Global Talks

 

One of the central objectives of the Centre for Global Studies is the creation of a community of scholars and of scholarship. “Global Talks” are weekly discussions/presentations set aside where we are able to listen to presentations from researchers within CFGS, the university more broadly, and also invited guest speakers. Essentially, this is our dedicated time that we can get together to learn from each other and the broader scholarly community in a shared space.  

These take place weekly on Wednesdays from 10:30-noon. Usually we have presenters speak for 45 minutes and then have a round table discussion for the remaining time.

 

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In an effort to continue providing an enriching environment where our members can share ideas and insights, while fostering a sense of community, the CFGS administrative team decided this April to resume our regular Global Talk series using a virutal platform. 

All Global Talk recordings are available in the archive section of this page. We have also highlighted our Signature Series presentations, as well as a collection of speakers who have addressed issues pertaining to the COVID-19 pandemic.

For the presentations that are uploaded to our youtube page, the video is embedded directly on our site. However, there a number of presentations that are linked through the Blackboard virtual platform. For these we recommend using Google Chrome to view. 

If you have any issues accessing the recordings, please contact the CFGS Events & Administrative Assistant, Stephanie Gruhlke, at cfgs@uvic.ca

March 2022 Signature Series

"The Russian Aggression against Ukraine: Contextualizing the Unthinkable"

CFGS Fellow Serhy Yekelchyk gave a compelling Global Talk exploring and contextualizing the ongoing crisis in Ukraine. He touched on various aspects of Russian and Ukrainian history that underpin Putin's recent aggression, explaining the complicated web of forces in play.

The Centre is fortunate to have such an expert as Serhy on site to help make sense of the troubling news coming from Ukraine.


January 2022 Signatures Series

"Project Showcase"

The fourth annual CFGS Project Showcase took place on January 12th. During the talk, representatives from each of our projects presented on their main research focus, current activities, upcoming opportunities, and future goals. At the end there was an extended discussion period.


December 2021 Signatures Series

"The governance of 'vulnerable' migrants - who decides?"

Legal and policy instruments at the global and European level increasingly emphasize the need to address the specific needs of vulnerable migrants. But what does it mean to be vulnerable?

This talk is part of a larger, three-year, international research project (VULNER) funded by SSHRC, the FRQSC and the EU’s Horizon 2020 program. The aim of the VULNER project is to investigate this question through field research in Europe (Belgium, Germany, Italy, and Norway), Africa (Uganda and South Africa), the Middle East (Lebanon), and North America (Canada).

Currently, there is no solid understanding of the concrete meanings, practical consequences, and legal implications of “vulnerability”. Meeting this research gap becomes even more crucial when it is recognized that every migrant is vulnerable to some extent, according to the context, their resources, and intersecting social identities, such as ethnicity, gender, age, and nationality. Without empirical data and analyses that provide a clear and non-stereotyped understanding and conceptualization of the vulnerabilities that are actually lived and experienced by migrants, such policy choices run the risk of failing to address some vulnerabilities, exacerbating existing vulnerabilities, or even producing new ones.

The talk will present some of our early, Canadian findings. It will contrast the way that vulnerability is currently employed throughout Canada’s refugee resettlement program with that of Canada’s inland asylum determinations.


June 2021 Signature Series 

"Cuba: Living Between Hurricanes ~ Film Screening & Discussion"

Cuba: Living Between Hurricanes is a film about the elements – hurricanes and rain, the sea and the earth. The story is told against the background of the Cuban Revolution, but the rule of the communist state is only the latest stage in the history of an island that has always suffered extreme weather events, of which hurricanes are only the most dramatic. As Cuba’s President, Miguel Díaz-Canel, told a meeting of Caribbean countries in Managua in 2019: “Living between hurricanes has conditioned our lives; it has modified our geographies and spurred our migrations. And it has also educated us in the need to further study the phenomena that await us and work to reverse their damage.” Cuba: Living Between Hurricanes takes a step in that direction. This event will begin with a screening of the film, followed by a discussion with Michael Chanan (Director and Editor) and Jean Stubbs (Producer and Writer).


May 2021 Signature Series

"The State of Global Democracy After Biden's First 100 Days"

While much is left to be seen regarding the long-term effects and legacy of the Trump Administration, Trump’s presidency brought to the surface a number of political issues within American society that challenge the state of democracy - political polarization, economic and social inequality, and right-wing populism, nationalism, “conspirituality”, and extremism. However, these issues are by no means limited to the American context. Over the last decade, we have seen the rise of right-wing, anti-immigrant forces throughout Europe, and ethnonationalism, polarization, and corruption challenging the resiliency of democracies in Asia.

