research has explored how Indonesian families negotiate reproduction, childrearing and health care in rapidly changing social and political conditions. Priority research themes have included pregnancy and marriage, infant and child health, HIV, and parent-child relations in the Indonesian provinces of Papua and Lombok. The Social Sciences and Humanities Research Council has supported several stages of this research, including two recently completed grants on the impact of international migration on the childrearing experiences of eastern Indonesian families. Since 2013, she has been actively involved in several initiatives within CAPI’s Migration and Mobility Program.


 

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Angie Chau

  • Faculty affiliation: UVic Pacific and Asian Studies
  • CAPI Associate since 2019

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Angie Chau is Assistant Professor of Chinese Studies at the University of Victoria (PhD, University of California, Sa​n Diego). She has published articles on modern Chinese literature, art, film and internet culture, and her research interests include contemporary Chinese literature, popular culture, visual art, and translation. Her work has appeared in peer-reviewed journals such as Modern Chinese Literature and Culture (MCLC), Concentric, and Chinese Literature Today, and various edited volumes. Prior to joining the University of Victoria, she taught courses in modern Chinese literature and film at NYU Shanghai, Arizona State University and UC San Diego.

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Raveendra Chittoor

  • Faculty affiliation: UVic Gustavson School of Business
  • CAPI Associate since 2017

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Raveendra Chittoor is an Associate Professor of Strategy and International Business and Canada Research Chair in Global Economy at University of Victoria. His research focuses on the internationalisation strategies of emerging economy firms and the structure and strategies of family-owned business groups. Dr. Chittoor’s research program is broadly focused on understanding how institutions and institutional environment shape the structure of the markets and the strategies of firms operating in those markets. This work will provide insights to managers and leaders of global firms for whom emerging market economies are becoming increasingly vital.

Prior to joining the Gustavson School of Business, he has taught at the Indian School of Business and the Indian Institute of Management Calcutta. He has industry experience of over twelve years in organizations such as IBM, CRISIL (a Standard & Poor’s company) and Mumbai-based Rajan Raheja group in senior management positions. Dr. Chittoor has won many awards for his research and teaching and his research has been published in journals such as the Strategic Management Journal, Academy of Management Journal, Organization Science, Journal of International Business Studies, Global Strategy Journal, Management International Review, Journal of International Management and Long Range Planning.

 

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Deborah Curran

  • Faculty affiliation: UVic Law
  • CAPI Associate since 2019

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Deborah Curran is an Associate Professor at the University of Victoria in the Faculty of Law and School of Environmental Studies (Faculty of Social Sciences), and the Executive Director of the Environmental Law Centre. Deborah’s work is in the areas of land and water law, with a particular focus on environmental protection and collaborative management in water law, healthy foodscapes, and how Indigenous law is shaping colonial law. Deborah also teaches a national field course in Environmental Law and Sustainability from the Bamfield Marine Sciences Centre with the support of the Huu-ay-aht First Nation, and is establishing relationships in Bhutan and Thailand in support of experiential learning.

Daniela Damian

Daniela Damian

  • Faculty affiliation: UVic Computer Science (Software Engineering)
  • CAPI Associate since 2018

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Daniela Damian is a Professor of Software Engineering in University of Victoria’s Department of Computer Science, where she leads research in the Software Engineering Global interAction Laboratory (SEGAL, thesegalgroup.org). Her research interests include Software Engineering, Requirements Engineering, Computer-Supported Cooperative Work and Empirical Software Engineering. Her recent work has studied the developers’ socio-technical coordination in geographically distributed software projects, as well as stakeholder management in large software ecosystems. Daniela’s research methodologies involve extensive field work and in-situ studies of software teams through collaborations with industrial partners such as IBM, General Motors, Siemens and Dell. Daniela has served on the program committee boards of several software engineering conferences, as well as on the editorial boards of Transactions on Software Engineering, the Journal of Requirements Engineering, the Journal of Empirical Software Engineering, and the Journal of Software and Systems.
Phil Dearden

Phil Dearden

  • Faculty affiliation: UVic Geography
  • CAPI Associate since 1994

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Phil Dearden was appointed Professor of Geography in 1981 and was Chair of the Department between 2008 and 2013. His main research interests are in conservation, particularly related to protected area systems, and he is the co-author of Parks and Protected Areas in Canada: Planning and Management, published by Oxford University Press and commonly used as a textbook on the topic in Canada.

Most of Dr. Dearden's career has been spent in the tropics and particularly in Southeast Asia. He has had active research programs in Thailand for 30 years and worked throughout other countries in the region, particularly Cambodia and the Philippines. He also has extensive experience in Sri Lanka and for the last 10 years has been involved in research programs related to poverty and protected areas in Ghana and Tanzania.

He is particularly interested in incentive-based conservation and working with communities to generate benefits from conservation activities. He is a member of the Community Conservation Research Network, based at St Mary’s University and a collaborator of the Centre for Indigenous Conservation and Development Alternatives based at McGill University.

Most of his activity is now focused on the marine environment, both in Canada and overseas. He leads the Marine Protected Areas Research Group (MPARG) at UVic and has research interests ranging from marine mammals through to coral reef monitoring, community-based governance, shark watching and SCUBA diver management in South East Asia.

Professor Dearden is actively involved with efforts to improve marine conservation in Myanmar. Working with both IUCN and Fauna and Flora International (FFI) Dearden has taken part in field expeditions and led several workshops and training courses on marine conservation. He has also provided a blueprint to the Myanmar Government on strategies and actions necessary to establish a MPA system in Myanmar with special attention on the Myeik Archipelago.

He was the Leader of the MPA Working Group for Canada’s Ocean Management Research Network, Co-Chair of Parks Canada's NMCA Marine Science Advisory Network and Expert Advisor to the Auditor General for the 2012 audit of MPA progress. He is a member of IUCN's World Commission on Protected Areas and has acted as consultant to the Asian Development Bank, the World Bank, IUCN, UNESCO, UNDP, CIDA, as well as many government agencies in Asia and Canada. He is a member of the College of reviewers for the Canada Research Chair Program, a past member of the SSHRC national adjudication panel on grant allocations and a Fellow of the Royal Canadian Geographical Society. A firm believer in the utility of NGOs he is a Trustee Emeritus of the Canadian Parks and Wilderness Society and currently on the Board of the Living Oceans Society. In 2011he was the Chair of the Local Organising Committee of the International Marine Conservation Congress (IMCC), the world’s largest marine conservation meeting. He is a member of an international working group funded by the National Science Foundation to develop an integrated framework to model resilience of the coupled human/natural environment in tropical and subtropical coastal systems. 

