Past recipients

Student recipients 2018-2019


Abbott, Ethan

Project title: Still sweeter than sugar? Investigating sucralose as an endocrine disruptor

Department: Biochemistry and Microbiology

Faculty supervisor: Dr. Caren Helbing

"Since the 1940’s, anthropogenic chemicals have been released into the environment in increasing amounts. Endocrine disrupting chemical (EDC) pollutants became a public concern from the global decline of avian populations in the 1950’s-1960’s, publicised by Rachel Carlson’s Silent Spring. EDCs affect the production, metabolism, and action of natural hormones in an organism.  Notably, EDCs can perturb thyroid hormone signalling responsible for regulating vertebrate growth, development, and metabolism including the metamorphosis of a tadpole into a frog. Recently, studies using bullfrog tadpoles uncovered the endocrine disrupting activity of triclosan and ibuprofen on thyroid hormone action, but there are many consumer products whose endocrine effects are unknown. Sucralose is a non-nutritive sweetener 600 times sweeter than sucrose and a persistent aquatic pollutant at concentrations up to 1 μg/L. The biological inertness of sucralose for human consumption has been questioned, and herein we predict sucralose to be an EDC. Using an American bullfrog model, we exposed tadpoles to relevant human dietary concentrations of sucralose for 48 hours and studied thyroid hormone sensitive gene readouts as biomarkers of endocrine disruption. An understanding of the biological activity of sucralose is important to guide consumer choices, setting the acceptable daily intake, and regulating environmental concentrations."        


Anderson, Ryann

Project title: Community-Engagement on Stage: A Case Study of Productions in the Williams Head Institution

Department: English

Faculty supervisor: Dr. Sheila Rabillard

"Recent scholarship commends the pedagogical potential of theatre, encouraging communities to use it as a tool. In a 2017 article, Katherine Steele Brokaw examines the ways that community productions of Shakespeare can address and align with the concerns of said community. She goes on to cite Mark Weinberg’s definition of community-based theatre as that which “closely allies itself with a particular community, develops performances about that community's concerns, and involves some level of participation from community members” (446).

My project embraces the aforementioned definition of community-engaged theatre and examines how a text can align with the needs of a community. I want to do so by conducting a case study of a Victoria-based program. Williams Head on Stage—the only program of it’s kind in Canada—allows inmates of the Williams Head Institution in Metchosin to create and participate in theatrical productions. Interviews with program staff will contribute to my study of the plays previously produced by WHOS (notable titles include Macbeth, and The Hobbit).

To supplement my research on the community-engaged productions of the WHOS program, I intent to compare and contrast other community-engaged productions such as the verbatim theatre of Anna Deavere Smith and Moisés Kaufman and the Tectonic Theatre Project’s The Laramie Project. By studying the plays as texts, as well as examining where and by whom they are performed, I will attempt to understand the formal way in which a community can align itself with a particular text."
   
   


Andrew, Lucas

Project title: Developments in Microfluidics for Targeted Polymer Nanoparticle DNA Delivery Technology

Department: Chemistry

Faculty supervisor: Dr. Matthew Moffitt

"Block co-polymer nanoparticles have great potential to act as targeted carriers for drugs such as anti-cancer agents. Microfluidic chip technology can allow for the synthesis of monodispersed nanoparticles ideal for DNA delivery applications, but the physical effects (e.g. shear forces) of this technology on drug integrity have not been thoroughly examined. Thus, using gel electrophoresis of various plasmid DNA samples as analogues for anti-cancer agents, the physical effects of on-chip polymerization on anti-cancer agents will be tested."        


Bancroft, Alan

Project title: Continuity and Discontinuity in Soviet Film: Avant-Garde and Socialist Realism

Department: Germanic and Slavic Studies

Faculty supervisor: Dr. Megan Swift

"Examines the points of continuity and discontinuity in form and content between Soviet avant-garde film of the 1920s and socialist realist films of the 1930s."  
    


Bell, Hannah

Project title: Kansha: An Exploration of Cultural Appreciation Through Dramatic Process

Department: Theatre

Faculty supervisor: Dr. Warwick Dobson

"Often when the topic of cultural appropriation comes up in conversation, the tone becomes tense and aggressive. This tension stops effective communicate in it’s tracks, having the opposite of the intended affect. So I want to flip the script from appropriation to appreciation. Since clothing is an important indicator of culture, I intend to use the kimono as a lens to look at Japan’s cultural history and its connection with Western culture. Kansha is the Japanese word for appreciation, which I believe is the perfect title for this research project. I will be facilitating the creation of a devised theatre play with the same name with support from the Department of Theatre and the Department of Pacific and Asian Studies. The central research question at the heart of the show will be: “How do we respectfully appreciate another person’s culture?” Kansha will last around 40 minutes with a 10 minute talkback session. The performance will include many elements of Japanese culture, including Japanese folk tales, odori (Japanese folk dance), taiko drumming, origami, and Japanese wood block art. The performance will be created based off of interviews with the Japanese community in Victoria, images, academic resources, and some of my family stories. The performance will take place as a part of Intrepid Theatre’s YOU Show Series on November 2 and 3, 2018. As the Japanese community in Victoria will be central to the creation of this show and this research, they will be invited to the performance."
    
    


Bell, Nathaniel

Project title: The Effects of Mindfulness Meditation on Stress, Attention & Exam Performance

Department: Psychology

Faculty supervisor: Dr. Colette Smart

"Attending university can be a difficult period of transition, and often times new undergraduate students experience stress and anxiety in this new environment. This project aims to investigate the effects of mindfulness meditation on academic performance, particularly in the developmental context of emerging adulthood. Specifically, the project aims to explore the impact of mindfulness meditation on stress and attention, and further examine how these two factors may mediate exam performance."        


Berlin, Graham

Project title: Early Experiences of Family-Based Heterosexism: Current Psychological Well-Being and Experiences of Shame in Sexual Minority Men

Department: Psychology

Faculty supervisor: Dr. Erica Woodin

"Gay and bisexual men (GBM) are at greater risk for adverse mental health outcomes (e.g., anxiety, depression). Minority stress theory, the psychological mediation framework, and the unified conceptual framework each provide important insights into the consequences of social stigma and the mechanisms through which stigma manifests as psychopathology. The present research integrates these models into a comprehensive framework to examine the effects of family-based heterosexism on current psychological wellbeing and experiences of shame in gay and bisexual men. Importantly, this research examines the moderating role of parental reactions to children’s disclosures of sexual orientation in conjunction with the mediating variables of internalized heterosexism and perceived sexual stigma, factors which have been implicated in adverse mental health outcomes and experiences of shame in sexual minority men. Participants were recruited through the University of Victoria’s psychology research participation website as well as through online reddit communities. The desired sample size is N = 400. Two moderated mediation models will be tested using conditional process analyses. We predict that parental acceptance will result in more positive outcomes (i.e., less internalized heterosexism/perceived sexual stigma, decreased psychological distress and experiences of shame). We further predict that perceived sexual stigma and internalized heterosexism will partially mediate the association between family based-heterosexism and psychological distress. Finally, we hypothesize that internalized heterosexism will partially mediate the association between family-based heterosexism and experiences of shame.

Graham Berlin, Lauren Matheson, MSc & Erica Woodin, PhD"


    
    


Bock, Laura

Project title: KZ Hersbruck: a look at the impact of the Holocaust on a small German town

Department: Germanic and Slavic Studies

Faculty supervisor: Dr. Helga Thorson

"KZ Hersbruck was a satellite camp of KZ Flössenberg, with another satellite camp close by in Happurg. How has this tiny camp been remembered and memorialized in comparison to much larger, well known camps? How did this camp impact the citizens of the small town of Hersbruck? How was the memory of the camp taught or not taught in schools, in combination with the teaching of the Holocaust as a whole?"
 
 


Boyd, Ben

Project title: Comparison of indoor and outdoor rock climbing on brain wave activity

Department: Exercise Science, Physical and Health Education

Faculty supervisor: Dr. Olav Krigolson

"My proposed research project seeks to examine the effect of rock climbing on an individual’s brain wave activity. Specifically, I hope to compare the frequency and amplitude of the P300 and N200 waveforms during pre- and post-climb conditions, in both indoor and outdoor environments. To obtain data, 15 participants will participate in two indoor and two outdoor climbs, with the MUSE device being used to collect brain wave data. In performing this research, I hope to determine whether participation in an activity with inherent risk elicits similar N200 and P300 waveform responses when performed in a relatively controlled indoor environment, compared to a less controllable outdoor environment. My proposed research has implications for individuals who choose to engage in activities that may occur in distinctly different environments (i.e., outdoor vs. indoor). If brain wave activity is seen to differ between the two conditions, it may indicate a need for an individual to undertake different physical and mental preparations in order to ensure optimized cognitive function, while simultaneously minimizing performance error and injury risk."
      
      


Bradshaw, Zoe

Project title: What’s for Dinner? Early-Modern Meals, Food Preparation, and Class

Department: History

Faculty supervisor: Dr. Andrea McKenzie

"My research project will probe the politics of food preparation in early modern England, focusing on seventeenth-century cookbooks and instructional literature targeting housewives and domestic servants. Through the investigation of these prescriptive texts, including Cookery Refin’d. Or, the Lady, Gentlewoman and Servant-maids Useful Companion (1697), The Queens Closet Opened (1684), and The English Hovse-vvife (1631), I hope to discover some of the interactions between class, gender, status, and cooking. These texts offer rich insights into the seventeenth-century home through their descriptions of foodstuffs and the labour necessary to transform these into acceptable meals, creating a picture of the domestic expectations and activities of women. This study of recipes, meals, ingredients, and methods of preparation and presentation, in combination with an analysis of recipes’ language, aims to reconstruct an image of the gender and class structures involved in early modern daily life. This is an important topic because it allows us to examine intricate and revealing issues of gender and status through the seemingly-mundane lens of food and cooking. While I will attempt to access the complexities of class structures in early modern homes, I am starting with the simple question: what’s for dinner?"


Brown, Rachael

Project title: Determining the Role of Eosinophils During Enteric Bacterial Infection

Department: Biochemistry and Microbiology

Faculty supervisor: Dr. Lisa Reynolds

"Eosinophils are a population of immune cells that have been highly studied in the context of allergic disease. Many of the hallmark symptoms of allergy are a result of the release of inflammatory mediators from eosinophils. Eosinophils, of course, did not evolve for the purpose of causing allergies. Instead, eosinophils provide defense against extracellular parasites, and recent reports suggest that they contribute to the maintenance of homeostasis in the intestinal tract.

Eosinophils are present at steady state in the intestinal tract of healthy individuals. Our intestines are home to thousands of species of mutualistic bacteria, as well as being continuously challenged by potentially pathogenic bacteria. The role of eosinophils in regulating immune responses to pathogenic intestinal bacteria is unknown, and is the focus of this project.

How eosinophil deficiency alters susceptibility to enteric pathogens will be investigated by conducting controlled mouse experiments. Lab techniques such as flow cytometry and cytometric bead arrays will be utilized to study eosinophils abundance, activation, and secretion of inflammatory signals during enteric bacterial pathogen challenge. As a complementary approach to in vivo experiments, eosinophils generated in vitro from bone-marrow stem cells will be analysed upon exposure to Salmonella endotoxin. In total, this project will contribute to determining a clearer role of eosinophils at the interface of the gut mucosa."        


Chau, Hoi Yee

Project title: Improving China’s Two Child Policy Through a Gendered Perspective

Department: Pacific and Asian Studies

Faculty supervisor: Dr. Andrew Marton

"Because of the aging population and gender imbalance, China's government finally ended the one-child policy in 2015 allowing Chinese couples to have a second child. The expectation of the new policy was an immediate increase in the birthrate. Yet, the baby boom did not happen, and the birthrate has even fallen. This project adopts a female perspective to examine why the change in policy has not resulted in more births. The phenomenon of the Chinese traditional son preference and "leftover women", higher education of Chinese women, and workplace female discrimination are the obstacles preventing Chinese women to have higher fertility intentions. Chinese women’s burdens on family and work will intensify if they have a second child. This research will examine how the Chinese traditional values influence the Chinese’s preference for their child sex, thus decreases the fertility rate. It will also analyze how delaying marriage and childbearing caused by higher education of females, and how the reduction of childcare programs led by the reforms of China’s economy and China' ineffective employments regulations discourage working females to have more babies. The key objective of this project is to examine the issue from the perspective of gender which will help explain why the two-child policy does not seem to have been successful at least at this stage and make suggestions about how the policy could be modified."
      
      


Chewter, Erin

Project title: Braiding Theory for Transformative Change: Exploring the Intersections and Incommensurabilities of Critical and Indigenous Theory

Department: Germanic and Slavic Studies

Faculty supervisor: Dr. Elena Pnevmonidou

"My research is an attempt to put the theoretical traditions of the Frankfurt School of Critical Theory in conversation with Indigenous-generated theories from across Turtle Island (North America) in order to illuminate any potential for radical “constellations of co-resistance” (Simpson, 2016) to colonial, gendered, and racialized oppressions. It will also seek to expose any historical and ongoing limitations of critical theory in addressing the particular mechanics of oppression within the settler-colonial context."        


Choi, James

Project title: Synaptic plasticity in the hippocampus

Department: Medical Sciences

Faculty supervisor: Dr. Brian Christie

"I will examine how ketogenic diets and intermittent fasting impact synaptic plasticity in the hippocampus to try and better understand this process before proceeding to work in mild traumatic brain injury. Having spent the summer working in the lab as a USRA student, I am uniquely positioned to make significant progress with this project."
       


Cliche, Élise

Project title: Tree-ring derived Little Ice Age hydroclimatic trends at Waddington Glacier, British Columbia

Department: Geography

Faculty supervisor: Dr. Dan Smith

"Dendroclimatological and dendrohydrological reconstructions use the information contained in tree-rings to produce annually resolved hydroclimatic records that provide insight into long-term natural climate variability. In the British Columbia Coast Mountains, the climate sensitivity of several tree species offers the opportunity to develop records of environmental change spanning centuries. My research focuses on developing proxy records from a remote high elevation site in the Mt. Waddington area. The research objectives are to: 1) construct representative tree ring chronologies from samples collected adjacent to Waddington Glacier; 2) employ dendroclimatological methodologies to reconstruct a summer (June-July) air temperature record spanning the duration of the chronologies; 3) use dendrohydrological methodologies to reconstruct the Little Ice Age mass balance history of Waddington Glacier; and, 4) document any interannual and multidecadal relationships between these proxy records and large-scale climate patterns in Pacific North America. Field sampling in July 2017 enabled collection of core samples from subalpine fir (Abies lasiocarpa) and mountain hemlock trees (Tsuga mertensiana) located at the local treeline. The cores will be prepared for ring-width measurement and the individual series combined to produce master tree-ring chronologies. Transfer functions will be used to reconstruct records of the climate variable with the strongest relationship to each, and linear regression models will be employed to predict the past values. It is expected these proxy records will provide the first detailed insights into hydroclimatic changes at Waddington Glacier, potentially spanning the Little Ice Age interval."        


Conradi, Kai

Project title: Intersections of poetry and fiction in contemporary literature

Department: Writing

Faculty supervisor: Prof. Marita Dachsel

"For this project I will research the intersections between poetry and fiction. I would like to focus the first half of my project on research and the second half on writing my own multi-genre work. I’m particularly interested in writing narrative pieces that could be considered works of fiction, but that also exist very much in the world of poetry, with a strong focus on the individual line. As far as themes, I’m interested in identity and in the relationships between people. Over the course of the project, my goal is to write between two and four pieces, each between 1000-6000 words. I hope that this self-directed project will allow me the time and space to more deeply explore multi-genre work in a way that is not always possible or available in a workshop context."
               
               


Coulter, Brittany

Project title: Dendroglaciological investigations at Bell Glacier, British Columbia Coast Mountains

Department: Geography

Faculty supervisor: Dr. Dan Smith

"Retreating glaciers in the British Columbia Coast Mountains are exposing the remains of forests buried during Holocene-age glacial advances. Despite recent progress in discerning the extent of these advances in many regions of the Coast Mountains, almost nothing is known about the character of these advances for glaciers draining into the Klinaklini River from the Mt Waddington areas.  My research project focuses on describing the Holocene activity of Bell Glacier. The research has three objectives: 1) to use dendroglaciologic and radiocarbon analyses to describe Holocene glacier activity; 2) to employ tree-ring and lichenometric analyses to detail the Little Ice Age behaviour of these glaciers; and, 3) to use dendroclimatological analyses to develop proxy reconstructions of climate and mass balance relevant glaciers draining into the Klinaklini River. Field sampling will be completed in July 2018. Exposed subfossil wood exposed by erosion and/or glacier retreat will be collected and dated to identify when it was killed by an advancing glacier. Tree-ring samples will be cross-dated to living chronologies or sent for 14C analysis to establish kill dates. Reconstruction of the Holocene behaviour of these glaciers will contribute to our understanding of long-term responses of glaciers in this region to climatically-driven mass balance fluctuations over the Holocene. The research will assist in developing an understanding of the recent and Holocene behaviour of glaciers in this remote region and provide information crucial for resource managers charged with managing water supplies in coastal B.C. in the face of accelerating climate change."       


Craig, Caitlin

Project title: A Taphonomic Approach to the Study of Heat Treating Ostrich Eggshell Beads from the 11,500 year old site Grassridge (South Africa)

Department: Anthropology

Faculty supervisor: Dr. April Nowell

"The human body lies at the intersection between constructed identities and the construction of identities. It is both the site of lived experiences and a means of communicating those experiences. As product of both nature and culture, it can be modified to fulfill, challenge or rebel against ideals of beauty and expectations related to age, gender, and social status. One of the ways in which humans modify the body is through the use of personal ornaments (i.e., modified or unmodified objects that are worn on the body, often as beads, pendants, necklaces, bracelets, earrings, diadems, rings, or piercings). One of the oldest types of personal ornaments is ostrich eggshell beads that date back to at least 70,000 years ago. This project will take a taphonomic approach to the study of more than 450 ostrich eggshell beads from Grassridge, a 7,000-11,500 year old site in South Africa. Many of the beads from Grassridge have been exposed to fire. Caitlin will expose unmodified ostrich eggshell (purchased in Cape Town, South Africa) to heat, varying the temperature and length of exposure, in order to reproduce the range of colors (and other transformations) visible in the archaeological assemblage. This data will then be linked with stage of manufacture (there are 7 stages from preform to complete bead). The results of this study will allow us to address questions related to craft production and decision making among these early Holocene peoples (e.g., Is it more likely the beads were accidentally or purposefully exposed to heat? Does exposure to heat change/ameliorate properties of ostrich eggshell that might make it more less difficult to shape? If purposeful, was there a specific point in the manufacturing process when beads were heated/burned? Did these practices change over time?). The results of this experimental work will be added to a general analysis of the manufacturing stages of the beads, residue analysis, sourcing of the ostrich eggshell and other specialized studies. It is anticipated that at least one jointly authored paper will result from this work."
        
        


Crook, Rachael

Project title: Politics and Subversive Potentials in "Fat Burlesque"

Department: Gender Studies

Faculty supervisor: Dr. Laura Parisi

"Activists have argued that burlesque offers an opportunity for fat women to enjoy and celebrate their full bodies while simultaneously engaging in radical subversive performance. Through this research I aim to explore burlesque as a potential space for fat people to embody the theoretical and political aspects of “fat liberation” and to subvert norms of sexuality and beauty. I will conduct interviews with a number of self-identified fat burlesque performers in order to better understand the experiences and motivations of people who participate in “fat burlesque.”

Research of this type is important because it adds the voices of actual burlesque dancers to ongoing debates about the potentials of burlesque and contributes to a growing body of knowledge on experiences of fatness in a society that idealizes thinner body types.

Please note that I am using the term “fat” as part of work to reclaim it as a neutral descriptive term which does not make judgments about what a “normal” body or weight should be."


Crystal, Jamie

Project title: Owen Underhill - Three Reflections on Pride

Department: Music

Faculty supervisor: Dr. Suzanne Snizek

"This project will focus on Canadian composers and why it is important to play music written in our own country. Specific composers will include Kathryn Cernauskas and will focus on her work as not only a Canadian composer, but also as a performer and a publisher."


Cumberland, Mackenzie

Project title: The Effect of Changing Reference Groups on Female Happiness

Department: Economics

Faculty supervisor: Dr. Merwan Engineer

"The modern women’s movement of the 1970s ushered in a new era for women: women gained access to the contraceptive pill so that the number of unwanted births declined, and it became socially acceptable for women to go to work. The increase in women’s welfare that occurred throughout this period leads one to assume that a corresponding rise in female happiness took place. However, in 2011, Stevenson and Wolfers produced a provocative study, “The Paradox of Declining Female Happiness,” that shows women have actually become less happy since the women’s movement took place. One theory used to explain this paradox is that a “double shift” has occurred as women have entered the labour market and also retained their responsibilities running the household. However, research shows that men have increased the number of hours that they spend on household chores, while women have decreased their time spent on household tasks. Another theory is that the reference groups of women have expanded to include men and more successful women. Reference groups are defined as the people that individuals relate to and compare themselves to. They are used to form personal benchmarks of success. My research will compare the happiness of women who have remained in traditionally female jobs to those who were able to enter new industries because of the women’s movement to demonstrate that a change in reference groups is responsible for the apparent decline in female happiness that has occurred since the 1970s."
             
             


Davie, Farah

Project title: Exploring the impact of participation in an intergenerational choir on residents in long-term care

Department: Nursing

Faculty supervisor: Dr. Debra Sheets

"This project investigates the impact of participation in an intergenerational choir in residential care. Choir participants include residents with dementia, their family caregivers, and students (e.g., high school students). This will be the first professionally directed choir in residential care and the season will culminate with a public concert. The purpose of the choir is to reduce the stigma of dementia and increase social connections through a meaningful and enjoyable activity. Key outcomes of the study also include examining the impact of the choir on cognitive function, health and quality of life."
       
       


Davies, Emily

Project title: A ‘chemical fingerprint’ for drug detection and identification

Department: Chemistry

Faculty supervisor: Dr. Fraser Hof

"Drug detection and identification is important for law enforcement and harm reduction strategies. This project will involve the synthesis and study of ‘host’ molecules that bind a wide variety of illicit drugs, and that turn on a coloured and/or fluorescent response upon binding. The responses of a small array of sensors will constitute a unique fingerprint that defines the identity of a given drug. This study might also be extended to include other detectable molecules that are important for human health, such as amino acids and metabolites."
          
          


Davis, Jacob

Project title: Synthesis of Prospective Pharmaceuticals

Department: Chemistry

Faculty supervisor: Dr. Jeremy Wulff

"I will be designing novel molecules using techniques learned from previous courses. These will incorporate special functional groups (called sulfones) that have under-exploited properties in medicinal chemistry. In addition, the molecules will have rigid architectures designed to favour binding to biological targets. By adding different substituents, a useful drug-candidate may be obtained. All compounds will be evaluated by two different screening agencies: Eli Lilly and the Community for Open Antimicrobial Drug Discovery."        


Demarco, Hector

Project title: An Udder One Bites The Dust” Optimal Grazing Management and Land Degradation

Department: Economics

Faculty supervisor: Dr. Daniel Rondeau

"Land degradation affects at least 3.2 billion people through biodiversity loss, extinction of species, increasing food and water insecurity, and exacerbating climate change. The management of grazing lands is one of the most important direct drivers of land degradation. For this reason, understanding the extent to which farmers' economic incentives contribute to land degradation is possibly an important step towards reducing the rate of land degradation and devising policies to improve the welfare of individuals across the globe. This study develops a model of optimal grazing by an individual farmer who is trying to maximize the discounted lifetime profits they obtain from their private land. The model is simulated as a dynamic system of three differential equations linking soil, grass biomass, and the number of animals the farmer puts on the land.  The results show that the optimal grazing strategy is contingent on the initial levels of soil. If soil is abundant, the farmer's optimal grazing strategy is to choose a grazing rate that never degrades the land. If the soil levels are low, the farmer would intentionally deplete the land. If the soil levels are below a certain threshold, the land degradation would be imminent, regardless of the grazing rate chosen by the farmer. When the soil levels are low, governments can stop land degradation by introducing subsidies for farmers who keep livestock levels below a certain target."
         
         


Dhalla, Alanya

Project title: The Impact of Climate Change on Human Trafficking and Irregular Migration

Department: Interdisciplinary Academic Programs

Faculty supervisor: Dr. Margo Matwychuk

"This project will examine the links between climate change and irregular migration out of rural communities in India and Bangladesh. Currently, twenty-five per cent of current migratory movements are influenced by hazardous changes in climate resulting in violent storms and intense flooding. With current global trends, it is expected that this figure will increase significantly. Environmental disasters, which are intensified by climate change, results in family fragmentation, loss of livelihoods and support networks, disruption of social norms, and relocation into unsafe disaster relief camps. These conditions are shown to be conducive to gender-based violence, exploitation, and trafficking. I propose to expand on existing literature that indicates that rural, low class women are most vulnerable to consequences of climate change by exploring evidence which links climate change to gendered dimensions of poverty, irregular migration, trafficking for sexual exploitation, and trafficking for labour exploitation.

As I am currently completing a CAPI internship with the Global Alliance Against Traffic in Women International Secretariat (GAATW-IS) in Bangkok, Thailand, my primary source of information will be previous GAATW publications and project reports. However, I will also survey existing literature and reports within the past 5 years from GAATW’s member organisations based in India and Bangladesh, as well as IO’s, to determine if there is an increase in the use of third parties (whether coerced or willingly) for migration due to environmental changes."


Dias, Kim

Project title: Elements of a Fairy Tale: Necessities for a Retelling

Department: Writing

Faculty supervisor: Prof. Lee Henderson

"A study of what elements are necessary to retellings of fairy tales. For example, when does a modern retelling of Cinderella stop being Cinderella and become its own original story? I will examine what makes a story a fairy tale and what aspects of the fairy tale remain even as the story crosses genres—from literary fiction to poetry to young adult and children’s fiction to romances to erotica—in its multiple retellings. I’m currently most interested in the Cinderella story, mainly because of the transformation scene. I’m fascinated in how the transformation can be interpreted in so many different ways. S. T. Lynn’s Cinderella Ella is a story where Cinderella is transgender and the transformation lets her appear as herself rather than as a man; meanwhile, in Gail Carson Levine’s Ella Enchanted, the transformation is nothing more than a dress and the coach. What does transformation mean? What importance does it hold to different groups of people? Is it always positive or can it be a negative thing? I’m curious about whether the elements that allow fairy tales to be retold in so many different ways explains their timelessness, or if there is another aspect that accounts for our fascination with them over 200 years after the Grimm brothers first published Children's and Household Tales."


Dixon, Larissa

Project title: Case Study: Triquet Artifact

Department: Priority Initiative - Anthroplogy

Faculty supervisor: Dr. Quentin Mackie and Dr. Duncan McLaren

"Between 2012 and 2016 a UVic archaeology crew uncovered rare, 8,000 to 5,000 year old, wooden artifacts from the Triquet Island site, in Heiltsuk Territory.  I would like to do research on these to understand their function and utility.  In particular, I am interested in examining a wooden spindle whorl shaft. This project would involve research off-campus at the Royal BC Museum, Simon Fraser University, in Bella Bella with Heiltsuk knowledge keepers, and at the Heiltsuk Cultural Centre. Some experimental archaeology will also be pursued to help understand the dynamics of operating a spindle whorl."
   
   


Dobbs, Joseph

Project title: Using Yeast to Determine if Missense Mutations in Ars2 are Linked to Neuropathic Disease

Department: Biochemistry and Microbiology

Faculty supervisor: Dr. Perry Howard and Dr. Chris Nelson

"I will investigate a mammalian protein called Ars2 using Schizosaccharomyces pombe, also known as fission yeast. Fission yeast is a model organism with many features and pathways that are conserved with mammals and contains an Ars2 homolog called Pir2. We can use this homolog to make determinations about the equivalent protein in other organisms. While Ars2 is both essential to normal functioning in the cell and involved with arsenic sensitivity, how it contributes to that sensitivity is not known. I will investigate whether the homolog Pir2 is involved in the oxidative stress pathway and how it is involved with nonsense mediated decay. Specifically, I will examine the expression of a downstream transcription factor called Atf1. We expect that Pir2 will regulate an upstream regulatory protein called Upf1, thereby reducing the expression of the transcription factor Atf1 in a mutant Pir2 deficient cell. Furthermore, I will investigate the interaction between Pir2 and the centromeric cap complex- previous research suggests the binding is cap independent. I will test this hypothesis, and if successful generate mutations to determine which domains interact with validated Ars2 targets. This will allow us to determine which Ars2 interactions are involved with centromeric silencing."


Duquette, Rosalie

Project title: From Novel to Film: A Study of Angeles Mastretta's Arráncame la vida

Department: Hispanic and Italian Studies

Faculty supervisor: Dr. Dan Russek

"This project will explore the adaptation of Mexican writer Angeles Mastretta's novel Arráncame la vida (1985) into film. Mastretta's work will be explored through its political and social context and tied to the modern Mexican feminist movement as it developed and found its voice by the end of last century. I am interested in exploring how the personal and the political are interwoven in the story, as it follows the life and struggles of its female protagonist, Catalina Guzmán. Comparing the novel and the film, released in 2008, will also allow for exploring the director's choices in terms of message and impact on the audience."
        
        


Dussault Gomez, Marie-Anne

Project title: The Effect of Chronic Stress on the Cognitive Abilities of University Students

Department: Exercise Science, Physical and Health Education

Faculty supervisor: Dr. Olav Krigolson

"Physiological stress is a serious health issue that has been shown to affect physical abilities, including cognition. Amongst students, adequate cognition is crucial for academic success; however, many students suffer from both chronic and acute stress as a result of academic pressure, financial instability or social relationships, amongst other reasons. Thus, investigating the effects of chronic stress on cognition within a university student population is both relevant and important. As such, the purpose of this project is to investigate the effect of chronic stress on the cognitive abilities of students, as well to assess the practicality of a portable electroencephalography (EEG) recording device in the quantification of human stress. This project will utilize a MUSE device to record the EEG signal of participants completing a cognitive task and will use the perceived stress scale (PPS) to subjectively measure chronic stress experienced by participants. The correlation between PPS responses and EEG low beta wave power will be assessed in order to study the relationship between cognitive abilities and self-reported chronic stress."
       
       


Engstrom, Jacob

Project title: Inclusion in Exclusivity: Burial Practices in the Social and Political Developments of the Prepalatial Greek Mainland (MH I - LH II). With a Preliminary Case Study of Tomb 11 at Ancient Eleon, Central Greece

Department: Greek and Roman Studies

Faculty supervisor: Dr. Brendan Burke

"This project will investigate the changing burial practices of the Middle Helladic and Early Mycenaean (Late Helladic I - Late Helladic II) periods in the context of the social and political developments which led to the eventual institution of the Mycenaean palaces in LH II (ca. 1500 BCE). Focusing on the concepts of inclusion and exclusion in the burial practices of these periods, I will explore the meaning and utilization of these features in the forging of social stratification and emerging power and prestige in the Early Mycenaean period.  The newly excavated Tomb 11 at ancient Eleon in Boeotia, which was uncovered during the 2018 season of the Eastern Boeotia Archaeological Project, will provide an original case study by which to consider these practices."        


Fairley-Beam, Iris

Project title: Standards of Evidence in Sexual Assault Trials

Department: Philosophy

Faculty supervisor: Dr. Scott Woodcock

"Recent sexual assault trials in Canada (e.g., The Queen v Jian Ghomeshi), the National Inquiry into Missing and Murdered Indigenous Women, and the international #MeToo movement raise pressing ethical questions for the protection of the rights both of survivors and alleged perpetrators before the courts. Taking into consideration psychological research on traumatic memory and post-traumatic behaviour, I propose to examine how an ethics-based perspective can shed light on these difficult questions. How can the courts avoid retraumatizing survivors, while maintaining the right of alleged perpetrators to be considered innocent before proven guilty? Usually considered from the perspective of law, feminist ethics can provide principle guidelines as the courts adjust standards of evidence in the future."
          
          


Fitz-Gerald, Wylee

Project title: Dynamics of dissolved oxygen in the Labrador Sea as observed by robotic profiling floats

Department: Earth and Ocean Sciences

Faculty supervisor: Dr. Roberta Hamme

"The Labrador Sea is one of the few places where surface water sinks into the deep sea and spreads throughout the world’s deep oceans.  The oxygen content of this water is critical to deep-sea habitats both near and far.  Previous work using data from oxygen sensors on robotic profiling floats has identified that oxygen concentrations are lower when wintertime convection in the region reaches deeper or when convection shuts down earlier in the winter. These floats change their density to sink or rise through the water column, collecting data as they go and transmitting it to shore via satellite.  This JCURA project will examine oxygen data from robotic float deployments made since 2014 with two objectives.  First, I will investigate whether more recent data fits the previously observed pattern during wintertime convection.  Second, I will quantify the role of photosynthetic oxygen production during the spring period and what role this has in countering the wintertime low values."        


Fode, Dominic

Project title: Investigating Australia’s Sedimentary Reservoirs through Geologic History

Department: Earth and Ocean Sciences

Faculty supervisor: Dr. Jon Husson

"The earth’s sedimentary reservoirs provide unique insights into the history of the earth.  For the first time sedimentary basins through time are characterized for the Australian continent.  Utilizing the Macrostrat database and tools, analysis and interpretation of the sedimentary reservoirs is possible."        


Fraser, Jessica

Project title: Selfish X chromosomes and host-parasitoid interactions in Drosophila testacea

Department: Biology

Faculty supervisor: Dr. Steve Perlman

"“Selfish” genetic elements promote their own transmission to the next generation, regardless of how this may affect the organism that carries them. Sex-chromosome meiotic drive is a case where a selfish genetic element is found on a sex chromosome and promotes its transmission during meiosis, i.e. during sperm and egg formation. One example of this, called the “sex-ratio” trait (SR), is found on the X chromosome in several species of Drosophila flies. SR kills the Y-bearing sperm in males that carry it, so they only produce daughters. Aside from sex-ratio distortion, there may be other fitness “side effects” associated with SR. SR-bearing X chromosomes have been found not to undergo recombination normally during meiosis. This could lead to an accumulation of harmful mutations on the X chromosome, since the mechanism for getting rid of them is disrupted. I will investigating whether the presence of SR in Drosophila testacea affects host-parasitoid interactions with Leptopilina heterotoma, a parasitoid wasp that attacks larval Drosophila. I will expose colonies of larval D. testacea comprising both wild-type and SR-type individuals to L. heterotoma and compare the proportions of each genotype in the emerging adult flies to the proportions in non-exposed colonies. This will indicate whether flies of a particular genotype are parasitized at higher rates. The results will provide insight into whether there are interactions between parasitoids and the SR “genetic parasite,” which is currently unknown and would have implications for the population ecology of species with similar meiotic drive systems."


              
              


Frost, Lauren

Project title: Casting Call: White Neutrality and Gender Binary in Theatre and Film

Department: Gender Studies

Faculty supervisor: Dr. Laura Parisi

"Drawing on current literature and interviews with working and aspiring professionals, this project will explore the history of white neutrality and adherence to the gender binary in theatre and film casting. Additionally, it will discuss the recent trend of “colour blind casting” and whether or not it can actually solve issues of racism in the industry, as well as the potential of gender neutral casting and the implications it would have for the performing arts."        


Gannon, Kiara

Project title: Traits of extinction: the conservation of species at risk in British Columbia

Department: Environmental Studies

Faculty supervisor: Dr. Brian Starzomski

"We are facing a global biodiversity crisis in which extinction is occurring at an unnaturally high rate as a consequence of human activities. Biodiversity loss has profound human consequences, including habitat change and the loss of ecosystem services. In British Columbia (BC), much of the biodiversity and human land-use is concentrated in species at risk hotspots (southern Vancouver Island and the south Okanagan), creating land-use conflicts. Developing a framework of attributes (termed “correlates of extinction”) that predispose species to extinction in the face of disturbance helps us to predict future risks and minimize human impact on biodiversity. This study examines correlates of extinction in two species at risk hotspots in BC by comparing trophic level, longevity, body mass, plant height, and range peripherality of species at risk to not at risk species. We predict that these attributes are distributed non-randomly between species at risk and not at risk species due to their influence on species vulnerability to anthropogenic change. This study will group eight major taxa together to examine the relevance of these correlates of extinction across taxa. By comparing attributes of species at risk and not at risk species collectively in southern Vancouver Island and southern Okanagan, we expect to gain insight into whether correlates of extinction influence species vulnerability in these conservation hotspots regardless of taxa."


Glassford, Blake

Project title: Tale of Two Democracies: Examining the Effectiveness of U.N. Democratization Missions

Department: Political Science

Faculty supervisor: Dr. Scott Watson

"For this research project, I plan on examining the effectiveness of U.N. sponsored democratization missions in post-conflict States. By conducting a most similar comparative case study of two sub-Saharan countries that have been the subjects of similar U.N. missions, in terms of mission mandate and dedicated resource that ended in drastically different results, to examine the political, social and economic contexts that influence mission results."
    
    


Graham, Sarah

Project title: How Can (un)Learning Settler Ancestry Challenge Settler Colonialism?

Department: Interdisciplinary Academic Programs

Faculty supervisor: Dr. Georgia Sitara

"When asked about my ancestral heritage a few years ago, I had little to say other than that my family has been in Canada for many generations and we are of vaguely European descent. Such a disconnection with the land that my ancestors immigrated from and a lack of understanding about why they chose to leave, allows settlers like me to imagine ourselves as the original people of this land, rather than its occupiers.

By taking responsibility for our own learning, settlers (especially those of European descent) can begin to interrogate how our histories are entangled with and inform the ongoing dispossession of Indigenous territories. Through this research, I will review literature written by settler and Indigenous scholars about settler identity and experience on Turtle Island to outline possibilities for peaceful coexistence with Indigenous peoples.

Ancestral research is a worthwhile effort that has the potential to substantially shift settler consciousness, but it must be embarked upon cautiously and with the acknowledgement that it is a settler project, rather than one which benefits or upholds the sovereignty of Indigenous nations. However, a more nuanced understanding of what it means to hold a settler identity could make anti-colonial solidarity efforts both more effective and genuine."


Gray, Morgan

Project title: Organic food and the Valuing of Intrinsic Goals

Department: Psychology

Faculty supervisor: Dr. Frederick Grouzet

"A growing movement for “Slow” foods, local foods, traditional foods and whole foods demonstrates the importance of relationship to food for the human organism. Using the Dual Valuing Process Model (Grouzet, 2013), it is predicted that proximity to an organic food will act as an organismic call, resulting in valuing intrinsic goals."
          
          


Gregory, Elizabeth

Project title: Does attachment style influence the gist perception of facial emotions?

Department: Psychology

Faculty supervisor: Dr. James Tanaka

"Attachment style is known to influence emotion perception. Individuals who display a highly anxious attachment style tend to show lower thresholds for perceptions of negative expressions of emotion, while individuals with avoidant attachment styles tend to be less responsive to both negative and positive valence expressions. However, the temporal effects of attachment style on emotion perception have not yet been investigated. Face recognition research shows that we only need a very short amount of time (less than 100 ms) – what has been referred to as gist perception - to recognize the identity of a face.  However, it is unclear how much time is needed to recognize facial expressions.  In the proposed research, we will examine the relationship between attachment style and gist expression recognition.  We will assess attachment style using a validated adult attachment style questionnaire (Revised Adult Attachment Scale, 1996). We will test gist expression recognition using holistic paradigm in which faces with negative, positive, or neutral expressions will be presented at very brief, display times. We will determine how much time is needed to correctly identify facial expressions and whether attachment style plays a role in the early, “gist” stages of emotion recognition. We expect that participants with an anxious attachment style will identify negative expressions at shorter display times, whereas participants with avoidant attachment style will need longer display times to recognize both positive and negative expressions."


