Programs with an Indigenous focus

UVic offers a wide array of diplomas, certificates, undergraduate and graduate programs in the fields of Aboriginal language and culture, health and social welfare, and governance and leadership.

Admission programs, as well as many courses with Indigenous focus, are available in a variety of faculties.

Bachelor of Education (Elementary Curriculum)

This elementary degree program provides course work and practicum experience designed to produce a well-qualified elementary school teacher. Students are eligible for a professional teaching certificate and Bachelor of Education (BEd) degree upon successful completion of this degree.

This degree program is also offered with an Indigenous Language and Culture focus in a variety of locations off-campus. It is available to students wishing to become certified Indigenous language teachers in BC public schools.

Students completing the first three years of this program are eligible to apply to the BC College of Teachers for a Developmental Standard Term Certificate (DSTC). Currently there are three partnerships with communities: Campbell River for the languages of Kwak’wall/Liq’walla, North Vancouver Island and on in the local territory of W’SANEC for the Coast Salish language of the Klahoose and Homolco and Sliammon peoples. Students are able to continue towards completion of the Bachelor of Education Degree.

Bachelor of Education (Elementary Curriculum), Aboriginal Language and Culture

This option is currently only available to students preparing to qualify for the BC College of Teachers Developmental Standard Term Certificate in teaching Aboriginal Language and Culture in BC public schools.

This program is delivered in a variety of off-campus locations and may be taken on a part-time basis.

Year one

  • Two of ENGL (115 or 135), 125 or 145 or other approved English
  • EDCI 302 Literacy & Language in the Elementary School
  • ED-P 200 School Experience Seminar & 3-week Practicum or ED-P 250 (School Experience) and 251 (Practicum)
  • Two LING 159 First Nations Language I
  • Four LING 3359 First Nations Language III
  • Eligible for BC College of Teachers First Nations Language Certificate upon completion of all Ling 159 and 359 courses.

Year two

  • Approved Canadian Studies
  • EDCI 372/IS 372 Indigenous Epistemologies
  • ED-D 301 Learners & Learning Environments
  • ED-D 408 Promoting Pro-social Behaviour
  • LING 180 Language Revitalization Principles & Practice
  • LING 181 Language Learning & Teaching in Situations of Language Loss
  • LING 401 Salish or LING 405 Wakashan
  • LING 461 Linguistic Field Methods
  • Eligible for UVic’s Certificate in Aboriginal Language Revitalization upon completion of LING 180, 181, 401/405, and 461.

Year three

  • EDCI 305A Drama Education: A Medium for Learning I
  • EDCI 271/IS 371 The History of First Nations Education in Canada
  • EDCI 336 Information and Communication Technologies in Education
  • EDCI 487 Special Topics: Immersion Language Teaching
  • ED-P 350 Field Experience Seminar
  • ED-P 351 Five-Week Elementary Practicum
  • IS 400 Special Topics Seminar in Indigenous Studies
  • Two LING 459 First Nations Language IV
  • Approved mathematics or approved elective
  • Approved laboratory science or approved elective
  • Eligible for BC College of Teachers Developmental Standard Term Certification upon completion of year three.
Diploma in Indigenous Language Revitalization
Bachelor of Education in Indigenous Language Revitalization

This degree program provides course work and practicum experience designed to produce a well-qualified elementary school teacher. Students are eligible for a professional teaching certificate and the Bachelor of Education (BEd) degree upon successful completion of this degree.

The program is delivered in a variety of off-campus locations and may be taken on a part-time basis.

Certificate in Aboriginal Language Revitalization

The Certificate in Aboriginal Language Revitalization (CALR) is offered in partnership between the Faculty of Education, the Department of Linguistics, and the Division of Continuing Studies, in partnership with the En’owkin Centre, Okanagan Nations.

The certificate is designed to support the teaching and continuation of Indigenous languages in the schools and in the community.

Participants in the certificate program must complete six core courses and three elective courses. Students must take an elective course in an Aboriginal language or demonstrate other comparable experience such as proficiency in an Aboriginal language.

The CALR is designed as a one-year program, primarily delivered in community, and in most cases in a cohort model. For example, there have been programs in Campbell River for the languages of Kwak’wall/Liq’walla, North Vancouver Island and on in the local territory of W’SANEC for the Coast Salish language of the Klahoose and Homolco and Sliammon peoples.

It is possible to ladder coursework on the certificate toward a diploma or degree program (Bachelor’s, Master’s or PhD).

The goal of the program is to develop understanding of the complex dynamics of language loss, maintenance, and recovery while also providing practical strategies for work in Aboriginal communities to preserve and revitalize threatened languages. This program is designed to honour traditional knowledge and practices, to recognize and accommodate the realities and needs of diverse communities, and to provide a foundation for both language revitalization activities and for further study in linguistics, education, and/or cultural resource management.

