In the Know: End of Second Term

 

In the Know: Advice for international students is a section of the UVic Global Community Newsletter that includes valuable information for undergraduate and graduate international students in the following categories: degree-seekingincoming exchange, and incoming study abroad/visiting.

Maybe you are graduating after this term. Maybe you are taking courses in summer. Or, maybe you are planning to work or travel during the summer. Here are some immigration FAQs and settlement resources to help you plan your next steps.

I am graduating after this term. Can I stay in Canada to work temporarily after graduation?

Your study permit will become invalid on the day marked on the permit or 90 days after the day you complete your studies, whichever comes first. If you want to stay in Canada to work temporarily after you complete your program of study, consider applying for a post-graduation work permit (PGWP).

To qualify for a PGWP, you must meet the eligibility requirements. You can visit the Working in Canada page of our website for more information about how to apply for a PGWP. If you are not eligible for a PGWP, you may consider applying for other work permits. Currently, our office can only provide support for your PGWP application.

If you submit your PGWP application in Canada while your study permit is valid and meet all the conditions outlined by Immigration, Refugees and Citizenship Canada (IRCC), you may be allowed to continue working after you submit your PGWP application. If you do not meet all the conditions to work while your PGWP application is being processed, you must wait until you receive your PGWP approval to resume employment in Canada.

If you need guidance to apply for a PGWP or have questions about your work authorization while your PGWP application is in process, you can contact an International Student Adviser for help.

My program requires continuous enrollment. Can I take a break in the summer session?

If your program requires continuous enrollment, then summer sessions are likely to be your regular academic sessions. In this case, you must continue registering in part-time or full-time courses to be compliant with your study permit conditions. If you have questions about whether summer is a scheduled break or a regular academic session in your program, be sure to consult with your academic adviser.

For full information about working on and off campus while studying in Canada, refer to the IRCC website.

To be eligible to work on a study permit or meet the PGWP eligibility criteria, you must maintain full-time enrollment during regular sessions unless it is your final term.

The definitions of full-time studies for undergraduate students and for graduate students are available in the UVic Calendar.

Please note:

  • If you are registered with the UVic Centre for Accessible Learning, consult with your CAL adviser to confirm the full-time definition based on your academic accommodations. The definition of full-time enrollment used for scholarships, bursaries, student loans, and external providers may differ from the full-time definitions in the UVic Calendar.
  • There is a different full-time definition for undergraduate (e.g. JD and JID) students in the Faculty of Law.

As Summer Session consists of 7 terms, be sure to follow the undergraduate and graduate Summer Session add and drop dates to manage your course registration.

If you want to take a leave during your regular academic sessions at UVic and stay in Canada, you should contact an International Student Adviser to discuss potential implications on your student status, work authorization and PGWP eligibility. 

The Summer Session is a scheduled break in my program. Can I take part-time courses and work with a study permit?

If the summer is a scheduled break in your program, and you plan to work in Canada during the summer break, your study permit may allow you to work full time if you meet the conditions to work with a study permit regardless of your enrollment status, provided you are registered full time the term before and after the summer break.

The definitions of full-time studies for undergraduate students and for graduate students are available in the UVic Calendar.

Please note:

  • If you are registered with the UVic Centre for Accessible Learning, consult with your CAL adviser to confirm the full-time definition based on your academic accommodations. The definition of full-time enrollment used for scholarships, bursaries, student loans, and external providers may differ from the full-time definitions in the UVic Calendar.
  • There is a different full-time definition for undergraduate (e.g. JD and JID) students in the Faculty of Law.

For full information about working on and off campus while studying in Canada, refer to the IRCC website. You can also find some information specific to UVic students on the Working in Canada page of our ICS website.

Note: As an international student in Canada, the onus is on you to understand the restrictions associated with working in Canada, and to never work without the proper authorization. Working in Canada when you are not authorized to do so may result in enforcement action taken by the Canada Border Services Agency (CBSA). It could also negatively impact your current temporary resident status and any future applications you make under the Immigration and Refugee Protection Act and its regulations.

If you need help with finding employment, Career Services is there to help you succeed at work during your time at UVic and beyond.

I want to travel outside Canada during the summer session. What should I know about the requirements to re-enter Canada?

Although most travel restrictions related to COVID-19 have been lifted, entry requirements may change without notice. If you plan to travel overseas, be sure to stay informed of the Government of Canada’s entry requirements. Travellers seeking entry to Canada must meet all the requirements in addition to holding the required Canadian immigration documents.

Be sure to review the following Government of Canada’s COVID-19: Travel, testing and borders website before finalizing your travel plans.

For step-by-step guidance and a list of documents to carry with you for travel, visit the Travelling to Canada section of our website.

Some ideas to help you move out of your current residence:

  • Sell belongings you no longer need online using a website like UsedVictoria, Facebook Marketplace, or Craigslist.
  • Donate items at the UVSS Free Store or at one of Victoria's second hand stores, such as Value Village or WIN.
  • Find out how to recycle items on campus or off campus.
  • Move belongings to your next destination using a large vehicle or a portable moving container.
  • Ship belongings to your next destination using Canada Post or a private shipping company.
  • Rent a storage unit to keep your belongings safe until you return.
  • Sell textbooks you don't want to keep back to the UVic Bookstore or consign them at SUBtext.

Other things you may need to take care of:

  • Do you live on campus? Have you connected with Residence Services for guidance about moving out?
  • Do you live off campus? Have you given your landlord or roommates a written notice? Make sure you understand your responsibilities as a tenant.
  • Do you need to update your address, or do you need to cancel the account? Consider each account that is in your name, such as your bank account, mobile phone, hydro, internet, cable, etc.
  • If you will leave British Columbia (BC) permanently, and you have BC Medical Services Plan (MSP) coverage, you must cancel your account.
  • If you will leave British Columbia (BC) temporarily and you have BC Medical Services Plan (MSP) coverage, contact Health Insurance BC by phone and ask to speak with an enrolment specialist about your options.
  • If you have extended health insurance through the UVic plan for undergraduate students, visit the UVSS Info Booth in the SUB to learn your coverage end date.
  • If you have extended health insurance through the UVic plan for graduate students, contact the GSS Office in the Halpern Centre to discuss your options.

Final tips for those of you who are returning home after studying in Canada

Your time in Canada will have influenced your perspective of the world. You might think that moving to a new country and culture is the most challenging part of your international student experience, but returning home after spending time away might be just as challenging.

It is common for international students to experience a transition called "reverse culture shock". Refer to the “Going home after your study abroad experience” handout for information and tips to overcome the reverse culture shock. The content is written for students returning to Canada after time away from their home country, but it is relevant for anyone who has studied abroad.

If you have questions about any information discussed above, please contact the International Centre for Students (ICS) via phone (+1-250-721-6361) or email (icsinfo@uvic.ca).

Upcoming Events:

March 22, 2023:  

Post-graduation work permit (PGWP) information session