President Biden ran on a platform of healing the divides in America, and restoring American leadership internationally. In his first foreign policy speech as President, he announced that, “America is back. Diplomacy is back at the center of our foreign policy” and he outlined his plans to “course-correct [American] foreign policy and better unite [American] democratic values with [their] diplomatic leadership.” He spoke of rebuilding democractic alliances, addressing the military coup in Myanmar, and challenging China’s economic and human rights abuses. The purpose of this event is to look back on the first 100-Days of the Biden administration and, in recognition of the urgency at which these issues must be addressed, discuss what has been done and what challenges the Biden administration faces going forward.


March 2021 Signature Series

"Creating Spaces of Engagement: Policy Justice and the Practical Craft of Deliberative Democracy"

On March 3rd, 2021 we welcome Dr. Sarah Marie Wiebe (School of Public Administration, University of Victoria) for a Signature Series Global Talk on her recently co-edited book with Dr. Leah Levac ‘Creating Spaces of Engagement: Policy Justice and the Practical Craft of Deliberative Democracy’. Sarah discussed the guiding framework of “policy justice” and its application to the theory and practice of public engagement and drew upon specific local and global examples from the collection. She also elaborated upon some of the contributions of her chapter ‘Storytelling as Engagement: Learning from Youth Voices in Attawapiskat’, which speaks to a mixed media storytelling methodology to advance create approaches to community-engaged scholarship for social and environmental justice.


December 2020 Signature Series

"Beyond Shanghai: The Modern Chinese Artist in Paris"

On December 2nd, 2020 we welcomed CFGS Faculty Fellow Angie Chau for a CFGS Signature Series Global Talk presentation, 'Beyond Shanghai: The Modern Chinese Artist in Paris'. Her presentation conceptualised the art of transposition as a creative strategy that views artistic difference as its desired end result, foregrounding why and how writers and artists were compelled to adapt, borrow, and incorporate iconic markers of Chinese cultural identity. As an alternative to translation studies, transposition can better account for the fluid movement of texts and images among media, linguistic, and national modes. Viewing literature and art through the lens of transposition uncovers what remained recognisable overseas and also what was transformed in this context, showing how cultural difference was circulated and promoted to challenge existing notions about modern Chinese art to a global audience.


November 2020 Signature Series

"Exploring the Interdisciplinarity of Remembrance: The Relationship between Tourism and Sites of War Memory"

On November 4th, 2020 we welcome Dr. Geoffrey Bird to present as part of our Global Talk Signature Series. Travelling to a battlefield, concentration camp, or cemetery can be a powerful personal experience. But tourism is also a front line in the politics of memory, myth, and legend along with what is silenced and forgotten. His presentation explored what has been happening at sites of war memory around the world, including Canada. Drawing on the work of the War Heritage Research Initiative and other sources, this discussion also explored how and what kind of inter- and intradisciplinary topics and approaches can deepen our understanding of the significance and role that war memory and remembrance play in shaping how we are as individuals, as a culture, and as a nation.


October 2020 Signature Series

"Our Two Far Norths: Environmental, Indigenous, Identity, and Security Challenges in Canada and Russia's Arcticsa's Arctics"

On Wednesday October 7th CFGS Faculty Fellow Megan Swift presented some of her research on Canada-Russia Arctic relations highlighting the Arctic as a trans-national area that is uniquely capable of moving Canada-Russia relations forward. Canada and Russia are two major stakeholders for decisions of global significance on the circumpolar Arctic. These decisions include changing national boundaries as polar ice melts, ownership of strategic shipping lanes, the presence of nuclear submarines, ecological preservation through the declaration of national parks and other designated areas, indigenous territorial and language rights, changed patterns of migration and impacts to traditional ways of life. All of these themes are important not just for the Arctic regions themselves, but for Canadian and Russian national self-imagination, since both cultural identities are strongly tied to a geographical and imaginary North and far North. 


June 2020 Signature Series 

""Boomerangst": Affording an Aging Population and Long Term Care" with Michael C. Wolfson 

On June 3rd, CFGS welcomed Dr. Michael C. Wolfson for a Signature Series Global Talk to discuss how the COVID crisis has sparked a new found urgency in addressing the challenges associated with long-term care. With baby boomers aging, the cost of long-term care is set to triple in the next 30 years. What’s our plan for dealing with this? We’ve known for decades that the boomer generation and Canadian demographic changes are coming. Sadly, in recent months this crisis has come to the forefront as the majority of deaths from COVID-19 have occurred in long term care facilities. Join Dr. Michael Wolfson to examine this urgency and how addressing the long-term care challenge must now more than ever be a national priority.


