European Studies

Welcome to the European Studies Program!

 

The European Studies (EUS) program takes an interdisciplinary approach to European integration. By coordinating the disciplines of politics, geography, history, culture, language, law, and economics, students achieve a unique understanding of European integration and its significance. Students in our program will hear from professors and experts in several fields and access opportunities to travel and study. European studies is a dynamic, unique, and highly flexible program that allows students to follow their interests and explore pressing issues from a new perspective. 

Connect with us and receive updates about our many opportunities:

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EUS Undergraduate Course Union Facebook 

Join our EUS Discussion Group

EUS 100 - Fall 2022

Introduction to European studies

The European Union consists of 27 European countries. The continent has a rich and varied history as the birthplace of many important ideologies, art forms, and political institutions.

This course gives a broad introduction to the wide range of topics explored by the European Studies Program, starting with a ‘Tour of Europe’. In class, we examine different European countries on their own, as well as in relation to each other and to the EU. In doing so, we focus on key issues and contemporary thinkers associated with the study of European integration. This is an interdisciplinary course, including the areas of politics, history, language, law, and economics. Some topics include the history of modern Europe, the debates and ideas behind the creation of the EU, and the cultural and political ramifications of ‘East-West’ legacies in Europe. The course also examines a number of current events and recent challenges facing the EU, to include the debt crisis, identity politics, and issues surrounding further political integration.

Taught by Dr. Valerie D'Erman

Read the 2020 EUS 100 course outline for more information.

Calendar Description

EUS 200 - Spring 2023

Introduction to European cultures and identities

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This course explores the evolving and interconnected cultural dialogues of European societies as they relate to one other and the world at large. The particular experiences and cultural innovations of each European society contributes a piece to a puzzle, which considered together paints a narrative of at times contrasting and at times complementary identities.

We will consider, for instance, how Ancient Greek ideas of democracy were enriched by Roman notions of cosmopolitanism, how Mediaeval European societies were enriched by interactions with Jewish, Muslim and Christian cultures on the Iberian Peninsula, and how European sciences arose in conjunction with artistic developments in Renaissance Italy. Throughout the course, issues such as religious intolerance, imperialism and colonialism are critically examined, as well as the collaborative endeavours that are at the root of the relative prosperity of Europe today.

 

Dr. Nina Belmonte will teach the course in Spring 2023. Read the course outline for more information. 

Calendar description 

EUS 300 - Spring 2023

European integration: Socio-economic and political development

EUS 300 is a critical, interdisciplinary introduction to the European Union and the European integration process, from above and from below. Looking at the EU from above, students will learn about the political, legal and economic institutions which drive integration, and how they are reshaping the current world order. Looking at integration from below, students will explore how residents, non-governmental organizations, and grassroots social movements are contesting this emerging world order through a range of contemporary political struggles.

This course is suitable for students from a wide variety of backgrounds. It requires no previous knowledge, and will be of particular interest to those seeking a critical, well-rounded overview of modern European governance and its implications. This course counts toward a Concentration or Minor in European Studies.     

EUS 300 is a participatory course which strives to put students in control of their own learning. The class is discussion based and topics will be chosen collectively by the students.    

Keith Cherry (Law) and Pablo Ouziel (CFGS fellow) will team-teach this course along with guest speakers. Read the course outline for more information.


Calendar description

EUS 400 - Fall 2022

The European Legacy

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Course Description

You use the term “Western culture,” but do you know what that really means? What are its defining values and where did they come from? In this interdisciplinary seminar course, you will explore the roots of western culture in the narratives of shared values that accompanied the historical emergence of something called “Europe”, and identify the legacy of these narratives in some of the most pressing issues of our times.

Our inquiry will revolve around four mutually implicit, double-edged themes:

1) faith/tolerance; 2) the value of the individual; 3) cosmopolitanism; 4) knowledge as universal truth. For each of these, we will examine historical sources and seek out its ongoing operation in current events. Weekly synchronous seminars and asynchronous online forums will provide an opportunity for you to share ideas, review readings and integrate course material toward a final term paper on a topic of your choice.

