Germanic courses

We offer a full complement of courses leading to a Bachelor of Arts degree in Germanic Studies in the General, Major (with an Honours option) or Minor Programs as well as a Certificate in German Language and Cultural Proficiency.

Our courses are focussed on helping you to acquire proficiency in German-speaking language and culture from the introductory to advanced level. Whether you are a native speaker on exchange, a heritage speaker, or have some knowledge of German from school or travel, we can find the right course for your interests and level of German. If you are not sure about which language course is right for you, please feel free to contact our If you want to know more about our degree programs, please contact our Undergraduate Advisor.

Course title, term, sections, days and time, classrooms and instructor

Short course description

GMST 100   Introduction to Germanic Studies

September:

A01 CRN: 11815  MTh 10:00-11:30 am, MacLaurin D101, Matthew Pollard

 

A multi-media foundation course introducing students to the cultural symbols, spaces and events which have not only shaped German-speaking identity but also the discipline of Germanic Studies itself.

Taught in English.

GMST 101   Beginning German I

September:

A01 CRN  11816 TWF 9:30 - 10:20 am, CLE A207,  Matthew Pollard

A02 CRN 11817 TWF 11:30 am -12:20 pm, ELL 161, Franziska Uhl

A03 CRN 11818 TWF 11:30 am - 12:20 pm, COR B145, Peter Gölz

A04 CRN 11819 TWF 12:30 - 1:30 pm, CLE A202, Matthew Pollard

Introduction for students with no previous knowledge of German. Facilitates learning and retention of vocabulary, effective communication in everyday interaction and the use of fundamental structures of grammar. Acquisition of a basic understanding of German and ability to read, write, speak and comprehend German at the beginner’s level. Provides an introduction to the culture of German-speaking countries.

Note: Credit will be granted for only one of 101, GER 100, 100A.

GMST 201 Intermediate German I

September:

A01 CRN 11820 TWF 11:30 am - 12:20 pm, CLE A118, Matthew Pollard

As a follow-up course to GMST 102, this course will be using the second-year version of Menschen. This course will review and reinforce familiar structures and vocabulary and will introduce grammatical structures such as the subjunctive and more in-depth vocabulary. Further insights into the culture of German-speaking countries will use authentic materials. Students will acquire an understanding of German that enables reading, writing, speaking and comprehension of German at the intermediate level.

GMST 301 Advanced German I

September:
A01 CRN  11821 MTh  11:30 am - 12:50 pm, CLE B215,  Ulf Schuetze

An advanced mixed-level language and culture course for learners of German as a Second Language, heritage and native speakers. This class provides all levels of language learners with a set of linguistic and inter-cultural tools that will allow them to confidently mediate between and within languages and cultures.

GMST 362 Two Germanies

September: 

A01 CRN: 11822  MTh 10:00-11:30 am, DSB C128,  Ulf Schuetze

A comparative study of daily life and culture in the formerly divided Germany (1949-1989) and how art, literature, music and film defined and distinguished the two countries.

GMST 369 Topics in Scandinavian Studies x MEDI 360: Selected Topic in Medieval Culture

September:

A01 CRN 11823 MTh 1:00 - 2:20 pm, CLE A206, Jón Karl Helgason

For the past two hundred and fifty years, Scandinavian myths and Icelandic sagas have had a huge impact on Western mentality, as well as on works of writers, visual artists, musicians, film-makers and designers of computer games all around the globe. The aim of the course is to draw up a chart of this creative process, looking with equal interest at playwright Henrik Ibsen who for his The Vikings of Helgeland (1857) was influenced by Njal’s Saga and Laxdæla Saga and the modern Japanese comic artists Makoto Yukimura who in recent years has published thousands of pages of a Manga titled Vinland Saga (2005-present). Particular emphasis will be placed on American adaptations of Old Norse literature, involving among others Henry Wadsworth Longfellow, Alexander Stirling Calder, Jack Kirby, and Kirk Douglas. The students will choose a particular field of study to specialize in and write assignments accordingly.