May 2020 Signature Series

"Israel’s Borders - As Yet Unfinished Business" with David Newman

On May 6th Dr. David Newman joined us virtually from Ben-Gurion University of the Negev to examine the changing dynamics of Israel's borders, with a particular focus on Israel, the West Bank, and a future Palestinian State. Borders between Israel and her neighbours remain fragile, at the best, and undemarcated at the worst. Out of Israels’ five borders, only two (with Egypt and Jordan) have de jure international status, two (with Lebanon and Syria) remain to be finally agreed and demarcated, while a potential fifth border (with a future Palestinian State) remains undetermined as to whether it will eventually emerge.The traditional mantra of returning to the 1967 Green Line has largely been obliterated by Israeli de facto annexation and mass settlement activity (now numbering 500,000 settlers ). The recent Trump Peace Deal (the so called deal of the century) has attempted to change the ground rules for border demarcation by accepting Israel’s right to formally annex most of the settlements, enable land / territorial exchanges between the two sides, but still leaving any future Palestinian State with far less  territory than that of the  West Bank.

This presentation examines the changing dynamics of Israel’s borders, with a particular focus on Israel, the West bank and a future Palestinian State.

The COVID-19 Pandemic: Challenges & Insights One-Year On with Dr. Mitchell Hammond, Dr. Robert Huish, and Dr. Dzifa Dordunoo

It has been a year since the World Health Organisation declared the COVID-19 virus the cause of a worldwide pandemic. On March 17th, 2021 we welcomed Dr. Mitchell Hammond (University of Victoria), Dr. Robert Huish (Dalhousie University), and Dr. Dzifa Dordunoo (University of Victoria) for a discussion on how our world has changed over the past year. Speakers discussed the tensions that have emerged as individuals and nations considered their interests and obligations at various levels of society. Discussion focused on how the COVID-19 pandemic has highlighted issues of public shaming, pandemic stigma, and scientific racism.


The COVID Pandemic and the Climate Emergency: Lessons in Governance with Jon O'Riordan

This presentation covers the following three topics: "What are the elements of good governance for managing emergencies?"; "How fit for purpose are current levels of government?"  and "What creative solutions in governance are required to tackle the climate emergency?". The conclusions are that none of the current forms of governance can avert a climate emergency. The creative solutions involve some form of polycentric governance as the issues are global in scale; a shift to ecological citizenship and substantive citizen engagement and education.


"Intergenerational Collaboration and Interspecies Coexistence:  Youth climate activism amid the COVID crisis" with Katia and Kelly Bannister

COVID-19 has put an end to the organizing of youth climate activists in the streets, but youth are continuing to fight for climate justice. Since social isolation requirements were put in place, youth have been climate striking digitally every week on Fridays. Despite the COVID crisis, the climate remains in peril so continuing to draw attention to the climate crisis is crucial. And the root cause of the current pandemic is more climate-related than one might think. But the dramatic response to the COVID-19 pandemic is in stark contrast to the lack of effective action on climate change, despite a number of similarities between the two threats. The visceral and immediate feelings that COVID-19 can trigger in the general public are not that different from the ones many youth activists feel about climate change–and a future earth that is inhospitable to humans within their lifetime. The time for climate action remains now and intergenerational collaboration is key.


"Solidarity in the Time of Corona: Why Cuban Medical Internationalism Matters for 21st Century Global Health" with Robert Huish

On April 29th, CFGS Visiting Fellow Robert Huish spoke about Cuba's medical internationalism, which is of exponential importance especially in times of corona. 

In Cuba, it has been normal practice for decades to send health workers to various countries around the world to assist in emergencies. The well-being of the population is seen as the most important task of the state. Dr. Huish emphasized that benefits are generated there through cooperation and solidarity, and that it is therefore of enormous advantage to take Cuba as an example and model to follow and understand our options in uncertain times.


"COVID-19 and Borders: North American Borders, Trust, and the Coronavirus" with Emmanuel Brunet-Jailly and Elisabeth Vallet 

On April 15th, Dr. Emmanuel Brunet-Jailly and Dr. Elisabeth Vallet offered a special joint presentation on the effects of COVID-19 on borders and boundary lines.

Dr. Brunet-Jailly began by exploring the various policy options that have been implemented around the world and discussed why international boundary lines are not the best place to implement health policies to control the spread of COVID-19. Then, Dr. Vallet continued the discussion on how, globally, states have reacted to COVID-19 by closing borders, and how public policies have been urgently defined at boy local and national levels. Arguing that the outcomes of the global health crisis rests on the notion of trust (or lack of trust) at the heart of the relationships not only between those who govern and those who are governed but also between states. 


"Stock Market Swings & the Economic Outlook in the Era of COVID-19 - Part 1 & Part 2with Michael R. King and Chris Lawless

Concerned about the wild gyrations in global stock markets over the past three weeks? Wondering what the impact of COVID-19 will be on the economy? Or curious about the impact of government policy measures and how investors may be addressing these challenges? Prof. Michael R. King and Chris Lawless, Executive-in-Residence and former Chief Economist at BCI, discuss historical precedents that provide insights for today's events. 

The first portion of the presentation reviewed the timeline of events and market reactions to date, while the second portion focused attention on the economic outlook and implications.

