Slavic courses

We offer a full complement of courses in Russian, Ukrainian and East European Studies, leading to the Bachelor of Arts in Major, Minor and General Programs in Slavic Studies, as well as a Certificate in Russian Language and Cultural Proficiency.

If you are planning to do any program in the Department of Germanic and Slavic Studies, we recommend you consult the Slavic Advisor concerning course selection both within and outside the Department. Students specializing in particular programs will find that they have sufficient electives to enable them to concentrate (Double Major) in a second field. A wise selection of courses is therefore important, particularly to those students who may wish to enter graduate school, teaching, library work or government service.

Course title, term, sections, days and time, classrooms and instructor

Short course description

SLST 100 Introduction to Russian Society and Culture
September:

A01 CRN 12889 TWF 12:30-1:20 pm CLE A316  Katrina Sark

Introduction to Russian society and culture from earliest times to the present. Explores Russian historical ties to other Slavic cultures, Asia and Europe. Discussion of the Russian national character as a cultural phenomenon by examining its geographical, historical and political sources.

Taught in English.

SLST 101 Beginning Russian I

September:

A01 CRN TWF 12890 9:30-10:20 am CLE D126 TBA

More than 250 million people speak Russian. Why don’t you? Learning to speak Russian opens the door to a rich and exciting world. SLST 101 is designed for students who have never studied Russian. In this course you will learn the basics of Russian through the acquisition of vocabulary and grammar used in everyday interaction. By the end of the course, you will be able to read, write, speak and comprehend Russian at the beginner’s level, and also appreciate aspects of Russian culture. 

 

SLST 201 Intermediate Russian I

September:

A01 CRN 12891 TWF 9:30 - 10:20 am ECS 130 TBA

This course expands and enhances your spoken and written knowledge of Russian at the intermediate level. By the end of the semester you will be able to converse and correspond in Russian in a variety of situations.

Prerequisites: SLST 102 or permission of the department.

SLST 203 Pronunciation and Colloquial Russian

September:

A01 CRN 12892 TWF 10:30 -11:20 am HSD A270 TBA

Focuses on Russian pronunciation, phonetics and intonation as well as colloquial language. Aims to build a foundation for confidence in spoken Russian. Proverbs and sayings, tongue-twisters, nursery rhymes, songs and cartoons provide an insight into Russian popular culture.

SLST 301 Advanced Russian

September:

A01 CRN 12893 TWF 1:30-2:20 pm CLE D125  Emmanuelle Guenette

For advanced-to-intermediate students of Russian. Focus on understanding advanced grammar features and developing communication skills while learning about Russian literature and culture.

SLST 361 x HSTR 351  Imperial Russia, 1689-1917

September:

A01 CRN 13787 TWF 1:30 - 2:20 pm CLE A205 David Dolff

A history of Russian Empire from Peter the Great to the fall of the monarchy. Traces Russia's response to the challenge of the West, with special attention to political reforms, social transformation and cultural change. Discussion of whether Late Imperial Russia was history's dead end or a promise cut short by revolutionary violence.

SLST 363 X HSTR 353 Modern Ukraine and Russian-Ukrainian Conflict

September

A01 CRN 12895 M,Th 11:30 -12:50 pm COR B107 Serhy Yekelchyk

Examines the formation of the modern Ukrainian nation with special emphasis on its historical relations with Russia. Discusses popular revolutions in Ukraine and the ensuing Russian-Ukrainian conflict in the wider historical context of imperial disintegration.

SLST 410 Special Topics: The Soviet Union in WWII

September:

A01 CRN 12896 Th 2:30 - 5:20 pm CLE D130 Serhy Yekelchyk

Historians of the Eastern Front were late in turning their attention to the everyday experiences of war and occupation, but when they finally did so, a new and much more accentuated picture began emerging. In this seminar we will focus on Nazi policy n the East and Soviet society’s response to the war. While paying due attention to the major military engagements on the Eastern Front, we will highlight recent debates about larger issues, such as the morale of the Red Army, the Nazis’ treatment of Soviet POWs, Eastern Europe’s experience of “double occupation,” the “Holocaust by bullets,” the role of Western aid through the Lend-Lease program, and the Soviet use of mass rape as a weapon, among others.

SLST 481 Existence and Anxiety in Dostoevsky

September:

A01 CRN 12897 TWF 11:30 am -12:20 pm CLE A203 Megan Swift

Dostoevsky’s works constantly top lists of the most important novels to read. He was obsessed with big questions: why does urban modernity damage the human spirit? What should we believe in: rationality and science, or the call of spirituality?  In this class we explore these issues through lectures, discussions and presentations. A native of Russia’s imperial capital, we map out Dostoevsky’s St. Petersburg and in our big project, write research articles that will appear on the virtual map of nineteenth-century St. Petersburg that I created for this class.