Grills, Ryan

Project title: Chinas Growing Debt is a Global Problem

Department: Peter B. Gustavson School of Business

Faculty supervisor: Prof. Komal Kalra

"China is known as one of the fastest growing major markets but in doing so, they have accumulated debt at an unprecedented level. Their buildup of debt began with a large stimulus package to escape the financial hardship of 2008 and continued as a way to maintain their impressive growth. With their current trade war with the US, a slowing economy and foreign countries struggling to repay their loans, their debt load may have reached a tipping point. This report will analyze the global impact of a Chinese financial crisis and potential ways to mitigate the issue, beyond what the Chinese government has done so far."        


Hack, Karine

Project title: History's Playthings; Exploring Trauma through Thing Theory

Department: English

Faculty supervisor: Dr. Nicole Shukin

"An examination of historical trauma through the lens of the family unit and objects. Through two books, The God of Small Things by Arundhati Roy, and Fugitive Pieces by Anne Michaels, I will explore the question of how historical trauma is archived and made tangible in objects.

Focusing on two traumatic histories - that of British colonialism and the Holocaust - I will research the ways in which the history tangibly carried by objects manifests both private and public human experience. By drawing our gaze to the lives of things, these two books imagine a different way to tell the stories of diasporic and post-colonial peoples. In doing so, these texts reverse a colonial gaze which seeks to objectify and dehumanize peoples. Through thing theory, I will explore how these novels blur the boundaries between human and object, thus radically reclaiming and reimagining what it means to be seen as "less than human."
       
       


Haisell, Camille

Project title: Systemic Racism & Mental Health: Effects of 1940s Canadian Policies of Dispossession and Internment on Japanese Canadians in BC Psychiatric Care

Department: History

Faculty supervisor: Dr. Jordan Stanger-Ross

"My proposed research project will be based on archival material digitized in the summer of 2017 by myself and three other members of the Provincial Records cluster of the Landscapes of Injustice research collective. My project will analyze patient case files from the Riverview and Essondale psychiatric institutions in BC and investigate the effects of the dispossession and internment of Japanese Canadians during WWII on their mental health. Specifically, it will examine how abrupt separation from families, forced removal from home, and racist/exclusionary societal and governmental actions manifested within the mental wellbeing of Japanese Canadians and how Japanese Canadian patients related their experiences of dispossession and internment to their mental states. Numerous Japanese Canadians were admitted near the time of dispossession and internment, and many files explicitly connect the patient’s condition with these upheavals. Moreover, correspondence between the British Columbia Security Commission (the corporate body responsible for the relocation and internment of Japanese Canadians), hospital staff, and patients’ families provide valuable information on the role of the BCSC in patients’ wellbeing and its role within the hospital system at the time. This is a valuable research avenue as it will contribute to an ongoing and much needed conversation on mental health, highlighting the serious effects that Canada’s policies of systemic racism can have on a population’s mental health. This project will be
contextualized within a history of medicine and psychiatric institutions in Canada
."        


Harrington, Marisa

Project title: The Effects of Multiple Concussions on Heart Rate Variability

Department: Exercise Science, Physical and Health Education

Faculty supervisor: Dr. Lynneth Stuart-Hill

"The coordination between the parasympathetic and sympathetic autonomic nervous systems becomes impaired when an individual suffers a concussion. This dysfunction can be observed through measurement of heart rate variability (HRV). This project will examine how concussions influence this phenomenon, specifically whether the amount of concussions exacerbates the impaired coordination of the autonomic divisions through measurement of HRV during rest, exercise, and recovery in participants who have suffered two or more concussions in the last 10 years. Participants will rest for 12 minutes and then undergo an exercise protocol a cycle ergometer consisting of a 6 minute steady submaximal load that will lead to an incremental test to exhaustion (VO2 peak). This will be followed by a 12 minute recovery period. The HRV profiles of participants will be compared to matched controls to determine the effects of concussions on HRV and consequently, the relationship between neurological and cardiovascular health and functioning."
       
       


Haupt, Alexandra

Project title: Doing” Sociology: Undergraduate Learning through Community Engaged Research

Department: Sociology

Faculty supervisor: Dr. Bruce Ravelli

"My research will explore the topic of community engaged learning as a method of practicing public sociology. Through my involvement in an intergenerational community applied theatre project that addresses seniors’ sexuality and the stigmas that surround it, my research will investigate what the process of community engaged learning can add to sociological education. Using the community theatre project as a case study, I will study the benefits and challenges of using my training as a sociologist to help a community project succeed. My final project will combine a narrative based approach and personal reflection to explore and analyze the field of community engaged learning at the undergraduate level."        


Hiebert, Avery

Project title: Using independent component analysis to investigate hidden states of an LSTM performing sentiment analysis

Department: Computer Science

Faculty supervisor: Dr. Nishant Mehta

"The hidden state of a Long Short-Term Memory (LSTM) network performing a natural language task encodes information about a text in a way that is difficult for humans to understand.  This project investigates the use of independent component analysis to better understand what an LSTM performing sentiment analysis encodes in its hidden state and how this affects the model's final classification.  We find some interpretable patterns that emerge from ICA, and also identify potential disadvantages of analyzing the hidden state in this way."
             


Higham-Leisen, Pascale

Project title: Neuroaesthetics and Vulnerability in Early Modern and Renaissance Art

Department: Art History and Visual Studies

Faculty supervisor: Dr. Catherine Harding

"I will be exploring and analyzing vulnerability in selected images in Early Modern and Renaissance art through a neuroaesthetic approach. Using a neuroaesthetic approach when analyzing art is crucial to understanding how people were affected by the pieces during that period and if it affects us in the same way now. Through Adrian Randolph and other scholars, the exploration of how women at this time would have perceived artworks such as Botticelli's Venus and Mars will be prevalent in my analysis. In this project there will be research based on new scholarship in neuroaesthetics, particularly art historical studies which analyze the brain and nervous system in order to understand what prompts people to feel a range of emotions when perceiving art. Personally, I have been emotionally moved by the art of the Early Modern and Renaissance periods. For example, some art brings me to tears or others leave me in a state of shared vulnerability with the characters, artists, and those who would have viewed it in the past. By exploring emotional reactions to art we can more deeply understand historical narratives, societies, and understand better how art can change opinions and inspire people."
         
         


Hills, Rory

Project title: Evaluation of real-time drug-checking technologies

Department: Chemistry

Faculty supervisor: Prof. Dennis Hore

"Analytical instrumentation for drug-checking offers the possibility of rapid identification of substances based on their molecular fingerprint. In addition to matching these fingerprints to those stored in a database for identification, there is a further opportunity for harm reduction through the analysis of trends. This project will use Raman spectroscopy, gas chromatography, mass spectrometry, and IR absorption to develop protocols for the storage, analysis, and sharing of data."
           
           


Hogan, Mikaila

Project title: HIV in Older Adults

Department: Anthropology

Faculty supervisor: Dr. Eric Roth

"The number of adults over 50 years of age living with HIV is on the rise worldwide. There are two reasons for the growth in this demographic. First, people with HIV are living longer lives due to treatment options like (HAART), which makes HIV a chronic, manageable illness. Secondly, the number of new HIV infections in older adults is increasing (Davis, Thornton, Oslin, & Zanjani, 2014; Guo & Sims, 2017; Greene et al., 2015; Harris, Emlet, Parker, & Furlotte, 2018; Roberson, 2018). In Canada in 2015, approximately 24% of new diagnoses were of adults over 50 years old and the new cases in this age group has been steadily increasing over the last five years (Bourgeois et al., 2017; HIV in Canada, 2016). The main research questions this research will address are: (1) how to create successful HIV education and prevention programs aimed at adults over 50 years of age by assessing their existing knowledge; and (2) how to improve training for healthcare providers to normalize discussions of sex and HIV prevention for older adults?"


Horne, Christopher

Project title: A Common Objective: Ideological Resistance in the Poetry of Louis Zukofsky and George Oppen

Department: English

Faculty supervisor: Dr. Luke Carson

"The American poets Louis Zukofsky (1904-1978) and George Oppen (1908-1984) both started their poetic careers in the midst of a vibrant modernist movement in poetry which for them was dominated by the innovative work of Ezra Pound. They were especially interested in Pound's attempt to write a poetry that could engage with the political and economic crises of the twenties and thirties, though as Jewish Americans interested in Marxism and socialism they found his economic ideas naive and his emerging anti-Semitism abhorrent. For my JCURA, I propose to examine how the early work of Zukofsky and Oppen shapes its political engagements in relation to poetic tradition and to modernist experimentalism, as well as to the ethnic and cultural difference of their minority status. Distinguishing themselves as members of a movement they called "Objectivism," Zukofsky and Oppen conceived of poetics as a form of knowledge that reframed experience in a way that could resist ideological forms of perception. My main focus will be the work of Oppen, who almost immediately after his first book withdrew from the literary world and exiled himself in Mexico to engage in political organizing. I will compare his first slim book (Discrete Series​, 1932) with some of his later work (particularly the long poem "Of Being Numerous," from the eponymous Pulitzer prize-winning book published in 1968) and with the post-Depression and post-World War Two work of Zukofsky in order to understand how Oppen's poetics changed under historical pressure between the thirties and the sixties."
        
        


Horning, Carilia

Project title: Place-Based Literature Instruction for Elementary School Children

Department: English

Faculty supervisor: Dr. Stephen Ross

"What would it look like to bring University-level study of literature and culture to elementary school children? How could we encourage a lifelong love of these topics, and give children a taste for experiential and engaged learning? How can we do this in ways that are especially resonant for this particular place, Victoria? My project will combine research and practical application to produce prototype instructional units grounded in a place-based literature curriculum. 

First, I will research existing best practices and principles of curriculum and programme design for teaching literature and culture to young children. I will supplement the existing scholarship by consulting with local elementary school teachers, indigenous peoples, and other community stakeholders to discover how these principles and practices might be adapted to our specific place. I will detail the results of my research in a brief research paper (2000 words). That paper will conclude with recommendations regarding which new lines of development seem most promising for devising place-based literature curriculum for young children. In the second phase of my project, I will design curriculum and programming on two scales: a) for a single day unit, and b) for a one-week unit. I will be guided in this development by an emphasis on the specificities of place, histories of colonialism, and the strong desire to inculcate a lifelong love of literature in young students. 

I will present the final design, with its rationale, principles, best practices, and examples at the JCURA Research Fair."        


Hrusik, Curtis

Project title: Moving Beyond Consistency: Motivations for a Non-Explosive Logical Consequence Relation

Department: Philosophy

Faculty supervisor: Dr. Audrey Yap

"This project will further investigate reasons for—and consequences of—a move from classical logic to a non-classical logic, specifically to a paraconsistent logic. Accordingly, it will examine whether there is a good argument for rejecting the principle of explosion of classical logic; and, subsidiarily, what (if anything) this says about the epistemic status of this principle."
     
     


Hunter, Stuart

Project title: « L'extrait théâtral dans le Mercure de France, 1724-1744 » which is in English "The theatrical extract in the Mercure de France, 1724-1744" (Mercure de France italicized.)

Department: French

Faculty supervisor: Dr. Sara Harvey

"The periodical press, a phenomenon of paramount importance in the history of media, is often associated with industrialization, but it emerges and develops largely in France during the early modern period. It marked the creation of several new forms of discourse, including the object of this project: the theatrical extract. To define this literary form, one must go beyond the dictionaries of the period – the term’s usage precedes its definition, and definitions remain inadequate or nonexistent until the mid-eighteenth century. The composition and function of the theatrical extract will be analysed through the Mercure de France - the exemplary periodical due to its long and consistent periodicity. We have chosen a sufficiently large sample to explore the question: 108 extracts of plays from the Comédie-Française between 1724 and 1744, which corresponds to the long career of Antoine de La Roque at the head of the Mercure."
             
             


Kapp, Sarah

Project title: De-Mythicizing the Artist: How Gauguin Shaped his Identity in Response to the Emerging European Art Market

Department: Art History and Visual Studies

Faculty supervisor: Dr. Catherine Harding

"The scholarship on Paul Gauguin (1848-1903) views his artwork through an anachronistic twenty-first century bias.  For contemporary viewers, the Tahitian oeuvre is particularly problematic. This research explores how we might re-invent the category of biography, applying a more critical lens to those places where it is too celebratory or judgemental, as well as needing the leavening force of the socio-economic field of art production.

Adopting a Materialist/Marxist approach, I have analyzed Gauguin’s production of his first album of prints, known as the Volpini Suite (1889), during a critical moment where he is re-evaluating his identity as an artist. His career trajectory is impacted by key events such as the 1882 stock market crash, the 1886 final Impressionist exhibition, the 1889 Exposition Universelle in Paris. By defining the precise historical conditions surrounding the Volpini Suite, Gauguin can be reinterpreted as a conscious cultural producer and adept marketer, in a critical period in his career before travelling to Tahiti in 1891. A dominant trend in the scholarship is to adopt Post-Colonial and Feminist approaches to the entirety of his oeuvre. Gauguin, like most artists operating during the late-nineteenth century, had to navigate both the challenges and opportunities presented by contemporary social, political, and economic forces. Understanding the precise nature of these cultural forces are vital to the re-positioning of the artist and offer art historians a new way to work with biography and the socio-economic production of art."
          
          


Kennedy, Jessica

Project title: An Environmental Scan of Social Work Response to the Overdose Crisis in Canada

Department: Social Work

Faculty supervisor: Dr. Bruce Wallace

"Canada is facing an illicit drug overdose crisis that has been getting dramatically worse over the past few years. Social workers are front-line responders to this crisis. The purpose of this research project will be to understand how social work as a profession is responding to the overdose crisis and what we can learn to inform responses. An environmental scan of national and provincial social work regulatory organizations and associations will be conducted in addition to a review of the literature. Results will be consolidated and findings shared back to the national and provincial organizations."


Kenyon, Madeleine

Project title: Forgiveness as a Societal Disservice: An Exploration of the Social Dangers of Forgiving Wrongdoers

Department: Philosophy

Faculty supervisor: Professor Klaus Jahn

"Among some psychologists and philosophers, it is sometimes suggested that unconditional forgiveness on behalf of a victim of wrongdoing is a moral virtue, regardless of the nature of the wrong.  I will argue that it may actually be morally preferable not to forgive a wrongdoer, in the name of upholding a safe and responsible society.  Specifically, I have in mind questions of gendered violence, and whether (unconditional) forgiveness of such violence may actually incite more instances of gendered violence, and undesirable social conduct, as a result of perpetrators not being held sufficiently morally responsible for their wrongs."
      
      


Kirchner, Liam

Project title: Improving Emergency Water Treatment in Rohingyan Refugee Camps

Department: Civil Engineering

Faculty supervisor: Dr. Caetano Dorea

"In the aftermath of a disaster, individuals and communities often lose access to adequate quantities of clean water required for proper hygiene and consumption. This can result in an increased incidence of diarrheal diseases, one of the major contributors to the overall death rate following a disaster. To limit the prevalence of such diseases, the swift re-establishment of a clean water supply is vital. In emergency situations, water treatment is usually achieved through a chemically-assisted “batch” sedimentation strategy inspired by conventional treatment approaches. In this process, aluminum sulfate is used to condition suspended particles for quicker settling and clarification. For efficient settling to occur, conditioned particles must be provided optimum conditions to collide and agglomerate. This process is referred to as flocculation, and is achieved by inducing specific energy inputs to the system. The flocculation process however is not included in “batch” treatment for the sake of simplicity in resource-limited contexts, and thus, longer settling times can result. With the onset of monsoon season, the “batch” water treatment system currently implemented in Rohingyan Refugee camps in Bangladesh will experience decreased drinking water production due to high source water particle loadings. The proposed solution requested by Oxfam, a major humanitarian relief agency, is to design and implement a portable flocculation unit to the existing system to improve particle settling times. The research conducted aims to determine whether successful flocculation can occur in a portable flocculator designed within the size and cost requirements of the project."
    
    


Kopik, Bruna

Project title: Your cheque is in the mail: A theoretical study of remittances

Department: Economics

Faculty supervisor: Dr. Alok Kumar

"Foreign workers contribute to poverty reduction through sending money (remittances) home to their family members. Remittances are associated with lower poverty levels and improvements in human capital indicators of the recipient countries, such as education and health. According to the World Bank, remittances to low- and middle-income countries reached approximately US$441 billion in 2015, a figure three times the volume of official aid flows. Yet, remittances do not necessarily lead to economic growth. In fact, they can pose negative impacts to recipient countries. Remittances can lead to currency appreciation, causing exports prices to go up and import prices to be cheaper. As a result, there is a reduction in export levels and increase in import levels. Moreover, in situations where remittances mainly finance consumption rather than investment, they fail to translate into sustainable growth. Using a Real Business Cycle (RBC) model, I will consider the implications of remittances in the economic growth of Honduras over the period 1974-2016."
        
        


Kuo, Tiffany

Project title: The representation of the Chiac vernacular, its speakers and other linguistic groups in Acadieman

Department: French

Faculty supervisor: Dr. Catherine Léger

"The animated series Acadieman, which aired on Rogers TV from 2005 to 2009 in both English and French, features the first Acadian superhero (sort of) who works in a call center in the Moncton region and speaks a variety of Acadian French known as Chiac. Peppered with Maritime terms and phonological and lexical archaisms, it also makes extensive use of English borrowings. Because Chiac has been viewed (and still is to a certain extent) as corrupted French, native speakers often suffer from linguistic insecurity. However, both Chiac and local identity have received validation through their representations in media, especially local radio shows and the works of artists (novels, songs, and Acadieman, for instance). With regards to Acadieman, despite initial limited exposure during its first year of existence, the series has grown to be widely successful, winning awards and being readily available in francophone stores across Canada. In this project, I focus on the episodes of the three seasons of the animated series in order to analyze the protagonist’s use of Chiac, that is, the particular ratio of archaic terms, nautical words and English loanwords he employs, which can reveal the particular view of Chiac that Dano LeBlanc, the creator of Acadieman, holds. I probe as well Acadieman’s interactions with other linguistic groups. Examining the relationships Acadieman has with speakers of other languages and dialects, including Québécois French which is often considered as superior, could shed light on the evolving attitudes towards Chiac, which has gained greater recognition in Canada."
              
              


Laird, Monica

Project title: “The Empire Traveller”: Purposeful Tourism in Western Canada, 1885 -1914

Department: History

Faculty supervisor: Dr. Mariel Grant

"With this project, I will be looking at British tourism in Canada during the late Victorian and Edwardian periods, with a special emphasis on tourism propaganda. By studying posters, guidebooks and advertisements, I will explore how Canada was viewed and portrayed as a destination for British tourists and as a part of the British Empire. I will also examine travel writings by British visitors to Canada. I will explore how common Canada was as a destination for aristocratic and wealthy tourists during this time period, why they chose Canada as their destination, how their travels were influenced by their perception of the British Empire, and how their time in Canada might have affected these perceptions. By doing so, I hope to extend our understanding of how Canada was viewed and portrayed by the wider world and how Canada was experienced by tourists in the decades preceding the First World War."        


Laketic, Katarina

Project title: Characterization of the neutral components of methylalumoxane using charge-tagging

Department: Chemistry

Faculty supervisor: Dr. Scott McIndoe

"The objective is to create a charged tag that is able to successfully attach itself to Methylalumoxane in order to then use ESI-MS to solve for the neutral components of MAO in the presence of said charged tag. By understanding the composition of MAO, it will allow for further understanding of its characteristics along with new suggestions for alternative and cheaper ways to synthesize MAO."
            
            


Lang, David

Project title: A History of the Conflict Over Raw Log Exports in British Columbia

Department: History

Faculty supervisor: Dr. Tom Saunders and Dr. Richard Rajala

"British Columbians have debated how to best manage their forest industry since the earliest days of the colony. As early as 1853, governments created legislation designed to develop and support forestry based value-added industries. However, by the early 21st century, raw logs made up a record percentage of BC’s forestry exports. How did this happen and what has it meant for the people of the province?"


Leclerc, Etienne

Project title: Switching in (m, n)-Mixed Graphs

Department: Mathematics and Statistics

Faculty supervisor: Dr. Gary MacGillivray

"The goal of the project is to try to extend results in the literature concerning switching and homomorphisms of m-edge-coloured graphs to the more general situation of (m, n)-mixed graphs (a special case of which are the former)."
      
      


Lee, Christopher

Project title: 3D-Bioprinting Brain Tumor Models for Screening Chemotherapeutic Agents

Department: Mechanical Engineering

Faculty supervisor: Dr. Stephanie Willerth

"Glioblastoma, a malignant cancer originating from the astrocyte cells of the brain, is one of the most aggressive and deadliest forms of cancer. Glioblastoma shows a high resistance against most of current anti-cancer drugs. One of the difficulties when developing anti-cancer drugs is the difficulty relating successful effectiveness of a drug in 2D cell culture to effectiveness in animal and human trials. Recurrence in glioblastoma is in part caused by the invasion of a subset of glioblastoma cells known as glioblastoma stem cells invading surrounding tissue, which is extremely difficult to replicate using 2D cell culture. Aspect Biosystems 3D Bioprinter called the RX1 can create complex layering of glioblastoma cells between neuronal and glial cells of the brain, generating an in vitro replicate of the natural environment of the brain. These "mini-brains" can then be used to screen anticancer drug effectiveness in stopping glioblastoma stem cells from invading the surrounding tissue, thus bridging the gap between 2D cell culture and animal models and allowing for an easier road for drug development. This project aims to develop a synthetic tumor invasiveness model (STIM) by 3d bio-printing glioblastoma stem cells in the presence of various neural tissue. Known effective anti-cancer drugs will then be used to verify effectiveness of the STIMs produced."

      


Li, YuQi

Project title: Enhancing cancer immunotherapy by engineering T cells to express a dominant – negative form of Cbl-b

Department: Biochemistry and Microbiology

Faculty supervisor: Dr. Brad Nelson

"Adoptive T cell therapy (ACT) is a powerful form of personalized cancer immunotherapy that has shown promise in the treatment of certain cancer types. However, as a treatment for solid tumors, ACT has limitations, including barriers that prevent T cells from entering the tumor bed to elicit their cytolytic activity. The project aims to improve ACT for the treatment of solid cancers by engineering T cells with enhanced ability to infiltrate tumors and carry out their cytolytic activity within the immunosuppressive tumor microenvironment.

Casitas B-lineage lymphoma proto-oncogene-b (Cbl-b) is a negative regulator of T cell receptor (TCR) signaling, enzymatically tagging positive regulators of the signaling pathway for degradation. Accordingly, our lab has previously observed enhanced efficacy of ACT using Cbl-b-null T cells in a mouse breast cancer model.

To enable future clinical trials of this concept, we require a reliable, feasible means to block Cbl-b function in T cells. The project will use a lentiviral expression system to engineer T cells (both human and murine) to stably express a “dominant-negative” form of Cbl-b, i.e. a mutant that will outcompete wild-type Cbl-b for binding to its target molecules but lacking any enzymatic activity. We will test the hypothesis that these T cells will exhibit enhanced signaling and proliferation in response to TCR stimulation, and elicit superior efficacy in a mouse tumor model of ACT, compared to wild-type T cells. In addition, we hope to observe by immunohistochemistry, improved T cell infiltration into solid tumors."
           
           


Light, Erin

Project title: The development of Executive Functions and Pragmatic Skills in Preschoolers

Department: Psychology

Faculty supervisor: Dr. Ulrich Mueller

"My project explores the relationship between the development of executive functions and pragmatic skills in preschool children. Executive functions are the cognitive processes we utilize when facing new tasks, or in goal-directed behavior. Pragmatic skills are the social aspects of language that allow us to use it effectively, and appropriately in different social contexts. The preschool age is a period of rapid development in both cognitive processes and language, offering a unique opportunity to study the changes in both over a relatively short period. Although previous research has found a relationship between executive functions and language, research on pragmatic skills in particular is quite sparse. As deficits in both executive functions and pragmatic skills are seen in certain developmental disorders, such as ASD and ADHD, understanding the relationship between the two could be key when creating programs to help such children.  As well, if a predictive relationship exists between the two it could be useful in the development of education practices with typically developing children who show slower development in particular areas. With my research in the Child Development Lab under the supervision of Dr. Mueller I hope to help clarify what the relationship between pragmatic skills and executive functions may be, and how it can be useful when working with young children."        


Liu, Amy

Project title: Opsins in the dark: The evolution of light sensing proteins in three distantly related cavefish

Department: Biology

Faculty supervisor: Dr. John Taylor

"Opsin genes encode G-protein-coupled receptors that are light sensitive when bound to a retinal-derived chromophore. Fish have surprisingly large opsin repertoires. When the so-called ‘visual’ and ‘non-visual’ opsins are all considered, repertoires of >30 genes are not uncommon; zebrafish have 10 visual opsins and 32 non-visual opsins.  This is perplexing: high resolution contrast sensitivity and wavelength discrimination, and circadian rhythm entrainment are well characterized in species with far fewer.  Also intriguing is the observation that many opsins (visual and non-visual) are expressed in  the brain, heart, skin and testis, as well as eyes. I am testing the hypothesis that opsin do more than sense light, by identifying those conserved in three species that have evolved in perpetual darkness, the Mexican cavefish, the Chinese cavefish and the cistern catfish, from Brazil. My research will study patterns of sequence evolution in all opsins we find in genome and transcriptome sequences."
    
    


Liu, Pengqi

Project title: On R-Optimal Designs for Regression Models

Department: Mathematics and Statistics

Faculty supervisor: Prof. Julie Zhou

"Optimal designs are worthwhile to be analyzed for regression models because an appropriate design will reduce the costs of experimentation while estimating parameters without bias and with minimum variance. For a given regression model, the optimal design problem typically involves choosing a design with certain number of design points and associated weights to best estimate the parameters. An optimality-criterion should be specified before computing an optimal design with respect to a model. There are many optimality-criteria, and the choice of a criterion depends on the specific situation.

In this project, we will study an interesting R-optimality criterion for regression models and compare it with A- and D-optimality criteria. The corresponding design problems can be transformed into convex optimization problems. We plan to apply CVX program in MATLAB to construct optimal designs for various applications."
       
       


Lloyd, Kelsey

Project title: Comparing Neural Activity Between Indoor and Outdoor Exercise Using a Portable EEG

Department: Exercise Science, Physical and Health Education

Faculty supervisor: Dr. Olav Krigolson

"My research will be investigating the change in neural activity between exercising indoors and exercising outdoors in nature. Subject’s neural activity will be recorded before and during exercising in both conditions using a portable EEG device. My research will be important in providing further evidence for implementing outdoor programming."
        
        


Louie, Michaela

Project title: Sisters Rising: Honouring Body and Land Sovereignty

Department: Priority Initiative - Child and Youth Care

Faculty supervisor: Dr. Sandrina de Finney

"Sisters Rising is a community-engaged, Indigenous-led, SSHRC-funded study looking at honouring Indigenous responses to gender and sexualized violence. The project engages Indigenous girls and youth of all genders in using arts and land-based materials to re-story Indigenous teachings of gender wellbeing."


Ma, Canice

Project title: BRCA Consenting Seminar Outcomes Proposal

Department: Nursing

Faculty supervisor: Ms. Laurie Barnhardt

"Ovarian cancer is the most fatal women’s cancer where every day, five Canadian women will die from the illness. Recent advances in the hereditary understanding of the disease have shown a significant role of the BRCA gene where this genetic marker can indicate an increase in cancer risk, as well as serving as a possible targeted treatment option for women. Identifying a mutation with the BRCA gene can also provide an opportunity for genetic testing to be performed for relatives, which can allow for preventative approaches to be taken. The purpose of this study is to evaluate the use of a seminar model to provide education and obtain consent for genetic testing for individuals with ovarian cancer. The investigators hypothesize that the seminar model is effective in providing education and obtaining consent, resulting in decreased wait times from diagnosis to test results while increasing the number of eligible individuals completing genetic testing."
 
 


MacIlroy, Alycia

Project title: Gendered Medicine: Exploring Female and Male Anatomy in Ancient Medical Texts

Department: Greek and Roman Studies

Faculty supervisor: Dr. Mark Nugent

"This project will center on the genderization of male and female anatomy in ancient Greek and Roman medical practices. This will primarily focus on the theorizations and philosophies of the Hippocratic Corpus, Celsus, Soranus, and Galen, all prevalent medical theorists of their respective eras. Through the textual and material evidence surrounding these medical practitioners, this study will focus on how genderization of the body impacted the study of anatomy in the ancient Mediterranean."        


Marks, Lindy

Project title: An Analysis of Victorian Gender Norms: Narratives and Popular Representations of Maria Manning

Department: History

Faculty supervisor: Dr. Simon Devereaux

"On 9 August 1849, Maria Manning and her husband Frederick George murdered Maria’s lover, Patrick O’Connor. This murder came to be known as the “Bermondsey Horror” and had a deep cultural impact. Charles Dickens based Mademoiselle Hortense, the maid in his novel Bleak House, on Maria Manning, and Madame Tussauds displayed a wax figure of Mrs. Manning for over a century. The legacy of the Bermondsey Horror is so long lasting that in 2013, the BBC documentary A Very British Murder featured the case. The case derived much of its sensationalism from the role of Maria. She was the one who had conceived of and carried out the murder, violating and defying prevailing Victorian gender norms. 

Given the lasting impact of the case on British culture that exists to this day, coupled with what contemporary reactions to Mrs. Manning illuminate about Victorian gender norms, it is striking that there exist only two book-length studies of the case, neither of which focus on the question of gender. 

My project will address this gap in the literature by analyzing the contemporary representations and narratives that were created around and about Maria Manning in order to explore Victorian notions of gender. To carry out this project, I will be relying on Robert Huish’s extensive 1849 book on the subject, The progress of crime, or, The authentic memoirs of Maria Manning, as well as primary sources from newspaper and periodical databases in the university’s library and The Making of Modern Law database."


Martin, Susan

Project title: Identifying and Recommending tools to Evaluate the ‘Relationship-Centredness’ of Primary Care in BC

Department: Health Information Science

Faculty supervisor: Dr. Francis Lau and Dr. Morgan Price

"BC’s Ministry of Health has identified the development of Patient Medical Homes (PMHs) - family practices offering “comprehensive, coordinated, and continuing care” provided by physicians working with interdisciplinary teams – as a priority in their Primary Care Strategy (1). Evidence shows that when the team in a PMH provides 'relationship-centred' healthcare - care that is built on the relationship between provider and patient – there is a  positive impact on care quality, patient experience, outcomes, and provider experience and reduced provider burn out. I will identify existing tools that evaluate ‘relationship-centredness’ from the literature and engage with a panel of patients and providers who will review these tools for use in BC practices. Based on feedback from the panel I will develop a report that ranks the tools, explains the rationale for the tools selected for further consideration and how recommended tools fit into the evaluation framework; this report will be used directly by the Centre for Relationship Based Care and the Innovation Support Unit (ISU) (both out of UBC) and other stakeholders (Doctors of BC, Ministry of Health). Knowledge translation activities will include an ISU webinar on relationship-centred care and a presentation to the Ministry of Health Primary Care leadership on relationship-centred care evaluation.​

1. College of Family Physicians of Canada. Why PMH? [document on the internet]. Mississauga: CFPC; 2018 [cited 2018 Aug 14]. Available from https://patientsmedicalhome.ca/why-pmh/ "


Maslova, Layma

Project title: A City Loved to Death: The Impact of Overtourism on Barcelona

Department: Hispanic and Italian Studies

Faculty supervisor: Dr. Silvia Colás Cardona

"This project will discuss the phenomenon of overtourism, and focus on its effects on Barcelona, a city of 1.6 million citizens that received 32 million visitors last year alone. Through my research I hope to identify the main causes of overtourism, shed light on the consequences it has had, and continues to have, on the city and its inhabitants, and explore some of the proposed solutions to the problem."       


McDonald, Victoria

Project title: Climate Sensitivity Dependence on Background Climate State

Department: Earth and Ocean Sciences

Faculty supervisor: Dr. Colin Goldblatt

"Climate sensitivity is the change in surface temperature after doubling the concentration of carbon dioxide in the atmosphere, and is estimated to lie between 2-4.5 K. I’m running a series of Global Climate Model (GCM) experiments to determine how incremental changes to the background climate state (via the strength of shortwave cloud forcing) impact climate sensitivity estimates."        


McMillan, Rachel

Project title: The End of Interjections? An Analysis of Heckling in the Presence of More Women in Politics

Department: Political Science

Faculty supervisor: Dr. Grace Lore

"Provincial and federal legislatures alike have developed reputations for disorder and hostility as a result of routine heckling. Is it possible that increasing the number of female MLA’s and cabinet ministers could alter this aspect of Canadian political culture? Drawing on critical mass literature, this research will analyze the dynamics of heckling in the current British Columbia legislature, which boasts the highest percentage of female MLA’s in Canada as well as a 50/50 cabinet."        


Milligan, Maeve

Project title: Beef Noodles and Legal Policies: How the Chinese Government Supports Minority Groups in Shanghai

Department: Pacific and Asian Studies

Faculty supervisor: Dr. Andrew Marton

"Ethnic minorities, each with distinct and different cultures, make up 8.4%China’s population of 1.4 billion people. These ethnic minorities tend to live along the borders of the country in and around autonomous regions. However, in recent years a notable number of ethnic minorities have migrated to China’s bigger cities – especially on the east coast. This project will examine the migration and life patterns of Chinese minority groups in Shanghai and the Chinese government’s attitude towards these groups. It will explore the policies that support minorities in the city as well as programs and legislation that protect their unique cultural identity. The analysis will focus on Shanghai restaurants run by minority groups and how the government protects their cultural and regional trademarks and traditions. This research will be undertaken by examining policies already in place, goal statements made by the government regarding minorities in the city, and academic articles on the lives and success of minorities in Shanghai. A key objective of this project is to explore how the Chinese government’s attitude towards minorities, and the policies it has established, affect the migration rate of minorities to Shanghai and their integration into city life."        


Moeller, Brandon

Project title: A Misunderstood Granulocyte: Investigating the Function of Thymic Eosinophils

Department: Biochemistry and Microbiology

Faculty supervisor: Dr. Lisa Reynolds

"Eosinophils are a granulocyte population that have been highly studied in the context of allergic inflammation and parasitic infection, however their role in mammalian tissues during development (in the absence of inflammation or infection) remains ambiguous. The signal(s) that regulate the recruitment of eosinophils to peripheral tissues also remain unclear. In this project, we aim to determine whether the microbiota alters eosinophil recruitment to peripheral tissues, and to test the hypothesis that eosinophils are involved in generating tolerance to orally administered antigens. Our project aims are to 1. determine whether a depleted microbiota affects eosinophil frequencies in the thymus, the intestinal tract, and the lungs. And 2. to develop a mouse model of oral tolerance and with it determine whether a lack of eosinophils affects the ability of mice to generate tolerance to orally administered antigen."
             
             


Mooney, Colin

Project title: “Accio Memoria!”: Memorialization of Memory in Fiction

Department: History

Faculty supervisor: Dr. Thomas Saunders

"The methodologies of preserving the public memory (sometimes framed as the “legacy”) of a person, group of persons, or event, has been a topic of intense debate and dialogue in both academic and non-academic circles. This paper will work to bridge the gap between the academic and popular by examining the methodologies and implications of memorialization processes across a selection of fictional works; it will be looking at the forms they take; how the characters of the work engage with them; and, by extension, how the characters engage with history itself."


Morgan, Jessica

Project title: An Intergenerational Community Choir for Persons with AD and their Caregivers

Department: Nursing

Faculty supervisor: Dr. Debra Sheets

"This project investigates the impact of participation in a community-based intergenerational choir designed to engage and support persons with Alzheimer’s disease (PwAD), their caregivers, and students (e.g., high school music education students). First, we assess the impact of the choir intervention on a range of health and well-being outcomes for PwAD and their caregivers (e.g., cognition, mood, social inclusion, caregiver burden). Second, we identify the key characteristics of a community choir that promote meaningful social inclusion, health and quality of life for PWAD and their family caregivers. Third, we use knowledge mobilization strategies to adapt the program into a model intervention that can be effectively utilized by other community groups."
  
  


Naumann, Trevor

Project title: Analysis of Vocal Production Techniques

Department: Music

Faculty supervisor: Prof. Kirk McNally

"Within the context of popular music the lead vocal is of particular importance. Increasingly, tools from the field are attempting to automate standard mixing processes, for example levels, equalization, and dynamics (DeMan et al., 2017). In this project I will use a pre-existing collection of multitrack recordings and their mixes1 to evaluate music production techniques used on lead vocals. I will subsequently generate a selection of vocal treatments based on my analysis and findings for use in listening tests in oreder to evaluate the perceived quality of these processes. I hope this work will be of interest and use to the audio engineering community and improve my own knowledge and skillset with regards to both music production and academic research methods.

1 http://multitrack.eecs.qmul.ac.uk"
    
    


Nazaroff, Isaac

Project title: Latin America or Indo-America: Reclaiming an Indigenous Identity

Department: Latin American Studies

Faculty supervisor: Dr. Beatriz de Alba-Koch

"My research project will focus on the Latin American theory of indigenismo, which seeks to identify an empowering identity for Indigenous peoples of the region without the influence of Europeanized perspectives, to throw off the yoke of colonial history. I will investigate specifically the avant-garde Marxist inspired form of indigenismo cultivated by the early 20th century Peruvian political philosopher and founder of the Peruvian Communist Party, José Carlos Maríategui (1894-1930). He argued that instead of being cultural in nature, the issues faced by the Indigenous population were caused by the discriminatory, feudal-like socio-economic structure that existed at the time.  Moreover, Maríategui looked to an early pre-colonial Inkan form of agrarian communism as basis for identity construction. I will examine the impact of Maríategui’s Marxist indigenismo on the cultural politics of Peru."       


Nicholson, Maxwell

Project title: Game Theory and the Blockchain: Applying Behavioural Economics to Consensus Mechanisms

Department: Economics

Faculty supervisor: Dr. Daniel Rondeau

"The blockchain, known mostly for its linkages to the infamous cryptocurrency Bitcoin, works through a consensus mechanism. This mechanism requires a multitude of users to validate a claim. Many incentives are at play when each individual user determines whether to validate a claim, from monetary rewards to resource constraints. Behaviour economics is built on the study of how individual incentives affect group dynamics. Applying these theories to the blockchain will help us better understand the potential and
possible risks associated with the technology. For my research project I will apply first principles of game theory to the consensus mechanism to analyze whether individual agents are incentivized to act in a way that maximizes social surplus.
"
             
             


Niwa-Heinen, Musa

Project title: Stella Benson: Canonizing her Contributions within Modernist Feminism

Department: English

Faculty supervisor: Dr. Mary Elizabeth Leighton

"My research focuses on the modernist author Stella Benson (1892-1933), a British novelist, poet, short story and travel writer, whose literary contributions to the Modernist movement have been overlooked. Even though Benson has not yet received sufficient scholarly treatment and critical attention, at present digital reprints of her works are preventing their loss. A contemporary of Virginia Woolf and Gertrude Stein, Benson was a published satirist and fantasy-fiction writer at the juncture of the 19th and 20th century. Her publications include approximately eight novels, four collections of poetry, five short story collections, and two travelogues. Her novels center on early Modern feminist issues and themes, which often humorously scrutinize gender and class discrimination in the context of British colonialism. Benson, herself a Suffragette, worked primarily as a social worker, advocating for causes such as the safety of prostitutes in England, and later fighting against child-prostitution in Hong Kong. She also served as a secretary, gardener, and farm laborer during the war. Her travels were extensive, especially for a young woman in England during the early 20th century, including to Jamaica, the United States, and China. Her primary sources include diary writings and travel essays. I am interested in publishing critical annotated editions of her 1915 novel I Pose and/or her unpublished 1902-1933 diaries held in the Cambridge University Library. I would use the grant to gain access to her unpublished diaries. Depending on my correspondence with the University of Cambridge, I would travel there and/or purchase copies of her diaries."