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Donna Greschner

  • Faculty affiliation: UVic Law

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Donna Greschner served as UVic Law Dean from 2008 to 2013. Her research and scholarship have focused on constitutional law (especially equality rights) and, more recently, health-care law. Her writings are frequently cited by Canadian courts.

As a law professor at the University of Saskatchewan from 1982-2003, she taught its first seminars in feminist legal theory and helped create the Women's Studies Research Unit in 1984. Greschner has been a visiting professor at the University of Toronto, McGill University and Griffith University (Australia), and has taught comparative constitutional law in southern California. She received the University of Saskatchewan's Master Teacher Award in 2002 for teaching excellence.

From 1992-96, she served as Chief Commissioner of the Saskatchewan Human Rights Commission. As a member of the Saskatchewan and California Bars, Greschner has advised many governments, First Nations and non-profit organizations on constitutional questions, and she was a member of the Government of Saskatchewan's negotiating team for the Charlottetown Accord in 1992.

Amongst other work, she was a consultant to the Royal Commission on Aboriginal Peoples (1990-91) and the Royal Commission on the Future of Health Care in Canada (2003). Her international work includes advising the African National Congress on constitutional issues in 1991, and consulting on anti-discrimination policies for the Commission on Labor Co-operation in 2004-2005.

Professor Greschner's UVic Law profile page

Jingjai Hanchanlash

Jingjai Hanchanlash

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Jingjai Hanchanlash received his Ph. D. in Public Law from France. His Post–Doctorate training included “Project Analysis” at the University of Connecticutt, USA and “Mid Career Management” at the University of Western Ontario, Canada. He has a wide range of experience in working in the public sector, international organizations, NGOs, academic and private sectors.

He started his career working with the Thai Government for 9 years coordinating technical and economic cooperation programs between Thailand and major European Countries. He then joined the International Development Research Center, where he served for 23 years, mainly as Asia Regional Director overseeing development research grants. He has been in the private sector since 1997.

Jingjai Hanchanlash's positions include: Chairman, Rutnin-Gimbel Lasic Center; Chairman Loxpac Co.; Chairman GMS Business Forum; Executive Board Member, The Thai Chamber of Commerce; Chairman, The French-Thai Business Council. He is also currently serving as Board member in several public organizations such as the National Education Council, the National Science and Technology Development Agency, and the Health Promotion Fund. His academic responsibilities include: Chairman of the Executive Board, University of Thai Chamber of Commerce and Council Member of King Prajadhipok Institute. He actively interacts with the civil society through his position as Secretary General of the Development Cooperation Foundation.

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Asad Kiyani

  • Faculty affiliation: UVic Law
  • CAPI Associate since 2019

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Asad G. Kiyani joined the University of Calgary Faculty of Law in 2019 after two years at UVic. He holds an LL.B from Osgoode Hall, an LL.M from Cambridge, and a PhD from UBC, where he was awarded a Four-Year Fellowship, a SSHRC Vanier CGS Scholarship, the Charles Bourne Graduate Scholarship in International Law, and the Dean of Law PhD Prize. Prior to joining UVic, Asad was an Assistant Professor in the Faculty of Law and an Adjunct Professor at the Centre for Transitional Justice and Post-Conflict Reconstruction at Western University.

Asad researches and teaches in domestic and international criminal law, immigration and refugee law (including national security issues), evidence, postcolonial theory, legal pluralism, and comparative law. His current research projects focus on three areas. The first critically examines the major obstacles to legal pluralism as a practical method in international criminal law, and the role of international bodies and Third World governments in co-opting pluralist practices. The second considers the utility and risks of extending Gladue-based sentencing principles to non-Indigenous communities, and the extent to which those principles turn on the specific colonial experience of Indigenous peoples in Canada. The third examines the racialized effects of contemporary Canadian national security policy, and the commingling of administrative and criminal law.

Asad has written a number of book chapters and articles, including for the Supreme Court Law Review, the American Journal of Comparative Law, the Journal of International Criminal Justice, the NYU Journal of Law & Politics, and the American Journal of International Law: Unbound. He is a recipient of the 2017 Antonio Cassese Prize for International Criminal Law Studies for his article “Group-Based Differentiation and Local Repression: The Custom and Curse of Selectivity”, and his article “Al-Bashir & the ICC: The Problem of Head of State Immunity” was cited by the Supreme Court of Appeal of South Africa in its decision on the South African government’s obligation to arrest suspects indicted by the International Criminal Court.

Before beginning his doctoral studies, Asad articled with the Department of Justice in Toronto, worked as a Pegasus Scholar with barristers at Garden Court Chambers and 2 Bedford Row in the United Kingdom, and was part of the appeal team for Issa Hassan Sesay before the Special Court for Sierra Leone. He also worked with various Toronto-area legal aid clinics, including Parkdale Community Legal Services and the South Asian Legal Clinic of Ontario, and was posted to Ethiopia as part of a capacity-building partnership between the Canadian Bar Association and the Ethiopian Bar Association.

Asad was called to the bar by the Law Society of Upper Canada in 2006, and is currently a member of the National Council for Canadian Muslims Advisory Panel on National Security. 

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Sujin Lee

  • Faculty affiliation: UVic Pacific and Asian Studies
  • CAPI Associate since 2019

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Sujin Lee is Assistant Professor of Pacific and Asian Studies at the University of Victoria. Lee completed her PhD in History from Cornell University in 2017 and served as a postdoctoral fellow at the UCLA Terasaki Center for Japanese Studies in 2017-18. Her research interests include transnational discourses of population and the intersection of race and gender politics in the Japanese empire and its aftermath. Dr. Lee is the author of several articles including “Differing Conceptions of 'Voluntary Motherhood': Yamakawa Kikue's Birth Strike and Ishimoto Shizue's Eugenic Feminism” (2018) and currently working on her book about the politics of population and motherhood in modern Japan.
Jae Woon Lee

Jae Woon Lee

  • CAPI Associate since 2020

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Jae Woon (June) Lee is Assistant Professor at the Faculty of Law in the Chinese University of Hong Kong (CUHK). Born in Seoul and educated there as well as at McGill University (LLM) and National University of Singapore (PhD), June’s main re­search and teaching interests are aviation law and competition law. He has seven years of legal affairs experience in the airline industry prior to joining the academia and is the sole editor of the book Aviation Law and Policy in Asia: Smart Regulation in Liberalized Markets (BRILL, 2020).