GMST 401  Topics in Popuar Culture (in German)

September: 

A01 CRN 11824 MTh 1:00-2:20 pm,  CLE D130,  Gerlinde Weimer-Stuckmann

You will explore elements of German Popular Culture such as the social media, music, politics, and film of contemporary Germany. Furthermore, since the Berlin wall fell thirty years ago, we will take a look back at recent German history by reading Thomas Brussig's bestselling novel Am kürzeren Ende der Sonnenalle, a Berlin coming of age story that takes place in the former DDR. By engaging with authentic material, you will be encouraged to practice your speaking skills and deepen your ability to express yourself in the German language. (Taught in German)

GMST 453 After-Images of the Holocaust in Text and Film

September:

A01 CRN 11825 W 4:30-7:20 pm, CLE A303, Charlotte Schallie

Examines how writers, filmmakers and visual artists attempt to come to terms with the legacy of the National Socialist regime while portraying the after-effects of the Holocaust for the second and third generations in Germany, Israel, the United States and Canada.

Notes: Credit will be granted for only one of GMST 453, GERS 433, GER 433.
No knowledge of German required

GMST 454 A Cultural History of Vampires in Literature and Film

September:

A01 CRN 11826 M 4:30 - 7:20 pm, MacLaurin A144, Peter Gölz

In this course, we will study literary and cinematic vampires in their historical context. Beginning with an overview of the classic vampire paradigms of Nosferatu and Dracula, we will analyze cinematic vampires’ changing guise during the last century, and end with the recent German We Are the Night and the mockumentary What We Do in the Shadows.

GMST 487 The Theatre and Dramaturgy of Bertolt Brecht

September:

A01 CRN 11827 T 4:30 - 7:20 pm, CLE A316, Elena Pnevmonidou

Exposes students to the core methods and concepts of Brecht’s dramatic theory, such as epic theatre, estrangement, the V-Effekt, Gestus etc. Students will study representative plays from each of Brecht’s major creative periods in juxtaposition with some of the pivotal dramaturgical texts from that same period, and will thus explore the historical evolution of the dialogue itself between Brecht’s theatre and his dramatic theory.

GMST 499 Honours Thesis

September:

A01 CRN 11828

Charlotte Schallie

The honours thesis provides you with the enriching opportunity to work one-on-one with your faculty supervisor, to explore in detail a topic of your choice, and to write a thesis of approximately 7,500 words which is the capstone of your learning experience. If you are interested, please contact our Honours Advisor, Charlotte Schallie.

GMST 462 Nietzsche in the English-Speaking World

January:

A01 CRN 21728 MTh 10:30-11:20 am, CLE C113, Matthew Pollard

 

The collection of myths surrounding Friedrich Nietzsche’s life and work lives on as distinct and separate from what he actually wrote. Beginning with his early reception in Europe and referring to literature, journalism, art and film, the course investigates how Nietzsche was constructed in the English-speaking world as the mad genius, the anti-Semite, and the proto-Nazi.

Course title, term, sections, days and time, and instructor

Short course description

GMST 101 Beginning German I

January:
A01 CRN 21718 TWF 9:30 - 10:20 am, CLE A118, Franziska Uhl, DAAD instructor 
A02 CRN 21719 TWF 11:30 am - 12:20 pm, CLE A311, Matthew Pollard


Introduction for students with no previous knowledge of German. Facilitates learning and retention of vocabulary, effective communication in everyday interaction and the use of fundamental structures of grammar. Acquisition of a basic understanding of German and ability to read, write, speak and comprehend German at the beginner’s level. Provides an introduction to the culture of German-speaking countries.

Note: Credit will be granted for only one of 101, GER 100, 100A.