Noble, Casandra

Project title: Physical literacy in middle-late childhood: Relationships among motor competence, perceived motor competence, task value and physical activity

Department: Exercise Science, Physical and Health Education

Faculty supervisor: Dr. Patti-Jean Naylor

"Physical literacy is the motivation, confidence, and physical competence to be active for life; encompassing affective, physical, cognitive, and behavioural components. Evidence is mounting that Canadian children have low levels of physical literacy. My project will assess the impact of an 8-week physical literacy mentorship program for elementary teachers on the physical literacy levels of children in their classes. The intervention will consist of a physical literacy expert working with the teachers during physical education classes through demonstrations, co-planning, and feedback on lessons. Using the Physical Literacy Assessment for Youth (PLAY) tools, the students’ physical literacy will be analysed pre and post intervention and compared to children in non-mentorship classes."        


Nyren, Jack

Project title: Cities and Space: A study of Centennial Square’s Past, Present, and Future

Department: Geography

Faculty supervisor: Dr. Cameron Owens and Mr. Ken Josephson

"This research project will concern space and place within Victoria, British Columbia - specifically the power public space, sustainability, and community engagement holds within changing cities for the better.  This project will draw on international sources and inspirations, such as Alexanderplatz of Berlin (Germany) and Superkilen Park of Copenhagen (Denmark) - both spaces I have had the opportunity to examine in person. The focus of the study, however, will be Centennial Square, a highly contested space within Victoria.  A research paper will critically evaluate the approach the City is taking to redesign the space (in comparison with these other case studies), exploring the community-engagement visioning process. I plan to create a community map and / or engagement event along with the reflective Honours thesis."
        
        


O'Briain, Teaghan

Project title: Adversarial Learning applied to Stellar Spectral analyses

Department: Physics and Astronomy

Faculty supervisor: Dr. Kim Venn and Dr. Sebastien Fabbro

"In an attempt to improve the efficiencies in the analyses of stellar spectra, a Generative Adversarial Network *similar to Liu et al. 2018) will be developed by the student, and applied to both observed and synthetically generated stellar spectra. The machine-learning task is to map the two separate domains to each other, to improve the analysis by bridging the synthetic gap.  We anticipate improvement in a range of stellar parameters, as well as identification of new features."
       
       


Oosterman, Justin

Project title: The artificial decline of English song titles in Japanese music during the Pacific War

Department: Pacific and Asian Studies

Faculty supervisor: Dr. Hiroko Noro

"My project will challenge the apparent increase in popularity of the English language in Japanese music – particularly song titles – following the end of the Pacific War. My research will draw on literature providing context for the political environment of Japan at the time, and I will prove through analysis of popular song’s titles throughout the pre, mid, and post war years that the apparent explosion of popularity of English in Japanese music was an illusion resulting from the artificially imposed absence of English language arts and traditions by Imperial Japan’s censorship efforts. Analysis will confirm that rather than representing an increase in the popularity of foreign music after the Pacific War, the data shows that post war trends are consistent with trends predating war-time censorship. This project and presentation will give me the chance to share an intriguing and often overlooked period of Japan’s history of global cultural interactions closely resembling modern trends."
    
    


O'Shea, Sadee

Project title: Smoking Kills: A Look at the Tobacco Inudstry in France

Department: Peter B. Gustavson School of Business

Faculty supervisor: Prof. Komal Kalra

"My research will be directed at the ever-popular cultural norm of smoking in France and how/why it remains so prevalent in their society. I will look into the current government regulations and taxations for the industry, in addition to any current or growing anti-smoking movements and what potential economic impacts the tobacco industry in France could face in coming years."        


Pandora, Passia

Project title: A Critique of Materialism in Philosophy of Mind

Department: Philosophy

Faculty supervisor: Professor Klaus Jahn and Dr. Eric Hochstein

"One of the long-standing questions in the field of philosophy of mind is called the mind-body problem. The problem is this: given that minds and mental properties appear to be vastly different than physical objects and physical properties, how can the mind and body relate to and interact with each other? Most contemporary philosophers of mind accept a materialist perspective with respect to the nature of reality, i.e., there is one reality and it is physical. Therefore, materialism requires that mental phenomena be explained solely by physical reality. In response to the mind-body problem, materialists argue that mental properties reduce necessarily and completely to physical properties.

In my analysis, I will offer a brief overview of the contemporary responses to the mind-body problem and discuss the development of some of the most prominent materialist theories. Next, I will present problems with the arguments offered for and against the materialist stance. Finally, I will argue that philosophers have failed to satisfactorily defend the materialist stance, specifically, they have been unable to explain how the mental reduces to the physical.  The failure of materialist perspectives to explain mind and consciousness is our invitation to take a fresh look at the alternatives."
       
       


Perks, Nelson

Project title: Investigating the impacts of algae density on coral recruitment following the 2015-2016 El Niño

Department: Biology

Faculty supervisor: Prof. Julia Baum

"Coral reefs are biologically diverse marine communities with many ecosystem services that humans rely upon. However, climate change, one of the major challenges of our time period, has caused mass mortality and degradation of coral reefs globally. Research is needed to discover the mechanisms of coral reef recovery and resilience if reefs are to persist throughout this future. Recruitment of new corals is essential to the recovery of coral reefs, however macro-algae inhibits coral larvae from settling by out-competing the larvae for space on the reef and preventing or slowing the regeneration of coral reefs. A stress event, such as an El Niño, that causes bleaching and/or mortality on a coral reef may push the system to a macro-algae dominated state. On Kiritimati (Christmas Island) the 2015-2016 El Niño event caused mass coral mortality
(~90%), and the south western reefs appear to now be undergoing a phase shift to macro-algae dominance, whereas the other reefs in the system are not showing signs of a shift.  Using coral recruitment videos that were collected before and after the El Niño, I will investigate the impacts of macro-algae density on coral reef recruitment by comparing the abundance and diversity of coral recruits in reef areas experiencing a phase shift to areas of no phase shift. This research will further scientific knowledge of how macro-algae impacts reef recovery, their resilience, and help determine what conservation initiatives are the most effective for the future."
              
              


Porteous, Isabelle

Project title: Wise Woman: How Matriarchal Knowledge Contributes to Feminist Discourse in Québecois literature

Department: French

Faculty supervisor: Dr. Marie Vautier

"This study seeks to draw a link between a selection of female literary characters who provide knowledge, wisdom or spiritual guidance to  other characters in contemporary Québecois texts, and investigating how this contributes to feminine voice and modern feminist discourse. It will attempt to highlight the importance of matriarchal traditions within the context of a patriarchal society."
           
           


Preissl, Dayton

Project title: Confinement Properties in Strongly Magnetized Plasmas

Department: Mathematics and Statistics

Faculty supervisor: Dr. Slim Ibrahim

"Long time estimates and local existence and uniqueness of the relativisitic Vlasov-Maxwell system for strongly magnetized plasmas. Physical applications in fusion reactors and modeling of astrophysical plasmas."
        
        

Reck, Nicole

Project title: BAG, BEG, BAGEL: The Case of Victoria Undergrads

Department: Linguistics

Faculty supervisor: Dr. Sonya Bird and Dr. Alexandra D'Arcy

"Dialectology evaluates language variation determined by geographic location. This project is concerned with sociophonetic change in the vowels of the BAG and BEG lexical sets, which are both raising in the western dialect region of Canada. The goal of the study is to determine if the BAG and BEG vowels are raising to share the articulatory space of the BAGEL set. Past research shows that this overlap is occurring in Oregon and Washington State, and preliminary research has documented its occurrence in Vancouver. However, a broader picture of the geography of this change is lacking. The current research sets to determine if Victoria is aligning with the greater Pacific Northwest for this change, implementing instrumental analysis of word list data from local undergrads."
    
    


Reid, Clara

Project title: Pollination and Floral Longevity

Department: Environmental Studies

Faculty supervisor: Dr. Brian Starzomski

"This is a pollination ecology study taking place in the boreal forest of southern Yukon. It examines the longevity of individual flowers of Arctic Lupine (Lupinus arcticus) in relation to their pollination. Pollination of plants by animals (ex. insects) is a mutualistic relationship in which the plant is pollinated (often with pollen from a different individual, leading to genetically diverse seeds), while the pollinator receives a reward such as nectar. A major role of blooming flowers is to attract animal pollinators, so once pollination occurs it may not be necessary or energetically favourable for the flower to continue blooming. Thus, pollination may decrease floral longevity, as has been shown in foxgloves, carnations, petunias and various orchids. Understanding such aspects of pollination ecology are meaningful in the face of declines in native pollinator and plant populations, as they can better inform conservation efforts."       


Robertson, Emma

Project title: Hounds, Guardians, and Oracles: Dogs as Symbols in the Middle Ages

Department: Medieval Studies

Faculty supervisor: Dr. Hélène Cazes

"Looking at medieval art, profane and sacred, at funerary sculptures, at drawings in the margins of manuscripts, at paintings or stained glass, one will encounter many dogs: of different sizes, colors, positions, and postures, they hold different symbolisms, representing in their contexts either loyalty or ferocity, either guardianship or aggression. The values and stories associated with dogs, a familiar pet but also a fearsome guardian and defender, intertwine classical myths inherited from Antiquity and Christian references. Often evoked as a way to reflect human qualities which one should either fear or emulate, they also linked human beings and gods, keeping the gates of the underworld or guiding the souls of the departed to their afterlives. Dogs held sacred power as well as familiar values. This complexity offers an opportunity for the analysis of an aspect of medieval culture: the synthesis of symbols and representations from different cultures. Through the use of primary sources —the Bible, European mythologies, medieval bestiaries, works of art— and secondary sources —works on animals in medieval art and culture —, I’ll examine the symbolic ambivalence of dogs as representations of friends, foes, and forewarnings. My problematic will be the manner one can recognize which type of symbolism to choose in a specific context: what is the significance of colour? of species? of posture? Which are the conventions to depict the good and bad dogs? Ultimately, are these medieval symbols still informing our own perception of dogs as symbolic representations?"
    
    


Rowley, Jaden

Project title: Modelling Nutrient Transport Processes In the Lake Winnipeg Watershed

Department: Geography

Faculty supervisor: Dr. Yonas Dibike

"Increased rates of eutrophication have been observed in Lake Winnipeg due to excess nutrient loading from both point and non-point sources. This project aims to develop a model within the Soil and Water Analysis Tool (SWAT) to simulate hydrologic processes and nutrient loading dynamics within the full Assiniboine River Catchment. This model may then be used as a basis for predicting future hydrologic and nutrient conditions for Lake Winnipeg, allowing best management practices to be established."
       
       


Russell, Sarah

Project title: Public Discourses on Opioid Replacement Therapy in the Prison System

Department: Social Work

Faculty supervisor: Ms. Nancy Pike

"This research will consider drug use in the Canadian prison system. In contrast to the Canadian public, opioid-dependant inmates are more vulnerable to infectious diseases, violence, and death from overdose. In BC, current policies offer drug users opioid replacement therapy while they are incarcerated. However, long wait-lists and bureaucratic hurdles make accessing these services unreliable, thus reducing efficacy. Recently, the BC-based Prisoners' Legal Services filed a human rights complaint against Correctional Service Canada, claiming that prisoners with opioid addiction are not receiving adequate access to treatment. While there is sufficient literature outlining the efficacy of harm reduction, there is, however, limited analysis of how the current discourse on opioid replacement therapy in the Canadian prison system nfluences public perceptions of opioid-dependant inmates. Grounded in critical social theory, this research will review recent media and academic literature on opioid replacement treatment within the prison system. Applying discourse analysis, I will explore the following questions: How is opioid replacement treatment discussed? Whose voice is being privileged in the literature and media? How is media informing public opinion? My employment and volunteer experience working with adults who have recently returned to their community after leaving the prison system and my social justice activism in the area substance use informs my interest in exploring this topic. The knowledge that I will gain from pursuing this research will greatly impact my work as an anti-oppressive social worker supporting marginalized and oppressed people, many of whom have substance misuse issues and/or criminal justice involvement."




Ruszel, Julian

Project title: The Neoliberalization of Collectivist Family Structures in Japan

Department: Pacific and Asian Studies

Faculty supervisor: Dr. Andrew Marton and Dr. Hiroko Noro

"Contemporary Japanese society has its roots in a collectivist, neo-Confucian social order that prevailed in Japan from the Edo Period (1603-1868) until the end of the Second World War. While postwar Japan saw an intersection of Japan's traditional social structures and western Keynesian capitalism that preserved important aspects of Japanese collectivist society—in particular its collectivist family structures and values—the rise of neoliberal capitalism since the beginning of the 1980s implies a fundamental societal reorientation that threatens enduring features of Japanese collectivist culture and identities.
Working from the premise that family is central to both social order (collectivist or otherwise) and capitalist social formations, this project will incorporate previous sociological and anthropological research to examine changing family structures in Japan since the Edo Period, and employ these models as a basis for clarifying the ongoing dialectic between the stark individualism of neoliberalism and the collectivist social structures and identities of traditional Japanese society."

Savidge, Elena

Project title: Characterizing an earthquake triplet in Iran using InSAR imagery

Department: Earth and Ocean Sciences

Faculty supervisor: Dr. Ed Nissen

"Three large earthquakes occurred in the Kerman region of Iran in quick succession and geographically close to each other in December 2017. Our goal is to study these earthquakes using InSAR imagery and to model them in order to characterize faulting. Further, we will use both distributed slip fault models as well as uniform slip fault models to assess where slip is at its peak and where it is minimal, and to better understand the relationship between the three events. We will also examine the triggering potential of the earthquakes on each other using USGS software. Ultimately, we are seeking to better understand how three large earthquakes occurred so close to each other in space and time."        


Sawyer, Austin

Project title: Development of a Computer Modelling Technique to Investigate Reverse Total Shoulder Replacement

Department: Mechanical Engineering

Faculty supervisor: Dr. Josh Giles

"The goal of this project is to investigate, for the first time, the biomechanical interactions between variation in shoulder bony anatomy and the mechanical design parameters of a new and radical type of shoulder joint replacement (the Reverse Total Shoulder Arthroplasty (RTSA)). As a result of the geometrical reverse of the shoulder joint articulation produced by an RSA, it is poorly understood what the biomechanical effects of the implant’s design parameters; furthermore, there is a complete lack of information in the literature regarding the interactions between the implant parameters and anatomical variations that occur between each patient.

To achieve this goal, I will complete the development of a Statistical Shape Model (SSM – a model that statistically analyses variation in a population of input shapes to determine the independent modes of geometric variation in that population) of the scapula and humerus (i.e. shoulder) bones which is currently underway as an Honour’s thesis project. Once completed, I will work to integrate this model with existing Biomechanical Rigid Body Dynamics modelling software that simulates shoulder motions of interest and determines the corresponding muscle and joint forces. Once integrated, it will be possible to conduct simulations of variable anatomy (as determined by the SSM) and RTSA configuration and thus determine the relationships which exist between these variables."

      


Schmidt-Brown, Abigail

Project title: Antisemitism in the Dialogue Surrounding the Israeli-Palestinian Conflict

Department: Religious Studies

Faculty supervisor: Dr. Andrea McKenzie

"I would like to investigate the ways in which the dialogue surrounding the Israeli-Palestinian conflict reflects the way that Judaism often gets merged with the actions of the Israeli government and the ideology of Zionism, a convergence that has led to a reemergence of anti-Semitism. Through unpacking largely ambiguous, weighted and contentious topics such as “religion” and the “Middle East,” I hope to come to a complex and multi-faceted understanding of how anti-Semitism has reemerged within many different movements in the recent years. This will include recognizing and interpreting what exactly is anti-Semitism by studying the history of the phenomena in order to see where it appears in relation to this dialogue, and analyzing the current and past ontological, political, ideological conditions that continue gave rise to this reappearance in our contemporary world. Overall I aim to bring awareness to this issue though providing an elaborate and discerning explanation of the topic at hand, an issue that can only be understood in relation to the greater circumstances that it is a part of and that can only be reconciled through a broad and a compassionate insight into this phenomena."        


Silvera, Alexis

Project title: Accessibility Innovation in Higher Education Through Telepresence Robots

Department: Curriculum and Instruction

Faculty supervisor: Dr. Valerie Irvine

"In this project, I will examine the use of telepresence robots to increase accessibility into physical classroom environments. Despite the supports we provide at UVic, students with special needs for access are underrepresented on our campus and alternative online programs charge three times our tuition, making obstacles even harder for accessing higher education. The 3,775,900 Canadians with a disability, or 1 in 7 people, consist of 13.7% of the total population. For half, the cement ramp, where it does exist, does nothing in terms of assisting them in gaining access to a physical location as their health issue may not be related to lower limb mobility. This JCURA project will entail implementing and evaluating one element of an accessibility pilot on campus in partnership with the Centre for Accessible Learning and the Technology Integration and Evaluation Research Lab. The goal is to determine its impact on the quality of learning experience and to gather the perceptions by instructors and learners in the classroom. Other applications will also be studied. For example, these telepresence robots can also support a variety of situations beyond supporting learners who cannot attend in person for a variety of health and other reasons, such as extending our reach into the community, supporting collective class observation of remote spaces, or bringing in specialists to interact with our students in various classroom environments."
      
      


Sinclair, Charlotte

Project title: Global Child Rights Dialog

Department: Public Health and Social Policy

Faculty supervisor: Dr. Ziba Vaghri

"This project will engage children from 5 different regions of the globe (about 15 countries) in a series of Focus groups that will initiate dialog with children (11-17) on their rights as articulated under the Convention on the Rights of the Child (CRC)."
     
     


Snowden-Richardson, Taylor

Project title: Effects of 3D-MOT Training on Reaction Time in Varsity Swimmers

Department: Medical Sciences

Faculty supervisor: Dr. Brian Christie

"3D-Multiple Object Tracking (3D-MOT) has been found to improve athletic performance, particularly in sports requiring the use of selective attention.  The majority of previous research examines the effects of 3D-MOT on visual selective attention; however, we are interested in the effects of 3D-MOT on auditory selective attention, as will be measured by changes in reaction time before and after 10 sessions of 3D-MOT training.  For the purpose of this experiment, the reaction time is defined as the time between the start gun firing and the athlete’s feet leaving the blocks.  The aim of our research is to determine if training on the Neurotracker, a 3D-MOT program, can enhance performance in non-visually dominated sports (e.g. swimming), as well as add to the existing literature in the area of athletic performance improvement via 3D-MOT."
      
      


Spence, Erin

Project title: The Impact of Electoral Systems in European Parliament Elections

Department: Political Science

Faculty supervisor: Dr. Oliver Schmidtke

"While the European Parliament (EP) mimics the functions and features of national parliaments, there are several unique aspects of this institution, which are distinct from any other political arena in the world. The European Parliament has transnational “Europarties” that attempt to create a European-level political discourse and debates, the methods of nominating, electing, and translating electoral outcomes to seats in the EP remains influenced by national rules and political cultures. Electoral results reflect regional variation in electoral turnout and engagement between states. In the 2014 EP election, turnout ranged between nearly 90% participation in Belgium to merely 13% in Slovakia.

This proposed research project focuses on these issues. I will examine both the influence and limitations that national electoral systems have upon engagement with EU institutions, and self-identification with the European project. I will select countries with diverse electoral systems and political cultures to identify the degree of influence that plurality and proportional representation systems have on voter turnout in EP elections and their wider impact on trust in the EU.

I plan to focus on the following countries as case studies: the United Kingdom, the Netherlands, and the Czech Republic. Data gathered by Eurobarometer, Eurostat, the OECD, and national polls will be used to compare patterns in both national and EU elections to help isolate the impact of electoral systems on participation and approval. My supervisor has expertise on this topic, and will mentor me throughout the process as well as supporting the further development of my research skills."
     
     


Stewart, Lexy

Project title: A Roof over their Heads: Exploring Housing Precarity for Vulnerable Populations

Department: Geography

Faculty supervisor: Dr. Denise Cloutier

"Housing is a basic need for individuals. In Victoria, BC issues around housing availability and affordability continue to grow. Recent reports suggest that Victoria is now one of the most heated housing environments in North America when it comes to price and stock. Segments of the population who are most vulnerable in this housing context include: seniors, students, low income individuals and immigrants. Unfortunately, social housing policy appears to be driven more by the interests of developers than by the need to address the precarious  circumstances of marginalized populations.

My Honours research project will be a community-based action research study, in partnership with James Bay New Horizons (JBNH). This organization is a non-profit society established in 1974 to support local residents in skills development and through social opportunities to enhance quality of life.  Working with JBNH representatives and advocates, the project will begin with an environmental scan of the gray literature and the research literature related to housing challenges for vulnerable populations. From there, an ethics review will be undertaken to do qualitative interviews with staff and representatives  of JBNH, and with a small number (n=6) of local members of JBNH who are also residents of James Bay, and who have, or who are experiencing circumstances  of housing precarity. The qualitative interviews will be thematically analyzed and a report will be developed for JBNH and Victoria City Council to promote greater understanding of the range of issues faced by these persons.  Findings will be presented to the community in March, 2019."
         
         


Thompson, Lyndsee

Project title: The Intersection of Privacy Norms: Social Media Use and Data Protection in Malaysia

Department: Political Science

Faculty supervisor: Dr. Colin Bennett

"Privacy is generally understood to be a fundamental human right in Western society – but what does this truly entail? Does our definition of privacy extend and apply to all cultures and religions, or is it ultimately a Western capitalist construct? This project delves into these issues, looking in particular at the concept of privacy and how it might be influenced by various understandings of religion and state; as well as how this relates to the monitoring of social media platforms such as Facebook, the most widely used form of social media in Malaysia today.

While there is currently a Western-style data protection regime in place in Malaysia via the Personal Data Protection Act, as passed in 2010, there is some question as to whether or not this law and the Privacy Commissioner can truly enforce privacy rights within Malaysian culture. To find an answer, I have spent the past several months in Malaysia developing several contacts such as academic experts, representatives of NGOs, and media experts who I have and will be interviewing in the coming months. In addition to this, in May of 2018, the ruling Barisan Nasional coalition - the governing party since Malaysia won independence in 1957 – was defeated by the progressive party. Because what this means for the Personal Data Protection Act is still in question, I will track how their changes affect and influence the privacy rights of the citizens of Malaysia as the progressive party works to undo the corruption of the previous government."
      


Toth, Amy-Lynn

Project title: The influence of Eastern European Folk Music on the 2nd Violin Concerto of Béla Bartók

Department: Music

Faculty supervisor: Ms. Ann Elliott-Goldschmid

"Bela Bartok (25-March-1881 to 26-September-1945) was one of the greatest composers of the 20th century. Bartok’s compositions were influenced by the traditional folk music that surrounded him. He was able to seamlessly intertwine this music within the Western Classical style creating a unique and remarkable voice.

A fine pianist, he composed lasting, brilliant works for all instruments. He succeeded in preserving many traditional folk melodies and styles by integrating them within these compositions.

Written between 1937-38 for the Hungarian violinist Zoltán Székely, Bartok’s Violin Concerto No. 2 shows many instances of this merging of styles. Despite the composer’s initial proposal of a one movement theme and variation, Székely insisted on a traditional three-movement concerto. Bartok complied, but subtly incorporated his original theme and variation form into the piece. 

I am researching and performing this concerto, and will demonstrate where Bartok introduces elements and techniques originating from Hungarian and other Eastern European folk music. While my research will largely be focused on this work, I will also borrow examples from Bartok’s other compositions where applicable. 

I will give illustrations of the rhythmic patterns, unconventional meters, idioms, ornamentation, phrase structures, modes, and scales taken from this “peasant music”. Diverse bow techniques and “folk-like” sound elements will also be explored.

Gypsy-Hungarian blood flows through my veins. I am passionate about this music and excited to share my research.

*I will have an audio-visual component for the Fair, however my main presentation will be given in MAC B037 at 8:00 PM on March 6th."       


Travers-Smith, Hana

Project title: Population Dynamics of green alder and white spruce in the NWT in response to climate change.

Department: Environmental Studies

Faculty supervisor: Dr. Trevor Lantz

"Several lines of evidence show that vegetation at high latitudes is changing.  In the Northwest Territories, fieldwork and remote sensing indicate that green alder (Alnus viridis) and white spruce (Picea glauca) populations are expanding near their northern range limits. These changes have the potential to increase fire frequency, impact animal habitat and alter surface energy balance. My research project will use historical and modern air photos to examine changes in the distribution of green alder and white spruce at two spatial scales. At a broad scale I will document and compare the northern extent of each species. At a finer scale I will examine how terrain types affect alder expansion, and compare local spatial patterns of spruce and alder recruitment. This project will provide insight into the extent of vegetation expansion in the NWT, and the fine scale processes underlying it."
      
      


Trimble, Brooklynn

Project title: E-Cigarettes and Body Weight: The Impact on American Youth and Young Adults

Department: Economics

Faculty supervisor: Dr. Christopher Auld

"E-Cigarettes were introduced to the American market 12 years ago and today their usage, especially among youth and young adults, is commonplace. The impact of E-Cigarettes on health outcomes and behaviours, specifically bodyweight, is largely unknown; although, the relationship between traditional cigarettes and body weight is a topic with extensive literature. This research paper will be the first to examine the causal effect of E-Cigarettes on bodyweight. Using microeconometric modelling with data from the 2016 BRFSS data set containing 486,303 records and data on state specific E-Cigarette policies this relationship will be explored. This paper will then go on to compare the impacts of E-Cigarettes to traditional cigarettes and the policy implications."
              
              


Tso, Lois

Project title: Innovative non-destructive techniques for assessing quality of building envelopes

Department: Civil Engineering

Faculty supervisor: Dr. Rishi Gupta

"The University of Victoria First Peoples House is a leading sustainable building with innovative design. Constructed in 2008, the building features the use of recycled material and rammed earth. In this project, non-destructive testing will be conducted to investigate the structural and material performance of the building’s rammed earth walls. This project will build on the success of a previous project completed a few years ago by using non-contact techniques like infrared cameras and also contact techniques like ultrasonic pulse velocity testing. This assessment will mark a critical 10 year milestone of this structure."        


Ugalde, Allyson

Project title: How will we sound? A sociolinguistic study of /t/ in developing speakers

Department: Linguistics

Faculty supervisor: Dr. Alexandra D’Arcy and Dr. Ewa Czaykowska-Higgins

"This study considers the acquisition and development of sociolinguistic variation among two children, five year-old twins, and contrasts their use with that of their primary caretaker. The target feature is /t/, a sound that is known to vary across varieties of English. In Victoria, the local model is fundamentally Canadian, but the city’s history as a site of English immigration, and the historically overt valuing of English norms, has potentially led to a unique Canadian context in which [t] is retained at higher rates between vowels than it is in other Canadian locales (e.g. compare wa-Ter and wa-Der ‘water’). The goal of this project is thus to get a snapshot of how /t/’s pronunciation patterns among emergent natives of Victoria English."
        
        


Van Der Meer, Kastle

Project title: Forced Sexual Labour Under the National Socialist German Workers' Party: Brothels in Nazi Concentration Camps and the Trauma they Inflicted on Women

Department: Gender Studies

Faculty supervisor: Dr. Laura Parisi

"This research project will explore how and why the Nazis utilized forced sexual labour in their quest for dominance. My research will focus in particular on the establishment of brothels, intended for prisoner use only, in concentration camps. In an effort to fill a gap in the historiography of this topic, I seek to determine how forced sexual labour was utilized by the Nazis as both a means of asserting their power and as a method of increasing production within camps. I will explore how this gendered form of labour impacted the women who were forced to perform it. To contextualize this topic for readers, I will first present a brief history of prostitution in Germany under the National Socialist German Workers' Party. Next, I will examine what drove the Nazis to establish brothels within the camps. Finally, I will analyze the extent to which nationality, race, and religion played a role in who was chosen by the Nazis to work in camp brothels. I will explore what life was like for women in the brothels and determine how these women were perceived by both their fellow inmates and the Nazi leadership based on their engagement in forced sex work. Through my research, I seek to answer the following questions: Why has the history of brothels in concentration camps remained largely unstudied? How has the neglect of this topic affected those who were subjected to forced sexual labour? By answering these questions, I hope to shed light on a topic previously neglected by many historians and highlight how certain gendered forms of labour are overlooked, despite their immense impact on women’s lives."

     
     


Vorster, Ryan

Project title: Force control of robotic polishing system using a 6-axis load cell

Department: Mechanical Engineering

Faculty supervisor: Dr. Keivan Ahmadi

"The surface roughness error of large optical mirrors for telescopes needs to be on the order of nanometers. A 6-axis KUKA arm robot was developed with a specialized polishing tool and CNC programming to polish flat mirrors with zero net force on the workpiece. This project aims to further develop the current system into being capable of polishing large curved mirrors with zero net force on the workpiece. A multi-axis load cell is implemented to handle compensation of the tool weight for the force control algorithm. A calibration procedure and algorithm using the multi-axis load cell are described along with modifications to the current force control system, so the system can polish large curved mirrors."

      


Walters, Andraya

Project title: Voices in Motion: An Intergenerational Community Choir for Persons with AD and their Caregiver

Department: Nursing

Faculty supervisor: Dr. Debra Sheets

"This project investigates the impact of participation in a community-based intergenerational choir designed to engage and support persons with Alzheimer’s disease (PwAD), their caregivers, and students (e.g., high school music education students). First, we assess the impact of the choir intervention on a range of health and well-being outcomes for PwAD and their caregivers (e.g., cognition, mood, social inclusion, caregiver burden). Second, we identify the key characteristics of a community choir that promote meaningful social inclusion, health and quality of life for PWAD and their family caregivers. Third, we use knowledge mobilization strategies to adapt the program into a model
intervention that can be effectively utilized by other community groups."
  
  


Wells-Durand, Emma

Project title: Exploring the use of base editing for correction of mutations in Gaucher disease

Department: Biology

Faculty supervisor: Dr._Francis Choy

"A novel technology, CRISPR/Cas9 gene editing, has allowed for the correction of numerous genetic mutations in human cells. This technique is currently being investigated as a treatment for genetic disease. Patients with Gaucher disease (GD), a rare lysosomal storage disease, could benefit from this form of therapy to ameliorate symptoms of neurodegeneration and hepatoslpenomegaly. Previous attempts to correct mutations in GD have failed due to low sensitivity of mutation correction detection and low transfection amenability of our target cell type, induced pluripotent stem cells. We will explore the correction of GD mutations using a new form of CRISPR/Cas9, called base editing, and with a more sensitive screening technique, droplet digital PCR."
    
    


Whitehead, Paige

Project title: Microorganisms and Indigenous Soils: Past and present Relationships with Ancient Soils

Department: Environmental Studies

Faculty supervisor: Dr. Darcy Mathews

"Human cultures around the globe, both in the past and in the present, have used sophisticated management techniques to build nutrient-rich, microbially-diverse, highly-productive soils that grew richer with continued usage. This study aims to begin investigation into healthy soil characteristics and soil-building strategies, with a focus on determining the availability of free soil electrons, and determining the importance of the soil microbial community’s role in producing these electrons. Free electrons from the soil are currently under investigation for use in electricity generation and improving human well-being. It is the goal of this study to provide some insight into how we can begin to rebuild degraded soil ecosystems by drawing from the diverse and rich human-history of soil-building techniques, such as ancient soils in the Amazonian Basin, and indigenous soils in Coastal British Columbia, to impress upon the audience the incredible importance of healthy soils for past, present, and future human health and future innovation."
       
       


Whitehorne, Lee

Project title: The Sweet Sounds of Syntax: Neural Processing of Hierarchical Structures in Music

Department: Linguistics/Music

Faculty supervisor: Dr. Martha McGinnis

"Music comprises connected sequences of hierarchically-related sonic events, roughly analogous in timescale and construction to the words, phrases and sentences found in language. The concept of “grammatical correctness” in music is somewhat more challenging to define, however—in part due to the interconnection of linguistic syntax and meaning that is generally lacking in music. Work such as Lerdahl and Jackendoff’s (1983) seminal Generative Theory of Tonal Harmony analyze musical structures in terms of their metrical tendencies, the boundaries between groupings of events, the relative importance of such events, and an ongoing sense of “tension” and “relaxation” throughout a musical passage. Modelling the organization of musical cognition, Lerdahl and Jackendoff suggest rules of well-formedness and preference to help define these structures; this in turn provides a framework for investigating exactly how the mind and brain process the structure of musical ideas as they unfold before our ears. For the proposed research, the sense of expectation that continuously develops across a musical passage will be compared systematically with grammar-governed expectations within linguistic sentences. The project will investigate the online processing of hierarchical structures in tonal music, in comparison to that of linguistic syntax—investigated by prior research such as Ding et al.’s (2016) neurolinguistics study. Participants will perform experimental tasks to evaluate their reaction times and judgments of grammaticality in response to stimuli of varying degrees of “well-formedness”."
     
     


Wong, Dee Dee

Project title: Predicting the sustainability of mobile health applications

Department: Health Information Science

Faculty supervisor: Prof. Karen Courtney

"With the increase usage of mobile applications and social media towards health awareness, it is evident that not all these applications will be as popular. There are many applications with similar functions, but they will not be as engaging and sustainable to the public. Some applications will be used for many years, while others will be downloaded then uninstalled due to their flaws. With that in mind, I am doing a study to observe and test some selected health promotion mobile applications. I will be evaluating these mobile applications using remote technology engagement from the literature. From there, I will compare and predict which mobile applications will be sustainable."


Woods, Mackenzie

Project title: The effects of anthropogenic underwater noise on plainfin midshipman fish reproductive behaviour

Department: Biology

Faculty supervisor: Prof. Francis Juanes

"I will conduct laboratory experiments to determine how anthropogenic noise (such as vessel noise) affects the nest guarding and/or vocalization behaviour of plainfin midshipman (Porichthys notatus) guarder males. The reproductive behaviour of midshipman guarder males is focused on parental care and nest guarding (as opposed to the stealthy reproductive behaviour of midshipman sneaker males), and the males produce a multitude of vocalizations, making them ideal study organisms. Using underwater speakers, I will expose the fish to noise treatments in various situations, such as while they are presented with a threat stimulus, and measure changes in behaviour, such as aggressive nest defense behaviours."       


Yang, Jitong (Jeff)

Project title: The Long-Term Effects of Population Aging on Chinese Financial Markets: A Quantitative Analysis

Department: Economics

Faculty supervisor: Dr. Ke Xu

"The issue of Chinese population aging will become a serious problem in the future, and it will sternly affect Chinese economies. In my thesis, I proposed to use mathematical methods to analyze the long-term impact of aging population on Chinese financial economics. For instance, I will analyze its effects on the issuance of bonds and securities, pension funds, insurance, etc. Also, I will describe the possible approaches to mitigate the losses from those negative impacts."        


Yoon-Henderson, Hanum

Project title: Cultural Relativism Compatible with Global Feminism?

Department: Philosophy

Faculty supervisor: Dr. Audrey Yap

"I would like to investigate the relationship between cultural relativism and moral realism from the perspective of feminist philosophy. These two theses are often seen as being mutually exclusive. I would like to investigate the middle ground, a feminist metaethical position that allows for legitimate moral criticism of different cultures, but that still recognizes the limitations of this kind of criticism. The central question I will look at is how we can engage in feminist theory and practice in an increasingly global world."
         
         


Yoshida, Kaya

Project title: Long-term monitoring of fall risk in older adults using walking gait and clinical measures

Department: Exercise Science, Physical and Health Education

Faculty supervisor: Dr. Marc Klimstra and Dr. Sandra Hundza

"Falls are the leading cause of fatal and nonfatal injuries among adults aged ≥65 years. Early and accurate identification of at-risk individuals is essential in providing effective interventions to decrease the likelihood of falling and subsequent injury. We recently determined a composite measure drawn from an extensive battery of common clinical mobility measures, postural sway and physiological tests as well as cognitively influenced gait parameters that retrospectively classifies fallers and non-fallers. This composite measure was able to accurately retrospectively classify fallers from non-fallers with a sensitivity of over 92%. To further develop this measure, prospective validation is required. The present study will measure older adults who at the time of enrollment are considered non-fallers, and will monitor their status yearly until they sustain a fall. This will allow the development of a predictive algorithm that will be able to identify at-risk older adults prior to falling and allow for early intervention and prevention of falls."
              
              


Young, Penelope

Project title: Characterizing the effect of tyrosine phosphorylation on the assembly of a7 and a4B2 nicotinic acetylcholine receptors in model HEK293T cells

Department: Biology

Faculty supervisor: Dr. Raad Nashmi

"nAChRs are critical mediators of signalling in our neuromuscular junctions and central nervous system. They regulate many important bodily processes that range from keeping our hearts beating to regulating dopaminergic signalling in our reward pathways. Consequently, loss of function of these receptors causes a number of problems, such as neurodegenerative diseases including Parkinson’s and  Alzheimer’s. It is important to characterize the molecular mechanisms that regulate these receptors given their large role in cognition, disease, and addiction."
      
      

Student recipients 2017-2018


Adams, Chantal

Project title: A Community-Based Research Project on Sexualized Violence

Department: Child and Youth Care

Faculty supervisor: Dr. Sandrina de Finney

"Sisters Rising is a community-based study with Indigenous girls, youth and young women, conducted in urban and rural communities in western BC. Sisters Rising responds to the urgent need for community-rooted responses to sexualized violence that support Indigenous wellbeing and sovereignty. Despite the calls to action by the Truth and Reconciliation Commission and the Inquiry into Missing and Murdered Indigenous Women, Indigenous girls and young women are too often the object of deficit-focused research; few studies have explored the historic and systemic roots of sexual violence from their perspectives. Our focus is on challenging the victim-blaming climate of gender violence by recentering Indigenous teachings and linking body sovereignty to decolonization and land sovereignty.

I feel very honoured to take part in this study and to be able to conduct research with young people in my home community of Haida Gwaii, and in other Indigenous communities. This grant will support my undergraduate journey as well as my transition to graduate school. Working with knowledge holders such as Elders, our goal will be to recenter Indigenous teachings that honor young people of all genders. Participants will use land-based methods (i.e., storytelling, drumming) and materials (hide, cedar, wool, etc.) to explore issues of dignity, safety, sexualized and gender violence, and resurgence. Workshops will be documented through multimedia methods including digital collage and video. As a way of sharing across Nations, our research team will co-author peer-reviewed publications, host workshops and activities, and create resources on sexualized violence, all showcased on the Sisters Rising website."


Akter, Tania

Project title: Large Scale Mining of Social Network Graphs

Department: Computer Science/Software Engineering

Faculty supervisor: Dr. Alex Thomo

"Graphs are the main modelling tool for online social networks and diffusion of information. Social media and networks can reach out to a large proportion of the population and spread out critical information in a very effective way. Businesses and other organizations have understood the huge potential of social media and networks and want to analyze the dynamics of social connections. In this project, we will conduct graph analytics and mining research using state-of-the-art systems for handling very large amounts of data distributed over clusters of commodity machines."


Atkins, Hayley

Project title: Benefits of the continuity of support throughout a student's education

Department: Curriculum and Instruction

Faculty supervisor: Dr. Kathy Sanford

"This project will explore the benefits of continuous support and communication between students, teachers and parents throughout a student's education career. Using Finland as a case study, when studen's transition from elementary school to secondary school, information about interests, learning needs and personal information is transferred between teachers and schools. This ensures progress made in the previous school system is not lost and the student can be fully supported as they continue in their educational career. This project will explore ways to implement this continuity in support into the BC education system in an effective manner."