The core courses are offered in Summer Institutes at the En’owkin Centre in Penticton or at the University of Victoria, and at varying times during the year at other locations. Elective courses are offered at the En’owkin Centre, at the University of Victoria, or in community settings.

Core courses

  • LING 180A & 180B
  • LING 181
  • LING 182
  • LING 183A & 183B

Elective courses

  • LING 159 First Nations Language I
  • LING 259 First Nations Language II
  • LING 359 First Nations Language III
  • LING 172 Introduction to the Languages of BC
  • LING 184 Aboriginal Language Materials Development
  • LING 185 Aboriginal Language Revitalization Practicum
  • LING 186 Language in First Nations Culture
  • LING 187 Special Topics in Language Revitalization

Certificate Program in Foundations in Indigenous Fine Arts

This certificate program is offered through the Faculty of Fine Arts in co-operation with the En’owkin International School of Writing and Visual Arts in Penticton, BC.

The program is designed primarily for mature Indigenous students who wish to develop specialized skills in creative writing and/or visual arts in an Indigenous context. Students may complete the program on a part-time basis but must successfully complete at least 13.5 units of course work over a period of two to six years.

Admission to the certificate program is made through the En’owkin International School of Writing and Visual Arts:

  • Credit obtained within the certificate program may be transferable to a regular UVic degree program. Students who wish to pursue a BA or BFA in Visual Arts or Writing at the University of Victoria must re-apply to UVic Undergraduate Admissions and fulfill all normal admission, program and course requirements.
  • All students wishing to complete the certificate must satisfy the University of Victoria English requirement. The En’owkin Centre normally provides the English placement essay and required course work to satisfy this requirement.

Students must choose 3.0 units of core courses from the following:

  • ART 100E Studio Foundation
  • ART 150E Introduction to Contemporary Art Theory
  • CW 100E Introduction to Creative Writing
  • Elective courses
  • Students may select either Creative Writing or Visual Arts courses to complete the required 13.5 units.
  • ART 100E Studio Foundations
  • ART 101E Drawing
  • ART 130E Printmaking
  • ART 150E Introduction to Contemporary Art Theory
  • ART 211E Painting
  • ART 221E Sculpture
  • CW 100E Introduction to Creative Writing
  • CW150E Writing for Children from a First Nations’ Perspective
  • CW 155E Creative Process and World View
  • CW156E Critical Process, Symbolism and Oral Tradition
  • CW160E First Nations’ Non-Fiction
  • CW212E Structure in Cinema and Television Drama

Students wishing to apply to a degree program Visual Arts at the University of Victoria must complete both ART 100E and ART 101E.

Contact:
Director, En’owkin Centre
RR#2, Site 50, Comp. 8
Penticton BC V2A 6J7
Phone: 250-493-7181

Indigenous Studies Minor

The Faculty of Humanities and the Faculty of Social Sciences jointly offer an interdisciplinary program in Indigenous Studies intended to provide both Indigenous and non-Indigenous students with a core program incorporating Indigenous world-views and ways of knowing.

This is a general program leading to the Bachelor of Arts degree. Students may obtain a minor by completing the requirements for the general program together with a major or honours program, or other degree program, in another department or faculty.

The core program will prepare any student intending to enter a vocation jointly serving Indigenous and non-Indigenous peoples. It will further prepare Indigenous students enrolled in professional programs at the University of Victoria who are planning to serve in Indigenous communities. Students in the program are required to take the introductory course (IS 200) and the unit capstone course (IS 400) plus 7.5 units of approved 300-and 400-level courses.

Courses include:

  • IS 200 Introduction to Indigenous Studies
  • IS 220 Preparation Seminar for Indigenous Research Apprenticeships and Community Internships
  • IS 310 LE,NONET Preparation Seminar
  • IS 320 Indigenous Research Apprenticeship
  • IS 321 Community Internship
  • IS 312 Indigenous Community Internship
  • IS 371 The History of First Nations, Métis, and Inuit Education in Canada
  • IS 371 Indigenous Epistemologies
  • IS 373 EL TELNIWT and Aboriginal Education
  • IS 400 Special Topics Seminar In Indigenous Studies
Graduate Certificate in Indigenous Language Revitalization
Master of Arts in Indigenous Language Revitalization
Master of Education in Indigenous Language Revitalization
Master of Education in Counselling for Aboriginal Communities and Schools

A minimum of 24 units of course works is required in the MEd program and a comprehensive exam.

Graduates of this program will have the necessary background to provide culturally responsive counselling to Aboriginal communities and in schools. This program is community-based and developed with the support and guidance of local Aboriginal communities.

A minimum of 24 units of course works is required in the MEd program and a comprehensive exam.