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Qian Liu

  • Faculty affiliation: UVic Law
  • CAPI Associate since 2020

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Qian Liu completed her Ph.D. in Law and Society at the Faculty of Law, University of Victoria in 2020. Her research interests include legal consciousness in Chinese societies, legal pluralism, feminist legal theory, postcolonial feminist theory, sexual orientation and the law, qualitative research, and gender issues in China. Dr. Liu is the author of several articles including “Legal Consciousness of the Leftover Woman: Law and Qingin Chinese Family Relations,” which won the 2019 Asian Law and Society Association Graduate Student Article Award. She is currently working on a monograph on the impact of the interaction of state law, family relations, and social expectations on Chinese leftover women’s choices in marriage and childbearing.


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Isabel Lloyd

  • CAPI Associate since 1999

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Isabel Lloyd is a highly experienced former Deputy Minister in British Columbia and is currently working with the Canadian International Development Agency (CIDA) and the United Nations Development Fund for Women (UNIFEM) on governance, legal reform and CEDAW implementation programmes in seven countries in Southeast Asia and Bangladesh. From 1996-2002, she was Director of a CIDA Regional Governance Fund in Southeast Asia, with a diverse portfolio of expertise in implementing capacity development initiatives and government programs, many of which have focused on legal reform, human rights, gender and good governance.

In 1988-90 she took leave from the BC Government to manage the implementation of the Canada-Thai Women's Economic and Leadership Development Program. In 1992 she moved back to Southeast Asia where she has since managed two major assignments and undertaken a number of short-term governance projects for CIDA. Between 1992-94 she served as the Senior Social Development Advisor to CIDA for Thailand. Her responsibilities included serving as the Gender, Human Rights, Social Policy and Technical Advisor for all CIDA programs in Thailand. In 1992 at the time of the May disturbances in Thailand she wrote the first report of its kind for CIDA on the impact of CIDA programs on the human rights and governance situation in Thailand. From 1994-96 (working as an independent consultant) in addition to the work in Thailand she worked directly with CIDA and with Canadian Executing Agencies on a number of activities: evaluation of gender dimensions of a multi year Canada-Cambodia project run by a consortium of Canadian NGOs; Social Policy/Gender Advisor to the CIDA Vietnam Program; Advisor to the Ministry for the Role of Women in Indonesia; Advisor to the Permanent Secretary in the Office of the Thai Prime Minister and the staff of the National Commission on Women's Affairs, Thailand. In 1994 Isabel Lloyd was the first foreigner to be given the International Women's Day Award by the Prime Minister of Thailand for "outstanding contributions to the Development of Women in Thailand".

From April 1996 until September 2002, as Director of the CIDA Southeast Asia Fund for Institutional and Legal Development (SEAFILD) Isabel Loyd was responsible for all aspects of the field management of this C$8.9m project from initial inception and implementation to closure. 150 sub-projects covered activities on legal reform, development of human rights institutions, legal issues related to trafficking of women and children, child sexual abuse, migrant workers rights, media and journalist training.

Isabel Lloyd has demonstrated expertise in: conducting institutional reviews of government departments, community-related agencies, health departments as well as gender strategy development, stakeholder facilitation, training programs and evaluations.

Her personal strengths are demonstrated by her proven track record as a problem solver, negotiator, administrator, manager, innovator, leader and communicator. Earlier in her career, she actively worked to promote gender equality and was at the forefront of the fight to establish home based services for the disabled, elderly, and children. Isabel Lloyd entered the Public Service of British Columbia in 1973 and was a Deputy Minister from 1982 to 1992. She brings an extensive range of executive government experience and administrative skill to her work, having served in five ministries as Deputy Minister of Labour (Employment and Women's Programs), Advanced Education and Training, Tourism and Government Services. During her career in the Government of B.C., she was responsible for the introduction of new and innovative government programs, most notably the Province's Long Term Care and Home Care Programs. In 1991 she was awarded the Lieutenant-Governor's Medal for her distinguished contribution to public service.

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Andrew Marton

  • Faculty affiliation: UVic Pacific and Asian Studies
  • CAPI Associate since 2017
  • CAPI Director: 2014-2017

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Dr. Andrew Marton specializes in contemporary Chinese studies. His research revolves around spatial economic transformation in China’s mega-urban regions, with a particular focus on the lower Yangzi delta. Dr. Marton is founding member of the Diffuse Cities & Urbanization Network with a comparative focus on Asian and European urban regions. Other research interests in China include studies of administrative restructuring, hybrid spaces of production and consumption in the countryside, education, and the emergence of new spaces for the visual arts and other creative activities. Dr. Marton is also undertaking research examining the doctrine of the unequal treaties and China’s approach to international law.

Dr. Marton served as CAPI Director from 2014 to 2017.

Ted McDorman

Ted McDorman 

  • Faculty affiliation: UVic Law
  • CAPI Associate since 1988

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Ted McDorman joined the Faculty of Law in 1985 and was promoted to professor in 2001. His teaching areas include public international law, international trade law, international ocean and environmental law, and private international law (conflicts of law).

He taught Canadian constitutional law for many years and also taught Canadian environmental law and comparative Asian law. He has been a visiting professor at institutions in Thailand, Sweden, the Netherlands and Canada and has over 100 publications in the areas of ocean law and policy, international trade law and comparative constitutional law. Since 2000, He has been the editor-in-chief of Ocean Development and International Law: The Journal of Marine Affairs.

Catherine Morris

Catherine Morris 

  • Faculty affiliation: UVic Law
  • CAPI Associate since 2001

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Catherine Morris has been involved in the field of conflict resolution since 1983. She has played key roles in numerous Canadian and international conflict resolution organizations and initiatives in academic, community, nonprofit, public and private sectors. She is a founding director of Peacemakers Trust, a Canadian charitable organization for education and research in conflict transformation and peacebuilding. She is a member of the bar in British Columbia.

Catherine is an Associate and a former Executive Director of the Institute for Dispute Resolution at the University of Victoria, where she worked in several leadership roles from 1992-1998. She is also an Associate of the Centre for Asia-Pacific Initiatives (CAPI) at the University of Victoria. She has taught internationally in non-formal and formal settings, including graduate-level courses at the University of Victoria, Osgoode Hall Law School, Chulalongkorn University and the Royal University of Phnom Penh. Her papers and publications include works on mediator ethics and qualifications, conflict and culture, ADR in legal education, religion and conflict, and peacebuilding in Cambodia. Her LLM thesis is entitled "Peacebuilding in Cambodia: Transforming Public Dialogue about Human Rights."

