Dr. Daniel Westlake

Dr. Daniel  Westlake
Position
Limited Term Assistant Teaching Professor
Political Science
Credentials

PhD (UBC)

Contact
Office: DTB A349

April-June 2019 office hours:

By appointment.

Daniel Westlake is an Assistant Teaching Professor at the University of Victoria where he specializes in Canadian and comparative politics. He studies multiculturalism, political parties, and electoral systems. His dissertation, Multiculturalism and Political Parties: Explaining the Positions that Parties Take and Their Influence over Policy Adoption, focuses both on the influence parties have on policy adoption and the reasons parties take the positions that they do. In particular, his dissertation highlights the importance of cross-party support for multiculturalism to policy adoption, the way that single member district electoral systems amplify the effect ethnic minority electoral strength has on party positions, and the way that ethnic minorities and far-right parties place competing pressures on parties’ multiculturalism positions.

Daniel has a strong interest in Canadian politics, and in particular, the Canadian party system.  While much of his dissertation involves quantitative analysis of 21 countries, it also includes deeper analysis of Canada as a case that illustrates the way the single member district electoral systems increase ethnic minority’s influence over elections. Much of Daniel’s teaching is also focused on Canadian politics, both at the introductory level and with respect to Canadian parties.

Daniel is interested very broadly in the interaction between immigration and integration policy, parties’ positions and elections, and electoral systems. This includes an interest in the way that path dependent dynamics associated with multiculturalism and other integration policies affect parties’ ability to influence policy, the extent to which different parties try to win the votes of ethnic minorities (and the way different electoral systems shape parties incentive to do so), and the way mainstream parties respond to the rise of far-right parties. His dissertation included a number of important findings regarding the development of multiculturalism policy, parties’ influence over policy, and the determinants of party positions. It shows that multiculturalism policies are subject to path dependent dynamics both in that policy retrenchment is rare and in that symbolic recognition increases the likelihood of further policy expansion. Further it demonstrates that partisan support for multiculturalism increases the likelihood of policy adoption, but only when that support is cross-partisan. Finally the dissertation demonstrates that parties respond to competing pressures from ethnic minorities and far-right parties when taking positions on multiculturalism, but that ethnic minorities’ influence is much stronger in single member district electoral systems as compared to proportional ones. Mainstream right parties’ positions are more responsive than mainstream left parties not only to the emergence of far-right parties but also to ethnic minority electoral strength.

Much of Daniel’s current research builds off of his dissertation. He is currently developing several research projects. One will look at why symbolic recognition but not funding for ethnic minority organizations increases the likelihood of multicultural policy expansion. A second looks at the different ways that mainstream left parties have responded to the emergence of far-right parties. In particularly it will examine the impact that far-right parties’ left-right positioning has on whether mainstream left parties co-opt far-right parties’ anti-multicultural and anti-immigrant positions. His future work will involve a combination of cross-country quantitative analysis and more detailed case study analysis looking at countries such as Canada, Australia, and Sweden.

Daniel also has a strong interest in the development of the Canadian elections and the party system. In particular he is interested in the decline of the Liberals through much of the 2000s, their resurgence in the 2015 election, and the ramifications for the future of the Conservative and Liberal parties.

Dr. Westlake teaches courses on Canadian Politics.

Teaching Summer 2019
  • POLI 351: Public Policy Analysis
  • POLI 369: Issues in Canadian Politics: "Canadian Political Parties"
Teaching Fall 2019
  • POLI 351: Public Policy Analysis
  • POLI 369: Issues in Canadian Politics: "Canadian Political Parties"
Teaching Spring 2020

Courses taught:

  • POLI 101: Canadian Politics
  • POLI 319: Issues in Comparative Politics: "Comparative Electoral Systems"
  • POLI 351: Public Policy Analysis
  • POLI 369: Issues in Canadian Politics: "Canadian Political Parties"
  • POLI 369: Issues in Canadian Politics: "Comparative Canadian Elections"

Academic Single Author

Westlake, Daniel. (2016) "Multiculturalism, Political Parties, and the Conflicting Pressures of Ethnic Minorities and Far-Right Parties." Party Politics. Online First.

Academic Co-Authored

Banting, Keith, Jack H. Nagel, Chelsea Schafer, and Daniel Westlake. (Forthcoming). "Comparing Performance in Canada and the United States: Implications of Sub-National Differences for Standard Explanations." In Paul J. Quirk, Mark Warren, and Colin Campbell (Eds.) The North American Experiment: Institutions and Policymaking in Canada and the United States. Oxford: Oxford University Press.

Data Set

MCP for Immigrant Minorities: Annual Data 1960-2011.  Available through the Queen's Multiculturalism Policies in Contemporary Democracies website at: http://www.queensu.ca/mcp/annual_data. 

Work in Progress

"Context Matters: The Development of Multiculturalism Policies."

"Following the Right: The Relationship between Political Parties and the Adoption of Multiculturalism Policies."

"Does Multiculturalism Fit? Examining the Relationship between Parties’ Left-Right Ideology and Support for Multiculturalism."

Selected Conference Presentations

Westlake, Daniel (2017) Following the Right: The Relationship between Political Parties and the Adoption of Multiculturalism Policies. Presented at the Canadian Political Science Association Meeting (CPSA), Toronto, Ontario.

Westlake, Daniel (2016) Context Matters: The Development of Multiculturalism Policies. Paper Presented at the American Political Science Association Meeting (APSA), Philadelphia Pennsylvania.

Participant at UBC Electoral Reform in Canada Roundtable, 2016, Vancouver, British Columbia.

Westlake, Daniel (2015). Multiculturalism, Political Parties, and the Conflicting Pressures Presented by Ethnic Minorities and Far-Right Parties. Paper presented at the Canadian Political Science Association Meeting (CPSA), Ottawa, Ontario.

Westlake, Daniel (2014). Do Political Parties Affect the Development of Multiculturalism Policies. Poster presented at the American Political Science Association Meeting (APSA), Washington, D.C.

Westlake, Daniel (2014). Political Parties and the Development of Multiculturalism Policy. Paper presented at the Canadian Political Science Association Meeting (CPSA), St. Catharines, Ontario.

Westlake, Daniel (2013). Does Multiculturalism Isolate People? Diversity, Social Capital, and Attitudes Towards Government in Canada. Presented at the Canadian Political Science Association Meeting (CPSA), Victoria, BC.

Non-Academic Publications

Westlake, Daniel. (October 16, 2015). "Strategic Voting has Long-Term Costs for Progressives" National Post.

Westlake, Daniel. (September 8, 2015). "Why are Our Elections So Small Minded." National Post.