The program of study includes the following required courses:

  • ED-D 503 Program Development and Evaluation
  • ED-D 514 Assessment in Counselling
  • ED-D 518 Advanced Seminar in Theories of Counselling Psychology
  • ED-D 519A Child and Adolescent Development and Counselling
  • ED-D 519H Career Development and Counselling Across the Life Span
  • ED-D 519L Group Counselling
  • ED-D 519N Diversity, Culture and Counselling
  • ED-D522 Skills and Practice for Counselling
  • ED-D 523 Internship in Counselling
  • ED-D 561A Methods in Educational Research
  • ED-D 597 Comprehensive Examination
  • ED-D598 Project
  • Two electives for courses related to Aboriginal culture, ways of knowing and/or counselling
Master of Social Work, Indigenous Specialization

This is a specialized program of studies leading to the Master of Social Work (MSW) degree for social workers working in Indigenous social settings. Social workers working for and with Indigenous organizations work in a fundamentally different historical, cultural and administrative environment to those working for non-Indigenous settings. The Indigenous specialization is designed to provide social workers working in Indigenous communities with the opportunity to develop their knowledge and skills within this context.

The MSW-Indigenous specialization degree requires a minimum of 15 units which are made up of 9.0 units of course and 6.0 units that consist of either a thesis (6.0) or a project (3.0) and practicum (3.0).

Students accepted into the foundation year without a BSW can request permission to complete the advanced year of their MSW degree with the Indigenous specialization.

Core course requirements:

  • SOCW 521 Indigenous Perspectives on Knowledge and Research
  • SOCW 522 Critical Indigenous Analysis of Social Work Theory
  • SOCW 523 Self-conscious Traditionalism in Indigenous Social Practice Seminar
  • SOCW 524 Critical Indigenous Analysis of Social Welfare Policy
  • SOCW 527 Research Methods
  • SOCW 528 Research Seminar

Additional program requirements:

  • Thesis option - SOCW 599 Thesis
  • Non-thesis option - SOCW 506A MSWI Practicum
  • SOCW 496A Team Graduating Research Report/Project
    or SOCW 598 Individual Graduating Research Project
Master of Social Work (distance delivery), BSW Entry

The Master of Social Work (MSW) program at the University of Victoria will be offered by distance delivery for BSW holders. The next application intake is for September 2012. The Advanced MSW requires a BSW degree with a B+ (6.0) average as a minimum requirement for admission to the program. The admissions selection process is competitive. Not all students who meet the minimum requirements will be admitted. All candidates must have the equivalent of at least two years of full-time post-baccalaureate professional experience in a human service organization. Students accepted into the MSW Advanced Program will be expected to come to campus a minimum of two times throughout their degree program.

Master of Social Work (on-campus delivery), non-BSW entry

This program entry will be offered every second calendar year (odd years) with the next offering for 2013. Students accepted into the non-BSW entry to the MSW Program will take both foundation and advanced year core courses on campus. (SOCW electives are available by distance education.)

The non-BSW MSW requires a BA degree with a B+ (6.0) average as a minimum requirement for admission to the program. The admissions selection process is competitive. Not all students who meet the minimum requirements will be admitted. All candidates must have the equivalent of at least two years of full-time post-baccalaureate professional experience in a human service organization. All updated information on our programs, delivery and applications can be found on the School of Social Work’s website.

Master of Social Work (blended learning format)

The May 2012 intake for the Master of Social Work with an Indigenous Specialization program at the University of Victoria will have the next offering in a blended learning format.

The MSW Indigenous Specialization program has one intake for the May session (Summer Term May to August) of every even Calendar year. The program is offered through a combination of two summer institutes and web-based instructional delivery. Students within the specialization will begin the (May) summer session by taking SOCW 521, offered on campus.

The MSW Indigenous specialization requires a BSW degree with a B+ (6.0) average as a minimum requirement for admission to the program. The admissions selection process is competitive. Not all students who meet the minimum requirements will be admitted. All candidates must have the equivalent of at least two years of full-time post-baccalaureate professional experience in an Indigenous social service setting. The distinctive feature of this specialized program is the requirement that this practice must be with an Indigenous social service setting.

Bachelor of Social Work

The School of Social Work offers a program of studies leading to the degree of Bachelor of Social Work (BSW) that is fully accredited by the Canadian Association for Social Work Education. Graduates are employed in a wide range of government and voluntary organizations such as family and children’s services, residential care facilities, community centres, mental health clinics, home health care, hospitals, women’s services, corrections and Indigenous social services.

Blended learning is the dominant approach to learning used at the school. This means that course are taught through both web-based delivery and face-to-face contact with students.

Indigenous specialization: Indigenous students completing a BSW degree may choose this specialization to focus on preparing for leadership roles as helpers and healers in Indigenous communities and organizations. Students will develop frameworks that centralize Indigenous knowledge, peoples, nations and communities.