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Renée Mulligan

  • CAPI Associate since 2019

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Renée Mulligan is a lawyer with the British Columbia Ministry of Attorney General. Since 2005 she has worked with the provincial government leading high-profile civil law, human rights, and statutory officer law reform projects. Renée is an active supporter and advocate for the Karenni Social Development Center, a refugee-run school teaching human rights in Northern Thailand. Since 2017 she has been a board member of Lawyers’ Rights Watch Canada, and has advocated for a variety of international issues, including by addressing the United Nations Human Rights Council in Geneva, Switzerland.
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Sudhir Nair

  • Faculty affiliation: UVic Gustavson School of Business
  • CAPI Associate since 2019

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Dr. Sudhir Nair is an Associate Professor of International Business and Strategy in the Gustavson School of Business at the University of Victoria. His research covers various facets of international business including drivers of international entrepreneurship and the internationalization of service firms. He has more recently been researching the newcomer space in Canada from an organizational perspective, and has been working closely with local organizations in the Capital District, especially the Inter Cultural Association of Greater Victoria. He is the recipient of the Gustavson School of Business’s Awards for Teaching Excellence as well as the International Advisory Board Community Service Award.
Sada Niang

Sada Niang 

  • Faculty affiliation: UVic French
  • CAPI Associate since 2017

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Sada Niang obtained his B.A. Honours and his M.A. from the Université of Paris X, Nanterre and a PhD from York University in Toronto. He has been teaching at the University of Victoria since 1991.

In addition to his book, Djibril Diop Mambéty, un cinéaste à contre courant (L'Harmattan, 2002), he ahs published articles and reviews in Research in African Literatures, The Dalhousie Review, Etudes Francophones, Presence Francophone, Notre Librairie, and book chapters in numerous critical collections. He is most recently the principal investigator of a major research grant on the Aesthetics of African cinemas, funded by the Social Sciences and Humanities Research Council of Canada.

His teaching interests include African literatures, Caribbean literatures, African cinemas, Caribbean cinemas and French phonetics. He is currently at work on several projects, in various stages of completion. They involve the relationship between African and world cinemas, the artistic legacy of Ousmane Sembene and Diaspora literature in France.

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Pooja Parmar 

  • Faculty affiliation: UVic Law
  • CAPI Associate since 2017

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Pooja Parmar joined the Faculty of Law in 2015. She received a PhD in Law from UBC, and has previously taught at Carleton University, Osgoode Hall Law School, and UBC Faculty of Law. Prior to commencing graduate research, she practiced law in New Delhi for several years.

Professor Parmar’s current research focuses on the legal profession in Canada and India, indigeneity, and human rights. Her research is informed by her interest in questions of legal epistemology and plurality. She is currently working on four research projects. The first is a study of lawyers who represent Indigenous peoples. The second is a legal history project (in collaboration with John McLaren) about lawyers who represented unpopular causes in BC in the early twentieth century. A third study focuses on the legal profession in India and examines the relationship between legal training and access to justice for Indigenous peoples in the country. Her fourth project focuses on international law and Indigenous peoples. Her published research has examined aspects of human rights, right to water, claims of indigeneity, oral history, translation across legal worlds, intersections of law and colonialism, and law and development. Her latest publication is a book titled Indigeneity and Legal Pluralism in India: Claims, Histories, Meanings published by Cambridge University Press in 2015.

Professor Parmar teaches courses in legal ethics and professionalism, property law, and international human rights law. She has previously taught a range of courses including Public International Law, Law & Development, International Economic Law, Human Rights & Social Justice, and Contracts. She is currently supervising graduate research on law and colonialism, Indigenous rights, environmental & social justice, and legal history.

Professor Parmar is a member of the board of directors of the Canadian Association for Legal Ethics (CALE). She is also a founding member of the Global South Asia Forum at UVic.

Thanh Phan

Thanh Phan

  • Faculty affiliation: UVic Law
  • CAPI Associate since 2020

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Thanh Phan currently teaches Engineering Law at UVic. He previously worked for the Vietnamese government for ten years as a delegate negotiating free trade agreements and an expert in competition law enforcement. He was educated at Hanoi Law University, Nagoya University, and received his PhD in Law from UVic. He has published journal articles in the Houston Journal of International Law, Louisiana Law Review, American Bar Association’s International Antitrust Bulletin, and Journal of Fair Trade of Japan. He is interested in transnational law, law and technology, and corporate governance.


Cody Poulton

Cody Poulton

  • Faculty affiliation: UVic Pacific and Asian Studies
  • CAPI Associate since 2017

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M. Cody Poulton is Professor of Japanese literature and theatre in the Department of Pacific and Asian Studies at the University of Victoria, Canada, where he has taught since 1988. Active as a translator of Japanese fiction and drama, he is author of Spirits of Another Sort: The Plays of Izumi Kyōka (2001) and A Beggar' Art: Scripting Modernity in Japan, 1900-1930 (2010). He is also co-editor, with Mitsuya Mori and J. Thomas Rimer, of The Columbia Anthology of Modern Japanese Drama (2014) and a contributing editor to The Cambridge History of Japanese Theatre (2016).

In fall 2018, Cody organized a four-day CAPI conference called "The Nonhuman in Japanese Culture and Society: Spirits, Animals, Technology," featuring a line-up of leading international scholars and artists whose areas of exploration cover a wide array of "nonhuman" issues in Japanese society, from animal studies and new materialism to augmented reality, artificial intelligence, and performance and puppetry. He continues to bring Japanese-focused programming to CAPI.

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Supriya Routh 

  • Faculty affiliation: UVic Law
  • CAPI Associate since 2017

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Supriya Routh is an Assistant Professor of Law at the Faculty of Law, University of Victoria, where he teaches Contracts, Individual Employment Relationship Law, and the Legal Process. He is also a member of the Curriculum Committee and the Graduate Studies Committee at the Faculty. Supriya’s research interests include theoretical conceptualizations of work and labour law, workers’ organization initiatives, international labour law, atypical and informal workers in the global South, and human rights and human development. His current research project explores the role and limitations of substantive human rights guarantees in promoting informal and precarious workers’ aspirations, and the innovative form and strategies of the newer kinds of workers’ organizations that are emerging in the Global South.

