Slavic courses

We offer a full complement of courses in Russian, Ukrainian and East European Studies, leading to the Bachelor of Arts in Major, Minor and General Programs in Slavic Studies, as well as a Certificate in Russian Language and Cultural Proficiency.

If you are planning to do any program in the Department of Germanic and Slavic Studies, we recommend you consult the concerning course selection both within and outside the Department. Students specializing in particular programs will find that they have sufficient electives to enable them to concentrate (Double Major) in a second field. A wise selection of courses is therefore important, particularly to those students who may wish to enter graduate school, teaching, library work or government service.

Students who believe they have sufficient background to be exempted from a specific pre-requisite for a course may request a pre-requisite waiver by submitting the waiver request form to the Department or School offering the course. It is the student’s responsibility to provide any relevant documentation to support their request – see instructions on page 2 of the form for details. Students should contact the Department/School main office to find out where to electronically submit their waiver form.

All Fall 2020 courses are taught online

Course title, term, sections, days and time, classrooms and instructor

Short course description

SLST 100  Introduction to Russian Society and Culture

September:

A01 CRN 12807 W 4:30-6:00 pm 

Course Outline

Here is a video of your instructor introducing the course.

Introduction to Russian society and culture from earliest times to the present. Explores Russian historical ties to other Slavic cultures, Asia and Europe. Discussion of the Russian national character as a cultural phenomenon by examining its geographical, historical and political sources.

The course will integrate both asynchronous and synchronous methods.

SLST 101 Beginning Russian I

September:

A01 CRN 12808 TWF 1:30-2:30 pm

Course Outline

Here is a video of your instructor introducing the course.

More than 250 million people speak Russian. Why don’t you? Learning to speak Russian opens the door to a rich and exciting world. SLST 101 is designed for students who have never studied Russian. In this course you will learn the basics of Russian through the acquisition of vocabulary and grammar used in everyday interaction. By the end of the course, you will be able to read, write, speak and comprehend Russian at the beginner’s level, and also appreciate aspects of Russian culture. 

The course will integrate both asynchronous and synchronous methods.

SLST 201 Intermediate Russian I

September:

A01 CRN 12809 TWF 9:30-10:30 am,  

Course Outline

Here is a video of your instructor introducing the course.

This course expands and enhances your spoken and written knowledge of Russian. By the end of the semester, you will be able to converse and correspond in Russian in a variety of new situations.

SLST 201 consists of three class hours per week.

Prerequisites: SLST 102 or permission of the department.

The course will integrate both asynchronous and synchronous methods.

SLST 301 Advanced Russian

September:

A01 CRN 12810 MTh 1:00-2:30 pm 

Course Outline

Here is a video of your instructor introducing the course.

For advanced-to-intermediate students of Russian. Focus on understanding advanced grammar features and developing communication skills while learning about Russian literature and culture.

The course will integrate both asynchronous and synchronous methods.

SLST 361 x HSTR 351  Imperial Russia, 1689-1917

September:

A01 CRN  12811 Online

Course Outline

Here is a video of your instructor introducing the course.

A history of Russian Empire from Peter the Great to the fall of the monarchy. Traces Russia's response to the challenge of the West, with special attention to political reforms, social transformation and cultural change. Discussion of whether Late Imperial Russia was history's dead end or a promise cut short by revolutionary violence.

This course is taught asynchronously.

SLST 364 Eastern Europe through Western Eyes

September:

A01 CRN 12812  Online,   

Course Outline

Here is a video of your instructor introducing the course.

A study of Western literary and cinematic representations of Eastern Europe, as well as Eastern European cultural reactions to these. Focus on the period from the 18th century to the present, with special attention to the 20th-century mass culture and the redefinition of the European "East" in the wake of communism's collapse.

This course is taught asynchronously.

SLST 460  History and Memory in Eastern European Countries

September:

A01 CRN 12813 Online,   

Course Outline

Here is a video of your instructor introducing the course.

A study of the construction of historical memory through literary and artistic representations of the past in several Eastern European nations. Focus on the role of historical novels in the cultural work of modern nationalism and cinematic treatment of the 20th-century wars and ethnic conflicts.

This course is taught asynchronously.

SLST 482/SLST 581 x  HSTR 451A/519 Twentieth-Century Genocides in Eastern Europe

September:

A01 CRN 12814 M 7:30 - 9:00 pm,


Here is a video of your instructor introducing the course.

Examines the common and unique features of genocides, ethnic cleansings, and forced population transfers in twentieth-century Eastern Europe including the Ukrainian Famine, the Holocaust and the Bosnian War.