Indigenous child welfare specialization: Admission to the Indigenous child welfare specialization is limited to students of Indigenous ancestry. We define Indigenous to be inclusive of students who come from various nationhoods, Métis and Inuit who are Indigenous to North America.

Courses include:

  • SOCW 354 An Introduction to Indigenous Issues and Human Services
  • SOCW 391 Indigenous Approaches to Healing and Helping
  • SOCW 451 Indigenous Policy Issues in Social Work
  • SOCW 491 Integration to Indigenous Approaches to Healing and Helping
  • SOCW 492 Protecting Indigenous Children

Students may elect to choose on of the specializations offered in the Social Work program:

1. Indigenous social work specialization

This specialization is a concentration within the BSW program and provides opportunities for Indigenous BSW students to focus their undergraduate program on preparing for leadership roles as helpers and healers in Indigenous communities and various Indigenous organizations. Students will co-create learning environments with other Indigenous students and faculty in the school.

2. Indigenous (child welfare) specialization

The intent of this specialization is similar to the Indigenous specialization with an emphasis on the well-being of Indigenous children, families and communities. Admission to the specialization is limited to Indigenous students of North America.

Diploma in Child and Youth Care in Indigenous Communities

The School of Child and Youth Care has responded to the child and youth care needs of specific cultural groups through the development of community-based, culturally sensitive course work. Certain specific admission criteria apply to applicants in this program. The diploma ladders into the 60-unit degree program in child and youth care.

  • Option One: Distance Learning. Students pursuing their diploma through the first option must be recommended by the appropriate Indigenous community review body for admission.
  • Option Two: Community Partnership. Students following option two will follow those criteria specified in a memorandum of agreement with each Indigenous organization. This course work is available only through specific Indigenous community partnerships. Completion of the two years CYCB course work also allows the student to apply to the BC provincial government for certification and registration as an Early Childhood Educator, having met the requirements for basic and post-basic Certificates in Early Childhood Care and Education (ECCE) in BC.

Admission requirements

Students who have been recommended by the appropriate Indigenous community review body for admission to the Indigenous community-based diploma have the option to apply for restricted UVic admission (contact the School of Child and Youth Care for details). Credit obtained from the Child and Youth Care Indigenous community-based course work may be transferable to a UVic degree program. Students may receive credit within the Indigenous community-based Child and Youth Care diploma for ECE certificates from an accredited post-secondary institution.

Option One: Distance Learning

The course work will normally include:

  • CYC 100A&B Introduction to Professional Care and Youth Care Practice Part One and Two
  • CYC 101 Introduction to Child and Youth Care Practice and Communications Technology
  • CYC120 Professional Communications in Child and Youth Care
  • CYC 131 Child and Youth Care Practice in Indigenous Settings
  • CYC 132 Indigenous Leadership in Child and Youth Care
  • CYC 152 Introduction to Helping Skills in Child and Youth Care Practice
  • CYC 166A&B Lifespan Development
  • CYC 171 Introduction to Families, Issues, Patterns and Procedures
  • CYC 205 Applying Change Theory in CYC Practice
  • CYC 210 Supervised Practicum I
  • CYC 230 Introduction to CYC Practice in Relation to Indigenous Contexts
  • CYC 240 Ethical Decision Making in Child and Youth Care
  • CYC 250 Introduction to Law in Child and Youth Care Contexts
  • CYC 260 (2) Special Topics in Child and Youth Care
  • CYC 265 Introduction to Group Work in Child and Youth Care Practice lab
  • CYC 356 Child and Youth Care Practice in Families

Option Two: Community Partnership

Bachelor of Child and Youth Care with an Indigenous Specialization

This stream is open to all Child and Youth Care students. The following courses must be completed to meet the requirements for the Indigenous stream. In addition to Core CYC courses, students enrolled in the Indigenous Stream take:

  • CYC 230 (1.5)    Introduction to CYC Practice in Indigenous Contexts
  • CYC 330 (1.5)    Applied Practice in Indigenous Contexts
  • CYC 430 (1.5)    Research Practice in Indigenous Contexts
  • CYC 410* (4.5)    Advanced Supervised Practicum
  • OR
  • CYC 410A* (4.5)    Advanced Supervised Block Practicum

* Must be completed in a relevant setting.

Read more Indigenous initiatives in the School of Child and Youth Care.

Diploma in Aboriginal Health Leadership

This program is offered through the new School of Public Health and Policy and the Faculty of Human and Social Development.

The diploma is a two-year, part-time, community-based program consisting of 18 units of course work offered at third and forth year level. The program has been designed to attend to the unique knowledge, skills and abilities required for health leadership within the context of Aboriginal people and communities. It is expected that students may have experience working in the health and social service sector and wish to further their education.