Prior to joining the University of Victoria, Supriya held research positions (Post-doctoral and Chair Research positions) at the University of Laval, Nantes Institute for Advanced Study, and Humboldt University. A Fulbright Scholar, Supriya holds a PhD in Law & Society from the University of Victoria, LLMs from the Vanderbilt University Law School and the West Bengal National University of Juridical Sciences, and BA, LLB from the University of North Bengal. Before commencing his doctoral studies, Supriya has had three years of teaching experience, teaching both LLB and LLM curriculums at the West Bengal National University of Juridical Sciences, where he held an Assistant Professor position. 

Supriya is the author of Enhancing Capabilities through Labour Law: Informal Workers in India (Routledge, 2014) and academic journal articles in the areas of labour law, informal workers, trade unionism, law and development, corporate social responsibility, right to information, and legal education. He is the co-editor (along with Vando Borghi) of Workers and the Global Informal Economy: Interdisciplinary Perspective, published by Routledge in 2016.

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Daromir Rudnyckyj

  • Faculty affiliation: UVic Anthropology
  • CAPI Associate since 2019

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Daromir Rudnyckyj is an associate professor in the Department of Anthropology at the University of Victoria. His research addresses globalization, money, religion, development, finance, and the state. He conducts field and archival work in Southeast Asia, North America, and Europe. His current research examines the techno-politics of money, with a focus on experiments in producing monetary forms and public debates over currency reform. His most recent book, Beyond Debt: Islamic Experiments in Global Finance (University of Chicago Press, 2019), examines efforts to create a transnational financial network independent of debt and efforts to make Kuala Lumpur the “New York of the Muslim World” by transforming it into the central node in a transnational Islamic financial system. With Filippo Osella, he co-edited the recent volume, Religion and the Morality of the Market (Cambridge University Press, 2017). Dr. Rudnyckyj’s book, Spiritual Economies: Islam, Globalization, and the Afterlife of Development (Cornell University Press, 2010), was awarded a Sharon Stephens Prize from the American Ethnological Society. He has published essays in American Anthropologist, American Ethnologist, Cultural Anthropology, Social Text, Anthropological Theory, JRAI, Political and Legal Anthropology Review, the Journal of Asian Studies, and elsewhere.
Hugh Stephens

Hugh Stephens 

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Mr. Stephens has more than 35 years of government and business experience in the Asia-Pacific region. Based in Victoria, BC, Canada, he is currently Vice Chair of the Canadian Committee on Pacific Economic Cooperation (CANCPEC), Senior Fellow at the Asia Pacific Foundation of Canada, Executive Fellow at the School of Public Policy at the University of Calgary, and an associate faculty member in the School of Business at Royal Roads University, Victoria, BC. Before returning to Canada in December 2009, he was Senior Vice President (Public Policy) for Asia-Pacific for Time Warner for almost a decade, located at the company’s regional headquarters in Hong Kong. In this capacity he managed Time Warner’s public policy program in Asia Pacific for Turner Broadcasting, HBO, Warner Bros, Time Inc. and AOL.

Mr. Stephens has been an active leader in a number of regional business organizations in Asia. He served on the Executive Committee of the Board of the US National Center for APEC and is a past Executive Committee Board member of the US-Korea Business Council. He has been a member of the Board of Directors of the US-ASEAN Business Council, Governor of the American Chamber of Commerce in Hong Kong and Vice Chair of the Quality Brands Protection Committee, a coalition of more than 180 multinational companies engaged in strengthening IPR protection in China.

In recent years, he has written and commented extensively on Canada’s engagement with the Asia Pacific region and has testified before the Foreign Affairs and International Trade committee of the Canadian Senate.

Prior to joining Time Warner in 2000, Mr. Stephens spent 30 years in the Canadian Foreign Service with the Department of External Affairs, later the Department of Foreign Affairs and International Trade (DFAIT). His last Ottawa assignment was as Assistant Deputy Minister for Policy and Communications in DFAIT. He also served abroad as Canadian Representative in Taiwan (Head of Mission-Canadian Trade Office in Taipei), Counsellor and Charge d’affaires at the Canadian Embassies in Seoul, Korea and Islamabad, Pakistan, among a number other overseas and headquarters assignments, including service at the Canadian Embassy in Beijing and Mandarin language training in Hong Kong.

Mr. Stephens was educated at the University of British Columbia (UBC), University of Toronto and Duke University, and has a Certificate in Mandarin from the Chinese University of Hong Kong.

Reeta Tremblay

Reeta Tremblay 

  • Faculty affiliation: UVic Political Science
  • CAPI Associate since 2017

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Reeta Chowdhari Tremblay is Professor of Comparative Politics and Global South in the department of Political Science at the University of Victoria. Her major areas of research are identity-based politics and secessionist movements (Kashmir) in South Asia, the politics of subaltern resistance and accommodation in post-colonial societies, democracy and governance, and comparative federalism. During her career, she has held several administrative positions including Vice President Academic and Provost at the University of Victoria; Vice President (Academic) and Pro Vice-Chancellor (Pro Tem) at Memorial University in Newfoundland ; Dean of the Faculty of Arts at Memorial; and, Chair, department of Political Science at Concordia University, Montreal.

Reeta Tremblay is Past President of the Canadian Political Science Association (CPSA), Canadian Asian Studies (CASA), and the Canadian Council of Area Studies of Learned Societies (including Canadian Asian Studies, Latin American Studies, African Studies and the Middle Eastern Studies). She has also served or is serving on editorial boards of several disciplinary journals including PS Political Science (APSA), Pacific Affairs, Canadian Journal of Law and Society, Politics and Governance.

Reeta Tremblay presently holds the Honorary Research Associate position at the Centre for India and South Asia Research at UBC. She is also associated with the Centre d’études et de recherche sur l’Inde, l’Asie du Sud et sa diaspora (CERIAS) at l’Université du Québec à Montréal. As well, she is a CAPI Associate at the Centre for Asia-Pacific Initiatives and a founding member of Global South Asia Forum at the University of Victoria, and a non-resident fellow at the Society for Policy Studies (SPS), New Delhi. In 2016 and 2017 summer terms, she was a Visiting Scholar at SOAS, University of London. In 2015, she was a Visiting Fellow at the Netherlands Institute for Advanced Studies at Wassenaar. 

Reeta Tremblay holds an M.A. and Ph.D. in Political Science from the University of Chicago. She also has an MPhil degree from the Jawaharlal Nehru University, India and an MA and BA from the University of Kashmir.  She has authored or co-authored six books and several articles and reviews. Her work is widely reviewed and cited—in particular her writings on Kashmir and India-Pakistan relations, a subject on which she is widely considered to be the leading North American expert. Her SSHRC funded research includes projects on comparative federalism in the South Asian region where she explores the relationship between territorial and cultural identities and examines the tensions and contradictions between formal and informal nationalisms; between subaltern resistance and accommodation in conflict zones. She has been recognized for her exceptional teaching at both the graduate and undergraduate levels and has received the Concordia University Alumni Association Award for Excellence in Teaching in 2002.

