Post-doctoral fellows

Prospective post-doctoral fellows: Are you interested in doing post-doctoral research with one of our faculty? If you have recently completed or are near completion of a PhD, you may want to contact UVic faculty members to discuss your interests and see if they have any PDF positions available through their grant funding.
Information for prospective post-doctoral fellows at UVic.


DMSC Post-docs   


(Christie Lab)

I am currently investigating the effects of adiponectin, an adipocyte-derived hormone that has a role in the regulation of synaptic transmission and hippocampal plasticity. The focus of my research is to elucidate whether this protein can minimize the deficits in synaptic plasticity that occur in the hippocampus of Fmr1 KO mice, a genetic model of Fragile X Syndrome. The results of this study may stimulate new therapeutic strategies for the treatment of this neurodevelopmental disorder.

ResearchGate

(Brown Lab)

 ResearchGate

(Christie Lab)

The prenatal and early developmental environment is vulnerable to damage from environmental influences and exposure to teratogens in the form of substances of abuse like alcohol and cannabis. I study how these most commonly consumed compounds affect offspring throughout the lifespan and have a particular interest in how males and females are differentially affected through early development, puberty and adulthood. Using a host of techniques I examine learning and memory processes in the teratogen-exposed brain with a goal of identifying therapeutic targets and windows for treatment. 

 

Simona Frederiksen

(Swayne Lab)

Explaining the complexity underlying development of disease phenotypes and the effect of genetic and environmental factors, including their interactions, are my core motivating interests. I have to date focused on characterizing a number of complex diseases and disorders including obesity, hypertension and primary headache. My training in quantitative genetics and genomics, combined with the use of a variety of animal models and bioinformatical approaches, has been instrumental in my ability to identify genetic variants and haplotypes that help to explain individual variation in various diseases states. In addition, my PhD thesis, identified a wide range of potential confounders (e.g. aura, blood specimen) that potentially distort the identification of valid biomarkers in migraine and cluster headache. By using immunohistochemistry, we also mapped neurotransmitters and headache targets within the rat and human and identified potential sites of action of anti-headache drugs. As a Postdoc in Swayne lab, my focus now shifts to identify proteomic changes (e.g. protein-protein interactions) during neurodevelopment and neurodegeneration. We aim to relate our findings to the human diseases and disorders and thus increase our understanding of pathological processes and potential therapeutic targets.

ResearchGate

(Caruncho Lab)

 

(Brown Lab)

My primary interest is to study how diabetes alters the neurological function. Recently, increased prevalence of neurodegenerative diseases have been reported in patients suffering from Type 2 diabetes. However, the underlying mechanisms of association between these conditions are still elusive. During my doctorate, I explored the possible involvement of epigenetic modifications in diabetes induced neurodegeneration. We reported that dysregulation of epigenetic pathways leads to cognitive deficit and amyloid-β accumulation in hippocampus of mice. We also examined the therapeutic potential of histone deacetylases inhibitors, during these co-morbid conditions. As a Post doc in the Brown lab, I will be studying how diabetes affects the rates of capillary obstruction and/or pruning. Further, we will focus to elucidate mechanistic understanding of how obstructions are cleared. This could be used in a therapeutic manner to preserve brain micro-circulation and function throughout the lifespan. 

(Swayne Lab)

 I am interested in the structural and functional development of neurons and changes occurring at synapses in various brain disorders. As a postdoc in the Swayne Lab, I am currently investigating the cell biology of Pannexin 1 (PanX1) ion channels. These channels form doorways in the cell membrane and have been implicated in neurological pathologies such as stroke. My major focus is to investigate the role of PanX1 in plasticity during development and after a stroke. This study may provide the base for novel therapeutics in brain disorders.

(Christie Lab)

I have an intense fascination with the way in which neurons alter their molecular structure and function in response to acquired brain injury, and how pharmacological or behavioural interventions can promote rehabilitation. My previous research focused on the identity of mechanisms that allow single session aerobic exercise to affect learning processes. Specifically, I assessed the biochemical signature that results from a single event of aerobic exercise in order to prime regions of brain to be more receptive of current therapeutics. My current research explores the role repeated mild head injuries (concussion) has on precipitating Chronic Traumatic Encephalopathy (CTE), an Alzheimer’s-like disease. More importantly, my work aims to reveal the underlying biochemical correlates that result from these injuries, with the expectation of progressing the field through identification of novel prognostic markers and potential treatment vectors.

ResearchGate