Intended Learning Outcomes

In this course you will gain a more complex, critical and historical understanding of the roots of western culture, the nature and source of its defining values and how they continue to operate in our present. You will be challenged to become more attentive readers, better writers, and more critical thinkers and cultural observers. You will have the opportunity to devote the semester to developing a research paper on a topic of your own choice, including developing an abstract and bibliography, and presenting your work to colleagues.

Taught by Dr. Nina Belmonte

2020 Course syllabus

Calendar description

EUS 390A/B - Summer

Directed studies in Europe I & II: EU Field School

EUS 390A/B is a directed studies course; this can either be the EU Field School, or a special project approved by the EUS Director. Every May, EUS 390A/B is offered as the EU Field School, which starts in Brussels, and takes students on a tour through the key sites of European Union institutions and civil society organisations. Students will engage with representatives of the EU’s administrative and political leadership, such as the European Commission, Parliament, Court of Justice, and Central Bank, along with other European organizations such as NATO, the European Court of Human Rights, and the Canadian Mission to the EU. The Tour is not simply an accredited course, it is a full immersion into European history, culture, and political formation, a program for self-directed and independent study.through various important EU institutions, and gives students an opportunity to have “face to face” contact and dialogue with presenters and seminar leaders from the ranks of those actively involved in the day to day work of the EU. Students will also meet with representatives of other European institutions, diplomatic representations to the EU (including Canada), policy think tanks, and civil society organizations. 

Read the EUS 390A (1.5 credit) course outline or the EUS 390B (0.0 credit) course outline for more information.

Calendar descriptions

EUS 495 Directed Experiential Learning

Individual examination of analytical issues in European Studies in relation to work, internship, volunteer activities, or other pre-approved activities under the guidance of a faculty member. Student and instructor must have agreed on learning objectives and methods of assessment before experiential learning opportunity begins. Learning opportunity must be distinct from any previous or concurrent Co-op work-term placements. Must involve a minimum of 200 hours of the activity per 1.5 units of credit.

*Credit for EUS 495 may be applied to West Coast Model EU

EUS 490 Special Topics in European Studies

Directed reading and/or a research project in European Studies under the supervision of a Faculty Member.

1.5 Units

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With the support of the Erasmus+ programme of the European Unionimage

Learn about us

EUS 100 - Fall 2022

Introduction to European studies

The European Union consists of 27 European countries. The continent has a rich and varied history as the birthplace of many important ideologies, art forms, and political institutions.

This course gives a broad introduction to the wide range of topics explored by the European Studies Program, starting with a ‘Tour of Europe’. In class, we examine different European countries on their own, as well as in relation to each other and to the EU. In doing so, we focus on key issues and contemporary thinkers associated with the study of European integration. This is an interdisciplinary course, including the areas of politics, history, language, law, and economics. Some topics include the history of modern Europe, the debates and ideas behind the creation of the EU, and the cultural and political ramifications of ‘East-West’ legacies in Europe. The course also examines a number of current events and recent challenges facing the EU, to include the debt crisis, identity politics, and issues surrounding further political integration.

Taught by Dr. Valerie D'Erman

Read the 2020 EUS 100 course outline for more information.

Calendar Description

EUS 200 - Spring 2023

Introduction to European cultures and identities

image

This course explores the evolving and interconnected cultural dialogues of European societies as they relate to one other and the world at large. The particular experiences and cultural innovations of each European society contributes a piece to a puzzle, which considered together paints a narrative of at times contrasting and at times complementary identities.

We will consider, for instance, how Ancient Greek ideas of democracy were enriched by Roman notions of cosmopolitanism, how Mediaeval European societies were enriched by interactions with Jewish, Muslim and Christian cultures on the Iberian Peninsula, and how European sciences arose in conjunction with artistic developments in Renaissance Italy. Throughout the course, issues such as religious intolerance, imperialism and colonialism are critically examined, as well as the collaborative endeavours that are at the root of the relative prosperity of Europe today.