The Diploma in Aboriginal Health Leadership is a two-year, part time, community-based program consisting of 18 units of course work offered at third and fourth year level. The program is offered using a blended learning approach, including distance education and in community course offerings. Students are required to attend one onsite component at UVic; a gateway onsite provides an introduction to the program, and learning strategies (online learning) and two course based onsites in the community, one in year one and one in year two.

Applicants will be expected to have completed Grade 12 or equivalent. Ideally applicants will have some post-secondary experience, however all applicants will be considered based on educational preparation and work experience.

Required documentation

In addition to the application to UVic Undergraduate Admissions, applicants should submit an application to the program, along with a letter of intent and a resume, to the Program Coordinator. Special admission categories outlined below may also require specific documentation, such as references.

Admission criteria:

Applicants will usually meet general admission criteria as set out by the University. However, the following principles will be considered: maximizing accessibility and the willingness to review applications on a case-by-case basis. Two additional distinct processes exist to facilitate entrance for those who do not meet the regular admission criteria. Potential applicants are encouraged to meet with the program coordinator to determine which admission category (general, special access or Aboriginal) best applies.

1. Special access:

The University of Victoria is interested in extending university-level learning opportunities to residents of British Columbia who may not qualify under the regular categories of admission. The number of applicants admitted under this category is limited by the availability of university resources. Admission under the special category is not automatic. An applicant for admission under the special category must meet the following criteria:

  • The applicant is at least 23 years of age by the beginning of the session applied, for and
  • The applicant’s academic achievements have been significantly and adversely affected by health, disability, or family or similar responsibilities.

The senate committee on admission, re-registration and transfer selects candidates for admission on the basis of:

  • their educational history
  • non-educational achievement that indicate an ability to succeed at university

Applicants in this category must submit two special access reference forms from persons specifically able to assess the applicant’s potential for academic success. References from relatives will not be accepted. Applicants must be able to document the nature and extent of their circumstances, and demonstrate the impact these have had on their educational achievements.

Note: Applicants who have attempted a full year or equivalent of university-level courses are not eligible to apply under this category. Applicants under this category must also meet the prerequisites for the program they wish to enter.

2. First Nations, Metis and Inuit:

The university welcomes applications from Aboriginal peoples of Canada, including those of First Nations, Metis and Inuit ancestry (including non-status Aboriginal). Applications from Aboriginal peoples of Canada who do not qualify under the other categories admission will be considered on an individual basis by the senate committee on admission, re-registration and transfer.

The committee will consider each applicant’s:

  • educational history
  • non-educational achievements that indicate an ability to succeed at university

Applicants who choose to apply under the “special access” or “First Nations, Metis and Inuit” category must submit two reference forms from persons specifically able to assess the applicant’s potential for academic success. If possible, one reference should be from a recognized Aboriginal organization. References from relatives will not be accepted. Applicants must also submit a personal letter outlining their academic objectives.

A limited number of students not formally admitted to the program may register for individual courses (if enrolment permits), with the permission of the program coordinator.

Master of Arts in Indigenous Governance

The Master of Arts in Indigenous Governance is an interdisciplinary program that provides students with a strong foundation in basic and applied scholarly research and a path to understanding government and politics among Indigenous peoples, with a special emphasis on the nature and context of Indigenous governments in Canada.

Courses include:

  • IGOV 520 Indigenous Governance
  • IGOV 530 Indigenous Research Methods
  • IGOV 575 Mentorship
  • IGOV 540 Indigenous Resurgence
  • IGOV 550 Indigenous People and Self-Determination
  • IGOV 570 Indigenous Women and Resistance

A Doctor of Philosophy (PhD) in Indigenous Governance can be undertaken by special arrangement.

Certificate in the Administration of Indigenous Governance (CAIG)

This Faculty of Human and Social Development program is a part-time university credit program. The courses focus on topics such as critical thinking, leadership and management in Indigenous organizations, as well as the legal, political, economic and public policy dimensions of governance in Indigenous communities. The entire certificate program is offered by distance through a combination of distributed learning options and on-campus seminars.

Upon completion of eight credit courses, a Certificate in the Administration of Indigenous Governments is granted. Students may also enrol in related programs at UVic, such as the School of Public Administration’s Diploma in Public Sector Management (DPSM) program, in which all of the CAIG courses are eligible for credit towards the diploma.

To enrol in this program or for more information, contact:

Program Manager
Indigenous Governance Program
Faculty of Human and Social Development
University of Victoria, Box 1700 STN CSC
Victoria BC V8W 2Y2
Email: igov@uvic.ca

Successful applicants will be expected to meet the university English requirements and to have completed grade 12.

Candidates without formal post-secondary qualifications but with demonstrable experience may be admitted, with continuation in the program subject to performance in the first two to three courses with a grade of C+ or better. A limited number of students not formally admitted to the program may register for individual courses, with the permission of the program administrator.