The Russian Aggression against Ukraine: Contextualizing the Unthinkable with Serhy Yekelchyk



CFGS Fellow Serhy Yekelchyk gave a compelling Global Talk exploring and contextualizing the ongoing crisis in Ukraine. He touched on various aspects of Russian and Ukrainian history that underpin Putin's recent aggression, explaining the complicated web of forces in play. The Centre is fortunate to have such an expert as Serhy on site to help make sense of the troubling news coming from Ukraine.


Radical Women? Exploring the Gender Gap in Nordic Radical Right Politics with Maria Finnsdottir 



The European radical right, a family of political parties characterized by antiestablishment populism and anti-immigrant xenophobia, has seen renewed electoral success over recent decades. The Nordic nations are no exception to this trend. Denmark, Finland, Norway and Sweden all have thriving and successful radical right political parties. Despite the resurgence of these politics in Nordic countries, women have been slow to turn to radical right politics, lagging behind their male counterparts both as voters and politicians. This has remained the case even as the Nordic radical right has elevated women leaders – namely Pia Kjærsgaard and Siv Jensen – and has appropriated discourses of women’s rights and gender equality. This gender imbalance in both the party and the base raises important questions about the gender gap in radical right voting, the characteristic of women voters, and the position of women politicians within the party. In response, my research examines the gendered differences underlying the gender gap in voting, as well as the gendered inequalities present within the parties.


Disaggregated Borders & the Global Erosion of the Right of Asylum: Research in Progress with Julianna Nielsen 

How does the changing nature of borders—shifting where and how boundaries are exercised by states and experienced by people on the move – interact with the right and practice of seeking asylum under the 1951 Refugee Convention and, in particular, its 31st Article? Walls, fences, deportations, and detentions have become flashpoints in academic and popular condemnations of the inhumane and violent means through which states exercise borders and manage mobilities. Although there remains much to be said about the very real human impacts of what Wendy Brown (2010) described as the theatrics of national security, stability, and sovereignty, manifest in the global proliferation of wall-building projects, the intent of this talk is the examine the theoretical and the human consequences of quiet administrative and technical strategies of border and migration governance. Reflecting on her early stages of research, this discussion explores some of the methodological questions and debates shaping contemporary approaches to understanding (and critiquing) contemporary border practices which increasingly challenge the application and spirit of the Refugee Convention.


The Birth of a Ridiculous Mouse: U.S. Citizen Diplomacy in the Creation of American Democracy Abroad with Katrina Ponti



This discussion explores a framework of strategies used by U.S. citizens abroad the expand the nation’s definition of democracy after the Revolution. This perpetuated a more nuanced, ad hoc foreign policy that included global pushes for economic and public relations that helped pave the way for the long-term security of American democracy in a world of aristocratic empires.


The governance of ‘vulnerable’ migrants - who decides? with Dagmar Soennecken



Legal and policy instruments at the global and European level increasingly emphasize the need to address the specific needs of vulnerable migrants. But what does it mean to be vulnerable?

This talk is part of a larger, three-year, international research project (VULNER) funded by SSHRC, the FRQSC and the EU’s Horizon 2020 program. The aim of the VULNER project is to investigate this question through field research in Europe (Belgium, Germany, Italy, and Norway), Africa (Uganda and South Africa), the Middle East (Lebanon), and North America (Canada).

The talk will present some of our early, Canadian findings. It will contrast the way that vulnerability is currently employed throughout Canada’s refugee resettlement program with that of Canada’s inland asylum determinations.


Reimagining international law(s): Part 1 with Natalie Oman   



This talk is part of a larger project that aims to make the classical sources of international law "do new work in the present." This project reinterprets these sources – which include treaties, customary international law, and general principles – from within the dominant occidental paradigm of international law, in order to reveal and challenge the foundational assumptions of an exclusionary system of international law built upon the non-recognition of Indigenous and other non-state peoples.

In part of a two-part series of Global Talks, Natalie Oman examines a historically-neglected class of general principles that, unlike other established sources of international law, does not originate in the juris generative authority of states. General principles of this class include human rights and human rights protection norms such as sustainable development, the principles of prevention and precaution, and the right to a healthy environment. The democratizing and inclusionary potential of this source of international law will be the focus of this presentation.


The effects of multi-level structures on the fulfilment of international environmental commitments. A comparative study of Canada, the European Union and beyond with Johannes Müller Gómez 



Why do France and Australia perform better in implementing the Ramsar Convention on Wetlands than Germany and Switzerland? Why is the EU more on track to meet its Paris climate targets than Canada? Johannes' research project aims to advance our knowledge of a political system’s capability to fulfil its international environmental commitments by bringing comparative federalism into international compliance research. Multi-level structures, i.e. federalism and decentral governance, increase the number of veto players, fragment decision-making processes and significantly influence the incentive structures of political actors. Nevertheless, the literature has so far neglected these effects. Johannes' project shows that multi-level structures matter in the fulfilment of international commitments and can affect the process both positively and negatively.