 

Dr. Nina Belmonte will teach the course in Spring 2023. Read the course outline for more information. 

Calendar description 

EUS 300 - Spring 2023

European integration: Socio-economic and political development

EUS 300 is a critical, interdisciplinary introduction to the European Union and the European integration process, from above and from below. Looking at the EU from above, students will learn about the political, legal and economic institutions which drive integration, and how they are reshaping the current world order. Looking at integration from below, students will explore how residents, non-governmental organizations, and grassroots social movements are contesting this emerging world order through a range of contemporary political struggles.

This course is suitable for students from a wide variety of backgrounds. It requires no previous knowledge, and will be of particular interest to those seeking a critical, well-rounded overview of modern European governance and its implications. This course counts toward a Concentration or Minor in European Studies.     

EUS 300 is a participatory course which strives to put students in control of their own learning. The class is discussion based and topics will be chosen collectively by the students.    

Keith Cherry (Law) and Pablo Ouziel (CFGS fellow) will team-teach this course along with guest speakers. Read the course outline for more information.


Calendar description

EUS 400 - Fall 2022

The European Legacy

image 

Course Description

You use the term “Western culture,” but do you know what that really means? What are its defining values and where did they come from? In this interdisciplinary seminar course, you will explore the roots of western culture in the narratives of shared values that accompanied the historical emergence of something called “Europe”, and identify the legacy of these narratives in some of the most pressing issues of our times.

Our inquiry will revolve around four mutually implicit, double-edged themes:

1) faith/tolerance; 2) the value of the individual; 3) cosmopolitanism; 4) knowledge as universal truth. For each of these, we will examine historical sources and seek out its ongoing operation in current events. Weekly synchronous seminars and asynchronous online forums will provide an opportunity for you to share ideas, review readings and integrate course material toward a final term paper on a topic of your choice.

Intended Learning Outcomes

In this course you will gain a more complex, critical and historical understanding of the roots of western culture, the nature and source of its defining values and how they continue to operate in our present. You will be challenged to become more attentive readers, better writers, and more critical thinkers and cultural observers. You will have the opportunity to devote the semester to developing a research paper on a topic of your own choice, including developing an abstract and bibliography, and presenting your work to colleagues.

Taught by Dr. Nina Belmonte

2020 Course syllabus

Calendar description

EUS 390A/B - Summer

Directed studies in Europe I & II: EU Field School

EUS 390A/B is a directed studies course; this can either be the EU Field School, or a special project approved by the EUS Director. Every May, EUS 390A/B is offered as the EU Field School, which starts in Brussels, and takes students on a tour through the key sites of European Union institutions and civil society organisations. Students will engage with representatives of the EU’s administrative and political leadership, such as the European Commission, Parliament, Court of Justice, and Central Bank, along with other European organizations such as NATO, the European Court of Human Rights, and the Canadian Mission to the EU. The Tour is not simply an accredited course, it is a full immersion into European history, culture, and political formation, a program for self-directed and independent study.through various important EU institutions, and gives students an opportunity to have “face to face” contact and dialogue with presenters and seminar leaders from the ranks of those actively involved in the day to day work of the EU. Students will also meet with representatives of other European institutions, diplomatic representations to the EU (including Canada), policy think tanks, and civil society organizations. 

Read the EUS 390A (1.5 credit) course outline or the EUS 390B (0.0 credit) course outline for more information.

Calendar descriptions

EUS 495 Directed Experiential Learning

Individual examination of analytical issues in European Studies in relation to work, internship, volunteer activities, or other pre-approved activities under the guidance of a faculty member. Student and instructor must have agreed on learning objectives and methods of assessment before experiential learning opportunity begins. Learning opportunity must be distinct from any previous or concurrent Co-op work-term placements. Must involve a minimum of 200 hours of the activity per 1.5 units of credit.

*Credit for EUS 495 may be applied to West Coast Model EU

EUS 490 Special Topics in European Studies

Directed reading and/or a research project in European Studies under the supervision of a Faculty Member.

1.5 Units