Students must complete eight required courses to receive a certificate. Successful completion of IGOV 381, IGOV 382, IGOV383 and IGOV 384 are prerequisites for progression through the program.

The required courses are:

  • IGOV 381 Indigenous Leadership and Governance
  • IGOV 382 Law and Indigenous Governance
  • IGOV 383 The Indigenous-State Relationship
  • IGOV 384 Special Issues in Indigenous Governance
  • ADMN 311 Introduction to Public Administration
  • ADMN 312 Managing in Public and Non-Profit Organizations
  • ADMN 316 Written Communications in the Public and Non-Profit Sectors
  • ADMN 421 Financial Management
Faculty of Education
Indigenous Education
  • IED 371 The History of First Nations, Métis, and Inuit Education in Canada
  • IED 372 Indigenous Epistemologies
  • IED 373 EI TELNIWT and Indigenous Education
  • IED 473 CENENITEL TW TOLNEW: Helping each other to learn
  • 499/591 Learning and Teaching in an Indigenous World
  • IED 583 Researching with Aboriginal Peoples: Aboriginalizing Research

Educational Psychology and Leadership Studies

  • ED-D 419 Introduction to Indigenous Approaches to Helping and Healing
Faculty of Fine Arts

Art History and Visual Studies

  • HA 284 Indigenous Arts: Local Themes and Global Challenges
  • HA 382A Native North American Arts
  • HA 382B Indigenous Arts: Arctic, Subarctic
  • HA 382C Indigenous Arts: Southwest, California, Great Basin
  • HA 383 Special Topics in North American Indigenous Arts
  • HA 384 Northwest Coast Indigenous Arts and Colonization
  • HA 480 Seminar in Contemporary North American Indigenous Arts
  • HA 482 Seminar in Indigenous Arts
  • HA 484 Advanced Seminar in the Arts of the Pacific Northwest
  • HA 565 Seminar in 20th-Century Native North American Arts
  • HA 582 Seminar in Indigenous Arts
  • HA 584 Seminar in Contemporary Art: The Pacific Northwest
Faculty of Human and Social Development

School of Child and Youth Care

  • CYC 130 Professional Communications in Indigenous Child and Youth Care
  • CYC 131 Child and Youth Care Practice in Indigenous Settings
  • CYC 132 Indigenous Leadership in Child and Youth Care
  • CYC 230 Introduction to CYC Practice in Indigenous Contexts
  • CYC 330 Applied Practice in Indigenous Contexts
  • CYC 430 Research Practice in Indigenous Contexts

Indigenous community-based child and youth care courses:

Note: The following courses are only available when delivered through special community-based programs.

  • CYCB 110 Practicum I: Community Care Settings For Children and Youth
  • CYCB 111 Practicum II: The Whole Child
  • CYCB 112 Practicum III: The Child in the Curriculum
  • CYCB 120 Introduction to Play (ECCE)
  • CYCB 121 Foundations of Curriculum Planning (ECCE)
  • CYCB 122 Curriculum Design and Implementation (ECCE)
  • CYCB 123 The Caring and Learning Environment (ECCE)
  • CYCB 140 Introduction to Human Behaviour
  • CYCB 141 Child Development I
  • CYCB 142 Child Development II
  • CYCB 150 Interpersonal Communications
  • CYCB 151 Communicating with Children and Guiding Children's Behaviour
  • CYCB 210 Practicum with Developmental Specialization
  • CYCB 211 Practicum in Supported Child Care for Children with Special Needs
  • CYCB 220 Introduction to School-Age Care (CYC)
  • CYCB 221 Introduction to Programs For Adolescents (CYC)
  • CYCB 222 Program Development for Infants and Toddlers
  • CYCB 230 The Ecology of Health, Safety and Nutrition for Children
  • CYCB 231 Administration of Child Care Facilities
  • CYCB 240 Introduction to Supported Child Care for Children with Special Needs
  • CYCB 250 Introduction to Planned Change
  • CYCB 251 Communication Skills for Professional Helpers
  • CYCB 260 Special Topics in Child and Youth Care

School of Nursing

  • NURS 483 Teaching and Learning in Nursing Practice
  • NURS 484 Nursing With Aboriginal Peoples in Canada

School of Public Health and Social Policy

Indigenous Peoples' Health
  • INGH 450 Culture and Context of Indigenous Health
  • INGH 451 Indigenous Health Trends and Social Determinants of Health
  • INGH 452 Traditional Healing in Indigenous Communities
  • INGH 453 Wise Practices in Indigenous Community Health