Understanding and Improving Transboundary Water(shed) Governance with Ben Perrier 



The purpose of this Global Talk was to exchange on the current state of transboundary water governance between Canada and the United States, with a focus on the evolution of the Columbia River Treaty. It is also a question of asking ourselves about the challenges and evolution in progress as well as about the future prospects. The theoretical aspect is based on the distinction between international law and transnational law. The main argument is to stress that the legal approach to transnational law effectively complements the dimension of classical international relations. According to us, this legal transnationalism would strengthen the inter-local governance of transboundary watersheds in addition to the classical international relations. In doing so, these transnational relations are also a field of study of legal pluralism and of possible paradigm shifts between hierarchical national/international law and a more open and inclusive networked law. In a word, transnational relations are a type of subsidiarity in relation to international law. With regard to the process of modernization of the Columbia River Treaty, it is necessary to question the role and legal power of all political and legal entities concerned with the Columbia River, and in particular of authorities and legitimacies other than those of the federal states and the federated states. The Canada-U.S. border thus appears to be a privileged place to study critically the existence of international and transnational relationships for the benefit of the shared and balanced governance of complex ecosystems. The transnational governance of waters and transboundary basins may appear as one of the most promising ways to respond to ecosystemic logics and future challenges. 


The Global State of Democracy after Biden's First 100 Days with Amarnath Amarasingam, Chris Kilford and Carole Petersen 



CFGS partnered with the Centre for Asia-Pacific Initiatives and the Centre for Studies in Religion and Society to host a panel discussion reflecting on the global state of democracy after President Biden's first 100 days in office. From the rise of QAnon to the crisis in Hong Kong, Dr. Amarnath Amarasingam, Dr. Chris Kilford, and Dr. Carole Peterson discussed how issues of political polarisation, economic and social inequality, right-wing populism, national, 'conspirituality' and extremism all challenge the global state of democracy. By looking back on the first 100 days of the Biden administration and, in recognition of the urgency at which these issues must be addressed, panellists discussed what has already been done and what challenges the Biden administration faces going forward. This event was co-moderated by Dr. Paul Bramadat (Director, Centre for Studies in Religion and Society), Dr. Paul Ramraj (Director, Centre for Asia-Pacific Initiatives), and Dr. Oliver Schmidtke (Director, Centre for Global Studies).


How can participatory media raise citizen voice in international development contexts? with Tamara Plush 

In this talk, Dr. Plush presented her findings into how participatory media practice might sufficiently raise citizen voice when situated in international development contexts. The resulting knowledge and conceptual framework from her PhD aim to help PV practitioners—and those interested in applying community-based media approaches in development and research—navigate complex development environments that hold potential to either enable or diminish the voices of society’s most vulnerable citizens. The discussion focused on how participatory media practitioners can expand possibilities for practice to meaningfully support citizen voice in being heard, valued and influential.


A Configurational Approach to the Effectiveness of Organizational Responses to Plural and Complex Institutional Environments: Lessons from the Canadian Oil Pipeline Industry with Juan Francisco Chavez

On March 31st we welcome CFGS Graduate Student Fellow, Juan Francisco Chavez to present on his doctoral research. His study analyses the hearing transcripts of 35 oil pipeline projects reviewed by the National Energy Board of Canada between 1993 and 2018 to explore the casual complexity of the effectiveness of organisational responses to plural and complex institutional environments. The preliminary results of this study suggest that notions of plurality and complexity can and should be operationalized separately as they influence differently the higher or lower effectiveness of organisational responses. Likewise, he observes that the effectiveness of organisational responses to plural and complex institutional environments depends on the interplay of being responsive to stakeholders concerns while addressing these concerns with specialists rather than generalists.


The COVID-19 Pandemic: Challenges & Insights One-Year On with Dr. Mitchell Hammond, Dr. Robert Huish, and Dr. Dzifa Dordunoo

It has been a year since the World Health Organisation declared the COVID-19 virus the cause of a worldwide pandemic. On March 17th, 2021 we welcomed Dr. Mitchell Hammond (University of Victoria), Dr. Robert Huish (Dalhousie University), and Dr. Dzifa Dordunoo (University of Victoria) for a discussion on how our world has changed over the past year. Speakers discussed the tensions that have emerged as individuals and nations considered their interests and obligations at various levels of society. Discussion focused on how the COVID-19 pandemic has highlighted issues of public shaming, pandemic stigma, and scientific racism.


Sex Based Discrimination and the Indian Act: Time for Repatriations? with Éloïse Ouellet-Décoste

On March 10th we welcome Visiting Graduate Student Éloïse Ouellet-Décoste to present on her dissertation research. Éloïse's presentation discussed Canada’s obligation under international law to provide adequate, full and effective reparation for the historic and contemporary violations of Indigenous women’s rights in order to explore the scope and content of the right to reparation in the context of Settler colonialism.


