Dr. Peter W. Kennedy

Dr. Peter W.  Kennedy
Position
Associate Professor
Economics
Credentials

PhD (Queen's)

Contact
Office: BEC 366

Peter Kennedy holds a PhD in economics from Queen’s University. His research focuses on theoretical issues in environmental economics, including work on environmental taxes, emissions trading, the environmental impacts of trade and growth, transboundary pollution, and climate change.

His teaching interests include economic theory, environmental economics, and mathematical economics.

Interests

Environmental economics:

  • Environmental taxes
  • Emissions trading
  • The environmental impacts of trade and growth
  • Transboundary pollution
  • Climate change

Courses

  • ECON 103, Principles of Microeconomics
  • ECON 111, The Economy & The Environment
  • ECON 113, Introduction to Economics for Policy Analysis
  • ECON 350, Mathematical Economics I: An Introduction to Static Methods
  • ECON 416, Cost Benefit Analysis: Principles and Applications
  • ECON 500, Microeconomic Analysis
  • ECON 516, Cost-benefit Analysis

Selected publications

  • Heyes, A., Kapur, S., Kennedy, P., Martin, S. & Maxwell, J., 2019. But What Does It Mean? Competition between Products Carrying Alternative Green Labels when Consumers are Active Acquirers of Information, Journal of the Association of Environmental and Resource Economists, doi: 10.1086/706548.
  • Kennedy, P., 2016. Cooperative Action on Greenhouse Gas Emissions and the Distribution of Global Output and Damage, Environmental and Resource Economics63(1): 147-166.
  • Farnham, M. and  Kennedy, 2015. Adapting to Climate Change: Equilibrium Welfare Implications for Large and Small Economies, Environmental and Resource Economics61(3): 345-363.
  • Hutchinson, E. and P. Kennedy, 2014. The Relationship between Emissions and Income Growth for a Transboundary Pollutant, Resource and Energy Economics 38: 221-242.   
  • Hutchinson, E. and  Kennedy, 2013. Transboundary Pollution and the Selective Enforcement of Environmental Policy, Environmental Economics4(4): 6-17.