Austin, Isobel

Project title: From Fear to Familiarity: Evolution of the Vampire

Department: Germanic and Slavic Studies

Faculty supervisor: Dr. Peter Gölz

"Exploring how the onscreen vampire has evolved throughout time to reflect the changes within our society. Discussing the transition from the frightening ghoulish villain to the desirable superhuman hero as we move the focus away from the blood sucking narrative and onto the individual stories of the vampires themselves. Addressing which core elements have remained the same, been altered, or been removed altogether. Taking examples from films such as “Nosferatu” (1922,1979), “Interview with the Vampire”, and “We Are the Night” to show topics such as the humanization of vampires, a decline in society's fear of vampires, and the shift in vampire films from horror to action."


Backhouse, Taylor

Project title: The effects of the German Divide from 1945-1989 on Germany’s Present Day Industry, Economics, and Investment

Department: Peter B. Gustavson School of Business

Faculty supervisor: Komal Kalra

"In 1989, with the fall of the Berlin Wall, a united Germany emerged. However, as you travel between the eastern and western parts of the country it is very evident that the country is still divided in terms of wealth, investment, and industrial production. It is noticeable in the pricing of goods between the east and west; the infrastructure in these areas; the social programs; and even a difference in average salaries between the east and the west. It is also abundantly clear that this division isn’t getting any better as time progresses—in fact, in some respects, it is like the Berlin Wall never fell. With this in mind, I will be conducting my research to find out why this phenomenon is occurring and its implications on doing business in Germany with regards to regional economics. To do so, I will look at three companies, from three major German industries, all of which are members of the Deutscher Aktienindex (DAX; the German Stock Index)."


Bagan, Stephen

Project title: In Ruins: A Visual Display of Spain's Recent Housing Bubble

Department: Hispanic and Italian Studies

Faculty supervisor: Dr. Silvia Colás Cardona

"The purpose of this investigation is to explore some of the implications of Spain’s recent economic crisis, focusing on practices of overdevelopment and speculative demand during the period of 1998-2008. More specifically, how the economic, political, and cultural practices turned the building boom into a real estate bubble after the financial market crash of 2008. The burst of the bubble left Spain with physical remnants of developments that do not serve their intended purpose: both finished and unfinished residential areas as well as underused infrastructure now in decay. My interest in this topic is rooted in my own observation of one of those unfinished urban areas south of Madrid. Many of the sights and landscapes have a beauty to them despite their tragic narratives. This analysis will include several case studies from the crisis, including both  small and large-scale projects. The accompanying images often say more than the textual analysis. The deserted landscapes serve as reminders of the dangers brought by overdevelopment."


Beattie, Benedict

Project title: Domine Mane Nobiscum: Religion in Northern British Columbia and the Legacy of the Frontier Apostolate

Department: Religious Studies

Faculty supervisor: Dr. Paul Bramadat

"For this JCURA I wish to study the Frontier Apostolate, a Catholic lay movement that brought around 4000 people to northern British Columbia from around the world to work and volunteer for the Roman Catholic Church between the mid 1950's and the early 1990's. I will discuss the legacy of the Frontier Apostolate, ahd its impact on the religious environment of northern British Columbia. As such, it will be important to address the colonial impact of the Roman Catholic Church in northern British Columbia, and consider how colonial practices were framed in this context. In this study I will analyze both primary and secondary sources, including newspaper articles, books, documentaries and journal articles. In addition to this I will also conduct interviews with members of the Frontier Apostolate community (for this I have contacted UVIC's Human Research Ethics, and will abide by their standards). Moreover, this study will tie these points of investigation into the broader conversation of religion and society in the bioregion of Cascadia."


Bolduc, Trevor

Project title: Synthesis and Selectivity Studies of Inhibitors for the Polycomb Group Protein CBX8 Upregulated in Cancer

Department: Chemistry

Faculty supervisor: Prof. Fraser Hof

"Extensive literature demonstrates the importance of CBX8 in progression of various cancers.  CBX8 is an epigenetic methyllysine reader, meaning it selectively processes methylated lysine residues in proteins, leading to diversified expression of the genetic code.  The methylation of such residues is one form of post-translational modification of proteins.  Currently there are no published inhibitors for CBX8 and the development of selective chemical inhibitors is necessary for understanding the specific biological roles of the protein.  These inhibitors will allow us to decipher the mechanisms through which CBX8 operates, and will further unveil the ramifications of rendering the reader protein inactive on the expression of certain genes related to cancer.  High-throughput screening of heterocyclic analogues has resulted in hit compounds that show promise for inhibition of CBX8.  Synthesis of additional analogues will allow for optimization of CBX8 inhibition and will give chemical tools that will allow us to study inhibition of the protein in cancer cells. The synthesis and characterization of such novel compounds will be investigated, and optimal synthetic routes to their design will be explored."


Boncajes, AJ

Project title: Youth Migration in Japan: From Rural to Megacity

Department: Pacific and Asian Studies

Faculty supervisor: Dr. Andrew Marton

"This project will examine the phenomenon of youth migration from rural areas to megacities in contemporary Japan. The research will analyze how the movement of young adults impacts populations in both the countryside and cities with a particular focus on young workers and how rural areas cope with the increasing proportion of elderly residents. From this baseline analysis, the project will examine how youth migration is represented in film, literature and popular culture, and will consider if such depictions are having an impact in the decisions of individual young people in deciding where they want to settle. Where possible and appropriate, interviews with Japanese youth will be undertaken to compare their migration experiences to those portrayed in films, documentaries, manga and books to highlight any significant differences and similarities. Findings from this cross examination of evidence will be used to comment on perceptions of a youth crisis currently unfolding in Japan, and to consider possible solutions to the demographic imbalance between cities and rural areas."


Boss-Moodie, Kasper (Justen)

Project title: Exploring the Gender of Art Practices: Value, Validity, and Perception

Department: Visual Arts

Faculty supervisor: Prof. Megan Dickie

"My work and art practice explores relationships of intimacy, sexuality, and the fragility of ambiguity. To further understand my own place within a LGBTQ+ art lineage I want to understand how sexuality and gender influences my work, how identifying as queer or gay can dismiss and undermine the validity of my work. This research project will combine a technical investigation into a sexual binary history and how that binary is breaking down. It will also involve discovering other contemporary work exploring similar themes and how they relate to my own practice. Within the confines of this research project I will explore and define how an object's history and it's process of creation influences the perceived value of that art object. The project will outline how the bias of “craft” and a connection to gender and sexuality can undermine a work's validity, importance, and power within a space. I want to create and continue a dialogue in art that defies these strong gender and sexuality biases, one that does not fully rely on monolithic masculine power but equally supports and admires feminine connotations and connections. The final accumulation of this research will result in a body of sculpture work. This collection will push contrasting perceptions of gendered objects and processes together by taking masculine objects and overwhelming them with woven, knitted, and crotched materials. These materials may change, grow, and adapt in response to the research."


Brooke, Erin

Project title: "Thus singen smale foules for thy sake": Chaucer's Birds and Interspecies Discourse

Department: English

Faculty supervisor: Dr. J. Allan Mitchell

"My research project analyzes species difference in relation to birds within medieval literary ecologies: i.e., how avian figures signify in various literary genres. I aim to examine the ramifications of transforming birds, normally associated with natural freedom, into literary subjects. Birds were appealing didactic figures to medieval minds: several "bird debate" poems, for example, have come down to the present day and demonstrate the rhetorical potential of the avian. However, birds could also function as receptacles for human knowledge, as in the case of St. Francis of Assisi's sermon to the birds, wherein he educates his literal flock about God's love for them. Other medieval texts, such as the Ch ster mystery play Noah's Flood, attend to the real relationships - some social, some merely functional - that existed between humans and animals. Several of Geoffrey Chaucer's works, notably The Parliament of Fowls and The House of Fame, emerge from this vibrant literary environment. My project, to be undertaken with the support of my faculty supervisor towards the  completion of an Honours graduating essay, presents several significant opportunities: it will advance my knowledge of later medieval culture, of avian relationships with their human interlocutors within literary habitats, and of current research surrounding medieval representations of birds in ecocriticism and animal studies. The research I would present at the JCURA research fair would explore how writers like Chaucer engage in interspecies dialogue, seeming to confirm human dominion over nature only to critique the human impulse to  control the environment."


Buhne, Maria

Project title: The Victorian Child: The Child’s Place Within Victorian Domestic Culture, Past and Present

Department: Art History & Visual Studies

Faculty supervisor: Dr. Carolyn Butler Palmer

"Under the supervision of Dr. Carolyn Butler-Palmer, of the Art History and Visual Studies Department, I intend to research and investigate the domestic life of the child during the Victorian era and within the local context. My research will take place at the 19th-century Victorian home and garden of Point Ellice House, a 150 year old National Historic Site, which retains its original collection and functions as a heritage museum in Victoria BC. I have been hired on as one of the two Canada Summer Works employees at Point Ellice House this summer, where they are keen in supporting my research and have given me the approval to work closely with the home’s collection over the course of the summer and into the Fall and Winter semesters. In addition to my research and work within the home, I plan to interview local historians and authors who have studied the O’Reilly family, to whom the Point Ellice House had originally belonged.

My primary goal with this project is to investigate the benefits of heritage museums, in regards to the cultivation of an increased interest in local art, and cultural heritage. Secondly, I intend to emphasize the historical importance of childhood at these sites within our local community, as experienced by the present day child who visits them. My goal is to create a relatable historical context in which children visitors may experience first-hand the world in which someone of their own demographic lived, and are given an opportunity to use their imaginations in coming to these realizations."


Cai, Jo

Project title: Generalized linear modelling of data from the Harmful Algae Monitoring Program 1999-2012

Department: Mathematics and Statistics

Faculty supervisor: Dr. Laura Cowen

"The Harmful Algae Monitoring Program (HAMP) has been monitoring sixty-four sites in British Columbia to collect data of harmful algae species and related factors; factors included descriptive data such as date and location, and environmental data like water temperature and salinity.

We will use a generalized linear models (GLM) and possibly rotating panel designs to examine the correlations between chosen variables and the presence of the algae species. In addition, we will use these models to provide prediction of future blooms."


Calveley, Duncan

Project title: Amber in the Tomb; a connection between the Khitan and the Chinese afterlife

Department: Medieval Studies

Faculty supervisor: Dr. Tsung-Cheng Lin

"The tomb of the Princess of Chen of the Liao Dynasty of China, buried in the 11th century, contains an unusually high quantity of amber. The Liao Dynasty, ruled and founded by the Khitan people, was in the process of adopting Chinese cultural practices, including burial practices, which differs greatly from traditional Khitan burial and death practices. The Princess of Chen was buried in a Chinese way, incorporating some burial practices of the earlier golden age of China, the Tang dynasty (618-907 CE). Placing the contents of the tomb of the Princess of Chen in the context of the contents earlier Chinese Tang tombs, contemporary Chinese Song (960-1279 CE) tombs, and the relationship between the Khitan people and the Chinese Empires, I aim to answer two questions. First, what does the contents of the Khitan Liao tombs, with focus on the amber, tell us about the Liao culture with regards to adopting and adapting Chinese customs and holding onto old traditions? Second, what was the significance of the presence of the amber to the Khitan Liao people, and to the Royal court at the time of the death of the princess? I am focusing on analysing the contents of the Tomb of the Princess of Chen, while also analysing contents of other Liao, Tang, and Song tombs for comparison between cultures."


Carelse, Michael

Project title: Satirizing the Reader in Thomas Hardy’s The Hand of Ethelberta

Department: English

Faculty supervisor: Dr. Mary Elizabeth Leighton

"Thomas Hardy (1840–1928) is well known today for the trenchant social critique of novels such as Tess of the d’Urbervilles (1891) and Jude the Obscure (1894–95), which scandalized their initial readers by subverting Victorian sexual double standards and class hierarchies. These novels have become so well known for the political nature of their subversiveness, however, that they have overshadowed a contrasting type of social criticism in Hardy’s fiction that has gone largely unstudied: Hardy’s satire of Victorian reading practices and literary institutions. To bring further attention to this more lighthearted side of Hardy’s social criticism, this essay will analyze the novel in which that lightheartedness is most apparent: Hardy’s little-studied comedic novel The Hand of Ethelberta (1875–76), which I will argue is valuable not for the trenchant social critique we have come to associate with Hardy but rather for its coy satire of its own readers. In doing so, I aim to uncover the comedic side of Hardy that often goes unacknowledged in Hardy scholarship, as well as bring attention to The Hand of Ethelberta not as Hardy’s least representative novel, as critics have traditionally considered it, but as the novel in which Hardy’s recurring interest in satirizing the reader finds its fullest expression."


Caters, Lauren

Project title: Influence of salinity on the surface structure of polymers

Department: Chemistry

Faculty supervisor: Prof. Dennis Hore

"The binding of organic pollutants onto ocean micro-plastics is strongly influenced by pH and salinity. This project will study how aqueous conditions affect the surface structure of polymers. I will use a combination of nonlinear vibrational spectroscopy, atomic force microscopy, and contact angle measurements to examine polymer surface structure and surface restructuring when exposed to solutions of varying composition."


Chalmers, Jocelyn

Project title: Are Girls Nostalgic of Dolls and Boys Nostalgic of Guns? Gender Differences in Nostalgia

Department: Psychology

Faculty supervisor: Dr. Frederick Grouzet

"Nostalgia has important psychological benefits, but does the content of nostalgic memories make a difference? Does the content of nostalgic event vary across gender. The objective of the research is to examine the content of nostalgic memories of men and women, and the effect on well-being. Participants are invited to describe a nostalgic moment that involves playing with toys and identify toys that make them nostalgic of their childhood."


Chapman-Humphreys, Zoë

Project title: Effects of Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion: Climate Engineering for Electricity

Department: Earth and Ocean Sciences

Faculty supervisor: Mr. Michael Eby and Dr. Adam Monahan

"Ocean thermal energy conversion (OTEC) generates renewable electricity using the temperature difference between tropical surface seawater and cold deep water. Consequently, it lowers sea surface temperature as deep water is discharged near the surface. Mass deployment of OTEC power plants has been proposed to fill global energy demand, and mitigate global warming. However, this artificial surface cooling could disrupt the global energy budget and eventually exacerbate climate change. The goal of this project is to analyze the long-term consequences of OTEC using the UVic Earth System Climate Model to simulate its effects. This research could help determine if any
configuration of power plants may generate sufficient energy without further disturbing the climate.
"


Chu, Samuel

Project title: Enhancing CRISPR/Cas9 Gene Editing Efficiency in the Correction of Mutations Causing Sanfilippo B Syndrome

Department: Biology

Faculty supervisor: Dr. Francis Choy

"Sanfilippo type B syndrome is an autosomal recessive lysosomal storage disorder. It results from mutations in the N-acetylglucosaminidase (NAGLU) gene. The defective Naglu protein leads to an abnormal accumulation of heparan sulfate. Clinically, Sanfilippo B manifests in the central nervous system. Patients experience developmental delays, behavioural issues, and cognitive deterioration. The average lifespan of a Sanfilippo B patient is two to three decades.  We propose to use the Clustered Regularly Interspaced Short Palindromic Repeats/CRISPR associated endonuclease 9 (CRISPR/Cas9) system to correct the causative mutations in our patient-derived Sanfilippo B cell lines. Simply put, CRISPR/Cas9 involves a guide RNA, which guides the Cas9 endonuclease to a specific genomic location, and a correction template. Once bound to the target locus, Cas9 cleaves the DNA. The DNA is repaired by the cell’s intrinsic DNA repair systems using the correction template. Our custom correction template will correct the mutations in Sanfilippo B. Initial CRISPR/Cas9 gene editing experiments yielded low rates of correction. Newly published methods outline the use of an asymmetrical single-stranded correction template, and a dual guide RNA targeting system to increase gene editing efficiencies. After CRISPR/Cas9 treatment, our cells will be screened using restriction fragment length polymorphism, lysosomal live staining, DNA sequencing, and Naglu activity assay. Any confirmed colonies will be expanded in cell culture for potential therapies."


Colborne, Lauren

Project title: Understanding Climate Change-Related Mental Health Issues: Experience with, and Solutions for, Eco-Anxiety

Department: Psychology

Faculty supervisor: Dr. Robert Gifford

"This series of studies will investigate the intersection between environmental issues and mental health as part of my psychology honours program. They will focus on the recently described cluster of acute climate change-related mental health issues, with a specific focus on eco-anxiety. This problem, rooted in fear combined with a sense of powerlessness, is becoming more widespread as more and more people realize the magnitude and impacts of this developing problem that even Barack Obama, who had to deal with many important problems, called “the issue that will chiefly define the 21st century.” Eco-anxiety is newly recognized as a form of distress and intense worry among an increasing number of individuals, particularly as they feel hampered by a large of number of structural and psychological barriers from solving, or even feeling able to help solve, the climate problem. As climate change worsens, experts are concerned that the prevalence of climate-related anxiety will increase, especially among vulnerable populations. Consequently, the proposed studies will expand understanding of climate-related anxiety at this relatively early stage of its impacts. The research will assess, using both qualitative and quantitative methods, the current prevalence of climate-related anxiety among students, that is, those who will experience some of the heaviest impacts of the changes over the course of their lifetime. It will also consider and begin to develop new means of alleviating climate change-related anxiety, and examine their possible effectiveness."


Corwin, Rachel

Project title: Voulez-vous un grilled-cheese ? An analysis of newly accepted English words in France and in Quebec

Department: French

Faculty supervisor: Dr. Catherine Caws

"Each year, Le Dictionnaire le Robert publishes their annual list of the newly accepted words in the French dictionary. The list published in 2017 presents many new words that originally came from the English language, such as pop-corn and troller. This same year, L’Office Québécois de la langue française, a Canadian organization that offers an online terminological database, also accepted words borrowed from English such as grilled-cheese and cocktail. These newly adopted words caused reactionary press articles due to the inclusion of several words of English origin. The goal of my research is to explore the integration of seven of these newly accepted words in French and French-Canadian press articles. I chose three words relating to food (cocktail, grilled-cheese and pop-corn) and four words relating to technology (spoiler, youtubeur/euse, geek, and troller). My analysis aims to understand how these words are integrated into French discourse as seen in the press articles that constitute my corpus."


D'Amours, Natasha

Project title: Experimenting with Virtual Reality and 360° Filmmaking

Department: Writing

Faculty supervisor: Prof. Maureen Bradley

"Virtual reality and 360° films are a very new, emerging form of storytelling. So new, in fact, that we don’t really know how to tell stories with this medium yet. As a storyteller and a lover of technology, I want to explore this new medium. What works in 360° storytelling and what doesn’t? How does it differ from traditional film? Can we tell good stories with this medium, or is it even built for storytelling? Through a variety of small 360° film projects and experiments, I want to start finding answers to these questions."


DeMedeiros, Dylan

Project title: Exploring the effects of traumatic brain injury on the development of Alzheimer’s Disease

Department: Psychology

Faculty supervisor: Dr. Jodie Gawryluk

"Alzheimer’s disease (AD) is associated with underlying brain pathology centered on the medial temporal lobes that leads to a progressive, neurocognitive disorder that is primarily characterized by memory impairment. Evidence to date has suggested that along with age, previous traumatic brain injury (TBI) may put individuals at risk for the development of AD. However, few studies have examined individuals with TBI for the biomarkers associated with AD. The proposed research will use a large publically available database containing neuroimaging and neuropsychological data from Vietnam War Veterans to compare those to sustained moderate/severe TBIs to healthy controls. Given that hippocampal atrophy on magnetic resonance imaging and memory impairments on neuropsychological assessment are most commonly seen in AD, we hypothesize that similar patterns of brain atrophy and cognitive deficits will be present in the TBI group compared to the control group. Ultimately, this work could lead to a better understanding of TBI as a risk factor for AD and inform the need for dementia prevention measures to be implemented for survivors of TBI."


Deschner, Finn

Project title: Environmental Deregulation and Media Censorship under Trump: Perspectives from White Collar Crime

Department: Sociology

Faculty supervisor: Dr. Garry Gray

"In the wake of the recently empowered Trump administration, a large-scale process of environmental and other deregulatory politics has begun, with significant implications for state-corporate relations and the field of White Collar Crime. Environmental pollution and destruction is both the most common, and one of the most damaging, forms of corporate violence, yet has received some of the least attention from criminologists in the past. Of particular significance, too, is the application or suppression of the media throughout the electoral campaign and into the Trump presidency, and its impacts on regulation and environment-based decision-making in politics. This research project aims to apply White Collar Crime Perspectives, in particular opportunity-based crime models such as routine activities theory, to the phenomenon of environmental deregulation under the Trump administration, to draw attention to and clarify the far-reaching implications these actions may have within and beyond the United States, now and in an environmentally troubled future."


Dolinar, Jacob

Project title: Canadian Credit Risk: Is the level of household debt sustainable?

Department: Economics

Faculty supervisor: Dr. Marco Cozzi

"Since the 2008 Financial Crisis that nearly crippled the world economy, the Bank of Canada has taken the position of a stimulus monetary policy to encourage growth. This narrative has led the target overnight lending rate to fall to 0.5%. Due to this low cost of borrowing, Canadians have taken advantage of this opportunity by borrowing at a record pace. This increased borrowing has led to the overall household debt levels in Canada to reach new heights. As household debt has continued to climb over this period, wages have remained sluggish and are lagging the inflation data. Accompanied by the meteoric rise of housing prices in Canada, the landscape remains uncertain for the stability of these debt levels. In addition, the Bank of Canada has begun to shift its narrative towards an imminent rate hike in the near future. These market conditions potentially leave the Canadian economy vulnerable to negative adverse shocks. My research aims to analyze the credit risk of Canadian household debt in major cities. Specifically, I will be using empirical data from cities such as Toronto and Vancouver since 2008 to examine trends in household borrowing levels during a time where average house prices have risen exponentially year over year. Additionally, I will analyze how an intervention from the Bank of Canada may affect the debt levels of Canadians."


Eaton, Sarah

Project title: Cancer nanotechnology: Use of gold nanoparticles for improved cancer therapeutics

Department: Physics and Astronomy

Faculty supervisor: Dr. Devika Chithrani

"Gold nanoparticles are being used as radiation dose enhancers in cancer therapy. I will be using gold nanoparticles encapsulated in liposomes as my therapeutic system for this study.  Breast cancer cells (MDA-MB-231) will be first incubated with the nanoparticle system. Once nanoparticles are internalized within cells, a radiation dose of 2 Gy will be given. Effectiveness of the treatment will be assessed using clonogenic assay. As an NSERC USRA student, I am studying the cellular uptake of this nanoparticle system. If I am given this award, I have the opportunity to test this nanoparticle system in radiation therapy."


Enns, Emily

Project title: Regulation of Pax6 by miRNA-7 in adult mouse subventricular zone neural stem cells

Department: Biology

Faculty supervisor: Dr. Bob Chow

"Pax6 is an important gene involved in many aspects of retinal and neural development. For example, it is expressed in a gradient in the subventricular zone of adult mice and plays a role in stem cell differentiation into dopaminergic neurons as they migrate to the olfactory bulb. It has been hypothesized that a complementary gradient of miRNA-7 serves to create this gradient and mediate the expression of Pax-6 protein in subventricular zone neural stem cells. miRNAs are small pieces of non-coding RNA that regulate the amount of protein produced at the post-transcriptional level, in a dose-dependent manner. miRNA-7 has targets on many genes, and so there are a couple of recently proposed target sites on Pax6. My research project will use knock-out mice for these proposed miRNA-7 target sites, followed by tissue sectioning and immunolabelling for dopaminergic neuronal markers, to further understand the mechanisms by which Pax6 is precisely and finely regulated in neural development."


Finnsson, Ari

Project title: Cruelty in Capital Punishment: France 1700-1800

Department: History

Faculty supervisor: Dr. Sara Beam

"The attempted assassin of Louis XV was executed in 1757 by being drawn and quartered. This method of execution was expressly designed in order to inflct the most pain as possible. A mere thirty-five years later, during the French revolution, the guillotine became the only method of execution in France. The guillotine, contrary to previous methods of execution, was designed in order to inflict as little pain as possible. This paper will explore the decline of cruelty of capital punishment in France during the 18th century."


Frymire, Luke

Project title: Impact of Railroad Development on Aboriginal Peoples

Department: Priority Initiative (Economics)

Faculty supervisor: Dr. Donna Feir and Dr. Rob Gillezeau

"A research project exploring the impact railroad development had on Aboriginal groups across  North America. Comparisons between agrarian and hunter/gatherer societies will be made to   draw inferences about how access to market and improved transportation may have impacted the lives of Aboriginal peoples."


Garnett, Ashley

Project title: Coding Behavior Change Techniques in Mobile Health Apps

Department: Health Information Science

Faculty supervisor: Dr. Karen Courtney

"I will be assisting Dr. Karen Courtney and PhD student Marcy Antonio with their research applying the Behavior Change Technique Taxonomy to mobile health applications.  The goal of this project is to try to identify behavior change techniques that are being used in mobile health apps.  As part of this project, I will complete training in research ethics (Tri Council) and in use of the Behavior Change Technique Taxonomy.   I will be working with the research team to review and code a sample set of chronic disease management health apps.   If this project is successful, the taxonomy would provide a standardized way for people to describe mobile health app interventions and assist researchers in understanding which behavior change techniques are most effective in different apps and in different settings."


Giannoulis, Dimitri

Project title: Performing in the Streets: Urban Soundscapes and the Politics of Place in Victoria, British Columbia

Department: Geography

Faculty supervisor: Dr. Reuben Rose-Redwood

"Urban soundscapes play an important role in the social life of cities. Street performers are part of the ensemble that constitutes a city’s soundscape, which brings urban space to life through the performative enactment of place. Drawing upon a combination of participant observation and semi-structured interviews, this study will examine how street performers produce “place” in the streets of downtown Victoria, British Columbia. Street performing is regulated by bylaws, but it is untaxed, irregular work. Street performers may therefore face certain economic or social challenges, and the degree to which they are marginalized or empowered in the context of Victoria is important to understand for both the performers and the city. The manifestations of power dynamics through land ownership, state regulation, and social interactions will be key elements considered in this research."


Gildner, Laura

Project title: Social Choreography and the Archival Body

Department: Visual Arts

Faculty supervisor: Prof. Cedric Bomford

"I am interested in the idea of social choreography, a term scholar Andrew Hewitt uses to describe a tradition of thinking about social order that places its aesthetic ideal directly at the level of the body.  I am specifically interested in how this concept, very much rooted in the performative, is able to relate to the still life image and its place within contemporary art.

As part of my research I will be looking at the contested validity of the still life within art criticism and its connection to the social construction of gender.   Further to this I will be framing my arguments within both historical and present-day ethical concerns surrounding photo-based media and the status of the body as it has evolved since photography’s inception.

The resulting work will take form as a photo-media installation."

Goldie, Devon

Project title: Theatre with Community: Historical Racism and Oppression of Ukrainian Canadians

Department: Theatre

Faculty supervisor: Dr. Warwick Dobson

"Despite Western society’s best efforts, racism and oppression are still prevalent today and continue to affect people from non-dominant cultures worldwide. Affected communities are left with emotional scars and the reality of their histories are often buried by the dominant culture in society. Although schools and educational institutions teach that racism and oppression are “bad”, they continue to exist and conversations around them are considered taboo and delicate. Theatre, on the other hand, has the potential to explore delicate and tabooed subject material in a way that is emotionally safe and that allows audience members to engage critically. Therefore, I propose an initiative to devise a theatre piece that discusses, explores, and engages audience members on the topic of racism and oppression that is created with the support of and for a specific community group. I propose working with Ukrainian Canadians, as this is my ethnic background and is an ethnic community that has historically faced intense racism and oppression in Canada. Through the historical lens of my culture, the theatre piece will speak to the greater truths and commonalities experienced by immigrants and refugees of all cultural backgrounds. I believe that through theatre this community will be able to begin a process of healing and reconciliation which will be carried forward in future generations."


Greenhill, Josie

Project title: North American Indigenous Responses to Contact with Non- Indigenous Peoples: An Investigation of ‘Hybrid’ Art Objects

Department: Art History & Visual Studies

Faculty supervisor: Dr. Victoria Wyatt

"This research project investigates ways in which North American Indigenous artists responded to contact with non-Indigenous peoples (traders and settlers) in the nineteenth and early twentieth centuries. Indigenous artists creatively integrated new materials, methods and motifs into their artistic production. The result is a category of ‘hybrid’ objects that bring together elements from both Indigenous and non-Indigenous visual cultures. This category of hybrid objects is broad and I will likely focus on one of its many facets as my research progresses.

This project proves that indigenous art is not static, and that the integration of new materials, methods and motifs does not discredit the indigeneity of the art. This challenges European discourse that primarily valued “authentic” Indigenous arts (i.e. styles and methods that represented a European view of pre-contact Indigenous peoples and their arts). This project provides an opportunity for comparisons between responses in different places in North America.

My anticipated learning outcomes include gaining a more in-depth understanding of local and national Indigenous histories and arts, gaining an intercultural perspective applicable to all future research, and strengthening my research skills through experiential learning. This project has the capacity for both experiential learning and broader community engagement due to the accessibility of relevant materials in local cultural institutions. I am fortunate to have access to an array of resources here in Victoria, from the collections at the Royal BC Museum to other resources nearby in Vancouver and Seattle. By accessing these resources I will be able to synthesize existing text-based research with tangible artworks."


Grundy, Ryan

Project title: Geochemistry of the Trembleur Ultramafic Suite

Department: Earth and Ocean Sciences

Faculty supervisor: Dr. Dante Canil

"The specific goal of the research project will involve using geochemical data on igneous rocks collected in the Fort St. James – Vanderhoof region of British Columbia to better constrain the geological history of the region."


Henrich, David

Project title: Shifting Runways; Evolving Media in Japanese Street Fashion

Department: Pacific and Asian Studies

Faculty supervisor: Dr. Andrew Marton

"This research will examine the effects that advancements in media and technology, and the resulting cultural globalization have had on the evolution of Japanese street fashion. The project will focus on the punk and hippie inspired movements in the mid-20th century, through the "heyday" of Harajuku and ground breaking DIY fashion of the early 2000s, to the increasing popularity of big brand names in the most recent contemporary era. This research will be undertaken through visual, semiotic, and critical discourse analysis of Japanese fashion media, both digital and print. Targets of this analysis will include Japanese street fashion magazines in both their print and online forms, the social media accounts of Japanese street fashion celebrities, and the various websites dedicated to documenting photos of streetwear in Japanese cities. While the runway is often seen as the traditional conduit through which one views fashion, a key objective of this research is to illustrate how the intersection between globalization, new media and street fashion in Japan subjugates that traditional model."


Higginson, Brittany

Project title: Fostering Inclusive and Sustainable Communities through Urban Agriculture

Department: Geography

Faculty supervisor: Dr. Cam Owens and Ms. Rhianna Nagel

"I will be working with Rhianna Nagel, Cam Owens, and (most likely) the Fernwood NRG to explore how urban agriculture and the community events supporting agricultural initiatives play a role in fostering inclusive and sustainable communities. I will be helping the Fernwood NRG in some capacity, and my final thesis will be partially comprised of a deliverable that can be passed on to the community partner to support their work in the community."


Hinde, Anthony

Project title: Characterization of the C Terminus of Ars2, a Highly Conserved Eukaryotic RNA Processing Gene

Department: Biochemistry and Microbiology

Faculty supervisor: Dr. Chris Nelson

"The objective of this project is to characterize Ars2, an essential gene found in eukaryotes. This gene has attracted interest due to its ubiquitous presence across disparate species and its diversity of function. Ars2 is essential to mammalian development and is involved in retinal development, facilitating stem cell differentiation into photoreceptor cells. In fission yeast, Ars2, likely through it highly conserved C terminus, facilitates RA processing as a central part of the cap binding complex and is also involved in chromatin formation. Understanding this protein would give us mechanistic knowledge of a central player in the fate of RNA, and more broadly, the pathways underlying embryonic development. However, the exact role of the C terminal domain is unknown. This project will attempt to uncover the mechanism by which this C terminal domain mediates interactions with RNA processing machinery. To do so, we will generate sequential deletions of the conserved C terminal regions using PCR amplification and will clone the resulting construct into E.coli. Subsequently, we will attempt to rescue a yeast strain possessing only a dysfunctional Ars2 gene using the artificial constructions. Rescue will be confirmed using several readouts established in the Nelson lab, and a lack of rescue by any of the deletion constructs will suggest that the region deleted was essential to Ars2 interactions. Completion of this project will help us better understand the mechanism by which an essential gene exerts its effect on embryonic development and cell fate."



Holmgren, Andrada-Elena

Project title: Begin Where You Are: Self-Knowledge and the Objectivity of Values in Charles Taylor's Sources of the Self

Department: Philosophy

Faculty supervisor: Dr. David Scott

"I propose to examine how Charles Taylor constructs a phenomenology of value in Sources of the Self by repurposing Heidegger's concept of intentionality as world-disclosure in order to ontologically situate the value-disclosing dimension of selfhood. My goal is to draw on Husserl's arguments that all knowledge is derivable from self-knowledge in order to show how Taylor's expansion of the resources of phenomenological description best accounts for our true starting point as value-creating cognizers, and in doing so, forms an important addition to first philosophy as Husserl envisioned it."


Isert, Zeverin

Project title: Performance Evaluation of MPEG-DASH over CDN

Department: Computer Science

Faculty supervisor: Dr. Kui Wu

"Dynamic Adaptive Streaming over HTTP (DASH), known as MPEG-DASH, enables high quality media streaming over the Internet from conventional HTTP web servers. The key idea behind MPEG-DASH is to adaptively adjust bitrate based on current network condition, in particular, bandwidth and delay. Content delivery networks (CDNs) utilize cache servers to reduce the delivery distance to end viewers and relieve the heavy traffic load from the original content servers. Nowadays, CDNs have become the major media delivery platform and carry over 80% multimedia traffic over the Internet. Nearly all CDNs adopt MPEG-DASH to enhance the quality of experience (QoE) of end users. The control of MPEG-DASH, however, is under the control of CDNs, and as such the quality of service delivered to end users may not truly align with their demand. To avoid the problem, it is desirable to design an intelligent agent at the client side (i.e., end viewer) to inject more feedback to the web servers. For this purpose, we need to analyze the behavior of MPEG-DASH via monitoring and analysing the media delivery over a real CDN. This project is proposed for this purpose."


Jansen, Sarah

Project title: A "Liberal" Arms Deal? The Canadian Sale of LAVs to Saudi Arabia

Department: Political Science

Faculty supervisor: Dr. Carla Winston

"Since 1993, the company, General Dynamics Land Systems Canada (GDLS-C) has been granted permission to export up to 3,000 light armoured vehicles to the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia through a legally binding contract. Regions of the Middle East have seen regional instability due to terrorism and conflict and this ongoing deal with Canada has the potential to further conflict in an already politically charged area.

In my research I will further investigate why Canada is still upholding this weapons deal even though NGO’s such as Amnesty International, Human Rights Watch, and United Nations Commissions have come out with reports stating that Saudi Arabia has been violating international humanitarian law. Canada, a country which is seen as safeguarding human rights in the international community, has formulated its foreign policy, which appears to disregard its values in favour of Canadian jobs and the defence industry, an alliance with a regional partner, or both.

Declassified government documents argue that these weapons have been sold to strengthen Saudi Arabia’s regional powers in order to counter attacks from ISIS in surrounding areas such as Iran and Syria, uprisings from Iraq and insecurity in Yemen. However, from a realist perspective, sending more arms to an already insecure area could make the area more prone to conflict.

My research to investigate this ongoing issue will include mixed methodologies of both qualitative and quantitative research data, official government statements, NGO reports and selected interviews with representatives of key players."


Kilshaw, Robyn

Project title: A Taxometric Analysis of Childhood Psychological Abuse and Neglect: Continuous Dimensions or Distinct Classes of Maltreatment?

Department: Psychology

Faculty supervisor: Dr. Erica Woodin, Dr. Marsha Runtz and Dr. John Sakaluk

"Childhood psychological maltreatment (CPM) refers to both emotionally abusive (e.g., criticizing, threatening, or denigrating a child) and emotionally neglectful (e.g., denying a child affection or attention) caregiver behaviours. Previous research has demonstrated that CPM is highly prevalent, and is associated with numerous psychological and behavioural disturbances across the lifespan. Nevertheless, inconsistencies in how emotional abuse and neglect have been defined, measured, and analyzed continue to impede progress in the understanding of CPM. For example, due to the high co-occurrence of emotional abuse and neglect, many researchers have used variable-centered analysis to control for the effects of one sub-type when investigating the other—an approach which assumes emotional abuse and neglect are continuous dimensions of CPM (i.e., varying by degree). In contrast, other researchers have taken a person-centered approach to their analyses—a strategy which assumes that emotional abuse and neglect are categorical in nature (i.e., present or absent). Using taxometric analysis, the goal of this study is to determine whether data collected from two measures of CPM provide evidence for emotional abuse and neglect as continuous dimensions, or distinct categories of maltreatment. To supplement an existing dataset of 410 undergraduate responses, self-report data will be collected from 625 adults using Amazon’s Mechanical Turk. The results of this study will guide the direction of future CPM research, as evidence for a continuous versus categorical (or vice versa) conceptualization of emotional abuse and neglect has important implications for the theory, assessment, research, and treatment of childhood psychological maltreatment."


Kinakin, Emma

Project title: Pricing Carbon Emissions Under Uncertainty

Department: Economics

Faculty supervisor: Dr. Peter Kennedy

"Recent international accords such as the Paris Climate Agreement have established that climate change is a global issue that must be addressed by reducing carbon emissions. The question now turns to the best way for countries to do so. One option is to create a market for carbon emissions, however, recent failures such as the European Union’s emission trading system show that in practice releasing the right amount of permits is a difficult and potentially costly task due to imperfect information. If the regulator releases too few permits then the price of the permits will be too high and the cost of reducing emissions will be exceedingly expensive; if too many permits are released then the price will be too low and carbon reduction goals will not be realized. This project will seek to model an emissions trading program with a “safety valve” under uncertainty where the regulator promises to release an unlimited amount of permits at a specified price, and where the marginal cost of abatement and marginal damage are unknown. Models such as this seek to combine the best parts of a tax and an emissions trading program by reducing the potential cost of releasing too few permits. The paper will then go on to compare the loss of social surplus amongst different models to try and attempt to make an efficiency argument. Finally, the paper will discuss the policy implications of these results in the context of global and Canadian carbon emission targets."


Kittel, Jacqueline

Project title: Women In the Cannabis Industry: Is there a “Green Ceiling”?

Department: Gender Studies

Faculty supervisor: Dr. Annalee Lepp

"The unregulated and federally illegal cannabis industry in Canada is on the cusp of massive cultural changes and women are making unprecedented strides in taking on entrepreneurial and leadership roles in this industry as has never been seen before. The legitimate cannabis industry is in its developmental stages across North America leading many to claim that this industry will be a blue skies market for women to take on leadership roles and to challenge gender norms in this newly emerging sector. This dominant discourse suggests women have an unfettered opportunity to take on influential and entrepreneurial roles in the industry, suggesting women will not have to overcome historic gendered divisions of labour that characterize most other industries.  This discourse erases the reality of gender inequality in our culture that the cannabis industry is not apart from.  The “blue skies market” sentiment towards the industry is a discourse that I wish to complicate and explore throughout my research by situating women’s lived experiences of the industry within the context of the corporatization of the cannabis sector which relies upon the legitimizing power of white, heteronormative femininity to normalize cannabis consumption.  My research project seeks to evaluate how gender is operating in the cannabis industry and the role that gender is playing in moving cannabis into the mainstream."