Creating Spaces of Engagement: Policy Justice and the Practical Craft of Deliberative Democracy with Sarah Wiebe 

In this talk, Sarah discussed her recently co-edited book with Dr. Leah Levac ‘Creating Spaces of Engagement: Policy Justice and the Practical Craft of Deliberative Democracy’. She discussed the guiding framework of “policy justice” and its application to the theory and practice of public engagement and drew upon specific local and global examples from the collection. She also elaborated upon some of the contributions of her chapter ‘Storytelling as Engagement: Learning from Youth Voices in Attawapiskat’, which speaks to a mixed media storytelling methodology to advance create approaches to community-engaged scholarship for social and environmental justice.


"Reconciliation is Dead”: Pluralism, Populism and Protest in the Wet’suwet’en Conflict with CFGS Graduate Student Fellow Keith Cherry

For decades, Wet’suwet’en hereditary leaders have been asserting their jurisdiction over their lands and refusing consent for pipeline developments. In January 2019, Canadian police arrested 14 Wet’suwet’en members and forcibly opened their lands to pipeline construction. In response, the Wet’suwet’en called on their supporters to “Shut Down Canada”. Supporters responded with a nation-wide series of rail, port, and road blockades and occupations. The slogan of these protests became “reconciliation is dead”, signaling not just opposition to a pipeline, but rather a wholesale rejection of the current relationship between Indigenous peoples and the Canadian state. In this talk, Keith Cherry began to unpack some of the historical and ideological context of the Wet’suwet’en crisis and explored what it can tell us about pluralism, populism and the relationships between them.


"Guides of Water": Indigenous Hydro-Social Territories beyond Adaptation to Climate Change with CFGS Visiting Scholar Julian Yates

Julian's presentation focused on the role of kamayoq in contemporary water-related adaptation programs. Kamayoq are Quechua agents of animation and transformation in Peru’s Southern Andes. Their praxis pre-dates their role in the Inka state (1438-1533), as well as their contemporary roles in development and adaptation programing. In contemporary programs, kamayoq are regarded as community-based experts and educators in areas such as water and pastoral management. He addressed the implications of incorporating kamayoq knowledges, community relations, and hydro-pastoral practices into adaptation programming. His insights raise implications for our understanding of situated transformational processes (in environmental change), the co-production of knowledges in inter-cultural collective learning spaces, and a decolonial climate change politics.


Pursuit of the Unknown: Refugees in the Realm of ‘Crisis’ with CFGS Graduate Student Fellow Mehdi Hashemi

Over the past few years, the international community has faced several humanitarian crises resulting in recording high 74.70 million individuals seeking humanitarian protection within or outside of their home countries. While some refugee populations have been constructed as a refugee 'crisis' and have received international attention, other have not received a similar recognition. This crisis- versus non-crisis binary and its impact on refugee experiences and behaviours is at the forefront of Mehdi's research project: Does the international refugee crisis discourse impact individual refugees’ experiences and behaviours throughout their journeys? If so, what are the implications of such discourses? To answer this question, Mehdi is conducting a comparative case study of Syrian and Iranian refugees in the following six countries: Canada, the United States, England, Germany, Lebanon, and Turkey.


Exploring the Interdisciplinarity of Remembrance: The Relationship between Tourism and Sites of War Memory with Dr. Geoffrey Bird 

Travelling to a battlefield, concentration camp, or cemetery can be a powerful personal experience. But tourism is also a front line in the politics of memory, myth, and legend along with what is silenced and forgotten. This presentation explored what has been happening at sites of war memory around the world, including Canada. Drawing on the work of the War Heritage Research Initiative and other sources, this discussion also explored how and what kind of inter- and intradisciplinary topics and approaches can deepen our understanding of the significance and role that war memory and remembrance play in shaping how we are as individuals, as a culture, and as a nation.


1, 2, 3, Action! Inuit Youth Engagement on Climate Change using Participatory Video with CFGS Graduate Student Fellow Maeva Gauthier 

During this presentation, Maeva shared her journey of using participatory video to engage youth in Tuktoyaktuk, NWT, on a topic they chose: climate change. She focused on knowledge co-production and, guided by a team of partners, these youth interviewed community members and other youth on the topic with the goal of producing a 22-minute video.


Beyond Shanghai: The Modern Chinese Artist in Paris with CFGS Faculty Fellow Angie Chau

This presentation conceptualised the art of transposition as a creative strategy that views artistic difference as its desired end result, foregrounding why and how writers and artists were compelled to adapt, borrow, and incorporate iconic markers of Chinese cultural identity. As an alternative to translation studies, transposition can better account for the fluid movement of texts and images among media, linguistic, and national modes. Viewing literature and art through the lens of transposition uncovers what remained recognisable overseas and also what was transformed in this context, showing how cultural difference was circulated and promoted to challenge existing notions about modern Chinese art to a global audience.