Reeta Tremblay's selected recent publications include: “Modi’s Foreign Policy” (2017); “Contested Governance, Competing Nationalisms, and Disenchanted Publics: Kashmir beyond Intractability?” (2017)   "Kashmir’s Contentious Politics: The More Things Change, the More They Stay the Same” (2015); “Beyond Parochialism and Domestic Preoccupation: The Current State of Comparative Politics in Canada" (2013) and "Labor Migration, Citizenship, and Social Welfare in China and India" (2013).

She also contributes commentaries on South Asia, in particular on Kashmir and on South Asian regional politics to South Asia Monitor (projects of the New Delhi-based think tank, Society for Policy Studies) and to KashmirConnected. In 2015, she was recognized as one of the top 40 prominent Indo-Canadians and was profiled in The Indian Diaspora’ A-List.

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Jeremy Webber

  • Faculty affiliation: UVic Law
  • CAPI Associate since 2019

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Jeremy Webber is Professor of Law at the University of Victoria. He has written widely in constitutional law, Indigenous rights, federalism, cultural diversity, and constitutional theory in Canada and in relation to other countries (especially Australia). He is the author of Reimagining Canada: Language, Culture, Community and the Canadian Constitution (1994), The Constitution of Canada: A Contextual Analysis (2015), and Las gramáticas de la ley: Derecho, pluralismo y justicia (2017). 

Professor Webber was UVic’s Dean of Law from 2013 to 2018. He held the Canada Research Chair in Law and Society at UVic from 2002 to 2014, when he surrendered the chair to serve as Dean of Law. Prior to joining UVic, he was Dean of Law at the University of Sydney, Australia (1998-2002) and Professor of Law at McGill University (1987-1998). He was appointed a Fellow of the Trudeau Foundation in 2009 and a Fellow of Royal Society of Canada in 2016.

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Monika Winarnita

  • CAPI Associate since 2019

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Dr Monika Winarnita teaches in Asian Studies and is a researcher in the School of Humanities and Social Sciences at La Trobe University, Melbourne Australia. She is the author of ‘Dancing the Feminine: Gender and Identity Performances by Indonesian Migrant women’, Sussex Academic Press UK (2015). The book was awarded Monograph of Distinction at the University of Victoria BC Canada ‘Ideafest’ (2017), during her time as a SSHRC Postdoctoral Fellow in the Department of Anthropology. Active in research networks (Founder/Board Member) Asia Pacific Digital Culture and Society, and Asian Australian Studies, her published research covers gender, migration and cultural performances.

Ercel Baker

Ercel Baker joined the Privy Council Office of Canada in June 1994, as Deputy Secretary to the Cabinet (Machinery of Government and Senior Personnel).

Christine Bradley

Christine Bradley is an independent consultant on gender and development and gender violence. Her Ph.D is in Social Anthropology from the University of London (U.K.) and she holds an M.Sc in Social Administration from the London School of Economics.

Connie Carter

Connie Carter is a business lawyer, educator and communicator who also consults on international trade, foreign investment, marketing, technology transfer and intellectual property law mainly in China, India and South East Asia.

Xiaobei Chen

Xiaobei Chen received her B.A. from Guizhou University (China), M.Phil. from the University of Hong Kong (Hong Kong), and Ph.D. from the University of Toronto. She was awarded a Killam Postdoctoral Fellowship in the Department of Political Science at the University of Alberta (2001 -2003).

Hilary Chung

Dr. Chung is a professor of Asian Studies at the University of Auckland in New Zealand and was a Visiting Scholar at the University of British Columbia during 2014. Her current research comprises a comparative study of embodiments of multiculturalism in diasporic Chinese theatre in New Zealand, Australia and Canada. 

Timothy Craig

Timothy Craig is an Associate Professor in the Faculty of Business at the University of Victoria where he teaches "The International Environment of Business" and "Introduction to the Japanese Business Environment."

Lu Ding

Lu Ding teaches economics at the University of the Fraser Valley, BC. A graduate from China's Fudan University, he obtained his PhD from Northwestern University (USA, 1991).

Derek Ellis

Derek Ellis was a professor in the Biology Department, University of Victoria, from 1964-1996, and is now Professor Emeritus. He graduated with a BSc from Edinburgh University, Scotland in 1951, and an Honours Degree in Zoology in 1952.

Nicholas Etheridge

A graduate of the University of Victoria, Nicholas Etheridge joined External Affairs (now DFAIT) in 1967. His career has taken him to Asia-Pacific, Europe and the Middle East, and involved him in both bilateral and multilateral work, usually of a political and security nature.

Stewart Goodings

Stewart Goodings is an experienced manager and consultant in the public and NGO sectors. He has a strong background in policy development, program management, executive training, and international education.

Thomas Guo Guoting

Thomas Guo Guoting earned his LLB from Jilin University in 1984, and then practiced in Fuzhou, Hong Kong, and Shanghai for 21 years.

Carin Holroyd

Carin Holroyd is a Senior Fellow at the Centre for International Governance Innovation in Waterloo, Ontario, and a Senior Research Associate with the Asia Pacific Foundation of Canada.

Stacey Lambert

Stacey Lambert earned her BA in Political Science and French from the University of Victoria and her law degree from the University of Ottawa with specializations in both international and social justice law.

Sharon Lee

Prior to joining the University of Victoria in 2006, Sharon Lee had been a Professor of Sociology at Portland State University, and a faculty member at the National University of Singapore, Cornell University, and the University of Richmond.

Tim Lindsey

Tim Lindsey is Professor of Asian Law and Director of the Centre for Islamic Law and Society in the Faculty of Law at the University of Melbourne, where he is also Director of the Asian Law Centre. In 1999 he was a visiting professor at CAPI.

Lawrence S. Liu

Lawrence S. Liu is Board Director, Executive Vice President and Chief Strategy Officer of China Development Financial Holding Corporation, one of the largest listed companies in Taiwan, since August 2004.

Gordon Longmuir

Gordon Longmuir was born in Trail, British Columbia and served as an officer in the Royal Canadian Navy before completing studies at the University of British Columbia. He went on to a foreign service career that took him to Vietnam (1967-69); Japan (1969-71 and 1980-84); the Republic of Korea (1973-76) and Thailand (1984-86).  He served as Deputy High Commissioner in India from 1991-1995 and Ambassador to the Kingdom of Cambodia from 1995 until his retirement in 1999.