Knopfel, Danielle

Project title: An Exploration of Mental Health Outcomes Between Children of Married- and Common-Law-Headed, Same-Sex Couples

Department: Sociology

Faculty supervisor: Dr. Karen Kobayashi

"Mental health is a growing concern in Canada, specifically within minority groups, such as the LGBTQ community (Mule & Smith, 2014). As a result of the Civil Marriage Act passed in 2005, the number of same-sex couple families in Canada rose 42.4% between 2006 and 2011 (Statistics Canada, 2011). Therefore, this study will seek to address if children of same-sex couples exhibit differences in mental health according to their parents' marital status. To answer the research question, in depth interviews will be conducted with 4 youths between the ages of 12-14; 2 whose parents are married same-sex couples, and 2 whose parents are common-law same-sex couples. The proposed exploratory study will use narrative analyses while the coding process will use methods of grounded theory in order to gain a holistic understanding of the lived experiences of the participants. Moreover, the findings will be discussed in the context of their implications on further research as well as program and policy shifts."


Kocurek, Charlie

Project title: Legends on Hellenistic Greek and Roman Republican Coinage: An Epigraphical Study

Department: Greek and Roman Studies

Faculty supervisor: Dr. Gregory Rowe

"My project will begin by building on Greg Woolf’s 2015 theory in which he discusses ancient literacy as a technology rather than simple representation of speech. I will evaluate a selection of Hellenistic Greek coinage, dating between 323 and 31 BC, as a miniature form of monumental records of the various states that arose in the post-Alexander age. In addition, this will allow me to create a standardized and comparable baseline against which to re-examine Michael H. Crawford’s original 1975 interpretation and publication of legends inscribed upon Roman Republican coinage, dating between 280 and 31 BC."


Kushneryk, Katrina

Project title: Racing toward Rockfish Recovery: Community-Based Marine Conservation in the Southern Gulf Islands

Department: Environmental Studies

Faculty supervisor: Dr. Natalie Ban

"My research project will look at community-based marine conservation efforts in the Southern Gulf Islands, with a focus on rockfish conservation on Galiano Island. Of the 37 species of rockfish found in British Columbia (BC), 8 species are currently threatened or at risk. In BC, 164 Rockfish Conservation Areas (RCAs) have been established, which are closed year round to hook and line fishing in order to help rebuild plummeting rockfish populations. Galiano Island touches three separate RCAs. As part of my research, trail cameras facing these RCAs will be used to monitor recreational fishing activity. Interviews with people fishing around Galiano will be conducted in order to determine the level of public awareness of RCAs. Public outreach efforts, such as setting up booths at environmental events and giving brief talks around Galiano Island, the surrounding Gulf Islands, and Victoria, will be carried out in order to raise awareness for rockfish conservation and provide public education. These activities will all contribute to the Rockfish Conservation Project, which is an ongoing joint effort between the University of Victoria, the Galiano Conservancy Association (GCA), and Valdes Island Conservancy (VIC). As the GCA and VIC are both community-based non-governmental organizations, one aspect of my research will look into the effectiveness of environmental efforts that are rooted in and driven by community engagement. Another component of my research will involve co-authoring a scientific paper on the Rockfish Conservation Project in order to report on the effectiveness and status of the project."


Lambrecht, Felix

Project title: International Law and Constitutional Democracy: An Exploration of Compatibility

Department: Philosophy

Faculty supervisor: Dr. Cindy Holder

"This project will investigate discussions of the compatibility of international law and constitutional democracy. Specifically it will investigate liberal cosmopolitan political philosophy and the conflict between the support of constitutional democracy and international law in the area of human rights and global distributive justice."


Larsen, Veronika

Project title: Psychosis in the Victorian Era: Examining the Conceptual Evolution of lnsanity between 1837- 1900

Department: English

Faculty supervisor: Dr. Lisa Surridge

"'The Victorian Age saw the transformation of the madhouse into the asylum into the mental hospital' Andrew Scull, Madhouses, Mad-Doctors and Madmen

How and when did the conception of madness as illness begin? When did we cease to view madness as curse of genetic inheritance and start to understand it as treatable? I propose to research these questions by looking at depictions of psychosis in Victorian literature between 1840-1900. The Victorian Era saw a change in the criteria for insanity: not only was the definition of insanity transformed by medical advances, but society also changed in its response to madness itself (Scull 1981). The notion of lun·acy as a manifestation of racial inheritance (a model that we see in Bertha from Jane Eyre [1847]) transitioned into a model of it as a form of illness. As such, the very nature of madness cascaded from something dark and ominous­ incurable-to a treatable medical issue. I hope to  study several works for  background information on psychiatry during this time, such as Madness and Civilization (1961) by Michael Foucault and Madhouses, Mad Doctors and Mad Men by Andrew Scull (1981). These works will be used to pursue insights into the evolution of psychosis in works such as, George Eliot's Adam Bede (1859), and Mary Elizabeth Braddon's Lady Audley's Secret (1862) and George du Maurier's Peter Ibbetson (1891). As I am completing a minor in psychology, this research allows me to tie in my psychology work regarding psychopathy and my primary interest in Victorian literature. By studying these texts, I hope to elucidate how the concept of madness in the nineteenth century transitioned to the forms of mental illness we perceive today."



Lawson, Saige

Project title: The Effects of Natural Resource Development: A Sociological Perspective

Department: Sociology

Faculty supervisor: Dr. Sean Hier

"This intent of this research is to critically analyze the sociological effects of natural resource development, specifically, the economic, environmental and social impacts of resource extraction on surrounding communities. The sustainable management of natural resources is a highly important issue in British Columbia, yet the majority of existing research pertains to cumulative environmental effects and there is limited research analyzing this issue through a sociological lens. This project thus serves to identify social areas impacted by resource development projects, and explore sustainable solutions. Relevant concepts include sustainable development; urban-rural divides; Indigenous Resurgence and politics of recognition; and the impact of unsettled land claims."


Leech, Jed

Project title: The Influence of Sugar on Heart Rate Variability in Exercising Young Adults

Department: Exercise Science, Physical and Health Education

Faculty supervisor: Dr. Lynneth Stuart-Hill

"I will look at the body’s response to oral ingestion of sugar via blood glucose levels as well as if sugar has an impact on nervous system function, specifically the parasympathetic and sympathetic branches of the autonomic nervous system. Sugars influence on the nervous system will be measured by looking at Heart Rate Variability (HRV), or the variability in time within each successive heat beat. Participants will come into the lab on two separate occasions in a fasted overnight state. They will receive a beverage with or without sugar. The amount of sugar will depend on their respective body weight. From here, students will lay down for 12 minutes with a heart rate monitor to collect HRV data. Following this, they will cycle for roughly 20-40 minutes, depending on their fitness level. After cycling is completed, participants will lay down for another 12 minutes to collect more HRV data. Blood glucose will be analyzed on four separate occasions, including before beverage ingestion, after beverage ingestion, after exercise, and after the final rest. The participants will ingest the contrasting drink (with or without sugar) from their first trial upon arrival for their second condition. From our results, we will look at sugars influence on blood glucose and HRV before and after exercise."


Leech, Kristen

Project title: Numbers of steps required to predict fall risk using GaitRite Mat

Department: Exercise Science, Physical and Health Education

Faculty supervisor: Dr. Sandra Hundza and Dr. Marc Klimstra

"Falls are the leading cause of fatal and nonfatal injuries among adults aged>65 years. Early and accurate identification of at-risk individuals is essential in providing effective interventions to decrease the likelihood of falling and subsequent injury. We recently determined a composite measure drawn from an extensive battery of common clinical mobility measures, postural sway and physiological tests as well as cognitively influenced gait parameters that retrospectively classifies fallers and non-fallers. This process involved data reduction using principal components analysis followed b logistic regression. The final model consisted of 5 gait measures with 92.3% sensitivity and 66.7% specificity (total model classification of 82.9%). Gait parameters were recorded as participants performed 10 cognitively loaded (continuing backwards aloud by serial sevens) and 10 unloaded walking passes (i.e. there and back) on a GAITRite instrumented walk way. Within each gait domain (length, width, timing, and velocity) there were variables representing the mean and variability for cognitively loaded trails and difference scores (unloaded-loaded trials). It is currently not known how many passes of gait data is required to produce this high level of specificity and sensitivity. It is would be clinically useful to use the fewest number of steps required, thus the aim of this project is to repeat this analysis using gait data from 1, 3, 5, and 7 passes in separate analysis to determine to the level of specificity and sensitivity of the resulting model."


Le Gratiet, Keyrian

Project title: Nicotinic acetylcholine receptors expression in MeCP2-deficient (Rett Syndrome) mice

Department: Biology

Faculty supervisor: Dr. Kerry Delaney and Dr. Raad Nashmi

"Rett syndrome is a neurodevelopmental disorder due to a spontaneous mutation in a gene (MECP2) on the X chromosome.  It is embryonically lethal in males while females expressing the mutation survive but manifest a constellation of severely debilitating symptoms after birth. Development is mostly normal during the first 6 months but then stalls and regresses resulting in individuals that lack motor coordination, have impaired speech, and exhibit Parkinsonian symptoms often accompanied by seizures. Mice with the same mutation have many neuronal dysfunctions including poor neural communication, some of which is due to improper signaling by the transmitter acetylcholine (ACh). The cholinergic system is critically involved in the generation of purposeful behaviours including voluntary motor acts, which correlate with some of conditions seen in Rett patients.  For my JCURA project, I will study the expression of the nicotinic type of ACh receptor (nAChR) in a mouse model of Rett syndrome.  I will use fluorescence microscopy to compare nAChR density in different regions and different neuron types in normal and Rett mouse brains to determine whether there is dysregulation in the expression levels of these receptors.  nAChRs are particularly dynamic and their densities are up- and down regulated in response to manipulations like nicotine exposure and sensory deprivation. Removing the whiskers for several days causes more nAChR to appear on neurons in normal mice. Thus, my ultimate goal will be to examine whether the density of these receptors is properly regulated in Rett mice in the brain region that processes whisker inputs."


Lewis, Alexa Leigh

Project title: Ideology in Humanitarian Intervention: An Analysis of the Influence of Ideology in Foreign Affairs

Department: Political Science

Faculty supervisor: Dr. Scott Watson

"Are administrations with strong commitments to realist ideology more likely to intervene in human rights violations? Although realists suggest that ideology does not matter in terms of foreign policy, realists are more likely to favor government sponsored humanitarian intervention if that intervention serves their national interest. The Obama administration will be used as a case study of realist ideology, and contrasted with the administration under Bush Jr., which can be classified as a regime with liberal ideological commitments. Their underlying ideology will be illustrated through examination of their National Security Strategy. Through the consultation of various indexes including the Minorities at War and the SIRRI databases, I will analyze the past humanitarian interventions under Obama and Bush respectively, and contrast them with those instances of human rights violations, which did not result in external intervention."


Liu, Jingqing

Project title: An Economic Theory of the Incentive to Report Sexual Harassment

Department: Economics

Faculty supervisor: Dr. Christopher Willmore and Dr. Christopher Auld

"As one of the most under-reported crime in North America, sexual harassment has been deeply studied by psychologists, sociologists and jurists but rarely by economists. My research aims to analyse the individual's decision making process of reporting sexual harassment from an economic perspective. By adding to the small literature in economics, this research focuses on private reporting and future crime preventing. A two stage dynamic game theory model will be built and guide the analyze."


Lukenchuk, Benjamin

Project title: Economic Inequality and Prescription-Opioid Use among American adults

Department: Economics

Faculty supervisor: Dr. Chris Auld

"I will provide the first estimates of the causal effect of economic inequality on prescription opioid use and overdoses in the United States. Exploiting longitudinal, county-level data administrative data on opioid prescriptions, data from the CDC on overdoses, and recently available annual county-level data on inequality, regression models will be developed to disentangle the effects of inequality from other determinants of opioid use, such as demographics and macroeconomic conditions.  A Bartik-style instrumental variable approach using interactions between lagged industrial structure and national changes in output prices will then be used to address unobserved confounders."


Mabbott, Connor

Project title: Effects of Prenatal Ethanol Exposure on Neural Plasticity in the Hippocampus

Department: Medical Sciences

Faculty supervisor: Dr. Brian Christie

"I will be joining work currently underway using an animal model for Fetal Alcohol Syndrome, through prenatal ethanol exposure in rats. I will be using immunohistochemistry to detect changes in hippocampal neurons, to determine the effects of ethanol on neural plasticity. This will help elucidate the ways in which alcohol affects learning and memory on a cellular basis."


MacFarlane, Amara

Project title: Outdoor Adventure and LGBTQ Youth Empowerment

Department: Gender Studies

Faculty supervisor: Dr. Laura Parisi

"My research project will explore how outdoor adventure culture, and summer camps in particular, can contribute to the empowerment of LGBTQ+ youth. I will examine how queer environmentalism can assist in the creation of outdoor adventure programs which achieve these empowerment goals."


Mailloux, Jena

Project title: Nurturing Inclusivity Through Story

Department: Theatre

Faculty supervisor: Dr. Warwick Dobson

"As a means to research and understand inclusivity in every age group, I would like to create and facilitate a single, versatile workshop that is capable of finding commonalities from children in grade school all the way to adults. The workshop would become an expansion of a previous workshop created for a grade five classroom, utilizing the story of Giordano Bruno, a man sentenced to be burned for his belief that the sun was the center of the universe. Giordano’s story took place in 1600BCE; I would like to cross cut this true moment in history with a similar, modern day story. Performing the workshop without age restrictions will aid me to understand which theatrical techniques are most effective at promoting inclusivity as children grow. Before expanding the workshop, I would like to research interdisciplinary and inclusive facilitation methods in community engagement and classroom settings. I believe a single story can resonate with students and adults of all ages, and if so, can be a method of encouraging tolerance and acceptance as we move through life."


Marshall, Mackenzie

Project title: Exploration of Pronunciation in SENĆOŦEN Using Ultrasound Imaging

Department: Linguistics

Faculty supervisor: Dr. Sonya Bird

"This project will explore the acoustic and articulatory phonetics of sounds that are not well understood in SENĆOŦEN. Additionally, research will be done on how to initiate linguistic research within indigenous communities in a mutually beneficial, appropriate, and respectful manner, and conducted in such manner.

For this project, pronunciation of sounds will be done using acoustic recordings and ultrasound imaging. A native speaker of SENĆOŦEN will have their tongue imaged while they are speaking in SENĆOŦEN using ultrasound, and exploration of SENĆOŦEN pronunciation will be researched using this imaging. The pronunciations that will be explored will largely depend on what the SENĆOŦEN speaking community’s goals of pronunciation are and these will be evaluated continuously throughout the project. An outcome of this research will be a full description of these sounds including their phonology, articulatory phonetics, speech physiology, and a narrow description of the target phonemes using the international phonetic alphabet that best reflects their exact pronunciation. Ultimately, this will help language learners of SENĆOŦEN better understand and learn how to articulate different sounds."


Martin, Elizabeth

Project title: It Takes: An Analysis of the Media’s Effect on healing from sexual assault

Department: Writing

Faculty supervisor: Prof. Kevin Kerr

"The project aims to create a textual play and live performance by compiling various forms of media and information (plays, poems, Wikipedia articles, statistics, policies, etc.) centred around rape and rape culture. The focus of the piece is on material that may aide a survivor of sexual assault in finding healing through paths of justice, reconciliation, and forgiveness. During the fall semester, the play will be compiled and refined in order to be performed during the spring Semester at the University of Victoria’s Phoenix Theater."


Martin, Samuel

Project title: Russian cultural attitudes towards citizen-state relationship

Department: Germanic and Slavic Studies

Faculty supervisor: Dr. Julia Rochtchina

"On March 26th, 2000, Vladimir Putin was formally elected as president of the Russian Federation. During the symbolic transfer of power, Boris Yeltsin insisted that Putin “take good care of Russia” (Colton, 437). Yeltsin’s request was highly symbolic, yet deeply relevant. Putin’s subsequent consolidation of power, characterized by political and cultural authoritarianism, may be symptomatic of Russian cultural attitudes regarding the state-citizen relationship. Putin’s style of authoritarianism has a paternalistic character, eschewing democratic values in favour of strong authoritarian leadership. We must consider what exactly Russian citizens expect from the Russian state. Does Putin’s paternalistic regime enjoy popular (if not democratic) support, or does the regime take an antagonistic relationship to the Russian citizenry?

Soviet communism may have had an influential role in shaping Russian cultural attitudes towards the state. Did Soviet communism, with its high degree of paternal care and practically non-existent democratic processes, lay the foundation of Putin’s Russia? If I am accepted for the JCURA scholarship, my research will examine Russian cultural attitudes towards the state, and how they have been shaped, particularly by Russia’s Soviet past. Health, quality of life, and political polling statistics will play a key role in my analysis as well as the history of life under the USSR and research on the social psychology of authoritarianism."


Mason, Celia

Project title: Examining the development of the femoral neck angle during growth in two forager samples

Department: Anthropology

Faculty supervisor: Dr. Helen Kurki

"The proposed research project will examine the development of neck-shaft angle of the femur throughout the growth period in two archaeologically derived skeletal samples of Holocene foragers. Using 3D model specimens of the proximal femora of juvenile skeletons from Indian Knoll, Kentucky (n=37; 4143-6415 BP), and Later Stone Age Foragers from Southern Africa (n=50; 9120-220 BP). Neck-shaft angle will be measured using measurement tools in GeoMagic Design X software, and examined across the age ranges represented in each sample. The neck-shaft angle has been chosen as the focal point of this research project because it is thought, in current paleo-osteological research to represent hip movement and load-bearing. The Indian Knoll foragers are described as semi-sedentary, who expertly utilized a small resource set through hunting and gathering, and lived along the relatively flat topography of Green River, Kentucky. The Later Stone Age foragers also utilized hunting and foraging, as well marine resources along the coastal region Southern Africa, which presented this population with a more diverse terrain (varying altitudes) than the Indian Knoll Sample. This research project hopes to determine whether the femoral shaft angle during development may be affected by the different ecological contexts and subsequent loading patterns experienced by the individual, and whether, in two populations with similar lifestyle strategies, an observed difference can be observed and attributed to their environment or activity patterns."


McCallum, Jacob

Project title: Generating protein diversity with chemical mimics of PTMs

Department: Chemistry

Faculty supervisor: Dr. Fraser Hof

"Post-translational modification of proteins in biological is a key driver of disease states. To further investigate these diseases, protein diversity must be expanded beyond the 20 proteinogenic amino acids. My project involves the generation of new alkyl halides to mimic biological post-translational modifications. Working in conjugation with CBX proteins to phage-display generated peptide sequences.

My project also involves the synthesis, development, and testing of selective inhibitors for CBX proteins."


McDermit, Robert

Project title: Decidedly Fatigued: EEG Objectifies Cognitive Fatigue

Department: Exercise Science, Physical and Health Education

Faculty supervisor: Dr. Olav Krigolson

"Firefighters’ decision making must be performed under extreme stressors: time pressure, high temperature, and physical exertion. This study will investigate (a) the impact of maximal exercise in full turnout gear on firefighters’ performance on a decision making task, (b) if the magnitude of this impact is correlated with physiological stress markers (cortisol, IL-6, CRP, HRV), and (c) if performance is marked by changes in ERP components (DAP & Rew-P)."


McDonough, Courtney

Project title: The Fighting Cholitas; How Indigenous Bolivian Women Found Themselves in the Wrestling Ring

Department: Interdisciplinary Program (Latin American Studies)

Faculty supervisor: Dr. Beatriz Alba-Koch

"This project aims to explore the tumultuous and complicated history of the Cholas, a group of Indigenous Ayamaran women in Bolivia. Easily recognizable in their traditional dress of bowler hats and colourful skirts, I intend to research and deconstruct the history of the unmistakable Cholas. A term once used pejoratively to classify and discriminate Indigenous women in Bolivia, Chola is now used by politicians and the tourism industry as a representative of Indigenous nationhood. I aim to explore how these women, are used as a commodity to promote indigenous culture and authentic Bolivian tradition. My research on the commodification of the Cholas will be largely done by examining Cholita Wrestling. This weekly event, charges audiences of over five hundred people to watch as Ayamaran women in full traditional wear, wrestle one another in the ring. Often described as a platform for Indigenous female empowerment, the fighting cholitas is an extremely popular event. My research will examine the event’s popularity, to determine if there is a legitimate shift from gendered racism to empowerment or rather, the commodification of the traditional oppression of Indigenous women."


McMechan, Cedar

Project title: Nurses’ Experiences with Medical Assistance in Dying (MAiD)

Department: Nursing

Faculty supervisor: Dr. Anne Bruce

"The purpose of this study is to understand the range of nurses’ experience of either providing care for a patient who has chosen medical assistance in dying (MAiD), or declining to participate in MAiD. Findings will generate knowledge of how nurses are being impacted personally and professionally, their perceptions of nursing roles and responsibilities, and what gaps in knowledge and skills exist related to MAiD. A qualitative design using narrative inquiry (Riessman, 2008) and thematic analysis (Braun & Clark, 2009) will be used. Participants will include approximately 20-30 licensed nurses (RNs, NPs, LPNs, and RPNs) employed in Island Health who have cared for a patient pursuing MAiD at home or in an institutional care setting or nurses who have made a conscious decision to not participate. Findings will add to the literature, provide direction for nurses and managers in this new clinical and legal reality, and support an application for a larger study of MAiD (interdisciplinary team and family perspective) across BC Health Authorities."

Mihalik, Ilona

Project title: Trophy Hunting Awards and the Anthropogenic Allee Effect

Department: Geography

Faculty supervisor: Dr. Chris Darimont

"The Allee effect is a biological phenomenon that predicts a decline in population productivity at low density, which can increase the risk of extinction in a vortex-like process. Recently, the concept has been modified to include the exploitation of populations by humans (i.e. hunting, fishing). The anthropogenic Allee effect (AAE) model suggests the large monetary cost, associated with killing individuals within rare populations - though counter to economic logic - actually increases demand, thereby leading to increased exploitation and eventual extinction. An assumption underlying the AAE is that the rewards for killing rare species outweigh the costs associated with locating and hunting them.

Little is known about what rewards hunters seek to motivate their willingness to pay high costs. Recently, however, Darimont et al (2017 Biology Letters) suggested that contemporary trophy hunting evolved via ‘costly signaling’; male hunters target costly prey (i.e. rare, dangerous animals) to signal to competitors and potential mates that they can absorb the costs. These days, costly prey can be defined by the financial costs to acquire through travel, guiding and governmental fees.

I will test AAE and costly signaling hypotheses. I predict that rare species are more costly to hunt and that the hunters that kill these same rare species receive more prestigious awards from hunting organizations, such as Safari Club International (SCI) and Boone and Crockett Club. Testing these hypotheses could unite these bodies of work and identify heretofore unrecognized routes towards conservation of endangered prey."


Mitchell, David

Project title: Natural Language Processing and the REM

Department: English

Faculty supervisor: Dr. Stephen Ross

"The Routledge Encyclopedia of Modernism (REM) is an encyclopedia of entries relevant to the study of modernism. The encyclopedia contains 2,900 curated essays about people, movements and places that contributed integrally to the Modernist  period. A companion site, the Linked Modernisms Project (LMP), is an ongoing project at the University of Victoria which aggregates metadata from REM and provides tools for browsing and viewing this metadata. LMP provides graphical tools for visualizing the relationships between subjects as well as locations, periods of time, political and artistic movements, etc.

Each relationship is stored' as a subject, object, predicate (SOP) triple, otherwise known as a semantic triple. Semantic triples are the data entities of the Resource Description Framework (RDF) data model. For example, searching the site for subject "Alan Turing" returns semantic triples such as ("Alan Turing", "has Birthdate",1912) and ("Alan Turing", creator Of, "Computer Science").

The problem of extracting semantic triples from articles in the REM is a typical problem of computational information extraction (IE). IE refers to the task of extracting information from an unstructured document (in particular plain text) and transforming the content into a formal relationship which is understood by computers. In this instance, the formal relationship is specified by the RDF data model.

The database of relationships is currently incomplete, with only a small number of the REM's subjects containing relationship data. The objective of this project is to utilize natural language processing information extraction techniques in order to finish populating the database with semantic triples that could be extracted from the REM.

The techniques utilized in this project represent an effective and pioneering method for doing literary and historical research. In addition, the methods have potential applications for research in other areas, such as biological sciences and social sciences. We believe that computational IE could represent a revolution in academic research."


Morgan, Carly

Project title: The puzzle of one-armed tails in Galactic satellites

Department: Physics and Astronomy

Faculty supervisor: Dr. Julio Navarro

"The Magellanic Stream is a trail of gas that emanates from the Magellanic Clouds and traces their orbit around the Milky Way. It is heavily lopsided, lagging behind the Clouds in their orbital path. This one-armed feature, together with the lack of stars associated with the  Stream, have raised question about its origin. If caused by Galactic tides, then one would expect a two-armed tail structure and the presence of stars. If caused by ram-pressure onto a tenuous halo of hot gas then its spatial distribution would not trace accurately the orbital path of the Clouds. We intend to address this puzzle using cosmological simulations of the formation of the Local Group of Galaxies from the APOSTLE project. Preliminary work has shown the presence of a number of one-armed features emanating from satellite galaxies in APOSTLE runs. Their detailed analysis should yield invaluable clues to interpret the properties of the Stream and to elucidate its origin."


Mun, Monica

Project title: Modernizing Korea: The Role of Educational Reform in the Formation of the Korean Society of Women Composers

Department: Music

Faculty supervisor: Dr. Joseph Salem

"My research focuses on the Korean Society of Women Composers as a way of studying the development of educational opportunities for women in music throughout the latter half of the twentieth-century. I will focus on the first educational institutes in Korea and the graduates who formed the first generation of female composers as a microcosm of broader trends. In the male dominant field of music and society of Korea, these composers set a precedent in signifying female presence. Currently, the Society advocates for Korean composition globally and for educating and discovering promising future female composers."


Ness, Lynnea

Project title: Code Switching and Code Meshing in the High School Classroom

Department: Curriculum and Instruction

Faculty supervisor: Dr. Kathy Sanford

"This project looks at code meshing and code switching as a challenge to traditional assessment models in the high school classroom. Advocates of code-switching tend to emphasize the practical value of learning to switch between different Englishes in a world that does not accept nonstandard Englishes in professional contexts, while advocates of code-meshing argue that Standard English has been arbitrarily given precedence over other Englishes and is a result of a fundamentally racist and classist system. Drawing from observations and anecdotal evidence collected in a high school classroom in 2017, the project explores the attitudes, successes, and challenges of students allowed to use code switching and meshing in their assignments."


Neufeld, Luke

Project title: Improving T Cell Therapy for Cancer

Department: Biochemistry and Microbiology

Faculty supervisor: Dr. Brad Nelson

"This project aims to improve the effectiveness of Adoptive Cell Therapy (ACT), a new treatment that bolsters the patient’s immune response against their cancer through the infusion of large numbers of tumour-reactive T cells. Despite the great clinical success of ACT in some settings, there remain significant challenges that limit the effectiveness. In particular, there is a need to develop in vitro T cell expansion protocols that yield fit and active T cells rather than exhausted, terminally differentiated T cells. Traditional T cell expansion protocols use high concentrations of the T cell growth factor Interleukin-2. While this yields high numbers of T cells, they are often near the end of their functional lifespan. We hypothesize that using different combinations of growth factors that promote the formation of long-lived “memory” T cells will result in a less terminally differentiated product that is better suited to recognize and attack cancer when infused back into the patient’s bloodstream. Specific populations of T cells from the product will be classified based on their T-cell receptor variable β chain (TCR Vβ), which examines population clonality. T cell expansion products will then be analyzed by flow cytometry to determine how memory and exhaustion phenotypes vary among specific TCR Vβ populations. T cell expansion products will also be tested for reactivity against primary tumour samples. By evaluating different growth factor combinations, we hope to create an improved protocol that yields more potent T cells for use in ACT, leading to better patient outcomes."


Neville, Cleopatra

Project title: Positive Living, Positive Homes (PLPH): Housing and Health for People Living with HIV

Department: Public Health & Social Policy

Faculty supervisor: Dr. Catherine Worthington

"PLPH is a community-based research project in BC being conducted by the Pacific AIDS Network (PAN) in partnership with the University of Victoria. PLPH is investigating the relationship between housing experiences and health outcomes for people living with HIV/AIDS (PLHIV). With the identification of housing as a critical health determinant for PLHIV, the study examines Prince George, Kamloops, and Vancouver communities using a case-study approach, exploring how housing experiences have interacted with the health and well-being of PLHIV. The study seeks to investigate how current housing and HIV programs, services, and policies have informed the health outcomes of case-study participants, and identify best practices for housing services and policies to better meet the needs of PLHIV. The study has interviewed policy makers and service providers in the three communities, and has interviewed people living with HIV at two time points, using qualitative interview, timeline and home mapping techniques. The JCURA research student will provide qualitative data analysis support and assist with the production of a community presentation and web content on study results."


Nicchitta, Novella

Project title: Gladiatorial fighting in Pompeii: evidence from a newly discovered funerary inscription near the Porta Stabia

Department: Greek and Roman Studies

Faculty supervisor: Dr. Gregory Rowe

"The purpose of my research is to explore the violent world of gladiatorial games in Roman society through Pompeian epigraphic inscriptions. In order to investigate the social importance of such practices in C1 AD Italy, both official dipinti and the more colourful graffiti will be explored, thus giving voice also to ordinary people.

Furthermore, in a broader territorial perspective, my analysis will try to focus on the local chauvinism that such contests fostered, and the spread of violence outside of the arena, as occurred in 59 AD.

Particular attention will be given to the new monumental epigraphic discovery recently found near Porta Stabia in Pompeii, soon to be open to the public. It is the case of a funerary tomb with an inscribed epitaph revealing new insights on the social aspect of the gladiatorial games and on historical events in Pompeii."


Pazdernik, Shae

Project title: Prevention of Bacteria Growth on Everyday Surfaces

Department: Mechanical Engineering

Faculty supervisor: Dr. Rodney Herring

"Iron doped TiO2 nanocrystals, a UVic grown photo-catalyst, have been developed, tested and proven to oxidize organic material for water purification applications. The nanocrystals act as a photo-catalyst when in contact with organic material, water and visible light. The nanocrystals remain inert and do not degrade in this environment through photo-catalytic operation giving them a theoretical infinite lifetime. This research aims to study the nanocrystals’ ability to oxidize bacteria and viruses by measuring the reproductive success of gram negative E. Coli. Should the experiment prove successful, applications of the nanocrystals could be useful in reducing the transfer of diseases by creating germ free environments with TiO2 based paints with specific applications within hospitals."


Pimm, Forest

Project title: An ancient greenhouse gas: understanding the role of ammonia in the Archean atmosphere

Department: Earth and Ocean Sciences

Faculty supervisor: Dr. Colin Goldblatt

"During the Archean eon, the Earth received only ~75% of the solar energy it receives today. There is no evidence, however, for the presence of an ice age during this time, which implies a immense greenhouse effect. One greenhouse gas candidate in a reducing atmosphere is ammonia. The goal of this study is to quantify the ammonia in the Archean atmosphere and to understand the extent to which the species contributed to a warmer Earth-surface temperature. We will consider both long term forcing and climate feedbacks involving ammonia."


Poirier, Zachary

Project title: Severing Ties: Energy Security and Gaz-Systems in Poland

Department: Peter B. Gustavson School of Business

Faculty supervisor: Komal Kalra

"This paper examines the impact of the Polish government’s desire for energy security on the state-owned energy infrastructure firm, Gaz-System. The project discusses historical and political context, analyzes recent strategy and developments, and examines possible courses of action."


Powell, Rebecca

Project title: Historical Memory and Memorialization: How War Memorials Have Influenced Historical Narratives of Canada’s Role in Military Conflicts

Department: History

Faculty supervisor: Dr. Penny Bryden

"With this project, I seek to analyze how Canada’s war memorials have aided in constructing historical narratives of Canada’s involvement in military conflict from the Boer Wars, through the First and Second World Wars, and finally to the Korean War. By studying memorials from each of these conflicts, I hope to understand how they reflect Canadians’ views of military conflict and the role of the military in society at the time in which they were built. I will explore how these memorials have been constructed to depict Canada, Canadians, and war in a certain way. My project will focus specifically on memorials in Victoria and Ottawa to compare how depictions of war differ across regions in Canada and, in particular, how Victoria’s military narratives differ from the larger Canadian depiction of war. Some of the secondary sources I will be using include Death So Noble (1997) by Jonathan Vance, Mystic Chords of Memory (1991) by Michael Kammen, and Blood on the Hills (1991) by David Bercuson. I also hope to utilize primary sources, such as the Diaries of William Lyon Mackenzie King, as well as archival resources at the Military Museums in Calgary and personal observation of the memorials."


Ramsay, Margo

Project title: Evaluation of polymer coatings for anti-fouling applications

Department: Chemistry

Faculty supervisor: Prof. Dennis Hore

"Polymer thin films are widely employed to inhibit the adsorption of organic compounds, such as asphaltenes during the processing of crude oil. The prevention of fouling of heat exchanger surfaces is of great industrial importance for the sake of energy conservation and cost benefit. This project will investigate the structural characteristics of the polymer-oil interface in the presence of dissolved and precipitated organic species, including model asphaltene compounds."


Ready, Ryon

Project title: A Part of Our Heritage: Profiling Those Buried in the Emanu-El Synagogue Cemetery

Department: Anthropology

Faculty supervisor: Dr. Erin McGuire

"Victoria’s Jewish community forms an integral part of Vancouver Island heritage, including the oldest continuously operating Synagogue in Canada. As part of one of the oldest Jewish communities in Canada and the West Coast of North America, the Emanu-El Jewish Cemetery is the subject of UVic Anthropology’s Dr. Erin McGuire’s practical field course in Heritage Archaeology. At the Emanu-El Cemetery students gain hands-on experience mapping the cemetery’s burials. Through data collected by the Field School, in tandem with archival research, this research project aims to build profiles of known burials for use by the Emanu-El congregation and larger community. With such important characters as Samuel D. Schultz, the first Jewish-Canadian judge, and David Oppenheimer, second mayor of Vancouver buried at Emanu-El, compiling detailed and accessible profiles is key to disseminating knowledge of this important part of our heritage. By first identifying a group of people throughout the cemetery’s history – from pioneers to Holocaust survivors – and then building online profiles, community engagement and accessible heritage is promoted. In this growing age of internet connectivity, having ready access to heritage resources drastically increases knowledge and engagement in the wider community. The results of this project, attained through archival research, would produce detailed profiles and accessible online resources, thus engaging the community on this marginalized part of our heritage. As it is Canada’s Sesquicentennial, acknowledging all aspects of Canadian heritage, and making them easily accessible to communities everywhere, is vitally important."


Reid, Darren

Project title: Hacking Colonial Discourse: Digitally Interrogating the Meaning of 'Civilization' in the 19th Century

Department: History

Faculty supervisor: Dr. John Lutz

"The term "civilizing mission" has been expressed as one of the primary rationales of, and justifications for, Great Britain's imperial expansion in the 19th century. This research project will attempt to unpack the meaning behind the shorthand "civilizing mission" by using the technique of "text-mining" on the collection of 19th century British literature digitized by the British library. By examining the frequency of the use of this and related terms, and exploring the main uses, I will answer the questions: What did the terms "Civilizing Mission" mean to 19th century Britons and who were the main targets of this "mission"?"


Ricciardi, Giorgia

Project title: Mediate che questo e’ stato’: The Ferramonti di Tarsia Concentration Camp

Department: Hispanic and Italian Studies

Faculty supervisor: Dr. Helga Thorson, Germanic and Slavic Studies

"Ferramonti di Tarsia — the largest Italian internment camp for Jews. An example of various aspects of the history of Italian Fascism which is largely unknown internationally."


Riseley, Jasmine

Project title: Ian Clarke’s Maya, for Two Flutes and Piano

Department: Music

Faculty supervisor: Dr. Suzanne Snizek

"A closer look and performance of Maya, a chamber music work written by contemporary composer Ian Clarke. Maya has become a popular new standard amongst flutists world wide owing to Clarke’s influential and unconventional techniques and beautiful melodies."


Rogers, Kenya

Project title: Creating Communities of Care: Towards a Survivor Centred Methodology in Political Science Research

Department: Priority Initiative (Political Science)

Faculty supervisor: Dr. Heidi Stark

"Sexualized violence affects communities throughout Canada at alarmingly high rates; however, a lack of accessible and representative data sampling, combined with a culture of silence and disbelief has limited the accuracy of data collected by states and institutions. This creates a significant gap in understanding of the structural roots of sexualized violence and its prevalence within communities, especially those that are disproportionately affected. For my project I propose that a new method, rooted in community-based and intersectional practice, will serve to produce a more holistic understanding of how sexualized violence appears in community and the extent of its impact.

This project will engage an ethnographic study here at UVic, rooted in an intersectional community-based framework. With the help of the Anti Violence Project (the on-campus sexual assault centre) I intend to work with focus groups of survivors to build a data collection model that centres the stories and safety of those who have experienced sexualized violence. From these focus groups I will build a tool (e.g. surveys, reporting frameworks) that can be used on campus to better understand the root causes, pervasiveness and impacts of sexualized violence. I strongly believe that a more intersectional and holistic understanding of how and why violence is happening will lead to better prevention and education frameworks for institutional response.

This project is also a personal endeavour. I am a survivor of sexualized violence, and I have dedicated the last 5 years of my life to engaging in anti-violence work and advocating for survivors."


Roome, Simon

Project title: Optimizing a System for Recombination in Escherichia coli

Department: Biochemistry and Microbiology

Faculty supervisor: Dr. Francis Nano

"Within the scope of the larger-scale project of transforming a bacterium with an entire bacterial chromosome, we aim to find the most efficient method of recombination in vivo with the red/gam λ phage recombination system. To optimize this system, we will be testing multiple different Escherichia coli background strains and counter selection agents. Since different strains of E. coli have different efficiencies of both taking up exogenous DNA and degrading exogenous linear DNA, and both of these features are likely to affect efficiency of “capture by recombination”, it will be important to test and determine these features to inform our decision of strain selection. Counter selection elements provide selective pressure when one is isolating recombinant DNA that lacks an antibiotic marker. This project will compare recombinant capture of Thermus thermophilus DNA into a BAC using different E. coli strains (recA, recJ, recD, etc.) and with different plasmids expressing red/gam functions. Additionally, we will compare the efficacy of CRISPR/Cas9, homing endonuclease I-SceI, and sacB (+sucrose) at enhancing the identification of BAC recombinants."


Ruston, Nathan

Project title: The Prohibition of Marijuana in Canada: Investigating International and Imperial Causes

Department: History

Faculty supervisor: Dr. Penny Bryden

"In the spring of 2017, the Canadian government announced its plans to end the prohibition of the recreational use of marijuana by the summer of 2018. This marks the end of nearly 100 years of governmental control of the drug, which began in the midst of the 1920s drug panic document by Catherine Carstairs and others. Opium was generally the substance in question, and while there were others, such as morphine and cocaine, which were publicly condemned, marijuana was largely unknown. Yet in 1923, it was added to the list of scheduled substances with little fanfare. Why did this occur? Carstairs suggests that the roots of marijuana prohibition can be found in Mackenzie King's attendance at international events on the opium trade from 1909-1912. This is particularly significant as the scheduling of marijuana occurred under King's government. The initial causes of the prohibition of marijuana remain unclear and appear somewhat separate from the broader drug panic; the first seizure of marijuana did not occur until fifteen years after its prohibition, in 1937, and it was not targeted by the anit-drug campaigns of the 1920s. I would like to more closely investigate the potential sources of marijuana prohibition by examing the House of Commons debates that saw its introduction, the report of the 1909 commission and the subsequent Hague Opium Conference, as well as Mackenzie King's personal diaries during those years. Hopefully, by the end of prohibition, I can shed some light on its beginning."