The Contentious Politics of Mega Oil Sands Pipeline Projects with CFGS Visiting Graduate Student Amy Janzwood 

While the vast majority of oil pipeline projects in Canada have been successfully built, several mega oil sands projects within and passing through Canada have been cancelled or significantly delayed. In recent years, several proposed oil sands pipelines have received intense scrutiny from a variety of actors. However, scholars have not yet understood the linkages between social movements and the outcomes of pipeline projects. The presentation focuses on the causal influence of campaign coalitions against new mega oil sands pipelines using two in-depth cases studies - the Northern Gateway Pipelines (NGP) proposal and the Trans Mountain Expansion Project.


Our Two Far Norths: Environmental, Indigenous, Identity, and Security Challenges in Canada and Russia's Arcticsa's Arctics with CFGS Faculty Fellow Megan Swift

Canada and Russia are two major stakeholders for decisions of global significance on the circumpolar Arctic. These decisions include changing national boundaries as polar ice melts, ownership of strategic shipping lanes, the presence of nuclear submarines, ecological preservation through the declaration of national parks and other designated areas, indigenous territorial and language rights, changed patterns of migration and impacts to traditional ways of life. All of these themes are important not just for the Arctic regions themselves, but for Canadian and Russian national self-imagination, since both cultural identities are strongly tied to a geographical and imaginary North and far North.


Democracy and Community: Exploring a Conceptual Link in Light of the Populist Resugence with CFGS Director Oliver Schmidtke 

 A central force in propelling contemporary right-wing populist parties is their ability to offer a mobilizing and emotionally charged sense of community. A nationalist rhetoric and anti-immigrant sentiments are constitutive elements of right-wing populism. Manifestly, the plea of populists to re-establish the sovereign rights of the ‘people’ is not based on a democratic, participatory empowerment of the people in whose populist leaders claim to speak. Against the background of the populist surge in Western democracies, the presentation explored the link between democracy and community from a theoretical perspective arguing that the practice of democratic self-governance is indeed reliant on a substantial, functionally and procedurally pertinent sense of communal existence and shared collective identity.


Ethical Principles for Knowledge Sharing & Knowledge Coproduction with Elder Florence James, Ira Provost, Elmer Ghostkeeper, Karin Smith Fargey, Gleb Raygorodetsky, and Kelly Bannister

This co-presentation shared background information and highlighted some key elements of the new "Ethical Principles for Knowledge Sharing & Knowledge Coproduction" that are being developed as a tool to enable relationship-building and collaboration between western trained scientists and Indigenous communities. The Ethical Guidelines are comprised of nine interrelated principles that support the co-creation of ethical space for respectful cross-cultural knowledge exchanges while maintaining the integrity of the knowledge systems. 


"Boomerangst": Affording an Aging Population and Long Term Care with Michael C. Wolfson 

With baby boomers aging, the cost of long-term care is set to triple in the next 30 years. What’s our plan for dealing with this? We’ve known for decades that the boomer generation and Canadian demographic changes are coming. Sadly, in recent months this crisis has come to the forefront as the majority of deaths from COVID-19 have occurred in long term care facilities. Join Dr. Michael Wolfson to examine this urgency and how addressing the long-term care challenge must now more than ever be a national priority.


The COVID Pandemic and the Climate Emergency: Lessons in Governance with CFGS Associate Fellow Jon O'Riordan

This presentation covers the following three topics: "What are the elements of good governance for managing emergencies?"; "How fit for purpose are current levels of government?"  and "What creative solutions in governance are required to tackle the climate emergency?". The conclusions are that none of the current forms of governance can avert a climate emergency. The creative solutions involve some form of polycentric governance as the issues are global in scale; a shift to ecological citizenship and substantive citizen engagement and education.


Geoengineering: Scenarios of potential geopolitical threats and governance responses with CFGS Associate Fellow Edward A. (Ted) Parson

The potential of engineered responses to actively manipulate the global environment and partly offset risks from elevated greenhouse gases has been a disruptive force on the margins of climate-change policy debates for a decade, which has grown more salient due to continued delays in enacting serious emissions controls and the current pandemic.  A recent scenario exercise examined several possible forms of future geopolitical challenge from various actors’ pursuit of geoengineering deployment, and implications for near-term initiatives to develop international governance capacity.

Watch Edward A. (Ted) Parson's presentation here!


"Intergenerational Collaboration and Interspecies Coexistence:  Youth climate activism amid the COVID crisis" with Katia Bannister and POLIS Co-Director Kelly Bannister

COVID-19 has put an end to the organizing of youth climate activists in the streets, but youth are continuing to fight for climate justice. Since social isolation requirements were put in place, youth have been climate striking digitally every week on Fridays. Despite the COVID crisis, the climate remains in peril so continuing to draw attention to the climate crisis is crucial. And the root cause of the current pandemic is more climate-related than one might think. But the dramatic response to the COVID-19 pandemic is in stark contrast to the lack of effective action on climate change, despite a number of similarities between the two threats. The visceral and immediate feelings that COVID-19 can trigger in the general public are not that different from the ones many youth activists feel about climate change–and a future earth that is inhospitable to humans within their lifetime. The time for climate action remains now and intergenerational collaboration is key.