School of Social Work

  • SOCW 354 Indigenous Perspectives on Practice Issues
  • SOCW 391 Indigenous Approaches to Healing and Helping
  • SOCW 451 Indigenous Policy Analysis in Social Work
  • SOCW 491 Integration of Indigenous Approaches to Healing and Helping
  • SOCW 492 Protecting Indigenous Children
  • SOCW 521 Indigenous Perspectives on Knowledge and Research
  • SOCW 522 Critical Indigenous Analysis of Social Work Theory
  • SOCW 523 Self-Conscious Traditionalism in Indigenous Social Work Practice Seminar
  • SOCW 524 Critical Indigenous Analysis of Social Welfare Policy
  • SOCW 525 Seminar in Child Welfare Policy and Practice in Indigenous Communities
  • SOCW 526 Seminar in Community Health Policy and Practice in Indigenous Communities
  • SOCW 551 Indigenous Communities: Practice and Policy
Faculty of Humanities

History

  • HIST 358C Natives and Newcomers: Historical Encounters in Canada to 1867
  • HIST 358F Natives and Newcomers: Historical Encounters in Canada since 1867

Philosophy

  • PHIL 209 Philosophy and First Nations Thought

Department of Linguistics

  • LING 159 First Nations Language I
  • LING 172 Introduction to the Languages of British Columbia
  • LING 180A Human Effects of Aboriginal Language Shift and Loss
  • LING 184 Aboriginal Language Materials Development
  • LING 185 Aboriginal Language Revitalization Practicum
  • LING 186 Language in First Nations Culture
  • LING 259 First Nations Language II
  • LING 359 First Nations Language III
  • LING 372 Native Languages of British Columbia
  • LING 401 Salish
  • LING 403 Dene (Athabaskan)
  • LING 405 Wakashan
  • LING 431 History of First Nations Language Research in British Columbia
  • LING 459 First Nations Language IV
  • LING 531 Community-Based Language Research in BC First Nations: A History

Indigenous Languages of the Americas Research Programs

  • Dogrib Textual Studies
  • Dogrib Online Dictionary
  • Halkomelem Morphology
  • Segments, Syllables, and Stress in Salish
  • Language Revitalization in Vancouver Island Salish Communities
  • Salish Prosodic Morphology and Contrast in Optimality Theory

Indigenous Studies minor

  • IS 200 Introduction to Indigenous Studies
  • IS 220 Preparation Seminar for Indigenous Research Apprenticeships and Community Internships
  • IS 320 Indigenous Research Apprenticeship
  • IS 312 Indigenous Community Internship
  • IS 371 The History of First Nations, Métis, and Inuit Education in Canada
  • IS 371 Indigenous Epistemologies
  • IS 373 EL TELNIWT and Aboriginal Education
  • IS 400 Special Topics Seminar In Indigenous Studies

Women's Studies

  • WS 207 Indigenous Women in Canada
  • WS 340 Indigenous Cinema
  • WS 341 Indigenous Women's Narrated Lives
Faculty of Law
  • LAW 340 Indigenous Lands, Rights and Governance
  • LAW 341 Historical Foundations of Aboriginal Title and Government
  • LAW 368 Indigenous Women and the Law
Faculty of Science
Faculty of Social Sciences

Anthropology

  • ANTH 336 Contemporary Aboriginal Peoples of Canada
  • ANTH 449 Archaeology of the Northwest Coast
  • ANTH 541 Advanced Research Seminar in Indigenous Peoples in Prehistoric, Historic and Contemporary Contexts
  • ANTH 641 Advanced Research Seminar in Indigenous Peoples in Prehistoric, Historic and Contemporary Contexts

Political Science

  • POLI 363 Indigenous Politics in Canada
  • POLI 263 The Politics of Indigenous Peoples
  • POLI 383 Global Indigenous Nationalisms
  • POLI 421 Advanced US/Canadian Comparative Indigenous Law and Policy

Indigenous Studies minor

  • IS 200 Introduction to Indigenous Studies
  • IS 220 Preparation Seminar for Indigenous Research Apprenticeships and Community Internships
  • IS 320 Indigenous Research Apprenticeship
  • IS 312 Indigenous Community Internship
  • IS 371 The History of First Nations, Métis, and Inuit Education in Canada
  • IS 371 Indigenous Epistemologies
  • IS 373 EL TELNIWT and Aboriginal Education
  • IS 400 Special Topics Seminar In Indigenous Studies
Overview of admission programs

The University of Victoria welcomes applications from Aboriginal peoples of Canada, including those of First Nations, Metis and Inuit ancestry including non-status Aboriginal.

We consider applications on an individual basis from Aboriginal peoples of Canada who don’t qualify under other categories of admission. The senate committee on admission, reregistration and transfer will consider each applicant’s educational history and non-educational achievements that indicate an ability to succeed at university. The Faculties of Education, Human and Social Development and Law hold a percentage of their seats for Aboriginal students.