Ryan, Faith

Project title: Green Miranda: Colour and Women's Power in Katherine Dunn's Geek Love

Department: English

Faculty supervisor: Dr. Jentery Sayers

"This research project argues that Katherine Dunn's carnivalesque Geek Love (1989) rewrites Shakespeare's The Tempest by privileging female characters and matriarchal power. Instead of comparing characters (Shakespeare's Miranda and Dunn's Miranda, for instance) or focusing on familiar themes (such as normalcy and monstrosity), I foreground how the colours blue and green correspond with power dynamics in both texts. Through an emphasis on colour and colour patterns, my reading centres on how the aesthetics of Geek Love reveal a subtle spectrum of gender politics at play in key moments of conflict. While existing scholarship on Dunn's work reduces Geek Love to a product of 1990s subculture, or it stresses the novel's tendencies toward vulgarity and "freakishness," no journal articles or monographs attend to how Dunn repurposes The Tempest through her use of colour, let alone how colour operates in relation to gender and power. To support my argument, I am interpreting colour as a symbol in the early modern and contemporary periods, and I am reading Color Codes (Riley 1995) and The Key of Green (Smith 2009) to historicize my inquiry through cultural studies of design and perception. I am also reading colour as both an allusion and articulation of gender, consulting publications such as Suffocating Mothers: Fantasies of Maternal Origin in Shakespeare/s Plays (Adelman 1992) and Prospero/s Island (Cobb 1984). Finally, to position colour as a signifier of difference, I responding to Weese's "Normalizing Freakery: Katherine Dunn's Geek Love and the Female Grotesque" (2000), one of few compelling articles about Dunn's novel. Ultimately, my research expands scholarly attention to Dunn's work beyond its association with 90s era "freaks and geeks" by introducing a reading that focuses on Geek Love's canonical influences and demonstrating (through interpretations of colour) a significant shift in notions of female power between the renaissance and the late twentieth century. I will present this research in poster format, which is conducive to sharing observations about the politics and aesthetics of colour."


Sam, Shezell-Rae

Project title: A Community-Based Research Project on Sexualized Violence

Department: Child & Youth Care

Faculty supervisor: Dr. Sandrina de Finney

"Sisters Rising is a community-based study with Indigenous girls, youth and young women, conducted in urban and rural communities in western BC. Sisters Rising responds to the urgent need for community-rooted responses to sexualized violence that support Indigenous wellbeing and sovereignty. Despite the calls to action by the Truth and Reconciliation Commission and the Inquiry into Missing and Murdered Indigenous Women, Indigenous girls and young women are too often the object of deficit-focused research; few studies have explored the historic and systemic roots of sexual violence from their perspectives. Our focus is on challenging the victim-blaming climate of gender violence by recentering Indigenous teachings and linking body sovereignty to decolonization and land sovereignty.

As a proud mother of five and a Nuu-Chah-Nulth student, this study will support my undergraduate success and future application to graduate school. I will facilitate hands-on, arts-based research workshops with Indigenous girls, youth and young women in their own communities. Working with knowledge holders such as Elders, our goal will be to recenter Indigenous teachings that honor young people of all genders. Participants will use land-based methods (i.e., storytelling, drumming) and materials (hide, cedar, wool, etc.) to explore issues of dignity, safety, sexualized and gender violence, and resurgence. Workshops will be documented through multimedia methods including digital collage and video. As a way of sharing across Nations, our research team will co-author peer-reviewed publications, host workshops and activities, and create resources on sexualized violence, all showcased on the Sisters Rising website."


Schiefelbein, Tami

Project title: The Impact of Climate Change on Food Security of Indigenous Peoples on the West Coast of Canada and New Zealand

Department: Anthropology

Faculty supervisor: Dr. Robert Hancock

"My research project will be a comparative analysis of the impacts of climate change on the food security of Indigenous peoples on the West Coast of British Columbia, Canada, and Aotearoa (New Zealand). While in two different hemispheres, the central coast of British Columbia and New Zealand have similar latitudes, climates, and ecosystems, and will likely face similar impacts from climate change. Through the the lens of food security, this project will therefore analyze how the impact of climate change on Indigenous peoples may also be influenced by the cultural, political, and socioeconomic environments that they are in. Thus, it will lead to a greater understanding of how differing human forces may influence Indigenous peoples ability to respond to the pressures imposed on them by global climate change in similar environments. It will also help create an understanding of the experiences of Indigenous nations in these areas regarding climate change and food security, and how they perceive future solutions, and current limitations to these solutions. The project will build off of my previous work in Heiltsuk territory on the central coast of BC, where I worked with community members and researchers to learn about their relationship to the land and ecosystems of their territory, and how they have witnessed and experienced climate change through these relationships."


Schmid, Todd

Project title: Invesigating the failure of a commutative C* algebra to admit quantifier elimination

Department: Mathematics and Statistics

Faculty supervisor: Dr. Christopher Eagle

"The groundbreaking Gelfand-Naimark theorem tells us of an equivalence between the class of compact Hausdorff topological spaces and the class of unital and commutative C* algebras. After the model theoretic study of operator algebras was initiated in 2010 by Farah, Hart, and Sherman, this opened a doorway for model theorists to study properties of these important topological spaces via their associated C* algebras. Proving quantifier elimination for a class of structures is often an important first step in applying model theoretic tools to those structures, but Eagle, Goldbring, and Vignati have shown that most unital commutative C* algebras do not have this. The proof of this unfortunate fact does not provide a concrete reason. We reasonably expect to find at least some of the specific obstacles to quantifier elimination that C* algebras face for some particular topological spaces."

Schwabe, Aliya

Project title: International Relations Theory: The end of US unipolarity?

Department: Political Science

Faculty supervisor: Dr. Scott Watson

"Since the fall of the Soviet Union, the world has been considered to be ‘Unipolar’ – characterized by the United States enjoying an unparalleled level of military, economic, and geopolitical prowess. In my research I will be attempting to ascertain whether this period is coming to an end. My research question is: Will the present system of US Unipolarity persist, in spite of challenges from Russia and China? This question will be answered by not only looking at military and economic indicators, but I will also investigate (through discourse analysis) how the United States perceives these threats from Russia and China."


Smith, Allison

Project title: Teaching Science to English Language Learners

Department: Curriculum and Instruction

Faculty supervisor: Dr. Kathy Sanford

"In the 2014/2015 school year, British Columbia accepted 18,700 international students in the K-12 school system and this number is only growing. Districts are happy to offer space to international students as they bring in tuition dollars and create jobs to run and support international student programs. Most of these international students, as well as the increasing number of immigrant students, are English language learners (ELL) and must learn English while integrating into the Canadian curriculum to try to be successful in their classes. Through my experiences teaching Biology 11 on practicum, speaking with practicing teachers, and working with ELL students I have recognized a shortfall in successful learning opportunities for ELL students in the science classroom. International and immigrant learners struggle to take away meaning and context from their science lessons taught in English when they are faced with the new uncommon vocabulary of the language of “science”.  This project focuses on instructional and relational strategies to increase success of ELLs in the science classroom. Research based on adaptations and modifications to improve the experiences of both teachers and international and immigrant students with consideration to science curriculum will be showcased."


Stewart, Johanna

Project title: Developmental history of a mid-elevation fen on central Vancouver Island

Department: Biology

Faculty supervisor: Dr. Terri Lacourse

"Peatlands cover only 3% of the global land surface but play an important role in the global carbon budget because they store more carbon per unit area than any other terrestrial ecosystem. There is concern that carbon stored in peatlands may be released through accelerated decomposition caused by atmospheric warming and that this process will further accelerate warming. Previous studies have shown that the amount of carbon stored in peatlands depends on the type of peat that accumulates. In order to understand the possible impacts of climate change on these important carbon sinks, research on how past changes in plant communities and climate have influenced peatland carbon storage is needed. In this project, I will analyze a peat sequence collected from a fen located on central Vancouver Island that spans the last 13,000 years. I will determine the type of peat (moss, sedge or ligneous peat) that has accumulated at this site using plant macrofossil analysis. This analysis will show whether changes in plant communities over the last 13,000 years have resulted in the accumulation of different types of peat. These data will be combined with carbon analysis to determine the relationship between changes in peat composition and carbon storage through time. Documenting changes in peat composition and carbon storage on long timescales will help improve our understanding of peatland dynamics and is essential for identifying the potential impacts of future climate change on these important carbon sinks."


Styan, Tara

Project title: Microspheres for stem cell differentiation into neural tissue

Department: Mechanical Engineering

Faculty supervisor: Dr. Stephanie Willerth

"The Willerth Lab uses stem cells to engineer neural tissue.  Stem cells have the ability to differentiate into any cell type in the body.  This tissue engineered from stem cells can be used to streamline drug screening and in organ transplantation increase supply and negate the risk of tissue rejection. However, tissue engineering still faces challenges.  Many cells need to grow in three dimensional (3D) aggregates to communicate and differentiate properly. Cells at the center of the aggregate interact less with molecules in the surrounding media while cells on the outside of the aggregate interact more with molecules in the surrounding media.  Additionally, morphogens must be added to the media on a regular schedule, making the entire process exponentially more labour intensive.  Microspheres are a potential solution because they can be incorporated into cell aggregates and degrade over periods of up to 100 days, allowing continuous and evenly distributed morphogen delivery.  Biodegradable scaffolds can also be used to support the cells and mimic the biological environment. In the future these scaffolds can be bioprinted in order to streamline the entire differentiation process.  This experiment investigates differing morphogens incorporated into microspheres, with 3D cell aggregates embedded into biodegradable scaffolds."


Suesser, Konrad

Project title: Effects of FASD on neuronal structure in the brain

Department: Medical Sciences

Faculty supervisor: Dr. Brian Christie

"Alcohol is a teratogen that can lead to a range of developmental problems in offspring known as fetal alcohol spectrum disorders (FASDs). Ethanol exposure during pregnancy, known more formally as Pre-natal ethanol exposure (PNEE), especially affects an infant’s ability to learn and form memories, which are functions commonly associated with the hippocampus, a subcortical structure. The efficacy of neural transmission and synaptic plasticity in the brain is determined by both increasing and decreasing synaptic strength of neurotransmission, known as long-term potentiation (LTP) and long-term depression (LTD), respectively. Using in-vitro electrophysiology techniques, I will be carrying out high-frequency stimulation (HFS) and low-frequency stimulation (LFS) protocols in the medial perforant path of the dentate gyrus, within the hippocampus, to analyze differences in LTP and LTD of male and female pair-fed rats."


Walther, Lena

Project title: Morning Person vs. Night Owl: Using EEG to Measure Your Attention Fluctuations Throughout the Day

Department: Exercise Science, Physical and Health Education

Faculty supervisor: Dr. Olav Krigolson

"Our research will be investigating subjects brain activity prior and during a written test completed by the participant; brain activity will be recorded using a portable FFG device. Ultimately we would work towards predicting academic performance analyzing the EEG data."


Watson, Morghan

Project title: Bodies of the Nation: Race, Gender and Nation in Suffrage and Sterilization

Department: Gender Studies

Faculty supervisor: Dr. Sikata Banerjee

"My project will explore how nationalist rhetoric was employed by feminists to advocate in favour of eugenics in early twentieth century Canada. The creation and implementation of sterilization legislation will be specifically examined, to show the connections between nationalism, eugenics and women’s advocacy.

Growing concerns around the "racial degeneration" of White Anglo-Saxon Protestants (WASPs), gave WASP women an opportunity to fashion themselves as mothers of the race, and the nation. In doing so, suffragettes were able to justify their participation in politics, often specifically in areas of social and moral reform. 

The platform for women's suffrage was built on racial anxiety, and the notion that motherhood was intrinsically connected to the health of the nation. Therefore, when reformists turned their efforts to eugenics, women and racial minorities became targets of the resulting sterilization legislation."


Watt, Harris

Project title: Deconstructing Conspiracies: Finding Innatist Critiques for Popular Accounts of Social Activity

Department: Philosophy

Faculty supervisor: Dr. David Scott

"Idealist, innatist philosophers (e.g., G. W. Leibniz, C. A. Campbell) considered human beings to be both active agents within, and single, distinct perspectives on, a greater social reality. Symbolic Interactionists (e.g., E. Goffman, C. Cooley) investigated social development by imagining individuals as simultaneously reflective and creative of social reality. Within this backdrop of innate perspectivalism, I intend to investigate the notion that there are features common to all people, and thus to their societies, that might inform sociological accounts of human activity. The study of such features would contrast the empiricist approach dominant to sociology. I raise this topic through a focus on conspiracy theory."


Webber, Kimberly

Project title: A Critical Evaluation of Current Indicators of Well-Being in Indigenous Contexts

Department: Priority Initiative (Economics)

Faculty supervisor: Dr. Donna Feir

"Indigenous communities are distinct communities within Canada, with their own cultural beliefs, practices, and languages. These communities are viewed as some of the economically poorest communities in the country, but arguably they are some of the wealthiest in terms of culture and kinship connections. In economics, well-being is often measured using income, life expectancy, education, and income. In Canada in particular, the well-being of Indigenous communities is often evaluated using a composite index called the Community Well-being Index (CWI). I believe that this and other measures do not fully encompass what it means for Indigenous communities to be “well-off.” Using my home community of K’omoks First Nation as a case study, I will look at currently available measures of well-being such as income, life expectancy, and the CWI and evaluate how tightly they relate to traditional and current ideas of well-being. I will then propose and construct other indicators of well-being, such as cultural retention and life satisfaction, which may be more useful in evaluating the effectiveness of policies and programs."


Westlake, Juliet

Project title: Empowering Students: Co-creating the TS Curriculum

Department: Interdisciplinary Program (Technology and Society)

Faculty supervisor: Dr. Janni Aragon

"This project will scan review the scope of technology use in the technology and society classroom. We will delve into how the technology and society coursework provides students theoretical opportunities and digital skills use. Juliet and Janni will also scan other similar courses in the province and survey former students. This will require ethics approval and will offer Juliet the opportunity for familiarity with qualitative and quantitative research."


White, Alison

Project title: Do you believe in the power of music? A scoping review of intergenerational music-based interventions for youth and community-dwelling persons with dementia

Department: Nursing

Faculty supervisor: Dr. Debra Sheets

"I have completed a scoping review of the literature examining intergenerational music-based interventions between children or youth and persons with dementia. This research is in support of Dr. Debra Sheet's ongoing research of a choir here in Victoria, Voices in Motion, composed of high school students, persons with dementia, and their caregivers."


Wild, Amanda

Project title: Modelling the Skeena River: Estimated Sediment Load Change and Associated Implications on the Skeena Estuary

Department: Geography

Faculty supervisor: Dr. Shannon Fargey

"Sediments are a crucial component to the aquatic ecosystem of estuaries and coastal wetlands, as they influence the biotic and abiotic exchanges and morphological transformations that occur (Levin et al., 2001). The Skeena River, a watershed in Northwestern British Columbia, at its delta mouth, deposits millions of tonnes of dissolved, suspended, and bedload sediment into the Skeena estuary (Kelson, 2012). However, there is little available, long term data records on sediment load transported by the Skeena River. In order to address this gap in knowledge, public and open source data were used to estimate sediment load and river discharge over a thirty year period at the mouth of the Skeena River using the Hydrotrend model. These results were compared with observed river discharge station data along the Skeena River in order to assess model accuracy. Trends apparent within the long term sediment load estimates are contextualized in terms of their current and posed future implications for the estuary. Moving forward with this research, a successful model could be used to estimate sediment load at the river mouth into the future using predicted climate scenarios or supplement further studies on the sedimentation within the Skeena estuary.

Keywords: Hydrology, Watershed, Modelling, Sediments, Discharge, Estuary, British Columbia 

References:

Kelson, J. (2012). 2011 Skeena Estuary Study (Rep.). Retrieved January 20, 2017.

Levin, L. A., Boesch, D. F., Covich, A., Dahm, C., Erséus, C., Ewel, K. C., ... & Strayer, D. (2001). The function of marine critical transition zones and the importance of sediment biodiversity. Ecosystems, 4(5), 430-451."


Wilson, Andrew

Project title: Numerical computation of Lyapunov exponents for area preserving maps of the torus

Department: Mathematics and Statistics

Faculty supervisor: Dr. Anthony Quas

"We will study a parameterized family of area-preserving maps of the torus (related to the "standard family"). The Lyapunov exponent measures the rate of stretching of microscopic regions as they are iterated under the dynamical system. There are many unresolved questions about coherence of unstable directions, existence of stable periodic points etc."


Wright, Rachel

Project title: Knowledge, skills, and attitudes of general dentists and dental hygienists in
British Columbia regarding oral health care during pregnancy

Department: Nursing

Faculty supervisor: Dr. Lenora Marcellus

"This is a pilot study focusing on the attitudes, skills, and practices related to oral health care during pregnancy. The objective is to identify baseline knowledge of general dentist and dental hygienists when working with pregnant patients. The second objective is to define the barriers and facilitators to accessing oral health care as identified by general dentist and hygienist. This pilot study is affiliated with a larger program of research being conducted and is in partnership with Island Health."


Wu, Songfeng

Project title: The use of absorbers in hill-climbing constructions of combinatorial designs

Department: Mathematics and Statistics

Faculty supervisor: Dr. Peter Dukes

"A combinatorial design is, roughly speaking, a family arrangements of some objects which enjoys various `balance’ properties.  An example is a completed Sudoku puzzle, in which every row and column uses all symbols exactly once each.  Hill-climbing is a standard algorithm used for constructing combinatorial designs on computer (among many other uses).  Some exciting recent work gives randomized constructions of combinatorial designs using an `iterative absorption method’.  However, these methods are theoretical and have no chance of generating a practical-sized example.  This research aims to explore the possible computational benefit of using absorbers in hill-climbing algorithms for designs."


Yang, Linyi (Linda)

Project title: Ode to Joy: The Experience of Women Migrants in a Chinese Megacity

Department: Pacific and Asian Studies

Faculty supervisor: Dr. Andrew Marton

"Women migrants in China’s big cities are increasingly well educated white-collar workers. Portrayals of the experiences of such migrant women in popular culture have raised awareness and shaped public perceptions. This project will explore representations of the lives of women migrants in Shanghai through an analysis of the hugely popular TV drama series Ode to Joy. The series revolves around the stories of five unmarried professional women on the same floor of a residential block in Shanghai. Focusing on all aspects of their personal and professional lives, the series has raised many issues about the experiences of young women in China, and especially of migrant women in large cities. The way in which these experiences are portrayed and represented in Ode to Joy will be critically analyzed in relation to key findings and debates in the academic literature, including differential treatment of migrant women, changing gender relations norms, balancing career aspirations with traditional expectations around marriage and children, and the tensions between female migrant identity and urban status. A key objective is to highlight where popular representations of migrant women are confirmed or not in the academic literature, and to comment on the possible impact of such portrayals on public perceptions in general, and on government policy in particular. The research will raise further questions about the relationship between the actual experiences of migrant women in Chinese megacities and how these are represented in contemporary popular culture in China."


Yuen, Brosnan

Project title: Embedded Systems for Satellite Applications

Department: Electrical and Computer Engineering

Faculty supervisor: Dr. Mihai Sima

"On board computer (OBC) on UVSD’s Homathko satellite handles with sensor processing, communications system, and payload deployment. OBC has to operate in harsh radiation enviroments in low earth orbit. The duration of the mission is approximately two years. UVic’s astronomy department and ALTAIR project requires multiple LASERs in orbit for telescope calibrations. Homathko fires multiple LASERs to a telescope for measuring distortions in upper atmosphere. Distortion information allows astronomers to get better images of celestial objects. Homathko requires a 2º attitude determination system for the LASER. OBC is required to be able to recover from soft errors induced by cosmic radiaiton. The system is also required to operate in extended range of temperatures from -20ºC to +70ºC. The physical size is constrained to 10 cm by 10 cm, which will require surface mounted components and a multiple layer printed circuit board. OBC will have a ham radio repeater. OBC will have RF and magnetic shielding to protect the instruments OBC will undergo extensive hardware and software testing. TRIUMF will induce 5krad of TID to OBC for testing."

Student recipients 2016-2017


Adams, Zachary

Project title: Mathematical model of the monolignol biosynthetic pathway in higher plants

Department: Mathematics & Statistics

Faculty supervisor: Dr. Roderick Edwards

"Metabolic networks are complex systems of enzymatic reactions, with many interdependent pathways from substrate to product.  Current understanding of metabolism is largely based on empirical studies; however, the advantages of a systems-biology approach, employing mathematical and computational modeling, is becoming evident.

Here, we will formulate a system of differential equations to model the monolignol biosynthetic pathway of higher plants. This metabolic network is responsible for the synthesis of lignin-precursors, and its behaviour determines the quality and quantity of lignin in mature vascular tissues. By formulating a deterministic model based on kinetic parameters, we can predict the effects of up- or down-regulating any constituent enzymes. Additionally, analysis of the metabolic flux may evince regulation points and suggest experimentally testable hypotheses. Previous models of the monolignol biosynthetic pathway, both stochastic and deterministic, have been formulated, but new data has been acquired since their publication.

Our study will begin by reviewing and comparing previous models with each other and empirical data. Hence, we will attempt to derive an updated deterministic model based on ODEs. We will attempt to incorporate previously unconsidered factors, such as the compartmentalization of certain reactions. After validating our model with empirical studies, we will explore its implications regarding hypotheses which are difficult to test experimentally. For instance, the monolignol biosynthetic pathway includes several "unnecessary" and energetically unfavorable steps: we (Dr. Ehlting, Biology) propose that these steps serve regulatory functions. The evolution of lignin, lignin-precursors, and related metabolites will also be considered."

Alamolhoda, Armon Max

Project title: Measuring the Effect of the Zero Lower “Bound” in Canada

Department: Economics

Faculty supervisor: Dr. Judith Clarke

"During a recent co-op work term, I became aware of the acute implications salary and hiring freezes can have on a firm's short-term operations. Lacking the ability to remain competitive in the labor market, and without the discretion to develop new positions, firms under salary and/or hiring freezes are limited in their ability to keep up with industry growth. Moreover, inefficiencies spawn from such policies and are costly; therefore, firms need to appropriately factor in all the indirect costs associated with such policies before implementing them. In my research study, I propose to explore the long-term effects of these temporary policies on corporates and public sector institutions.

I plan to develop a model based on microeconomic theory that explores the relationship between the short-term savings decisions of firms (focusing on hiring and salary freezes) and the long-term effects those decisions can have. Typically, firms have numerous choices at their disposal to control or cut costs. Are they making the optimal one when choosing labor?

With the model, I would like to answer practical questions applicable to the private and public sector. For example, under what scenario is choosing an alternative method to control costs optimal? In a short-term liquidity crunch is a firm better off cutting production or foregoing merit increases? What type of impact will a hiring freeze have on long-term productivity or innovation at the firm level? Are the effects different across the public and private sector?

A literature review will be conducted alongside model development."

Altherr, Annina

Project title: The Potential of Marine Protected Areas to Promote Protection of Marine Mammals from Underwater Noise

Department: Geography

Faculty supervisor: Dr. Rosaline Canessa

"This research project will explore how marine protected areas (MPAs) might help promote marine mammal protection from underwater noise. This will involve using GIS to help identify areas on the west coast where important marine mammal habitat overlaps with high noise levels, and proposing potential sites where establishing MPAs could help protect marine mammals."


Anderson, Zachary

Project title: Memories Now: An Alzheimer’s Chorus

Department: Nursing

Faculty supervisor: Dr. Debra Sheets

"Dementia is often associated with loss and a existential scariness about who we are when we are losing our memories. As dementia progresses, the carer and care recipient often find themselves socially isolated. Participation in a community-based chorus is an intervention that has been effective in increasing social inclusion and quality of life for carers and their care recipients with early to mid-stage dementia. This project draws on best practices in developing a choir for community-dwelling people with Alzheimer’s disease and their accompanying care partners. The experience of singing in a choir can bring joy and playfulness into the everyday lives of people who live with Alzheimer’s disease. Student activities will include being involved in a literature review, grant writing, community development activities, project planning, and evaluation."

Ashton, Matthew

Project title: The Effects of Minor Traumatic Brain Injury on Hippocampal Structural Plasticity

Department: Medical Sciences, Department of Psychology

Faculty supervisor: Dr. Brian Christie

"Previous electrophysiological research has shown that the electro-excitability of hippocampal circuits can change in response to traumatic brain injury (TBI). My honors project will study the effect of repeated minor TBIs on the structural plasticity of the hippocampus in rats. Structural plasticity, or neuroplasticity, is the brain's ability to change and adapt due to experience. The hippocampus is responsible for the formation of long-term memories and upon TBI, can be damaged and reasonable for cognitive and memory deficits. Specifically, I am interested in the effects seen in the performant pathway which extends between the entorhinal cortex to all fields of the hippocampus, including the dentate gyms. By stimulating this pathway, the excitability of post-synaptic neurons can be observed by recording the resultant excitatory postsynaptic potential (EPSP). Long-term Potentiation (LTP) describes an increase in the strength and efficiency of neuronal communication and can be represented by an increase of the quality of the EPSP in a pathway. The formation of LTP can be produced in vivo by sending rapid and short bursts of electricity through a pathway of neurons. This project compares the quality of resultant EPSPs following LTP stimulation between rats that have incurred minor TBI and healthy control rats. The results of this study will isolate the effect that minor TBI has on the structural plasticity of the hippocampus and, therefore, the ability to perform its normal cognitive and memory functions."


Bartlett, Chad

Project title: Characterization of the Protein Streptavidin

Department: Electrical & Computer Engineering

Faculty supervisor: Dr. Reuven Gordon

"In order to help characterize the protein Streptavidin, I am seeking to research and identify the time-constant between open and closed transition states of the proteins binding mechanism by utilizing optical trapping data. These transition states are a theoretical model of how the protein binds and if a characterization is extracted from the data, it can be used extensively in both research facilities and industry.

By analyzing data of the protein trapped in gold double-nanohole samples from the lab, I will develop a Matlab program to help identify the state transitions through signal processing techniques such as filtering, autocorrelation, Golay-smoothing, etc."


Benner, Rebecca

Project title: Personalized Learning in Teacher Education: Impact on Student Experience

Department: Educational Psychology & Leadership Studies

Faculty supervisor: Dr. Valerie Irvine

"This project will involve working with Dr. Valerie Irvine to study the continued development of personalized learning in EDCI 336: Technology and Innovation in Education. The work will include collecting data via interviews and surveys to research student experiences with personalized learning and the structures to scaffold learning in a self-directed manner. Shifts are occurring in K-12 education and beyond to increasingly personalize learning approaches. This is in contrast to the industrialized model of teacher-centric instruction. The personalized approach draws mixed reactions from university students, so this study is meant to identify when and how supports can be provided to scaffold the transition from their prior experience with highly structured, teacher-centered courses. Other purposes of the study include determining effective ways of involving the education community in university teacher education, potentially through the YYJEdChat platform."

Bharadwaj, Devesh

Project title: Osmotic Energy Storage (Storing Energy using Osmosis)

Department: Mechanical Engineering

Faculty supervisor: Dr. Henning Struchtrup

"With the increase in ocean levels and global warming, there is a desperate need for renewable and clean energy at this time, more than ever before. Although the economic development of technologies such as wind and solar power is improving, these energy sources are intermittently available in nature. A reliable energy storage technology could bridge the gap between the supply and demand of electricity.

The osmotic energy storage system would store energy by separating a water-based solution, creating a chemical potential. Energy is retrieved by mixing the solutions. The research would involve optimizing such a technology and would show the practicality of an osmotic energy storage system."


Blackall, Alanna

Project title: The Changing Status of the Manuscript

Department: Medieval Studies

Faculty supervisor: Dr. Hélène Cazes

"What do we do with a medieval manuscript, held in our University library in 2016-2017? Is it for decoration? History? Literature? Pedagogy? Not only do books undergo change over time and space, but the ways we discuss books and will allow or organize access to books also change according to the cultures, the societies and the milieu. A recent article, authored by Janelle Jenstad and Erin E. Kelly, remarked that we do not read Early Modern books anymore exclusively for their texts,  as vehicles of a direct information, but we often use them to bring history into the classroom for students. Although Jenstad and Kelly refer explicitly to printed texts, the principle of the idea is also applicable to manuscripts. Les Enluminures will present, for the first time, “Manuscripts in the Curriculum” to the University of Victoria this year. This program will loan manuscripts to academic institutions for the purpose of the integration of manuscripts into the teaching. With such programs and the new design of Rare Books room, that includes a teaching space where original documents may be handled to a group, students are given the opportunity to engage with these artefacts on a material and presential level. This pedagogical and experiential contact with manuscripts was certainly not intended originally by the makers and conceptors of medieval manuscripts, when students often had to copy their own textbooks. Interaction with manuscripts has long been the privilege of owners and seasoned scholars, required for the basis of paleography and codicology, the sciences of deciphering and describing ancient manuscripts. Now, within a larger audience, undergraduate students can learn experientially topics such as book history, textual transmission and reception, and manuscript production. As such, this project seeks to examine the changing status of some of the manuscripts on loan as they circulated throughout history. This task will be undertaken through an investigation of manuscripts, on loan from Les Enluminures, and their changing status as both objects and books. This project may also consider the pedagogical use of manuscripts within curricula."

Blosmanis-Lund, Tia

Project title: Human Trafficking in German Refugee Camps and Law Enforcement’s Response

Department: Germanic & Slavic Studies

Faculty supervisor: Dr. Elena Pnevmonidou

"Germany has become a focal point for human trafficking. Many factors have contributed to the rise of this problem, including under-investigation and underreporting of the issue. It is also partly the result of legislative changes, such as the removal of the main methods of victim identification through the legalization of prostitution and the 2007 expansion of the Schengen agreement which allows for travel in Europe within the Schengen zone without passport controls. Sex trafficking has increased in Germany in the wake of the refugee crisis. Germany has accepted over a million refugees in 2015. Officials involved in refugee camp protection have openly admitted that exploitation is probably occurring, but are not looking into it. This may be due to officials and social programs being overstressed from the magnitude of the refugee crisis, racial biases, fear of potential terrorism, and the temporary nature of the camps. There also seems to be little pressure from the German public or legislators to increase investigations of human trafficking in the refugee camps.

In my JCURA project, I wish to research how and why human trafficking in refugee camps in Germany is occurring. I want to study what obstacles officials face, and how these obstacles are essentially facilitating human trafficking, and I will focus in particular on examining to what extent racial and cultural biases may be contributing to the under-investigating of human trafficking in German refugee camps. I will also be applying for a short-term research grant through the DAAD (German Academic Exchange Service) to conduct some on-site research for this project."


Boothroyd, Malcolm

Project title: Habitat patterns affecting Arctic fox predation on tundra nesting shorebirds

Department: Geography

Faculty supervisor: Dr. Dennis Jelinksi

"Predation by Arctic foxes is the primary cause of shorebird nest failure on Coats Island, Nunavut. Vegetation in certain tundra habitats provides excellent concealment for nesting shorebirds. Yet paradoxically, data from an artificial nest experiment shows that habitats with the greatest concealment also face the highest predation rates. I hypothesize that this is the result of foxes targeting habitats typically preferred by shorebirds, thereby optimizing their foraging. To determine this, I will conduct research at a well-established research camp on Coats Island, in the north end of Hudson Bay. Throughout the shorebird nesting season, I will place trail cameras among the island’s four dominant habitat types: sedge meadow, dry heath, gravel ridge and scrub willow. I will use a combination of trail camera data and observational records to determine whether foxes concentrate their nest searching efforts in certain habitat types. I will also determine the primary habitat types favoured by nesting shorebirds by searching for nests throughout the season and broadly categorizing the habitat types they are found in. I will then relate variations in fox search intensity between habitats to shorebird nest site selection. Understanding fox nest searching strategies and shorebird nest site selection will help provide information on complex predator-prey interactions."


Bowditch, Flora

Project title: Analysis of the eternal colouring game

Department: Mathematics & Statistics

Faculty supervisor: Dr. Gary MacGillivray

"We will use tools from combinatorial game theory to analyze the eternal colouring game introduced by Klostermeyer in 2014.  We expect to be able to give (checkable) criteria under which one of the two players (or the other) has a winning strategy, and a means for determining the number of moves in the game.  We will also consider the possible effects of the initial configuration, and the situations where the colour palette is of extreme size."

Brander, Leone

Project title: The Legend of Candle Lake: An Exploration of Saskatchewan Folklore

Department: Writing

Faculty supervisor: Prof. Lee Henderson

"Growing up in Saskatchewan, I’ve always had a healthy appetite for local legends and folklore. Candle Lake is named for its mysterious lights that sometimes appear on the lake’s surface, like candles, with earliest reported sightings going back to the Cree tribes that inhabited the area. As a writing student, my studies have focused on fiction and non-fiction. Folklore’s blend of truth and mystery makes them compelling content to tackle. For my project, I intend to bring this legend to life as a short comic, an ideal story-telling form for oral histories, which are often image-based and rarely in print."


Bratanovic, Ivica

Project title: Targeting a Protein that isn’t there: Synthesis of MTA Analogues for Targeted Cancer Therapy

Department: Chemistry

Faculty supervisor: Dr. Jeremy Wulff

"The enzyme methylthioadenosine phosphorylase (MTAP) is deleted in ~30% of cancers, but present in all normal tissue. This difference presents a unique opportunity to develop novel, selective anti-cancer agents. But how does one target a protein that is missing? Ivica will build upon recently-uncovered structure-function data from the Wulff group to craft toxins that are selectively inactivated in healthy (MTAP-expressing) cells, but persist in MTAP depleted cancer cells. Compound synthesis and enzyme assays will be conducted by Ivica himself, while complementary cell- and animal-based data will be collected by collaborators at the BC Cancer Agency."

Brock, Teddie

Project title: Sonic Objects, Living Bodies: A Study in Oramics and Representation

Department: English

Faculty supervisor: Dr. Jentery Sayers

"According to electronic music composer and feminist scholar Tara Rodgers, “sounds and audio technologies are crucial sites of representation through which such historical shifts and associated cultural politics were imagined, expressed, and legitimated.” In the history of electronic music, the contribution of Daphne Oram’s “oramics machine” has been largely overlooked.

Developed in the early 1960s, oramics was an approach to musical composition that would allow composers to establish the parameters of individual sounds using an alphabet of hand-drawn symbols on synchronized strips of film. These symbols would then be fed into the oramics machine to produce the desired sonic output. Oram’s inspiration and research for the oramics machine was largely influenced by Pierre Schaeffer’s concept of the “sound object,” an individual sonic entity ontologically distinct from its source that Oram illustrates in her out-of-print 1972 work, “An Individual Note: Of Music, Sound, and Electronics.”

For my research, I will investigate how Oram’s compositional paradigm and oramics machine intersect with Rodgers’ exploration of how sonic and social worlds are interrelated through electronic sound. I will consult Rodgers’ feminist theory regarding music technologies, especially her work on the representation of non-cis gendered, white male bodies in histories of technology and sound. I will also engage with examples of how Oramics have been remediated and recontextualized in both digital and physical spaces, including museum exhibitions, iPhone apps, Oram’s own development of a 1980s computer program, and contemporary compositional tools."

Buchanan, Emily

Project title: N-acetylglucosaminidase: Characterization and DNA repair studies for potential treatment of Sanfilippo B syndrome

Department: Biology

Faculty supervisor: Dr. Francis Choy

"N-acetylglucosaminidase (Naglu) is a lysosomal hydrolase deficient in Sanfilippo B syndrome, an inherited mucopolysaccharidosis characterized by the accumulation of undergraded heparan sulfates in the brain of patients that are neurotoxic and lethal. At present, there is no effective treatment as the therapeutic enzyme fails to enter the brain because of the blood-brain barrier. We plan to use the CRISPR-Cas9 technology, a new and highly precise methodology in genome editing, for direct homology repair of the mutations in the Naglu gene that result in Sanfilippo B syndrome. In brief, cultured Sanfilippo B skin fibroblast or iPS cells will be transfected using custom-designed guided RNA (gRNA) flanking the Naglu mutation as a gRNA-Cas9 complex in the presence of a single-strand DNA oligonucleotide correction template. The transfected cells will be plated and cultured, and recombinant cells will be screened, identified, further expanded and analysed using RFLP and DNA sequence analysis, and confirmed by Naglu activity assay and immunoblotting. Positive clones will be cultured and expanded to establish stable cell lines for further characterization and differentiation to various cell types, including neuronal cells, for potential cell replacement therapy of Sanfilippo B syndrome."

Cameron, Brooke

Project title: Youth Representation in School Media and Academic Self-efficacy

Department: Curriculum & Instruction

Faculty supervisor: Dr. Kathy Sanford

"A lack of positive role models in the school may contribute to decrease a student’s self-efficacy, especially in academic and career-related motivation. For example, recent studies have shown that the lack of women in professional roles depicted in public school textbooks in the United States most likely is a contributing factor to the lack of representation of women in science, technology, engineering and math (STEM) fields (Ceci et al., 2015, Styles, 2015). 20% of Canada’s population is comprised of new settlers, introducing diversity in the Canadian classroom that extends beyond gender to include language, ethnicity, religion, affiliations, sexual orientation, abilities and economic status. With such a diverse set of students in the classroom, it is important that each student feels represented and observes positive role models at school in order to maintain high self-efficacy and succeed academically and socially. This project will consider the representation and self-efficacy of varying ethnicities in general school-created media (posters, newsletters, yearbooks, website) and perceived self-efficacy of student populations. Interviews will be conducted with students of all/random ethnicities of several high schools in Victoria to record their perceived representation as well as academic self-efficacy and media from these high schools will be analyzed to record representation of the considered ethnicities. The goal of this research is to determine if there is a correlation between representation by the school of particular students and students’ perceived self-efficacy. The results of this research may motivate schools with a diverse student population to properly maintain strong self-efficacy among its diverse student body.

Ceci, S., Ginther, D., Kahn, S. & Williams, (2015). Women in science: The path to progress. Scientific American Mind, 26 (1): 62-69.

Stiles, W. (2015). "The Representation of Professional Females in Math and Science Textbooks used in Public School Education Curriculums" Psychology Master's Theses. Paper 3."

Campos, Juan Pablo Mendez

Project title: Oportunidades: Effects on Education and Employment in Mexico

Department: Economics

Faculty supervisor: Dr. Rob Gillezeau

"This project seeks to find the long-term effects of the Oportunidades program (formerly known  as Progreso) on education and employment. Specifically, it focuses on graduation/drop-out rates in education and employment opportunities/income as a result of participation in the program."

Cassidy, Elise

Project title: Creative Pedagogies in the Child and Youth Care

Department: Child & Youth Care

Faculty supervisor: Prof. Jin-Sun Yoon

"Building upon a short literature review conducted over the summer that examined the benefits of arts-based methods in child and youth care (CYC) practice, my research project will explore the use of creative and arts methods in the pedagogy of CYC with undergraduate students. CYC is often described as complex and value-laden work that calls for a praxis that integrates knowing, doing, and being (White, 2007). I would like to understand how creative and arts methods are drawn upon in the classroom (virtual and physical), and how this contributes to students learning across the dimensions of knowing, doing, and being. My intention is to develop a set of guidelines and recommendations that may be utilized in the development, design, and delivery of curriculum in CYC. Ideally, the program will utilize innovative and relevant arts-based pedagogical strategies to expose students to diverse methodologies that, in turn, can enhance their professional practice."