Kenneth MacKay

Kenneth MacKay is a marine biologist with extensive experience in conservation, sustainable fisheries and agriculture. He has worked on the Atlantic coast of Canada, Africa, South-East Asia and the Pacific.

Peter Maidstone

Peter Maidstone was instrumental in developing, and has taught in Asia Pacific Studies at Camosun College, since 1988. He has been a Visiting Lecturer at Tianjin University, PRC, and was a Visiting Fellow at the Institute of Southeast Asian Studies in Singapore.

Terence McGee

Dr. Terry McGee is Professor Emeritus of Asian Research and Geography in the Department of Geography and the Institute of Asian Research at the University of British Columbia. He has been carrying out research on urbanization in Asia with particular focus on urbanization and development in Southeast Asia for more than fifty years and has been published extensively on the subject.

Chantal Meaghar

A graduate of UVIC Law (’85), Chantal Meagher is a Canadian diplomat currently on leave from Global Affairs Canada, where she worked as a lawyer responsible for international human rights issues, primarily with respect to the rights of women and children. She has participated in treaty negotiations at the UN and ILO in Geneva, as well as at the UN General Assembly in New York.  During her most recent posting to China (2004-2008), she was responsible for monitoring China’s domestic human rights situation, including engaging with the NGO community (Canadian and Chinese), government, and local activists. She has also provided policy advice to the Canadian government on approaches engaging with China on human rights issues, and drafted the chapter relating to China for the Diplomat’s Handbook for Democracy Development Support.

Chris Morgan

Chris Morgan got his B.A. and M.A. at UVic in Anthropology in 1978 and 1980 and his Ph.D. in Anthropology and Pacific Studies from Australia National University in 1986 before joining UVic's Pacific and Asian Studies faculty. Having done extensive fieldwork in Tonga and Fiji, Chris was the pillar of Pacific Studies until his retirement in August 2017. His particular interest was in political and social change, and the effects of global trade, in small states in Oceania. He also taught on indigenous peoples of the Pacific.

Masafumi Nakahigashi

Masafumi Nakahigashi has conducted research at the University of Victoria, University of British Columbia, and University of California at Berkeley, amongst others. His areas of specialization are in corporate law and securities regulations.

Pip Nicholson

Pip Nicholson joined the Asian Law Centre, University of Melbourne, in 1997 and was a Senior Fellow of the Faculty from 1998. She joined the Faculty permanently as a lecturer in 2002.

Linda Pennells

Linda Pennells is a consultant in governance, gender and social impact at policy and program levels. She has worked in 14 countries in the Asia-Pacific region and nine countries in Africa. Her clients include UNICEF, UNESCO, UNDP, FINNIDA, DFID and CIDA.

Saikia Pahi Saikia

Pahi Saikia received her MA and MPhil from JNU [Delhi, 2003] and PhD from McGill University, Canada [2010]. Her research interests include identity issues of ethnic minorities, sustainable development, social movements, migration issues, ethnic violence and conflict prevention in the Asian region.

Anne Park Shannon

The Asia Pacific region has been a focus of Anne Park Shannon’s diplomatic career, first in Malaysia and Myanmar, and later as head of the economic side of the Canadian Embassy in Tokyo.

Mark Sidel

Mark Sidel writes and teaches about comparative law with special reference to Asia (particularly Vietnam, India, and China), nonprofit and philanthropic institutions, and human trafficking.

Ivan Somlai

Internationally educated, Ivan Somlai has lived in Europe, Asia and North America. He has consulted in 30 countries and at universities he oversaw the development of over 50 international contracts and projects in the education, natural resource, health, management, technical trades and tourism sectors.

Tadanobu Suzuki

Tad Suzuki is an Information Services Librarian at McPherson Library, University of Victoria. His areas of subject responsibility includes Fine Arts (Departments of History in Art, Theatre, Visual Art, and Writing) and Department of Hispanic & Italian Studies.

Robby Tulus

Robby Tulus pioneered the Credit Union Movement in Indonesia in the late 1960s, co-founded the Credit Union Counseling/Central Organization (CUCO) in Indonesia as well as the Asian Confederation of Credit Unions (ACCU) in 1971.

Stephen Tyler

Stephen Tyler is the founder of Adaptive Resource Management Ltd, an interdisciplinary consulting practice specializing in community-oriented natural resource management and adaptation studies, active in B.C. and internationally.

Francis Yee

Francis Yee received a B.A. (Hons.) from Simon Fraser University and an M.A. and Ph.D. (1992) in Geography from the University of British Columbia. He has been an instructor at Camosun College since 1989.

David Chuenyuan Lai (1937-2018)

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David Lai receives the 2003 CAPI Asia-Pacific Service Award from CAPI Associate Director Helen Lansdowne

David Chuenyuan Lai, Professor of Geography, taught at the University of Victoria for 35 years prior to his retirement in 2003. He received his B.A. (First Class Hons.) and M.A. in Geography from the University of Hong Kong, and Ph.D. in Geography from the London School of Economics and Political Science, University of London. Read about Mr. Lai's legacy (Victoria Times Colonist).

  • View Dr. Lai's public archive in the UVic Libraries Special Collections

Art Wright (1939-2019)

Art Wright was a diplomat, foreign policy analyst and international development practitioner in Asia, Africa and the Caribbean and served as Vice President of the Canadian International Development Agency for Asia (1982-86) and Multilateral Programmes (1990-93). More

Nima Dorji

Nima Dorji

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Nima Dorji is a PhD student at the Law and Society Program at the University of Victoria and a Canadian Queen Elizabeth II Diamond Jubilee Advanced Scholar (QES-AS). He is a senior lecturer and one of the founding faculty members at the Jigme Singye Wangchuck (JSW) School of Law, Bhutan’s first law school. Nima has been working on the law school project since 2014, which led to its opening on July 3, 2017, as the law school welcomed its first cohort of 25 students to the campus. Before joining JSW, Nima worked as a Legal Officer at Bhutan National Legal Institute (BNLI). He was one of the founding staff members of BNLI, managing UN-funded activities and legal dissemination programs. He received his BA and LLB (Hons.) degrees from NALSAR University of Law in India in 2009, his Postgraduate Diploma in National Law (PGDNL) from the Royal Institute of Management, Bhutan, in 2010, and his Master of Laws (LLM) from the University of Canberra, Australia, in 2014. 