Faculty of Education

The Faculty of Education is committed to increasing the number of students with First Nations, Inuit and Métis ancestry in our programs and therefore encourages applications from Indigenous people. In recognition of the BC Ministry of Education’s mandate to increase access for Indigenous students, the Faculty of Education has developed special access initiatives:

Reserved seats

Five per cent of the positions in all the faculty’s undergraduate programs will be held for Indigenous applicants who meet the Faculty of Education’s minimum program entrance requirements and Indigenous application requirements.

Exceptional admission

Exceptional students who do not meet the standard faculty requirements may be eligible for admission through a case-by-case review process.

Eligibility for special access

To be eligible for a reserved seat and/or exceptional admission, an applicant will need to submit the admissions application form for Indigenous students (available from teacher education advising or the School of Exercise Science, Physical and Health Education) in addition to the general admissions application or application to the School of Exercise Science, Physical and Health Education.

Applicants will be considered for placement in the programs on an individual basis, taking into account such factors as Indigenous identity, academic performance, employment history, relevant experience with young people, evidence of participation within an Indigenous community and a letter of reference.

Admission interview requirement

Following the review of an application, an interview (in addition to the program interview) may be required. This interview will be conducted by the Indigenous education coordinator and adviser. The interview process will take into account geographic distance of the applicant from the campus, and an alternative interview process may be considered.

Faculty of Human and Social Development
Diploma in Aboriginal Health Leadership

The university welcomes applications from Aboriginal peoples of Canada, including those of First Nations, Métis and Inuit ancestry (including Non-status Aboriginal).Applications from Aboriginal peoples of Canada who do not qualify under the other categories admission will be considered on an individual basis by the senate committee on admissions, reregistration and transfer.

The committee will consider each application’s:

  • educational history
  • non-educational achievements that indicate an ability to succeed at university

Applicants who choose to apply under the “Special Access” or “First Nations, Métis and Inuit” category must submit two reference forms from persons specifically able to assess the applicant’s potential for academic success. If possible, one reference should be from a recognized Aboriginal organization. References from relatives will not be accepted. Applicants must also submit a personal letter outlining their academic objectives.

A limited number of students not formally admitted to the program may register for individual courses (if enrolment permits), with the permission of the program coordinator.

Faculty of Law

The Faculty of Law desires that the number of people of First Nations, Metis and Inuit backgrounds among the ranks of the legal profession increase substantially and, accordingly, encourages inquiries and applications from Aboriginal people.

Applications from Canadian Aboriginal people will be considered on an individual basis, taking into account such factors as academic performance, results of the LSAT, employment history, letters of reference, and past, present and future connection with the Aboriginal community. Applicants with less than three academic years of post-secondary education are rarely offered admission.

If an applicant's academic background is deemed appropriate, the admissions committee may make an offer of admission conditional upon successful completion of the Program of Legal Studies for Native People, conducted by the Native Law Centre at the University of Saskatchewan. The faculty fully endorses this program, and considerable weight is placed upon the evaluation submitted by its director.

For more complete information concerning the Program of Legal Studies for Native People, please contact:

The Director, Program of Legal Studies for Native People
Native Law Centre
University of Saskatchewan
101 Diefenbaker Place
Saskatoon, Saskatchewan
Canada S7N 5B8
Phone: 306-966-6189
Email: native.law@usask.ca

Applicants must supply satisfactory evidence of their eligibility to apply in the Aboriginal category.

First Nations, Métis and Inuit

The University of Victoria welcomes applications from Aboriginal peoples of Canada, including those of first Nations, Métis and Inuit ancestry (including non-status Aboriginal).

Applications from Aboriginal peoples of Canada who do not qualify under the other categories of admission will be considered on an individual basis by the senate committee on admissions, reregistration and transfer.

The committee will consider each applicant’s:

  • educational history
  • non-educational achievements that indicate an ability to succeed at university.

Applicants who choose to apply under the “Special Access-First Nations, Métis and Inuit” category must submit two reference forms from persons specifically able to access the applicant’s potential for academic success. If possible, one reference should be from a recognized Aboriginal organization. References from relatives will not be accepted. Applicants must also submit a personal letter outlining their academic objectives.

Indigenous seats in the Faculty of Law
First Year J.D Aboriginal Applicant Category:

The Faculty of Law desires that the number of people of First Nations, Metis and Inuit backgrounds among the ranks of the legal profession increase substantially and, accordingly, encourages inquiries and applications from Aboriginal people.

Applications from Canadian Aboriginal people will be considered on an individual basis, taking into account such factors as academic performance, results of the LSAT, employment history, letters of reference, and past, present and future connection with the Aboriginal community. Applicants with less than three academic years of post-secondary education are rarely offered admission.

If an applicant's academic background is deemed appropriate, the admissions committee may make an offer of admission conditional upon successful completion of the Program of Legal Studies for Native People, conducted by the Native Law Centre at the University of Saskatchewan. The Faculty fully endorses this program, and considerable weight is placed upon the evaluation submitted by its director.