Chen, David

Project title: Expansion and Contraction: Political and Economic Rights in the Post-Modern Society

Department: Sociology

Faculty supervisor: Dr. Bill Carroll

"Past decades have seen an expansion in people’s political rights in the Global North (the developed countries of the world) while there has been a concomitant and rapid decline in their economic rights. This conflicting phenomenon will form the foundation of my honours thesis. Using a Marxist perspective, my thesis will critically examine how such discrepancy is tightly bound to the rise of postmodern pluralism, which has shifted the main focus of political struggles from economic to cultural issues."

Chestnut, Taylor

Project title: The Neural Basis of Human Decision Making

Department: Exercise Science, Physical & Health Education

Faculty supervisor: Dr. Olav Krigolson

"I will be conducting my honours research project wherein I will be using electroencephalography (EEG) to improve our understanding of the neural mechanisms that underlie human decision making. To accomplish this, I will be recording EEG data while participants perform a computer based decision-making task."

Chin, Michael

Project title: Testing the perceptual strategies of expert radiologists to detect cancer in mammograms

Department: Psychology

Faculty supervisor: Dr. Jim Tanaka

"The hallmark of a perceptual expert is their ability to make fast, accurate decisions in a single glance. For example, it takes less than a second for a skilled radiologist to detect a cancerous spot in a mammogram, for the expert birdwatcher to identify the species of a common bird or for people as everyday face experts to recognize the identity of a familiar face. Although the visual skills of the perceptual expert have been well documented in the literature, the perceptual strategies mediating their speeded and precise discriminations are less well understood. In the current study, we will investigate whether expert radiologists apply holistic strategies to detect abnormalities in mammograms. Expert radiologists will view upright or inverted craniocaudal mammograms; half of the images will be “normal” and half of the images will contain cancerous abnormalities. Upright and inverted faces will be used as a control stimulus where half of the faces will depict a happy expression and half will depict a neutral expression. The mammogram or face stimulus will be presented for 500 ms followed by a backward noise mask. For the mammograms, participants will decide whether the mammogram appears to be “normal” or “abnormal”. For the faces, participants will decide whether the face appeared to show a “happy” or “neutral” expression. The stimuli will consist of 50 mammogram images (25 normal, 25 abnormal) and 50 face images (25 happy, 25 neutral). That is, their discrimination will be accurate when mammograms are shown in the upright orientation and relatively low when shown in the inverted orientation. In contrast, novices will not show a difference between their discrimination of upright and inverted mammograms. Moreover, we hypothesize that the strength of the inversion effect will increase as a function of the expert’s experience."

Clerihue, Mary Barbara

Project title: Legal Performances and Social Behaviour in early Victoria (1858-1889)

Department: Theatre

Faculty supervisor: Dr. Jennifer Wise

"The argument of civil and criminal cases before the bench is a highly performative process, wherein barristers provide persuasive arguments on the interpretation of laws, evidence and fact. These performances, and their legal outcomes in the form of jury or administrative tribunal decision-making, serve not only to resolve a conflict between two parties, they can also establish or reinforce social norms of behaviour and thought when performed in front of an audience or jurors and spectators.

This research will explore in what ways did the legal performances of barristers (1858-1889) impact the early cultural and social norms of the new town of Victoria BC?"


Cleveland, Sarah

Project title: Competencies required for rural, remote and northern nursing: A scoping review of the literature

Department: Nursing

Faculty supervisor: Dr. Karen MacKinnon

"The purpose of this project is to develop a proposal to submit to the Canadian Association of Schools of Nursing to support the development of a competency document in relation to rural, remote and northern nursing. We will be using JBI’s approach to scoping reviews and this student will have the opportunity to work with the team from the beginning of this exciting project. I will have the opportunity to participate in teleconferences with nurses from across Canada who are working on this project (e.g. Canadian Association of Rural and Remote Nurses). Participate in the preliminary literature review process which will be used to develop a JBI protocol."

Conover, Cassidy

Project title: Synthesis and pKa study of cis-oxalyl Nindigo derivatives

Department: Chemistry

Faculty supervisor: Dr. Robin Hicks

"The project will involve synthesis of new derivatives of the "cis-oxalyl Nindigo" structure. The main objective of this is to examine the acid-base chemistry of these compounds, in particular (i) the dependence of the optical properties on protonation state and (ii) measurement of the pKa of these compounds."

Crocker, Jordan

Project title: WWI in video-games and on YouTube

Department: History

Faculty supervisor: Dr. Peter Cook

"My thesis will look at the ways directors and designers, through visual media, act as educators for the public when it comes to the Holocaust. I will examine diverse, non-academic media, such as Crash Course, Schindler's List and Hearts of Iron, to argue why historians need to make a greater effort in engaging with these mediums to ensure the accuracy of the Holocaust, and general history, for the public."

Czerwinski, Charlotte

Project title: Neural basis of motor control: feedback error-related negativity

Department: Exercise Science, Physical & Health Education

Faculty supervisor: Dr. Olav Krigolson

"Feedback error-related negativity is an electrical signal that can be measured with an EEG device (electroencephalogram) placed on the scalp. This type of signal is generated when people receive feedback from the environment, for example: visual and auditory information. This information conveys the performance-related outcome: whether the outcome was worse than expected in a given situation. The implications and relevance of this information will be explored."

Dino, Sahil

Project title: Systems Engineering for Energy Systems

Department: Mechanical Engineering

Faculty supervisor: Dr. Curran Crawford

"Energy systems issues are often recognized as requiring a systems approach to their solution, including both technical, economic, societal and political considerations. The goal of this project is to research the current state-of-the-art in systems engineering methods and approaches in a general sense, and identify promising tools that might be usefully applied to the study of energy systems. In particular, the complexity, scale and multi-faceted nature of energy systems stand to benefit from the application of systems engineering techniques to their potential solutions."

Dodd, Anna

Project title: Making Vicious Circles Virtuous: Motivating Consumers to Support Private Regulatory Arrangements

Department: Political Science

Faculty supervisor: Dr. Michael Webb

"Economic globalization creates social and environmental problems that traditional international organizations have not addressed effectively.  The failure of state-based international organizations to protect social, labour, and environmental rights has led to the emergence of private regulatory arrangements (PRAs) that seek to persuade multinational corporations to abide by higher standards.  Firms that cooperate can use a label signifying the PRA’s endorsement of their practices to appeal to consumers. If enough consumers choose companies based on these labels, companies are more likely to abide by higher standards. My previous research on the Forest Stewardship Council (FSC) revealed a key limit to the impact of this PRA on global forestry industry practices, and on tropical deforestation in particular: the buying power of consumers in the global north has not been effectively mobilized behind the initiative.  This research project will investigate how the potential power of consumers can be manifested more effectively in pursuit of higher social, labour, and environmental standards in global supply chains. I will undertake a comparative case study of leading PRAs, including the FSC, the Marine Stewardship Council, and FairTrade International, focusing on their successes and the pitfalls they have experienced in generating consumer activism in support of their goals. How can consumers be motivated to take PRAs more seriously, to the point of deeply impacting global economic practices? To answer this question, I will consider the psychology, sociology, and politics of consumption, and will explore the potential for social media to serve as a force for change."

Duhaime, Zoé

Project title: Diverse Methods of Timekeeping within Canada

Department: Religious Studies

Faculty supervisor: Dr. Paul Bramadat

"This research project aims to explore diverse methods of timekeeping, and how they can be minded and navigated within the secular state. Using holiday and calendar as the focus of inquiry, this research project will explore how the Canadian state and body of politics/institution/organization approach timekeeping that deviates from the “secular” Gregorian schedule. Necessarily, this research will be first grounded with the history of the Gregorian calendar within Canada, and its privileging as the “secular” and official measure of time. Aiming to be as inclusive as possible, while negotiating the realty of scope and language within academia, the project will focus on the “world religions” and their presence in Canada. Historic and contemporary calendars and methods of timekeeping will be considered as being pertinent contributors to the current landscape of “official” Canadian time. Research will include inquiries and dialogue with experts and practitioners in the field, predominantly through the University of Victoria’s Centre for Studies in Religion and Society (which will be the venue of RS403, Studies in Religion and Society – whose coursework and academic relationships will contribute to the proposed JCURA research project). The final poster project will feature an analysis of how diverse methods of timekeeping are currently regarded and employed, as well as a proposal for needed considerations based on findings."


Dupuis, Mariana

Project title: Egypt Before and After 2011: an Uncertain History of Revolution

Department: History

Faculty supervisor: Dr. Andrew Wender

"Despite the harsh repression imposed by the counter-revolutionary regime led by President Abd al-Fattah al-Sisi, the nature of the Egyptian revolution that began in 2011 remains indeterminate. Whether or not historians will even label it a revolution remains to be seen. The ideological and institutional battle between the new regime and any remaining opposition has managed to drown out the diverse voices of the revolution that challenged the status quo in Tahrir Square and around the country. In the name of promoting “stability” in the region, the regime manipulates inter-communal differences to produce fear of uncertainty and characterizes any one who disagrees with its policies as a threat.

Revolutionary theory is marked by a distinction between what is known as third generation scholarship that focuses on state-based, structural factors and fourth generation scholarship that takes an interdisciplinary approach accounting for a multitude of further socio-political factors. The unfolding conflict in Egypt is an exceptional case study for comparing the merits and limitations of these two approaches. Using them comparatively to examine recent Egyptian history, a range of crucial questions emerge: how, if at all, has the paternalistic relationship between a military autocrat and the Egyptian people, associated with President Gamal Abdel Nasser, changed due to the events of 2011? How, if at all, did the revolution of 2011 affect how individual Egyptians understood themselves in relation to the state and each other? I intertwine my study of this uncertain history with the ongoing historiographical debate on the nature of revolutions."


Edwards, Jensen

Project title: Irony, Politics, Literature: Quebec’s 1980 Referendum Represented in the Novel

Department: French

Faculty supervisor: Dr. Marie Vautier

"This research project will analyze how irony, politics and literature came to overlap one another in Québécois literature after the 1980 provincial referendum on the question of Quebec sovereignty.

Being a tripartite analysis, this project requires in depth examination of these three individual areas of study as a starting point in order to accurately grasp the background contexts of each. As such, I will be consulting sources such as Le Territoire imaginaire de la culture (Morin, Bertrand 1979) and “The New Quebec Culture” (Morin 1980) to help understand the sociocultural background that fueled the separatist movement in Quebec. I will also look at primary and secondary source political analyses such as and Nationalism and Literature: The Politics of Culture in Canada and the United States (Corse 1997) to grasp the academic understanding of the separatist question. Finally, to advise my understanding of the role that irony plays in literature, I will consult analyses of the role that irony plays in literature, such as Linda Hutcheon’s Irony’s Edge (Hutcheon 1994) and Cynthia Willett’s Irony in the Age of Empire (Willett 2008).

All of this analysis will come together in my examination of 1980s québécois politically-engaged novels such as Jacques Godbout’s Les Têtes à Papineau (1981) and François Barcelo’s La Tribu (1981). Ultimately, I aim to discover how, through humour, irony, and satire, the selected novels digest and understand the result of the 1980 Quebec referendum and the question of Quebec sovereignty."

Egner, Kelsye

Project title: Arthur Rimbaud’s Influence on Hart Crane

Department: English

Faculty supervisor: Dr. Luke Carson

"Though he stopped writing at the age of 21, Arthur Rimbaud (1854–1891) is widely considered to be among the greatest French poets and has been a major influence in American poetry. A selection of his work was first published in the United States by the American poet Ezra Pound in 1918 in a little magazine (The Little Review), among the readers of which was American poet Hart Crane, who promptly ordered Rimbaud’s Œuvres, vers et proses (Mercure de France, 1912) from Paris, and eventually used a line from Rimbaud’s Illuminations as an epigraph to his first book, White Buildings (1926). This makes Crane the first major American poet to receive and interpret Rimbaud’s poetry and poetics, a fact that has not been sufficiently recognized in Crane criticism or in the history of American modernist poetry. While Rimbaud had served as an inspirational romantic legend for other English-language poets (a role he would play for many poets and rock stars in subsequent years), Crane was the first to study Rimbaud’s poetics with the intent of transforming his own during the crucial early years before his first book. In my JCURA project, I propose to examine Crane’s early work up to 1926 to detail the effects of his study of Rimbaud, focusing particularly on Rimbaud’s remarkable use of sound, rhythm, and imagery in the process and method of becoming a “seer” that he called “the long, immense and rational dérèglement des sens” (the derangement, disordering, or rearranging of the senses)."

Ezeuko, (Obidigbo) Harmony

Project title: The Use of Scientific Evidence in Legal Context

Department: Philosophy

Faculty supervisor: Dr. Audrey Yap

"I will be primarily focusing on the Daubert Standard to frame my research concerning the admissibility of scientific expert testimony in court. I intend to evaluate the Daubert Standard (and guidelines therefrom as applied in legal proceedings) with the various theories covered in my Philosophy of Science course (356), and once satisfied with my evaluation (granted that suggested alterations may be made), I will then apply it to various appropriate legal contexts to test for feasibility. In doing so, I plan to also compare my evaluation with the Frye Standard as a way to bolster my evaluation, and indeed show why the Daubert Standard seems to be the preferred method for determining the admissibility of expert evidence/testimony."

Feldman, Artemis

Project title: Many Lemmas

Department: Visual Arts

Faculty supervisor: Prof. Sandra Meigs

"I will complete two five by ten foot abstract paintings, both composed of very small and somewhat uniform marks.  In order to avoid an overly busy piece, I will keep a nearly monochromatic palette and restrict the materials used to one brush and type of paint for each piece.  The first work will be painted with soybean resin and the second will be with graphite.

The work, ‘Many Lemmas,’ will be a time consuming and laboured task: it will require mechanical discipline.  This will allow me to make art as if I were a robot without the option of creative ambition.  On the other hand, even with these heavy restrictions I will be forced to decide whether it is compositionally favourable to make a mark or leave a space blank with every moment I am drawing.  In mathematics, a lemma is a step within a proof that only solves one pieces of a larger problem.  For this reason, I consider the two works to be pieces composed entirely of lemmas.

I want to complete this work because I have often worked on figurative images composed of tiny marks (dots and the like), but I feel that the meat of the work lies in the mark making and this meaning gets lost when I draw a figure.  I feel that an abstract work would better convey meaning in this case and want to explore the idea further."

Ferguson, McKaila

Project title: Contextualizing Boucher: Reconstructing Madame de Pompadour's Dressing Room

Department: Art History & Visual Studies

Faculty supervisor: Dr. Erin Campbell

"One of the most efficient ways in which curators can get the most art to be viewed by the greatest number of people is by displaying the artworks near similar pieces, either by the same artist or created in the same period or style. In this project I will show the ways in which displaying a work of art as close as possible to its original context can enrich the museum-going experience. As a case study I will conceptually recreate the context for François Boucher's "The Toilette of Venus" from 1751. This painting, currently at the Metropolitan Museum of Art, was commissioned by Madame de Pompadour for her dressing room at the Bellevue Châteaux near Paris. Art historian Melissa Hyde has reconstructed parts of the Bellevue; however, no attention has been given to Pompadour's dressing room. My project aims to add to the Bellevue reconstruction. I will research how this room would have functioned within the social atmospheres of eighteenth century Paris, as well as the various aspects of Rococo design, such as furniture, textiles, clothing, wigs, and makeup. I will utilize the Rococo collections in institutions such as the MET and the Victoria and Albert Museum, in order to piece together what this space may have looked like."

Finley, Theron

Project title: Neotectonics of the Cascadia Subduction Zone: Constraints on Crustal Fault Activity on Southern Vancouver Island

Department: Earth & Ocean Sciences

Faculty supervisor: Dr. Lucinda Leonard and Dr. Kristin Morell

"Geological field investigations, remote sensing techniques, and geophysical analyses will be used in combination to better constrain the nature of crustal faults in the forearc of the Cascadia Subduction Zone. Of particular local significance, the Leech River Fault, which passes underneath the Greater Victoria region, will be investigated. Past investigations were hindered by thick glacial sediment and dense vegetation preventing direct observation of the fault. Recent studies involving LiDAR, seismic reflection lines, and geological mapping have led to the suspicion that this fault may be active, posing a previously unrecognized hazard to residents of Southern Vancouver Island and surrounding areas. More constraints are needed, and I intend to contribute to the ongoing research with analyses of data from geodetic networks, gravimetric surveys, seismic reflection lines, LiDAR imagery, and/or cross-fault trench profiles."

Fitzpatrick, Shannon

Project title: Understanding the neuronal basis of human learning

Department: Exercise Science, Physical & Health Education

Faculty supervisor: Dr. Olav Krigolson

"In recent years it has been shown that electroencephalography (EEG) can be used to isolate where and when learning occurs in the human brain. My project in Dr. Krigolson’s lab involves recording EEG data while individuals complete a simple computer-based motor learning task. Importantly, analysis of the EEG data is expected to show the role of a reinforcement learning system within the human medial-frontal cortex in motor learning."

Fraser, Lorinda

Project title: Denoting and Representing the Other through the Legend of Saint George and the Dragon

Department: Art History & Visual Studies

Faculty supervisor: Dr. Catherine Harding

"During the late-medieval and early-modern period, increasing travel, trade, and contact with peoples of different cultures, religions, and ethnicities brought Western European understandings of the human body into question. My research investigates whether such contemplations and fears, as established in the legend of Saint George and the Dragon, were a reflection of changing conceptions about bodies. I consider how the legend reinforced the superiority of ‘appropriately’ human bodies which conformed to Caucasian, Christian, masculine ideals, and argue that representations of the dragon reflected expanding cultural notions of the racialized, feminized, and pagan ‘monstrous’ Other.

Within Europe, the Christian church was the ultimate authority for determining and controlling what was considered ‘normal.’ Religious, biological, and cultural judgements became problematic for those with non-normative bodies and, thus, were considered beyond redemption. Within the legend, immoral female desire is symbolized by the denigrated dragon being penetrated by the saint’s pseudo-phallic lance and female purity through the princess’s girdle and virginity. Over fifty known representations depict the dragon with a vagina and/or breasts, further feminizing and reducing its power. Ethnic differences were also used to establish political and religious assertions of authority based on culturally perceived physical characteristics and skin colour. The dragon’s dark skin and monstrous form clearly distinguished it from Christians. Ultimately, the dragon symbolized those human bodies deemed unqualified for belonging to ‘humankind’ and, therefore, ineligible for religious conversion and salvation, as part of a normative process of representation—which was anything but neutral, as this study suggests."


Gaudet, Renee

Project title: J.S. Le Fanu’s Sensational Tales in Illustrated Victorian Periodicals

Department: English

Faculty supervisor: Dr. Mary Elizabeth Leighton

"The prolific author of Gothic and sensational tales designed to unnerve and mystify his Victorian readers, Joseph Sheridan Le Fanu (1814–73) published his works in numerous popular periodicals. Though he vehemently rejected ties to the genre of sensation fiction, his lurid stories nonetheless titillated the public imagination, inspired contemporaries like Charles Dickens and Mary Elizabeth Braddon, and regularly haunted the pages of periodicals such as All the Year Round, Belgravia, and The Dark Blue. Yet, as Nicholas Rance writes, “of the sensational triumvirate of Collins, Braddon, and Le Fanu, it was the relatively conservative Le Fanu who attracted the least audience” (166). Perhaps best known today for his sexually charged vampire tale “Carmilla,” a story that inspired Bram Stoker’s Dracula (1897), Le Fanu is today largely overlooked by scholars; Simon Cooke notes this “critical neglect,” emphasizing “the lack of any sustained analysis of the rich field of illustration” (“Haunted Images”).

For my JCURA project, I will address this lack, examining the original periodical illustrations for four of the five tales that comprise Le Fanu’s 1872 collection of short stories, In a Glass Darkly: “Green Tea” (All the Year Round 1869; unillustrated), “The Familiar” (Ghost Stories and Tales of Mystery 1851), “Mr. Justice Harbottle” (Belgravia 1872), “The Room in the Dragon Volant” (London Society 1872), and “Carmilla” (The Dark Blue 1871–72). Drawing on Victorian illustration studies, I will analyse how text and image function together to produce different effects in different stories and publication venues despite the stories’ connection through the recurring character of occult detective Dr. Martin Hesselius."


Gilmour, Thomas

Project title: Design and Application of cooperative mobile and aerial robotics

Department: Mechanical Engineering

Faculty supervisor: Dr. Yang Shi

"Application-oriented research on heterogeneous multi-agent systems has experienced a surge of interests. Complicated tasks such as search and rescue, reconnaissance, surveillance can be autonomously conducted with higher efficiency.

In this project, we aim to design original prototypes for both a ground mobile robot and an aerial multi-rotor. System dynamics will be mathematically derived for the motion controls. With the use of computer vision, GPS data, and quad encoders we aim to implement robot localization, odometry, object avoidance and object detection. A ROS-based (Robot Operating System) communication network will be developed to allow the agents to share information wirelessly in order to effectively complete cooperative tasks. Unique control algorithms will be developed for specific collaborative tasks based on the system dynamics and the available data from various sensors. Finally, the multi-agent system will be used to test the effectiveness of proposed cooperative control methods."

Goatley, Sasha

Project title: The Interrelationships Between Maternal Emotion Regulation and Cellphone Use

Department: Psychology

Faculty supervisor: Dr. Colette Smart

"Being a new mother can be a stressful time that taxes emotion regulation abilities. This project will examine individual differences in maternal emotion and the types of emotion regulation strategies new mothers use. Also, building on the growing literature examining the relationships between smartphone device use and emotion and behavior, the project will also examine how difficulties in emotion regulation may be associated with excessive smartphone usage in new mothers."

Graeme, Michael

Project title: The Agroforestry Antidote: Enacting Biocultural Restoration in Ecuador

Department: Anthropology

Faculty supervisor: Dr. Margo Matwychuk

"Land extensification is a land-use pattern that involves the clearing of forests for short-lived, unsustainable pastoral and agricultural operations. This pattern of razing forested landscapes, cultivating them briefly until soils become depleted, and then repeating the process in a new area, is common in Ecuador. As a result, Ecuador has experienced mass deforestation (28.6% of Ecuador's forest cover was lost from 1990 to 2010) along with a concomitant degeneration of ecosystems, loss of biodiversity, soil degradation and erosion. My project proposes to address the underlying factors allowing land extensification to continue in Ecuador, as well as demonstrate how sustainable alternatives might be (and are being) achieved. In particular, a viable solution I wish to explore is the implementation of agroforestry systems by small-scale farmers in collaboration with environmental programs and organizations. Agroforestry practices are based in using the interrelationships of trees, animals and crops to provide food security and economic well-being, while at the same time conserving, even enhancing, biodiversity and ecosystem integrity. Agroforestry has been employed in many forms in the neotropics since time immemorial, yet these various Indigenous practices have greatly declined since conquest. Therefore, my research will examine how moving away from industrial agriculture and ranching can encourage cultural restoration while providing stimulus for ongoing processes of decolonization. Participating in a UVic-accredited Spanish language exchange to Ecuador this fall will both situate me in my region of study, and allow me to conduct deeper research by accessing literature published in Spanish or by visiting local library resources."

Guthrie, Madison

Project title: Dendroglaciological discoveries at Forest Kerr Glacier, northern British Columbia Coast Mountains

Department: Geography

Faculty supervisor: Dr. Dan Smith

"The retreat and downwasting of glaciers flowing from the Andrei Icefield in the Boundary Ranges in northwestern British Columbia is exposing the remains of forests buried during Holocene glacier advances. My research will focus on a dendroglaciological analyses of radiocarbon-dated wood remains collected at eastward flowing Forrest Kerr Glacier. The intent is to construct radiocarbon dated floating chronologies from these archived samples to describe the late-Holocene behavior of the glaciers. The research will document discrete advances and allow for a description of the accompanying paleoclimate."


Hanneson, Cedar

Project title: The Interplanetary Magnetic Field in the Inner Heliosphere: Dependance on Heliospheric Distance

Department: Earth & Ocean Sciences

Faculty supervisor: Dr. Colin Goldblatt

"My research project aims to characterize the interplanetary magnetic field (IMF) at the heliospheric distances of Mercury, Earth and Mars using magnetometer data from MESSENGER, ACE and MAVEN, respectively. The observations will span from September 2014 until April 2015, which is the period of overlap when all three spacecraft were operational.

I will look at the three vector components of the IMF, in the radial-tangential-normal (RTN) coordinate system, as well as its magnitude and how these all vary with heliospheric distance. I will also compute the direction of the IMF, in terms of the azimuthal and polar angles, and look at how they vary with heliospheric distance. The results will then be compared to theoretical predictions (e.g. Parker, 1958; Totten et al., 1995) and other empirical results (e.g. Khabarova and Obridko, 2012; Khabarova, 2013).

Time series analysis will be performed on the various time dependent vectors to reveal any periodicities of the IMF. If time permits, I will also identify heliospheric current sheet (HCS) crossings in the three data sets. I will use this information to characterize the geometry of the HCS in the inner heliosphere and compare it to theoretical predictions and other empirical results."

Heilig, Abbey

Project title: Translated Subjectivities

Department: Gender Studies

Faculty supervisor: Dr. Sikata Banerjee

"Language functions as the currency of nationalism. I wish to explore questions related to how language assimilation and negotiation can affect the identities and experiences of people and groups in Canada that have first or traditional languages that are not English or French. Language is a crucial component of identity and culture that informs how the very world is interpreted. Drawing from a Lacanian analysis of coming into subjectivity through language, it becomes crucial to examine how subjectivities become translated and how language is used to demarcate the boundaries of national subjecthood and citizenship.

I hope to denaturalize the myth of English and French as the true and sporadically occurring languages of what is now called Canada, and the naturalization of their dominance and hegemony. I also wish to use this discussion of language to focus attention on the myth of Canada’s idyllic multiculturalism, as a reminder that the imposition of English and French and the suppression of other languages is not a gentle or benign process, but one that continues today and has created a situation in which at times there literally is no language to be able to express what has been lost. It is crucial to acknowledge that, while we are all agents and may choose to learn dominant languages to gain access to various things, we are also all located in unequal configurations of power that are historically rooted."


Heizer, Melanie

Project title: Grave Monument RTI Photography: Uncovering Lost Inscriptions

Department: Anthropology

Faculty supervisor: Dr. Erin McGuire

"By performing Reflectance Transformation Imaging (RTI) photography on grave monuments, we are able to rediscover inscriptions and motifs that have been lost through environmental damage and degradation. With this project, I would select monuments from three cemeteries in Victoria (Emanu-El Jewish cemetery, Ross Bay cemetery, and Harling Point Chinese cemetery) and use RTI to try to uncover what we can no longer see on the monuments. I will compare the results with historical records of these sites. I will also look at the materials used and the environments surrounding them in order to identify how the damage is being caused, look at similarities and differences between the sites, and propose conservation techniques, and ways to combat further damage."

Helps, Carolyn

Project title: Narrative Development and Executive Function in Children

Department: Psychology

Faculty supervisor: Dr. Ulrich Mueller

"This research project is part of a larger study on communicative development and executive function in preschool children. It has been hypothesized that social-communicative interactions, such as narrative, engage cognitive processes that contribute to the development of executive function. The goal of this study is to determine if the ability to create a narrative , which requires organizing and connecting language to create a story,  is related to executive function abilities such as working memory, response inhibition, and shifting."

Horne, Melanie

Project title: Evaluation of negative effects of radiotelemetry in field studies of vertebrates

Department: Biology

Faculty supervisor: Dr. Patrick Gregory

"The usage of radiotelemetry provides field biologists with valuable information on animal's movement patterns, habitat selection, and thermoregulatory behaviour, among others. An important assumption of radiotelemetric studies is that the transmitter will not affect the bearer’s movement ability, general behaviour, and risk of mortality. Generally, it is thought that the impact of the transmitter will be greater as the transmitter:animal mass ratio increases. Our research will attempt to determine the possible negative side-effects experienced by vertebrates who carry radiotransmitters, and if the data gained through radiotelemetric studies justifies these effects. In particular, we are interested in amphibians and reptiles of smaller body size, as transmitters may often weigh up to 10% of the animal’s mass."

Houston, Kathryn

Project title: Aesthetic experience in the public space: the case of Mexico City

Department: Hispanic & Italian Studies

Faculty supervisor: Dr. Dan Russek

"This project explores the aesthetics of urban space in contemporary Mexico City. I am interested in Mexico City because it embodies the highs and lows of the aesthetic experience in the public space: on the one hand, it is a modern city with a rich cultural history and an extraordinary creative energy that has survived political crises, economic upheavals and natural disasters. On the other hand, it shows the pitfalls of uneven development, social and economic inequality, and urban chaos. This dichotomy applies to the visual arts: Mexican muralism, the most iconic cultural product stemming from the Mexican Revolution at the beginning of the 20th century, can be read as a foil to the anarchic, subversive, and dramatic sprawl of street art. One of the questions I ask is how graffiti has reshaped the conception of aesthetics of public space in Mexico. I also address how do these forms –officially sanctioned Muralism and popular graffiti art— set up a dialogue. What shape does the project of urban life acquire, given, on the one hand, the rich history of Muralism, and on the other, the inescapable urban realities of sensorial overstimulation and spatial disorganization, of which graffiti can be seen as both cause and effect? I will resort to literary, artistic and historical sources to answer these questions."

Ingram, Erika

Project title: Ecological Gratitude: Cultivating Appreciation in Students of Global Interconnectedness

Department: Curriculum & Instruction

Faculty supervisor: Dr. Kathy Sanford

"I define gratitude broadly in terms of self-awareness, appreciation for oneself, others, and the world around us. Gratitude as a value, and an attitude, is closely connected with self-reflection and ways in which we view and use time. Cultivating gratitude among students within the new BC curriculum means addressing social justice issues and Indigenous worldviews in meaningful ways, ultimately fostering dispositions of responsibility, respect, and active membership in community. I am completing my second practicum with the Institute of Global Solutions at Claremont Secondary and hope to explore ways in which the teachers, who are propelled and inspired by teaching environmental-based solutions, also address ecological relationships as quintessential to changing the world, paying attention to relationships and epistemologies appropriate to these global matters. Much like the case of climate change, where the industrial and neoliberal models that are driving much of corporate decision-making but is fundamentally unsustainable, I am examining individualistic notions of what is ‘best for me’ and addressing the failure of this mindset to acknowledge the various levels of privilege we hold and the potential impact of relationships with elders, teachers, parents, and peers in community.

My questions include: How can self, and community, reflective gratitude enhance ecological literacies and learning in students? How can educators support and cultivate gratitude in learners? And why is gratitude important in today’s world, and to future generations?

I will draw on the work of Paulo Freire, Shawn Wilson and Lorna Williams to more deeply understand the issues related to working on ecological mindshifts with students, and will then develop a two-part inquiry: 1) developing and implementing a unit of study focused on gratitude as a way to better understand ways to interact meaningfully and collectively in the world, observing students’ reactions and responses; and 2) conduct follow-up interviews with selected students in the class and with mentor teachers I have been working with."


Jensen, Tahsis

Project title: "It's only politics:" Constructing Others in Concept Musicals

Department: Gender Studies

Faculty supervisor: Dr. Annalee Lepp

"My research will explore the use of the societal Other in the concept musicals of the 1960s and 1970s (particularly Cabaret, The Rocky Horror Picture Show, and Company). Concept musicals (also called “bookless musicals”) revolve around a metaphor or idea rather than a linear narrative/plot, and often comment upon societal values or trends, while also defying unifying structural elements. While elements were used as a means to experiment with form (Bob Fosse, for example, used concept musicals to explore the possibilities of intertwining dance with the story), other concept musicals reveled in exploring the use of morally or sexually ambiguous characters on stage without automatically villainizing them. This lead to a proliferation of characters that defied societal restrictions placed on sex and gender—the Emcee in Cabaret, whose ambiguous sexuality controls the “underground” Kit Kat Klub; Dr. Frank N. Furter in The Rocky Horror Picture Show, whose “alien” proclivities cause ruptures in polite society; and Bobby in Company, a polite, perfectly ordered man coming to terms with his sexuality. The heroes of concept musicals are ambiguous, created from the moral fears of the dominant society of the time, produced as Other even as they captivate (and titillate) the audience—and these characters change with the whims of directors, shifting to continuously represent the antithesis of the hegemonic values of the time."


Johnson, Gregory

Project title: "Something to get it outside of me": Betroffenheit and Mental Illness

Department: English

Faculty supervisor: Dr. Sheila Rabillard

"I am interested in studying modern drama’s use as a vehicle for discussing mental illness, via an examination of Betroffenheit. This Vancouver-based collaboration between Crystal Pite’s Kidd Pivot Dance Company and Jonathon Young’s Electric Company Theatre premiered at the Toronto 2015 Pan Am Games and toured internationally to great acclaim. Betroffenheit (“a state of being stricken, shocked”) presents the aftermath of Jonathon’s traumatic failure to save his daughter and her two cousins from a fatal fire. The play’s text is a circling, repeating loop of “therapy-speak and brutal internal accusations”, and the elements that cannot be put to words are put to dance. My method will be to work with the playwright, choreographer, composer, and actors/dancers, who have provided me with access to scripts, video recordings, and production archives. In conducting this research I will include both a theoretical analysis of current dramatic criticism on affect, trauma, and other applicable theory, and a material analysis of the play. My goal will be to document an important theatre work, and analyze its contribution to the dramatization of mental illness. I was drawn to this emotionally tough material immediately upon seeing the play. Its examination of human suffering resonates on both societal and personal levels, and through the darkness there is a sense of community, even humour. The challenges of this research are significant — this is not easy subject matter — but the rewards lie in a greater understanding of the dramatic medium as a tool for analysis and healing."

Justice, Sandra

Project title: At the drop of a hat: consequences of the omission of the circumflex for Anglophones learning French

Department: French

Faculty supervisor: Dr. Emmanuel Hérique

"In September 2016, the French education system will introduce the orthographic rectifications proposed by le Conseil supérieur de la langue française that simplify the spelling of approximately 2,400 words. This research will focus on the planned elimination of the circumflex on the letters i and u. Although the circumflex has no phonetic value on these letters, it has etymological significance that can help learners of French trace a word back to its Latin root or to cognates in other languages. While this omission of the circumflex was intended to facilitate learning, it could have the opposite effect for Anglophone students as it may obscure the relationship between certain French and English words. For example, the circumflex often indicates the omission of a preconsonantal s in a word, while its English cognate may have retained the s (e.g. the crust: la croûte; to cloister: cloîtrer). This research will examine the 320 affected words and will determine whether or not the change will hinder an Anglophone’s comprehension of these words. This project will include a comprehensive evaluation of the list of words to determine which have English cognates that have conserved the s. It will also include an experiment in which two versions of a text, one with and one without the circumflex, will be given to sixty UVIC students in first-year French courses (FRAN 120 and 160). The students’ comprehension will be measured in order to determine whether the etymological information provided by the circumflex is useful in recognizing cognates."

Kaehn, Olivia

Project title: Contributors to successful supported employment for youth with disabilities: An evaluation

Department: Child & Youth Care

Faculty supervisor: Dr. Doug Magnuson

"TeenWork supports youth with disabilities who seek meaningful, part-time paid employment, providing comprehensive support and guidance from the moment of first interest and continuing if needed to adulthood. Ninety-three percent of TeenWork participants achieve paid employment during participation and 85% exit the program with paid employment. TeenWork staff suggest that the strengths of the program are: youth-to-youth support; individualized and long-term support; flexibility in program design; extensive communication with participants, guardians, and employers; and voluntary participation.

TeenWork is an example of a class of employment support programs; the criteria of success and the program practices in these programs vary widely. The objective of this project is to use TeenWork as a case study for assessing the usefulness of the criteria.

The activities of this study are:

a)     to locate in the evaluation literature the common criteria of success and contributors to success for supportive employment programs for youth;

b)     analytically compare those with current TeenWork practices; and

c)     use those criteria to pilot/test a data collection tool with a sample of participants, guardians, and employers."


Kates, Stephanie

Project title: A Pro-Nazi Vichy Regime: France's Collaboration in the Holocaust

Department: Germanic & Slavic Studies

Faculty supervisor: Dr. Charlotte Schallié

"During the war, the Vichy regime aided Nazi Germany in deporting approximately 76,000 Jews from France, including children. Until very recently, public access to documents was extremely limited. Examining both current research and past documentation, I will research the extent of the collaboration with Nazi Germany and how it affected daily life in both France and Germany during the Second World War."


Kennedy, Sofia

Project title: Determining Essential Features of the Ars2 RNA-processing Factor

Department: Biochemistry & Microbiology

Faculty supervisor: Dr. Chris Nelson

"The research I will conduct will focus on the Ars2 RNA-processing factor, more specifically determing the function of a previously identified conserved C-terminal domain and its possible role in distinct RNA processing events. Since the Ars2 gene is essential in mammals, I will be performing this structure-function analysis with the genetically-tractable S. pombe model organism, or fission yeast. I have two main objectives that I will focus on to direct this research. The first objective involves creating yeast expression vectors of both wild type Ars2 and Ars2 lacking the aforementioned conserved C-terminal domain, and confirming that these vectors are expressed in S. pombe. The second objective is to utilize these expression vectors expressed in S. pombe to rescue the slow-growth phenotype of an existing yeast strain expressing a hypomorphic allele of Ars2, and to use co-immunoprecipitation in order to determine whether the conserved C-terminal domain is necessary for interaction with the cap binding complex (CBP). It is my hope that this research will determine the essential nature of the conserved C-terminal domain, and whether this domain is the interface between Ars2 and 5' CBP."

Klassen, Alex

Project title: 12 pieces for Paul Sacher: a cross sectional analysis

Department: Music

Faculty supervisor: Dr. Joseph Salem

"When the Russian Cellist Mstislav Rostropovich commissioned twelve compositions to mark the 70th birthday of his friend, conductor Paul Sacher, he did far more than inspire a tremendous addition to the solo cello repertoire. In enlisting musical luminaries as varied as Benjamin Britten, Luciano Berio, and Pierre Boulez, Rostropovich brought about a confluence of works by artists whose field had been maligned as being disparate beyond aesthetic comprehension. The resulting 12 compositions amount to a nexus of currents in contemporary art music that demands the attention of a wider audience.

My study will begin by looking at the influence of Sacher and Rostropovich on the trajectory of modern music by examining how they came to affect the lives and careers of the 12 composers involved in the project. Turning to the composers themselves, I will provide an overview of their various styles, and situate the ‘Sacher' works in their broader outputs. An analysis of the set of pieces - covering, among other subjects, the composers' treatment of the name 'Sacher' as a melodic theme, and how each composer uses the technical resources of the cello to unique musical ends - will provide a means of experiencing the similarities among the works while understanding the expressive possibilities offered by the different compositional techniques. Through this combination of historical and analytical investigation, I aim to generate renewed interest in these wonderful and diverse pieces while putting to rest unfounded notions of the aesthetic discordance of modern compositional practice."


Krause, Katherine

Project title: Role of interfacial water in adsorbed protein structure

Department: Chemistry

Faculty supervisor: Prof. Dennis Hore

"The structure of water at solid surfaces is responsible for the sequestering and subsequent attachment of proteins in aqueous environments. The nature of the surface (charge, hydrophobicity, roughness, etc) dictates the alignment of a few layers of water molecules that, in turn, influence proteins stuck to the surface. This relationship will be investigated by analysis of molecular dynamics trajectories."