The course will integrate both asynchronous and synchronous methods.

SLST 499 Honours Thesis

September:

A01 CRN  

The honours thesis provides you with the enriching opportunity to work one-on-one with your faculty supervisor, to explore in detail a topic of your choice, and to write a thesis of approximately 7,500 words which is the capstone of your learning experience. If you are interested, please contact our .

Please note that teaching mode for Spring 2021 will be announced later

Course title, term, sections, days and time, classrooms and instructor

Short course description

SLST 101 Beginning Russian I 

January:

A01 CRN 22673 TWF 1:30 - 2:30 pm,  Emmanuelle Guenette, PhD candidate

More than 250 million people speak Russian. Why don’t you? Learning to speak Russian opens the door to a rich and exciting world. SLST 101 is designed for students who have never studied Russian. In this course, you will learn the basics of Russian through the acquisition of vocabulary and grammar used in everyday interaction. By the end of the course, you will be able to read, write, speak and comprehend Russian at the beginner’s level, and also appreciate aspects of Russian culture.

SLST 102 Beginning Russian II

January:

A01 CRN  22674 TWF 10:30  - 11:30 am, 

This course is a continuation of SLST 101 and is designed for the development of basic reading, writing, and conversational skills. It presents the basic Russian grammar, communicative models, and essential vocabulary.

Prerequisites: SLST 101 or permission of the department.

SLST 111 Beginning Ukrainian

January:

A01 CRN 22675 MTh 1:00 - 2:30 pm,

Introduction to the essential points of grammar and basic vocabulary for everyday interaction, as well as reading and writing.

SLST 180 Magic and the Fairy Tale World

January:

A01 CRN 22676 TWF 11:30 am - 12:30 pm

An introduction to Russian folk beliefs and magic, as well as the fairy tale in the Russian, Soviet and post-Soviet context. Topics may include shared world fairy tale themes and popular folk and fairy tale figures in literature, animated and live- action film.

SLST 202 Intermediate Russian II

January:

A01 CRN 22677 TWF 12:30 - 1:30 pm,  

The course will further your knowledge of grammar and vocabulary at the intermediate level with continued reading, writing, listening and speaking in Russian. You will continue learning about Russian life and culture through the language.

Prerequisites: SLST 201 or permission of the department.

 SLST 300 Slavic Cultural Studies

January:

A01 CRN 22678 TWF 12:30  - 1:30 pm,

Provides case studies in the cultural history of Slavic and other Eastern European countries in which students analyze texts, films, media, as well as visual and material objects and spaces from a variety of approaches and perspectives.

SLST 345 The Eastern Front in the First and Second World Wars

January:

A01 CRN 22679 M 10:00-11:30 am Serhy Yekelchyk

Examines the military, political, and social aspects of the Eastern Front in Europe during both World Wars. Aims to analyze the Eastern Front's difference from the warfare in the West, and how this specificity explains the origins of revolutionary violence and genocide.

SLST 362 X HSTR 352 The Soviet Union and its Successor States, 1917 - 2000

 January:

A01 CRN 22680 TWF 9:30-10:30 am,   

A history of the Soviet Union and its aftermath. Examines political, economic, social and cultural transformations that shaped the Soviet socialist experiment, as well as the causes of its collapse and the difficulties of post-communist transition in Russia and non-Russian republics. Emphasis on social history, gender, and everyday life.

SLST 403 Topics in Russian Culture, Literature, Film (in Russian)

January:

A01 CRN 22681 TWF 9:30-10:30 am,   

For advanced students of Russian. Focuses on conversational fluency, comprehension and written composition.

SLST 450 Cold War on Film

January:

A01 CRN 22682 M 4:30-7:30 pm Serhy Yekelchyk

A study of the enemy's image in Soviet and Western films of the Cold War era. Analysis of films and related literary and political texts tracing the cultural construction of Cold War animosity from 1945 to the recent renewal of geopolitical rivalry between Russia and the West.

SLST 451 Stalinist Cinema

January:

A01 CRN 22683 Th 4:30 - 7:30 pm,   

Focuses on the interaction of art, mass entertainment and socialist propaganda in the Stalinist film industry. Major films of the time will be analyzed against the background of contemporary political and social developments.

SLST 499 Honours Thesis

January:

A01 CRN 22684

The honours thesis provides you with the enriching opportunity to work one-on-one with your faculty supervisor, to explore in detail a topic of your choice, and to write a thesis of approximately 7,500 words which is the capstone of your learning experience. If you are interested, please contact our .