SLST 499 Honours Thesis

September:

A01 CRN 13785 Helga Thorson

The honours thesis provides you with the enriching opportunity to work one-on-one with your faculty supervisor, to explore in detail a topic of your choice, and to produce a 20-25 page thesis which is the capstone of your learning experience. If you are interested, please contact our Honours Advisor, Dr. Helga Thorson

Course title, term, sections, days and time, classrooms and instructor

Short course description

SLST 101 Beginning Russian I 

January:

A01 CRN 22737 TWF 12:30 - 1:20 pm  CLE D132  Emmanuelle Guenette

More than 250 million people speak Russian. Why don’t you? Learning to speak Russian opens the door to a rich and exciting world. SLST 101 is designed for students who have never studied Russian. In this course, you will learn the basics of Russian through the acquisition of vocabulary and grammar used in everyday interaction. By the end of the course, you will be able to read, write, speak and comprehend Russian at the beginner’s level, and also appreciate aspects of Russian culture.

SLST 102 Beginning Russian II

January:

A01 CRN 22738 TWF 10:30  - 11:20 am CLE A311 TBA

This course is a continuation of SLST 101 and is designed for the development of basic reading, writing, and conversational skills. It presents the basic Russian grammar, communicative models, and essential vocabulary.

Prerequisites: SLST 101 or permission of the department.

SLST 111 Beginning Ukrainian

January:

A01 CRN 22739 MTh 1:00 - 2:20 pm  CLE C108 Olga Pressitch

Introduction to the essential points of grammar and basic vocabulary for everyday interaction, as well as reading and writing.

SLST 180 Magic and the Fairy Tale World

January:

A01 CRN 22740 TWF 9:30-10:20 am FA 103 Megan Swift

An introduction to Russian folk beliefs and magic, as well as the fairy tale in the Russian, Soviet and post-Soviet context. Topics may include shared world fairy tale themes and popular folk and fairy tale figures in literature, animated and live-action film.

SLST 202 Intermediate Russian II

January:

A01 CRN 22741 TWF 1:30 - 2:20 pm CLE A307 TBA

The course will further your knowledge of grammar and vocabulary at the intermediate level with continued reading, writing, listening and speaking in Russian. You will continue learning about Russian life and culture through the language.

Prerequisites: SLST 201 or permission of the department.

 SLST 300 Slavic Cultural Studies

January:

A01 CRN 22742 W 3:30  - 6:20 pm CLE C111  Kat Sark

Provides case studies in the cultural history of Slavic and other Eastern European countries in which students analyze texts, films, media, as well as visual and material objects and spaces from a variety of approaches and perspectives.

SLST 345 The Eastern Front in the First and Second World Wars

January:

A01 CRN 22743 MTh 10:00 -11:20 COR B135 Serhy Yekelchyk

Examines the military, political, and social aspects of the Eastern Front in Europe during both World Wars. Aims to analyze the Eastern Front's difference from the warfare in the West, and how this specificity explains the origins of revolutionary violence and genocide.

SLST 362 X HSTR 352 The Soviet Union and its Successor States, 1917 - 2000

 January:

A01 CRN 22744 TWF 1:30-2:20 pm CLE A205 David Dolff

A history of the Soviet Union and its aftermath. Examines political, economic, social and cultural transformations that shaped the Soviet socialist experiment, as well as the causes of its collapse and the difficulties of post-communist transition in Russia and non-Russian republics. Emphasis on social history, gender, and everyday life.

SLST 401 Advanced Russian Practice

January:

A01 CRN 22745 TWF 9:30-10:30 am CLE C214 TBA

For advanced students of Russian. Focuses on conversational fluency, comprehension and written composition.

SLST 450 Cold War on Film

January:

A01 CRN 22746 T 4:30 - 7:20 pm  ESC 116 Serhy Yekelchyk

In this course, you will learn how the Western and Soviet cinemas constructed the image of the ideological enemy during the “long” Cold War, which started with the Bolshevik Revolution of 1917 and continued beyond the Soviet collapse. This course combines the study of historical events and cultural representations with in-depth analysis of films, including such aspects as editing, movement, lighting, and camera angle. Almost all the movies we are going to watch in this course were in their day major blockbusters, and we will find out why. This course counts toward a Film Studies minor. No prerequisites and no books to buy.

SLST 460  History and Memory in Eastern European Cultures

January:

A01 CRN22747  M 3:30 - 6:30 pm CLE A302 Olga Pressitch

A study of the construction of historical memory through literary and artistic representations of the past in several Eastern European nations. Focus on the role of historical novels in the cultural work of modern nationalism and cinematic treatment of the 20th-century wars and ethnic conflicts.

SLST 499 Honours Thesis

January:

A01 CRN 23628 Helga Thorson

The honours thesis provides you with the enriching opportunity to work one-on-one with your faculty supervisor, to explore in detail a topic of your choice, and to produce a 20-25 page thesis which is the capstone of your learning experience. If you are interested, please contact our Honours Advisor, Dr. Helga Thorson.