"Israel’s Borders - As Yet Unfinished Business" with David Newman

Borders between Israel and her neighbours remain fragile, at the best, and undemarcated at the worst. Out of Israels’ five borders, only two (with Egypt and Jordan) have de jure international status, two (with Lebanon and Syria) remain to be finally agreed and demarcated, while a potential fifth border (with a future Palestinian State) remains undetermined as to whether it will eventually emerge.The traditional mantra of returning to the 1967 Green Line has largely been obliterated by Israeli de facto annexation and mass settlement activity (now numbering 500,000 settlers ). The recent Trump Peace Deal (the so called deal of the century) has attempted to change the ground rules for border demarcation by accepting Israel’s right to formally annex most of the settlements, enable land / territorial exchanges between the two sides, but still leaving any future Palestinian State with far less  territory than that of the  West Bank.

This presentation examines the changing dynamics of Israel’s borders, with a particular focus on Israel, the West bank and a future Palestinian State.


"Solidarity in the Time of Corona: Why Cuban Medical Internationalism Matters for 21st Century Global Health" with CFGS Visiting Research Fellow Robert Huish

On April 29th, CFGS Visiting Fellow Robert Huish spoke about Cuba's medical internationalism, which is of exponential importance especially in times of corona. 

In Cuba, it has been normal practice for decades to send health workers to various countries around the world to assist in emergencies. The well-being of the population is seen as the most important task of the state. Dr. Huish emphasized that benefits are generated there through cooperation and solidarity, and that it is therefore of enormous advantage to take Cuba as an example and model to follow and understand our options in uncertain times.


"Emancipation Through the Participation of Civil Society in Contemporary Peace Building: A Case Study of Peacebuilding Efforts in Colombia"with CFGS Visiting Graduate Student David Romero Espitia 

On April 22nd, CFGS Graduate Student David Romero Espitia presented his Global Talk all the way from Columbia! In this talk David argued that a new peacebuilding framework, one that reconsiders the terms of engagement between international, national and local actors is needed in order to foster effective peacebuilding efforts in contested transitional states. To support his argument, David used Columbia as a case study where he says a liberal "minimalist" peacebuilding effort is underway and the international community is contributing to the space for emancipation and the participation of civil society.  


"COVID-19 and Borders: North American Borders, Trust, and the Coronavirus" with BIG Project Lead Emmanuel Brunet-Jailly and Elisabeth Vallet 

On April 15th, Dr. Emmanuel Brunet-Jailly and Dr. Elisabeth Vallet offered a special joint presentation on the effects of COVID-19 on borders and boundary lines. Dr. Brunet-Jailly began by exploring the various policy options that have been implemented around the world and discussed why international boundary lines are not the best place to implement health policies to control the spread of COVID-19. Then, Dr. Vallet continued the discussion on how, globally, states have reacted to COVID-19 by closing borders, and how public policies have been urgently defined at boy local and national levels. Arguing that the outcomes of the global health crisis rests on the notion of trust (or lack of trust) at the heart of the relationships not only between those who govern and those who are governed but also between states. 


"Knowledge, Democracy and Action: Progress and Challenges in the Work of the UNESCO Chair in Community-Based Research and Social Responsibility in Higher Education" with CFGS Associate Fellow Budd Hall

Budd Hall and Rajesh Tandon, a UVic Honorary Doctorate recipient, and founding President of Participatory Research in Asia have worked together on matters of research and social justice for 40 years.  In 2012, they were invited by UNESCO to apply for a Chair on the topic of Community-Based Research and Social Responsibility.  Their mandate is to build research capacity in the global South and the excluded North in the field of community-based participatory research. Their work has involved several major global studies, extensive policy and advocacy work and since December of 2017, the creation of the Knowledge for Change Global Consortium on Training for Community Based Participatory Research.  
 
Budd's presentation will briefly cover the mandate of the Chair, major activities to date and will explore a number of the challenges which currently engage both Budd and Rajesh Tandon.


"Stock Market Swings & the Economic Outlook in the Era of COVID-19 - Part 1 & Part 2with Michael R. King and Chris Lawless

Concerned about the wild gyrations in global stock markets over the past three weeks? Wondering what the impact of COVID-19 will be on the economy? Or curious about the impact of government policy measures and how investors may be addressing these challenges? Prof. Michael R. King and Chris Lawless, Executive-in-Residence and former Chief Economist at BCI, discuss historical precedents that provide insights for today's events. 

The first portion of the presentation reviewed the timeline of events and market reactions to date, while the second portion focused attention on the economic outlook and implications.