 

Ratana Ly

Ratana Ly

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Ratana Ly is a PhD candidate in the UVic Faculty of Law. She completed her LLB at the Royal University of Law and Economics, Cambodia, and LLM at the Nagoya University, Japan. She then worked as a researcher at the Center for the Study of Humanitarian Law in Cambodia, focusing her research on international human rights, international criminal law, labor migration, and refugees. Observing the recent booming of construction in Cambodia, she is keen to explore the relationship between this business sector with labor rights, migration, gender, and the environment. In her spare time, she enjoys taking long walks. Ratana is looking forward to the exciting challenges and opportunities, which will come her way during the program, and learn as she goes. Ratana is particularly grateful to CAPI, the QES-AS scholarship, and UVic for the funding and other support, which allow her to undertake these studies. 


 

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Songkrant Pongboonjun

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Songkrant is a PhD student at the Law and Society Program at the University of Victoria and a Canadian Queen Elizabeth II Diamond Jubilee Advanced Scholar (QES-AS). Songkrant was an environmental lawyer who practiced law in Thailand for ten years and then shifted to teach law at Chiang Mai University, Thailand, since 2016. His worked was about empowering local people to protect their environment, natural resources, and their health and also encouraging young lawyers to engage in public interest lawyering, especially in environmental field. He is interested in the interaction between formal legal institutions, such as legal texts, judiciary, and informal institutions such as local communities, public interest lawyers, academy that leads to create law in action, in order to find the best way to expand civil liberties and civil rights. His tentative thesis title is “Creating Rights from the Bottom:  The Case of Environmental Public Interest Lawyers in Thailand”. This work will investigate the roles and impacts of public interest lawyers in developing environmental rights in the context of developing country like Thailand.


 

pema wangdi

Pema Wangdi

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Pema Wangdi is a PhD student at the Law and Society Program at UVic and a Canadian Queen Elizabeth II Diamond Jubilee Advanced Scholar (QES-AS). He is a senior lecturer and one of the founding faculty members at the Jigme Singye Wangchuck (JSW) School of Law, Bhutan’s first law school.

Pema has been working on the law school project since 2011, which led to its opening on July 3, 2017, when the law school welcomed its first cohort of 25 students to the campus. He has designed and taught the philosophy course for the law students and also co-designed and taught the Political Science Course. He is also part of the committee who is designing the Gross National Happiness and the Law Course, which is considered to be the capstone of the JSW School of Law Curriculum.

Prior to this current job, Pema worked as a Managing Director of a Radio Station popularly known in Thimphu, Bhutan as Kuzoo FM, the Voice of the Youth. He has also worked as a curriculum writer and audio/visual producer for the Ministry of Education. Apart from that he has an experience of teaching from Kindergarten to the University level. He received his teaching training from Samtse College of Education, Bhutan and studied Cinema, TV, Stage and Radio from the Southern Alberta Institute of Technology in Alberta. He received his BA in Philosophy, Politics and Economics from Rangsit University, Thailand and MA in Philosophy from Fordham University, NY USA.


 

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Vandanet Hing 

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Vandanet Hing is a researcher and lecturer at the Center for the Study of Humanitarian Law at the Royal University of Law and Economics in Cambodia whose time at CAPI included conducting research on "the development of international criminal law: assessing Extraordinary Chamber in the Court of Cambodia (ECCC) precedents" as part of the CAPI/University of Victoria Faculty of Law project "Regulating Globalization in South and Southeast Asia."


 

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Ly Anh Hoang

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Dr. Ly Anh Hoàng is a Lecturer in International Law and Acting Head of the Department of Research Management and Journal Administration at Hanoi Law University. Dr. Hoàng will be at UVic for three months working on her current research project investigating Vietnam's compliance with the UN Convention on Biological Diversity and undertaking a research placement with UVic's Environmental Law Centre.


 

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Tiasa Basu Roy

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Tiasa's dissertation deals with the Christianisation of the Saoras of Ganjam district (Orissa, India): Contributions of the Canadian Baptist Mission 1870-1970. The main focus of this project is to trace the history of conversion movement among the tribal group (First Nation people, a term used by the Candian missionaries) 'Saoras' who reside in the frontier zones of the Ganjam district. With the advent of the Canadian Baptist missionaries like John Glendinning, Dr West, Amos Sutton and others in the region, Christianity takes a ground in the heathen land, bringing a new life to these people. This research will also try to show the various methods used by the missionaries to evangelise, the response of the Saoras and their neighbouring communities like the Panos, Paidis and Bissoyis, and most importantly, the conflicts and contradictions among the non-converts and mainly the Hindu Mahasabha who try to push away the missionaries from India, socially ostracize the Christian converts fearing a growing majority of the Christian community.


 

Shane Barter

Shane Barter

  • Position, home institution:
    Associate Professor of International Studies, and Director of the Pacific Basin Research CenterSoka University, California
  • Duration of visit at UVic: 
    June to August 2019

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Dr. Barter is an Associate Professor at Soka University of America, where he serves as the Director of the Pacific Basin Research Center.  His research focuses on armed conflict, elections, and territorial autonomy especially in Southeast Asian countries.  While at CAPI, his primary project is writing a new book, Armed Conflicts in Southeast Asia: Ethnicity and Difference, part of the Southeast Asian politics Elements series with Cambridge University Press.

Sunayana Ganguly

Sunayana Ganguly

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Sunayana Ganguly is currently Assistant Professor at the Azim Premji University in Bangalore. She received her PhD in Political Science from the Freie Universität Berlin where she was affiliated with the Environmental Policy Research Centre, while working with the German Development Institute in Bonn. She was also previously, a research associate at the Industrial Ecology Group, University of Lausanne (Switzerland), working on the interdisciplinary research project on the dynamics of consumption patterns, practices and policies among new consumers in two megacities of South and South-East Asia. Her first book Deliberating Environment Policy in India - Participation and the role of advocacy was published in 2015 (Routledge). Her time at CAPI will be spent exploring themes on environmental governance, civil society and sustainable consumption with a focus on South Asia.


 

Sushmita Pati

Sushmita Pati

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Sushmita is currently teaching at the School of Policy and Governance, Azim Premji University, Bangalore as Assistant Professor. She finished her doctoral degree from Centre for Political Studies, Jawaharlal Nehru University, New Delhi. Her work falls in the larger domain of urban politics but she draws from methods and debates across disciplines like anthropology, political economy, history and law. At CAPI she worked on her book manuscript which looks at the processes and politics of villages getting drawn into the urban fold in the context of Delhi since 1950s to contemporary times.