GMST 102 Beginning German II

January:
A01 CRN 21720 TWF 9:30  - 10:20 am,  Cor A128, Matthew Pollard
A02 CRN 21721 TWF 10:30 - 11:20 am, CLE A205, Peter Gölz
A03 CRN 21722 TWF 12:30 - 13:20 pm, CLE A 211, Matthew Pollard

GMST 102 is a continuation of GMST 101 and will cover the second half of the textbook Menschen. Facilitates further learning and retention of vocabulary, effective communication in everyday interaction and the use of fundamental structures of grammar. Acquisition of a basic understanding of German and ability to read, write, speak and comprehend German at the advanced beginner’s level. The culture of German-speaking countries will be explored further using authentic texts. Successful completion of this course would place students approximately at the A1 level of proficiency according to the European Language Reference Framework.

 

GMST 180 Myths, Fairy Tales and Fantasy Fiction 

January:

A01 CRN 21723 T 4:30-7:20 pm, ELL 167,  Elena Pnevmonidou

An introductory survey of Germanic mythology, Medieval heroic epics, Romantic gothic tales, the fairy tales of the Brothers Grimm and contemporary fantasy fiction and their adaptations in opera and film. Topics include the heroic quest, the fantastic and sorcery, and witches. Emphasis on the mythical narrative structure and on the cultural significance of specific myths and tales.

GMST 202  Intermediate German II

January:

A01 CRN 21724 TWF 11:30 am - 12:20 pm, CLE C115, Janine Wulz, PhD candidate.

As a direct continuation of GMST 201, the course builds on previous knowledge to explore and practice more complex grammatical features and vocabulary, and how to use them in sentences and texts; students will also learn about further aspects of German-speaking culture, while also encouraging students to acquire an understanding of German that enables reading, writing, speaking, and comprehension of German at the advanced intermediate level. Successful completion of this course would place students approximately at the A2 level of the European Language Reference Framework.

 

GMST  300  Germanic Cultural Studies

January:
 
A01 CRN 21725 TWF 10:30 - 11:20 pm, CLE C111, Elena Pnevmonidou

Provides case studies in the cultural history of German-speaking countries in which students analyze texts, films, media, as well as visual and material objects and spaces from a variety of approaches and perspectives.

GMST 302 Advanced German II

January:
A01 CRN 21726 MTh 11:30 am - 12:50 pm, CLE D130, Franziska Uhl, DAAD instructor 

Uses an intercultural approach to learn more complex semantic structures. Emphasizes the use of synonyms, idioms, phrases, and dialects and using them effectively in written and oral texts. Exploration of differences and cultural diversities in German-speaking regions and countries.

GMST 350 A Short History of German Film

January:
A01 CRN 21727 TWF 12:30 pm - 1:20 pm, CLE A307, Peter Gölz

An overview of German film-making from the early days of expressionism up to the New German Cinema. Films may include: The Cabinet of Dr. Caligari, Metropolis, M, The Murderers Are Among Us, Ali: Fear Eats the Soul.

GMST 402 Film (in German)

January
A01 CRN 23876 M 4:30-7:20pm, CLE A207, Franziska Uhl

This course will explore the role of recent German-speaking film and television series in addressing social, political and cultural issues and how historical events as well as current topics are represented in cinematic media. All four language skills are developed and practiced so that students can effectively discuss and analyze examples of various cinematic genres in German.

Open to students with previous credit in GMST 402 (with the instructor's permission), as this year's content will be different from previous versions. Taught in German.

GMST 410  X GMST 581 Topics in Holocaust Studies: Holocaust in Cultural Contexts

January:
A01 CRN 23825 x 21731 Mondays, 12:30 - 3:20 pm, CLE D261 Charlotte Schallie

GMST 499 Honours Thesis

January:
A01 CRN 21729
The honours thesis provides you with the enriching opportunity to work one-on-one with your faculty supervisor, to explore in detail a topic of your choice, and to write a thesis of approximately 7,500 words which is the capstone of your learning experience. If you are interested, please contact our Honours Advisor, Charlotte Schallie.