Lam, Holly

Project title: Let’s Make a Baby: 2 decades of queer motherhood on TV

Department: Writing

Faculty supervisor: Dr. Maureen Bradley

"Sometime after it became okay to make lesbians have children on TV, it became all they ever do. Having babies has been a staple of lesbian characters’ storylines through mainstream 1990s hits like Friends and NYPD Blue, through queer-focused shows of the 2000s like The L Word and Queer as Folk. And still, in 2016’s everexpanding network of queer women characters, it seems inevitable to have a lesbian conception/pregnancy/ birth storyline. Can the writers think of nothing else? This trend has roots in a wider social pressure for women to be mothers and to portray motherhood as essential to womanhood; an attempt to homonormalize queer portrayals for mainstream audiences; a laziness in digging deeper for queer female stories; and a reflection of reality. I will examine different cases of this frustrating trope across different TV shows, blending film production, film theory and gender studies to produce a stylized supercut video – a re-edit of existing footage that will serve as both entertainment and cultural commentary. This draws inspiration from previous socio-culturally aware supercuts such as Christian Marclay’s “The Clock” and Dylan Marron’s “Every Single Word Spoken By a Person of Colour in the Entire Harry Potter Film Series” (both on You Tube)."


Lazin, Sarah

Project title: Effects of Zika Virus on Health Law in Ecuador

Department: Hispanic & Italian Studies

Faculty supervisor: Dr. Pablo Restrepo-Gautier

"In early 2016, the World Health Organization deemed Zika virus a Public Health Emergency of International Concern. There is currently no preventative vaccine, nor specific treatment for the virus. As communities throughout South America have discovered, when Zika spreads from a pregnant woman to her fetus, there exists the grave possibility of the baby being born with microcephaly – that is, an underdeveloped brain.

The overwhelming response of South American governments has been to suggest that women abstain from getting pregnant for the foreseeable future. However, given the inaccessibility of contraceptives, combined with the illegality of abortions, more women are challenging dominant health law norms around the continent. 

Ultimately, this project will examine the ramifications of Zika virus on health law norms in Ecuador by answering the following question: How is Zika virus affecting sexual and reproductive health norms in Ecuador, both within a health law and sociopolitical context? I will discuss the historical and cultural factors that have shaped Ecuador’s health law into what it is today, and consider the contemporary debate surrounding sexual health and reproductive rights through both human rights and legal lenses.

I will be conducting my research while studying in Ecuador. I intend to consult local experts, such as those at the Center for Social Studies and Planning in Quito to ensure an accurate representation of this issue."

Leverett, Conner

Project title: Understanding free-floating car share movement patterns by leveraging user-generated GPS location data: a Vancouver case study

Department: Geography

Faculty supervisor: Dr. Aleck Ostry

"Using official and volunteer geographic information, cycling safety hotspots will be identified. Once these hotspots are identified, official bicycle counts and Strava volunteer geographic information will be overlaid to identify cyclist exposure to these danger zones. Overall the goal of the research is to develop methods of using a combination of official and crowdsourced geographic data to create a safer cycling environment."

Lightbourn, Ryleigh

Project title: The network of words: an analysis of the word PETIT in French collocations

Department: French

Faculty supervisor: Dr. Catherine Caws

"When acquiring a new language, learners are often eager to investigate similarities and differences between their mother tongue and the foreign language. To that end, they will often use bilingual dictionaries to examine word-to-word translation and discover new vocabulary items. While this system of translation might prove useful in many contexts, it becomes complicated with the introduction of complex lexis. The learner is thus confronted with an obstacle of understanding and manipulating word combinations, better known as collocations or idioms. Semantically, a collocation cannot always be understood as a combination of the meaning of each of its constituents, thus they are problematic for a language learner. This is the case, for example, in French compounds which employ the word PETIT, and where the adjective can take a variety of meaning depending on the word with which it is associated.  My research goal is to do an in-depth analysis of the lexical network of PETIT in order to investigate the system of complex lexis. Using the methodology of Igor Mel’čuk (1995) as a guide, I will analyze the semantic and syntactic structures that PETIT presents hoping to establish a working model of the said lexeme that will illustrate the complex mechanics of lexicons in the French language. Mel’čuk’s meaning-text theory will allow a more accurate systematization of the variety of meanings assumed by PETIT in collocations and idioms, and thus better illustrate its semantic variations. This research will have a direct impact on the acquisition of words by language learners."

Loten, Robert Isaias

Project title: Kantian Ethics and Consequentialism: Exploring Compatibility

Department: Philosophy

Faculty supervisor: Dr. Colin Macleod

"I wish to investigate the compatibility of Kantian Ethics with consequentialism. Kantian Ethics is traditionally associated with deontology; however, I suspect that this association is not necessary. I am interested in expanding upon the work done by Shelly Kagan in his essay "Kantianism for Consequentialists", and researching the viability of a consequentialist moral theory generated by Kant's Formula of Universal Law."

MacLennan, Eva

Project title: Behavioural responses in the Plainfin Midshipman to anthropogenic acoustic stimuli

Department: Biology

Faculty supervisor: Prof. Francis Juanes

"Soniferous fishes like the plainfin midshipman use sound to communicate with conspecifics. The behavioural response of the plainfin midshipman to anthropogenic noise will be assessed in order to examine the potential impact of the changing soundscapes on the ocean's wild populations of soniferous fishes. Additionally, the dependence of this behavioural response on habitat complexity will inform the relevance of ecological context in the laboratory."


Mahbub, Rahat

Project title: Peer-to-peer exchange of EMR data to perform statistical analysis

Department: Computer Science, Software Engineering

Faculty supervisor: Dr. Jens Weber

"Medical research using EMR data is difficult because of the legal, security and privacy issues involved. The research project will explore the implementation of an infrastructure where EMR data providers can exchange data using secure multi-party computation algorithms so that each provider will only see data and intermediate results explicitly made available to them but contribute to aggregated data among all providers without any identifying information."

Makaro, Tyler

Project title: ALTAIR Dark Energy Analysis and Instrumentation Development

Department: Physics & Astronomy

Faculty supervisor: Dr. Justin Albert

"We request a student to join the international ALTAIR team (http://projectaltair.org), he would contribute to the development of the propulsion system for future ALTAIR payloads. Propulsion will greatly benefit the future of ALTAIR flights as the ability to more precisely control the flight path would allow ALTAIR to pass directly in front of type 1A supernovae rather than merely nearby. This allows for better calibration for the magnitude of the supernovae or other astronomical light sources. ALTAIR is a collaboration of 4 Canadian universities and 2 US universities plus NRC and NIST. Analysis of the observation and telemetry data, in order to obtain precise photometry of supernovae or other astronomical light sources, brings students into the heart of the scientific analysis required to obtain results."

McCartan, Delaney

Project title: An insight into online social networking communities and their affect on suicidal behaviour

Department: Sociology

Faculty supervisor: Dr. André Smith

"Sociologist Emile Durkheim’s theory of suicide is a framework used to analyze how suicidal behaviour is associated with the level of social integration and moral regulation an individual adheres to within a specific community. As social networking websites such as Facebook, Twitter and online forums continue to foster community relations and comprise the majority of our social interactions, it is important to examine the possible negative effects of these relations. Within this research project I seek to apply Durkheim’s theory of suicide as a framework to analyze suicidal behaviour within online communities. In order to effectively research this topic, I will conduct qualitative research with in-person, semi-structured interviews and quantitative surveys that will be administered to online communities."

McCarthy, Morgan

Project title: The Impact of Super InTent City on the harms of Homelessness

Department: Nursing

Faculty supervisor: Dr. Bernie Pauly

"The purpose of this project is to analyze media and court documents to identify the impacts of Super InTent city on its residents. This will take into account health, safety and wellbeing of the super InTent city residents."


McKenna, Adam

Project title: Gold Mining and the Likelihood of Conflict: A Panel Data Analysis

Department: Economics

Faculty supervisor: Dr. Merwan Engineer and Dr. Nilanjana Roy

"Opportunities related to small-scale and artisanal gold mining provide livelihoods to communities around the world, from Peru to Indonesia. Arguably, this has helped to raise living standards and provide employment to hundreds of thousands of people. However, such activities are often centred in areas of the world which experience violent intra- and inter-state conflict. Evidence of a ‘resource curse’ (a situation in which the presence of natural resources slows economic growth and contributes to violent conflict) has been studied extensively, but mainly in the context of diamond mining or oil drilling. A causal relationship between gold mining and conflict has not yet been established. The purpose of my paper will be to examine various facets of the gold industry (prices, small- and large-scale production, national Mining Code regulations, etc.), through panel data models, to test whether gold production plays a causal role in the likelihood of intra- and inter-state conflict in countries that engage in gold mining activities."

Mollard, Simone

Project title: Emotion and Moral Agency in Bks 1 & 2 of the Iliad

Department: Greek & Roman Studies

Faculty supervisor: Dr. Laurel Bowman

"I propose to examine Books 1 and 2 of Homer's Iliad, to provide a thorough analysis of the text, focussing on the role of emotion in books 1 and 2 of the Iliad and its affects on moral agency."

Moore, Dylan

Project title: Social Learning: Building Equitable Classroom Community through the Listening Circle

Department: Curriculum & Instruction

Faculty supervisor: Dr. Kathy Sanford

"How can community projects and place-based learning work together to help students not only gain a deeper understanding and appreciation for their local community but also a voice in that community? How can educators facilitate positive relationships between students, local landscapes, knowledge holders and other key community members? In a world that is globally connected and in constant transit, how important is the development of place-based community and localized knowledge?

Place-based and site-specific projects for me are about responding to the environment and deepening my connection to a landscape. I have been inspired by art educators such as Lorna Reid (retired) at Esquimalt High and Sue Garat, currently at EMCS in Sooke, in terms of how they have incorporated community projects into their teaching practice. More recently my knowledge of local histories has been transformed through the stories and teachings of local indigenous knowledge holders J.B. Williams, Earl and Nick Claxton and local artist Chris Paul.

My research methodology would take the form of reflective self-study as well as the incorporation of narratives and documentation created by students (photos, journals and other media inspired by their experiences). Key texts that inform my thinking about community connections are “Saltwater People,” by Dave Eliot Sr. and “Photovoice: Sharing Pictures, Telling Stories and Changing Communities,” by Beverly Palibroda with Brigette Krieg, Lisa Murdock and Joanne Havelock."


Moore, Logan

Project title: Testing whether a bacterial symbiont defends its insect host against parasitic nematodes

Department: Biology

Faculty supervisor: Dr. Steve Perlman

"Only recently have we come to appreciate that animals host diverse symbiotic microorganisms that benefit them in many ways, such as protecting them against natural enemies. For my research, I will study interactions between Myrmica ants and their symbionts and parasites. These ants are commonly infected with Spiroplasma bacterial symbionts, as well as with parasitic nematodes (worms), although both of these types of infections are little studied. Interest in this field is inspired by the continuing research being done on the relationship between the woodland fly Drosophila neotestacea and their own symbiotic Spiroplasma  – a relationship which protects the woodland fly against nematode parasites. For my study I will use molecular approaches to characterize Spiroplasma and nematode infections, and test the hypothesis that Spiroplasma protects ants against nematode infection by asking whether Spiroplasma-infected ants are less likely to carry nematodes. Finally, I will use DNA sequence analysis to ask whether different ant species that co-occur harbour the same Spiroplasma strains, which will provide clues as to how the symbionts are transmitted and how specialized they are. This work will help contribute to our understanding of the ecology of interactions between animals, symbionts, and natural enemies."

Murray, Emma

Project title: The Impact of Euromaidan on Ukraine

Department: Germanic & Slavic Studies

Faculty supervisor: Dr. Olga Pressitch

"My research project will examine the social, political, economic, and cultural impact of the Euromaidan Revolution that took place in Kyiv, Ukraine in 2013/2014. Through this research, I will seek to analyze and explain the factors leading up to the demonstrations, the issue of corruption, the importance of European integration for the country of Ukraine, and how the revolution has manifested itself in the arts. I also wish to explore the phenomena of popular revolutions and demonstrations and the reasons as to why such events occur, why they grow, and why they often turn violent. More important, I would like to look at the consequences of the Euromaidan—did the new Ukrainian authorities manage to get rid of the corruption and establish political transparency? Street art will be crucial component of my project; I plan to highlight it when preparing my poster."


Murray, Matthew

Project title: Augmented Extrusion: Interactive 3D Modeling in Augmented Reality

Department: Computer Science

Faculty supervisor: Dr. Andrea Tagliasacchi

"In this project I intend to further my summer USRA research for the development of an “Augmented Extrusion” paradigm to 3D shape modeling - where a user creates objects with their hands within their natural 3D environment by leveraging an Augmented Reality (AR) setup (e.g. Microsoft HoloLens). We believe this project could have immense potential in rapid design prototyping, and in reducing the knowledge gap between users and creators currently existing in 3D content creation. The core paradigm we plan to investigate is the one of “extrusions”. As an example, a user could first draw a rectangle of the desired size on the floor, then extrude it orthogonally out of the floor to create a 3D parallelepiped. Both additive and subtractive operations would be available, leading to a very generic content creation framework. Extrusion lies at the core of the well known Google Sketchup product line. In this project, we plan to research to what degree this concept can be leveraged in an AR setting, and identify its applicative challenges, especially as we focus on natural user interaction as an input method. Beside investigating user interaction challenges and solutions, my research will also have an applied numerical optimization component, as I will leverage modern graphics/vision research in developing smart “snapping” procedures. This will allow the user to draw smooth surfaces or straight lines from noisy and imprecise hand and finger position measurements. Through an intuitive process whose precision is driven by optimization, we believe a user could be capable of creating a wide variety of models; and as a result, would add an entirely new dimension to the way people interact with their environments."

Nagrocki, Jacob

Project title: Crime Data Analysis by Computer-Assisted Mathematics

Department: Mathematics & Statistics

Faculty supervisor: Dr. Ryan Budney and Dr. Farouk Nathoo

"I will be reviewing methods for crime data analysis, and writing software to provide meaningful visualizations and statistics. Analysis methods will include regression and principal component analysis. The software will include functions to help spot trends by examining crime types, time of day, weather, geographical location, and other external factors. Tools will also be provided to produce visualizations relating to these factors. The final report will include statements on the limitations of these methods and the nature of the data used."


Nguyen, Peter

Project title: Study of Chemiluminescence Using Orthogonal Instrumental Techniques: UV/Vis Spectroscopy and ESI-MS

Department: Chemistry

Faculty supervisor: Dr. Scott McIndoe

"The chemiluminescent systems have been thoroughly studied using UV/Vis instrumentation, but through this research project, we offer a new perspective using Electrospray Ionization Mass Spectrometry (ESI-MS). The aim is to simultaneously measure the light output through UV/Vis Spectroscopy and observe the change in species through Mass Spectrometry, both in real-time. Coupling these orthogonal techniques will give insight into the reaction mechanism and kinetics where one might miss alone. The use of ESI-MS will involve characterization of species by mass to charge ratio (m/z), monitoring the change in concentration of incoming and outgoing intermediates over time, and draw upon rates of reactions."

Noseworthy, Matthew

Project title: Visualization of tumor-reactive CD8+ T cells and cognate antigen-bearing tumor cells by in situ PCR

Department: Biochemistry & Microbiology

Faculty supervisor: Dr. Brad Nelson

"Background: Tumour-infiltrating CD8+ T cells (CD8+ TIL) are strongly associated with patient survival in high grade serous ovarian cancer (HGSC). However, in some tumors, the majority of CD8+ TIL are observed within the tumor stroma. Intrastromal tumor-reactive TIL may be unable to access tumor cells bearing their cognate antigens, and would thus be unable to perform their cytotoxic function. To date, the spatial distribution of tumor-reactive CD8+ TIL and their cognate antigen-bearing tumor cells has not been determined.

Hypothesis: Tumor-specific CD8+ TIL in some ovarian cancers are trapped in tumor stroma and are therefore spatially separated from tumor cells bearing their cognate antigen.

Objective: To localize tumor-reactive CD8+ T cells and their cognate antigen-bearing tumor cells in the microenvironment of HGSC tumors.

Methods: We are developing an in situ polymerase chain reaction (isPCR) protocol to amplify the DNA sequences of tumor-specific T-cell receptors (TCRs) and their cognate tumor antigens within whole tumor sections. These PCR products will be visualized by chromogenic detection. We are currently developing this protocol in a mouse mammary tumor model system (NOP23), in which we are targeting the DNA sequences of both a model tumor antigen (OVA) and the TCR of cognate CD8+ TIL (OT-1). Once this protocol is optimized, we will develop a parallel isPCR protocol to detect human CD8+ T cells specific for the cancer-testis antigen, NY-ESO-1, in HGSC.

Results: PCR parameters were optimized in solution-based PCR using DNA extracts from NOP23 and OT-1 mice, and are now being tested in isPCR on NOP23 tumor tissue."

Pagani, Dalton

Project title: Archives, Museums, and Public Space in the Production of History

Department: Anthropology

Faculty supervisor: Dr. Ann Stahl

"My hometown of Powell River, BC, is a settler community located on the traditional territory of the Tla’amin Nation. The historical narratives of both groups have crossed and intertwined throughout the 20th century, and this is evident in the local archives, museum, and public spaces. Many questions, however, arise in regards to what the story of Powell River is and who is telling the story. Using archival, museum, and public information, I hope to explore the production and presentation of history in Powell River."

Pang, Angela

Project title: Effects of Pre-natal Ethanol Exposure on Long-Term Depression in the Dentate Gyrus of Rats

Department: Medical Sciences, Department of Biology

Faculty supervisor: Dr. Brian Christie

"Fetal alcohol spectrum disorders are a pathological condition where the timing, dose and maternal factors affect the severity of physiological deformities and cognitive impairments. Alcohol, once in the bloodstream, readily crosses the blood-brain barrier, and permeates cell membranes to interact with cellular components, changing their function and efficacy. These changes to neurons have a profound effect on synaptic plasticity, therefore learning and memory can be affected long after alcohol exposure has ended. In this study we will explore how prenatal ethanol exposure (PNEE) alters synaptic plasticity in the dentate gyrus of the hippocampus, a structure important for learning and memory. Specifically, we are interested in how synaptic plasticity is changed following PNEE. Synaptic plasticity has two complementary mechanisms, long term potentiation (LTP) and long term depression (LTD) that enhance the efficacy of synaptic transmission and decrease the efficacy of synaptic transmission respectively. Both components of synaptic plasticity are crucial for altering neuronal connection, influencing learning and memory. Using electrophysiology low frequency stimulation (LFS)  protocols, we will induce LTD in hippocampal slices from rats with PNEE to determine whether changes in synaptic plasticity could contribute to impaired learning and memory."

Poole, Brandon

Project title: Unlike-Likes: Metaphor and Truth in the Visual Arts

Department: Visual Arts

Faculty supervisor: Prof. Daniel Laskarin

"I am interested in the relationship between metaphor and truth-- specifically, the type of truth which metaphor allows. If metaphor follows the form “X is Y”, but only holds as functional if “X is not Y” is true, then it can be said that metaphorical truths do not abide the rules of strict logic, and are simultaneously assertions of identity, as well as assertions of difference. They are, in the words of the Poet Charles Simic “part of the not-knowing aspect of art”.

I would like to question the mechanics of metaphor and further my understanding of visual art’s reliance on a similar, though not necessarily linguistic, mode of comparison. I am fascinated by the capacity of art for uncanny juxtapositions that prod the mind into new territories of thought.

As this will be an arts-based research project, an important element of the process will be the making of a body of work, and will necessarily hold as evidence both theory and practice. On the side of theory, I will take as a point of departure Jan Zwicky’s Wisdom and Metaphor and Lyric Philosophy, as well as Wittgenstein’s Philosophical Investigations. Complementing these texts I will be reading poetry, specifically concentrating on the hybrid work of BP Nichol. I will be following this line of thinking into the realm of visual art with a focus on early conceptual artists Joseph Kosuth and John Baldessari.

The outcome of this research will be a video/sculpture-orientated series of work."


Pulsifer, Lia

Project title: The Relationship Between Social Connectedness and Health Among Young Adults in a BC Town

Department: Public Health & Social Policy

Faculty supervisor: Dr. Charlotte Loppie

"This study will help researchers to better understand the influence of social connectedness on the health of young adults. Research suggests that social connectedness is an important factor related to health. Abundant literature is available on the relationship between social connectedness and self-rated health (SRH) for older adults and adolescents, but little research on this topic has been done with young adults aged 18-34. This type of information is important in order to inform policies and programs intended to support young adults’ health and wellness."


Radisavljevic, Nina

Project title: Mechanisms of Neuroinvasion by Treponema pallidum

Department: Biochemistry & Microbiology

Faculty supervisor: Dr. Caroline Cameron

"My honours project for the 2016-2017 academic year will focus upon the Treponema pallidum virulence factor, Tp0751, and its role in interaction with, and attachment to, vascular and neural endothelial cells.  This project is part of an ongoing collaborative project with the laboratory of Dr. Leigh Anne Swayne, Division of Medical Sciences, University of Victoria.  The overall research project will investigate the host cell response upon interaction of Tp0751 with vascular and neural endothelial cells, including monitoring the integrity of cell-cell junctions, determining the cell morphology upon exposure, investigating the 67 kDa laminin receptor (67LR) as a putative receptor for Tp0751, and determining if this interaction is involved in host endothelial cell modulation. These investigations are expected to uncover a completely novel and highly exciting mechanism of successful host invasion mediated by the Tp0751 virulence factor of T. pallidum."

Raftery, Erinn

Project title: Tracking off-axis hyrdrothermal alteration with Sr/Rb isotopes

Department: Earth & Ocean Sciences

Faculty supervisor: Dr. Laurence Coogan

"Working on a method using Sr and Rb isotopes to track the timing of hydrothermal alteration in oceanic crust in the off-axis region."

Rekis, Jaclyn

Project title: Humour in Kierkegaard’s Existential and Religious Philosophy

Department: Philosophy

Faculty supervisor: Dr. Nina Belmonte

"I would like to investigate a topic which is often considered to be a large part of “the good life” and yet is rarely investigated by philosophers. This is the topic of humour. In particular, I would like to research how Søren Kierkegaard depicts the meaning and inescapable presence of humour. Humour is not important merely for the pleasure it brings, but reveals what is individual, rather than universal, about human existence, the soul, and one’s relation to God. Furthermore, Kierkegaard views humour as a reaction to the incongruity between what is expected and what actually occurs, and what is life if not an experience of this absurdity? I will research how Kierkegaard’s philosophy of humour expands on this existentialist view and how it is possible for one to hold the idea that humour is both a tool towards believe in the divine as well as a marking of the individual responsibility one has for one’s own life."

Ruiz, Lena

Project title: The Pancake Problems: Sorting and Permutations

Department: Computer Science, Mathematics & Statistics

Faculty supervisor: Dr. Frank Ruskey

"Given a stack of n pancakes, all of different sizes, a pancake flip consists of removing a smaller stack from the top of the stack, inverting it, and replacing it on the original stack. The nth pancake number is the minimum number of flips required to sort n pancakes in the worst case. Currently only the first 13 pancake numbers are known, although lower and upper bounds of n and 2n-3 have been established for all unsolved n. A related problem is the burnt pancake problem, where each pancake has one burnt side which must face down once the stack is sorted. The burnt pancake numbers are known to be bounded by 3n/2 and 2n-2.

The burnt pancake problem can be represented by a graph with 2^n * n! vertices, each representing a different state of the stack and edges connecting states that differ by exactly one flip. Because every stack has n substacks removable from the top, this graph is n-regular. Each path in the graph represents a sequence of flips, so the diameter of the graph gives the nth burnt pancake number. Since this is the Cayley graph generated by the set of flips, its paths can be used to study ways of writing all permutations of any n-set as a composition of prefix reversals. The pancake problem can also be used to model genetic mutations as compositions of inversions.

We would like to investigate higher pancake numbers and other applications of pancake flipping."


Sabino, Jenna

Project title: Comparison of postural sway measurement technologies’ ability to predict fall risk

Department: Exercise Science, Physical & Health Education

Faculty supervisor: Dr. Sandra Hundza

"We will compare the ability of 3 technologies measuring standing balance to differentiate fallers vs non-fallers.  Forty community dwelling older adults (70+) participants with and without a history of falls will be asked to perform 6 standing balance tests (Eyes open, Eyes closed, Wearing visual conflict dome with and without standing on foam).  Postural Sway during these tests will be measured with Pen and paper, inertial motion sensor and force plate.  We will conduct an analysis of the sensitivity and specificity of each of these technologies to retrospectively predict falls in older adults.  This understanding will provide a principled basis for the development, enhancement and evaluation of fall prediction strategies by identifying the risk factors associated with increase incidence of falls.  This information will be used to develop, enhance and evaluate strategies for fall prevention and rehabilitation post falls."

Sandhu, Guleena

Project title: The Effects of Public Opinion on Euro Adoption in the Czech Republic, Hungary, and Poland

Department: Political Science

Faculty supervisor: Dr. Amy Verdun

"The European Union (EU) represents a singular body of political associations in that, as a supranational organization, it encompasses characteristics of both a federal system and an intergovernmental organization. My research will specifically focus on the economic institutions of the EU, namely its single currency – the euro – which is unique to the EU and represents the area of highest cooperation within the organization.

In my research, I will explore the effects of public opinion on the decisions of the national governments in the Czech Republic, Hungary, and Poland regarding the adoption of the euro. I have chosen to focus on these three countries as they represent the last three of the ten states part of the Eastern European expansion of 2004 to have not yet adopted the euro, which they are required to do by law when meeting all the criteria. My research will offer a review of existing literature on euro adoption, and analysis of public opinion. I will analyse Eurobarometer data as well as national public opinion data (in order to offset any pro-EU bias) and do further media analysis of public opinion by studying leading newspapers. By using a mixed methods approach, I will benefit from the strengths of both quantitative and qualitative methods. Furthermore, I plan to develop my skills in empirical research by engaging in content analysis of the media and statistical analysis of public opinion data. Under the expertise of Dr. Verdun, this project will ultimately form the basis of my Honours thesis."

Savage, Alyssa

Project title: Valuing Traditional Ecological Knowledge in British Columbia’s Environmental Impact Assessment Process

Department: Economics

Faculty supervisor: Dr. Donna Feir and Dr. Peter Kennedy

"The Environmental Impact Assessment process in British Columbia has been criticized for its inability to facilitate sound and thorough assessments of major development projects across the province. Assessments are intended to consider potential environmental, economic, social, heritage and health effects. These various potential impacts undergo their respective reviews, providing information to decision makers. Currently, economic reviews consider employment, contribution to GDP, output, and various other macroeconomic costs and benefits. Occasionally an economic review will include the valuation of ecosystem services, but ultimately the assessments are incomprehensive in capturing the true costs of resources lost from the development of proposed projects. I plan to design an economic valuation framework for Traditional Ecological Knowledge of First Nations in British Columbia, as a proposed augmentation to the provincial Environmental Impact Assessment process. This would include how to value the potential loss of First Nations knowledge that may occur with the degradation or destruction of an ecosystem, and how to value to loss of future First Nations knowledge that may be created with the maintenance of associated ecosystems and traditional practices. Using various case studies and valuation techniques, I intend to create a basic methodology for valuing this form of knowledge capital."

Shamei, Arian

Project title: An Acoustic Analysis of Cannabis-intoxicated Speech

Department: Linguistics

Faculty supervisor: Dr. Sonya Bird

"Speech from medicinal users of cannabis will be compared before and after the consumption of prescribed cannabinoid medication. The objective of this comparison is to identify potential vocal/acoustic markers that can be used to distinguish cannabis-intoxicated speech from sober speech.

The legalization of cannabis for recreational purposes has been suggested by the current Canadian government, therefore, developing accurate roadside methods to detect cannabis-impaired drivers is a growing priority; currently there is no roadside method to detect cannabis-impairment aside from a blood-test which is not feasible in most situations.

Acoustic analysis has been shown in previous research to accurately distinguish intoxication from a variety of substances, including alcohol. Algorithms have also been trained to discriminate sober from intoxicated speech with high accuracy. To date I have been unable to locate an acoustic analysis of cannabis-intoxicated speech. Therefore, the proposed analysis has the potential to further the state of knowledge in addition to solving a current problem for frontline personnel in medicine and law enforcement.

The proposed analysis is an extension and replication of a pilot project I completed in previous undergraduate course work (HREB course-based ethics approval was obtained). The results of the pilot study suggest that acoustic correlates may be identified, but further research is warranted. Volunteers will provide sober and medicated audio recordings of speech and language tasks, which will be compared using software specialized for the analysis of vocal quality. Acoustic correlates that possibly signify cannabis-intoxication will be recorded for future algorithm development."

Shier, Jordan

Project title: Insights into the Emergence of Drum Samples in Recorded Music

Department: Music

Faculty supervisor: Prof. Kirk McNally

"The emergence of a new industry focused on the development of electronic musical instruments has changed the way many musicians create and consume sounds [1]. The use of synthesized and acoustic drum samples in recorded music has become increasingly common over the last 30 years. Through my project I hope to develop a deeper understanding of this shift in music. This will be accomplished by examining drum samples and recordings from two different perspectives and comparing the results. The first perspective will use audio feature extraction techniques outlined by IRCAM (Institute for Research and Coordination in Acoustics/Music) [2] and implemented in a software toolkit [3] to develop objective measures of popular drum sounds. The second will explore the historical context of the use of drum samples in recorded music.  The goal of this comparison is to determine whether there is a particular, measurable quality in popular drum samples that could explain this shift, or if the change is more related to historical contingencies related to then-contemporary musical practices.

This research will advance upon current research that my advisor is involved in, which utilizes audio archives from the band KLÖ as a test-bed for exploring the pedagogical opportunities such archives can offer for audio engineering programs. As a composer and technology developer, I hope that this research will provide me with insight into my own consumption and practice of electronic music and inform future research opportunities in the creation of new instruments and music.

[1] Théberge, Paul. Any sound you can imagine: Making music/consuming technology. Wesleyan University Press, 1997.

[2] Peeters, Geoffroy. A Large Set of Audio Features for Sound Description (similarity and classification) in the CUIDADO project. IRCAM, April 2004.

[3] Harker, Alexander. “Software.” http://www.alexanderjharker.co.uk/Software.html. Accessed 30 August 2016."

Siemens, Kathryn (Kate)

Project title: History on the web: prototyping a website on Japanese Canadian dispossession

Department: History

Faculty supervisor: Dr. Jordan Stanger-Ross

"More options are available than ever before for sharing scholarly work as historians enter the digital age. The internet offers new possibilities for publishing research because of its dynamic and increasingly accessible format, multi-media capacity and facilitation of increased user interaction and user-generated content. While website content and layout can mimic that of historical monographs and articles, the attributes of the internet encourage exploring new approaches to sharing historical information.

Working with files from Landscapes of Injustice, a multi-year research project on the dispossession of Japanese Canadians during World War II, my research project will explore theoretical and practical possibilities for sharing historical research on the web. The project will work with a small sub-set of the archival material collected by Landscapes of Injustice, relevant secondary sources on the dispossession of Japanese Canadians during World War II and ideas of public and digital history.

This project will create an informed prototype that provides visitors with historical information, facilitates their learning experience, and encourages community participation and interaction with the material. Building on the dynamic, interactive and user-focused characteristics of a website, this project will offer one suggestion for how the dissemination of historical information could look online."

Simmons, Jake Steven Zimmermann

Project title: Properties of the Cone Generated by Triangles in Graphs on n Vertices

Department: Mathematics & Statistics

Faculty supervisor: Dr. Peter Dukes

"The set of all edge-weightings of the complete graph Kn is a vector space of dimension n(n-1)/2. Consider the triangles in Kn, which we regard as zero-one vectors with ones on the edges of the triangle. Taking all linear combinations of these triangles with nonnegative constants, we obtain a polyhedral cone. This cone is very complex and connects with several other topics in discrete mathematics, including the metric polytope and graph decompositions. Fortunately, this cone also has a lot of symmetry due to the large automorphism group of the underlying graph. The cone also has a recursive structure, although presently this is poorly understood.

This project will study the symmetries, recursive nature, and other properties of the cone. One goal is to discover more connections with other geometric or algebraic structures. Another is to improve computations of the face structure of the cone. Indeed, having a good description of the cone by halfspaces is useful for edge-decomposition questions such as the Nash-Williams conjecture."


Slager, Lisa

Project title: The relationship between family and substance abuse: Experiences of addiction recovery

Department: Sociology

Faculty supervisor: Dr. André Smith

"As a social determinant of health, family is a source of support that has a significant impact on mental health for individuals, particularly those struggling with drug addiction and recovery. Family can offer economic and social resources, and are often the first contact in treatment seeking behaviours. They can assist in social support, acceptance of recovery, and the financial means to seek professional help. Close family members may also normalize drug-related behaviours, or be a source of stress and conflict. Social theorists argue that health habits are learnt in childhood, suggesting that conditions in childhood can negatively impact future drug related behaviours as adults.  Family may also reject and label individuals, leaving them without valued social support.

Not only does drug addiction affect users, but it has an impact on the family as well. Anxieties and stress as a result of breakdowns in social connections, loss of trust, and worry of safety can cause strain relatives. Treatment can be a financial burden, and becomes a lifelong process for both family members and individuals suffering from substance use disorders.

Often stigmatization and culturally influenced ideologies make it difficult to receive community-based treatment for substance users. Within the medical community, family roles and involvement in treatment are under-recognized, despite research supporting the significance of social support in recovery. By understanding the experiences individuals face in their recovery, particularly regarding family influence, community health programs can better accommodate structural problems, such as increased family involvement in recovery programs."

Slamka, Catherine

Project title: Translating Reflexivity

Department: Pacific & Asian Studies

Faculty supervisor: Dr. Timothy Iles

"This project examines the process of translation to determine the role that the translator him/herself plays in concretising “meaning”: how do individual choices alter or interfere with text in both the target and original language? What are the steps involved in producing a “faithful” translation, and how can a researcher independently verify these? The project utilises various techniques of translation and critical self-evaluation to form its argument."

Speakman, Mark

Project title: Foxconn in the Czech Republic: How Foxconn and Czech Policy are Changing the Czech Economy

Department: Peter B. Gustavson School of Business

Faculty supervisor: Prof. Mike Szymanski

"When I think of Foxconn I think of working conditions so horrific that employees would rather jump out of factory windows than work another grueling shift. The company, which is the third largest private employer in the world, is infamously known for incidences where this took place in their Chinese factories. The mainstream media covered the story closely not only because it was alarming, but because of what the factories were producing: iPhones.

So, with that being my only knowledge of the electronics manufacturing giant, I was shocked to learn that they had two factories less than an hour’s drive away from where I am currently studying. The Kutna Hora and Paradubice factories in the Czech Republic act as the center of Foxconn’s European operations.

This led me to ask a few questions. Why would the largest electronics manufacturer in the world choose to run production facilities in the Czech Republic rather than China? What are the working conditions like in the Czech factories in comparison to those in China? How does the Czech business environment impact Foxconn’s operations? And who in their right mind would want to work for them?!

I will delve into the questions above in greater detail throughout this paper. Based on everything I know about Foxconn I hypothesize that there are slave-like working conditions in all of their factories. How else would they achieve such outstanding efficiency and speed in their production? Perhaps, throughout the course of writing this paper, I will be proven wrong."


Tidey, Leah

Project title: Intergenerational Theatre in Education Sexual Health Project

Department: Theatre

Faculty supervisor: Dr. Warwick Dobson

"Statistically, elders and youth represent the highest percentages of our population having unprotected sex and are in the most need of effective sexual health education. The rise of Sexually Transmitted Infections and Diseases over the past two decades clearly indicates that action must be taken to educate and promote healthy sexuality. Therefore I propose a joint health initiative between elders and youth in Victoria to discuss, learn, create, devise, and share the importance of sexual health. I believe that sexual health through Theatre in Education is an innovative initiative that has the ability to deconstruct social stigma and provide an embodied learning experience that will create lasting change."


Turner, Iliana

Project title: Decolonizing Political Theory: Intersectionality as a Possible Tool

Department: Political Science

Faculty supervisor: Dr. Andrew Wender

"The dominance of the “western canon” in political theory has resulted in the pre-eminence of a limited number of specific voices in this area of study. The majority of scholars that comprise the “western canon” occupied spaces of privilege that related to their gender, race, and class. Despite calls to action for the decolonization of political theory, western curriculums remain largely comprised of these voices, and a diversity of theorists continues to be excluded. In my research I seek to address if intersectionality is a useful approach in decolonizing political theory. By focusing on the texts and scholars that are currently used in western curriculums, I intend to investigate if intersectionality is a productive tool in better influencing the selection of learning material. Further, this research questions if intersectionality is a useful lens of analysis when teaching and researching the scholars who comprise the “canon,” so as to recognize their value while also challenging the oppressive ideas to which they were committed. The “western canon” is used in this research noting its problematic implications of an east/west binary that is also a central issue in the decolonization of political theory."

VanGils, Ian

Project title: Western Brass Instrument Pedagogy Through Traditional Chinese Music

Department: Music

Faculty supervisor: Prof. Merrie Klazek

"I propose to compile traditional Chinese melodies and transcribe them into a trumpet method book. This project is an opportunity for me to deepen my understanding of brass (instrument) pedagogy, and combine that interest with my recent experience studying Mandarin in Taiwan, ultimately synthesizing a potentially enduring contribution to the trumpet community.

I will search for traditional melodies from different parts of China, and transcribe simple melodies which are well suited to serve as practical study material on the fundamentals of brass playing, similar to the Bel Canto pedagogy which brass players have adapted from Italian vocal tradition, in which purity of sound is emphasized. In accordance with Western Brass pedagogy, and with guidance from my supervisor, these melodies can then be expanded and developed into exercises which focus on many fundamental musical skills, such as transposition, rhythm and articulation.

In addition to the pedagogical benefits of this project, the musicological side will include research about the culture and traditions related to the chosen material. This may include the meanings of the titles, information about where the melodies originated, and possibly translations of stories, traditions or festival celebrations relating to the music. To my knowledge this anthology will be a unique contribution to the world of trumpet pedagogy and I look forward to the many ways in which this research will benefit my development as a musician and a scholar."

Wang, Zifei

Project title: Two Recipes for Japan: Tampopo and Udon

Department: Pacific & Asian Studies

Faculty supervisor: Dr. Timothy Iles

"This paper will bring two Japanese films centring on a postmodern critique of contemporary social and historical issues, primarily multiculturalism in an urban, globalised Japan. These two films are separated by roughly twenty years, and so present drastically different perspectives on their contexts. The paper will explore how the films use postmodern narrative techniques to present their critiques."

Wiebe, India

Project title: Instilling simulation pedagogy through the BSN Curriculum

Department: Nursing

Faculty supervisor: Dr. Maureen Ryan

"Developing a pedagogical pathway to instill simulation curriculum within Camosun College's and University of Victoria's Schools of Nursing (joint degree program)."

Wood, Flora

Project title: #YYJ EdChat Community: A Study of Community Conversations as Curriculum

Department: Educational Psychology & Leadership Studies

Faculty supervisor: Dr. Valerie Irvine

"This research project is a study of the YYJ EdChat community that was initiated in the spring of 2016. YYJ EdChat provides a platform for educators to collaborate and support each other both at monthly in-person meetings and online via monthly twitter chat. The website address for YYJ EdChat is http://yyjedchat.ca and twitter chat is http://yyjedchat.ca/twitter-chat/. The research will be done through content analysis, surveys and interviews."

Wooding, Jennifer

Project title: Equity Orientated Pain Management

Department: Social Work

Faculty supervisor: Dr. Bruce Wallace

"Chronic pain management tools, support and advocacy are increasingly being provided online through web-based campaigns. If granted a Jamie Cassels Undergraduate Research Award my research will seek to explore the relevance of local, provincial and national web-based campaigns for chronic pain management for populations experiencing structural vulnerabilities. Specifically, I am interested in assessing and appropriateness of these campaigns and tools for people who live with chronic pain and intersecting oppressions such as colonialism, racism, homophobia, transphobia, poverty and housing vulnerabilities, substance use issues and ableism. A content analysis of leading local, provincial and national campaigns will be conducted based on a suite of indicators defining trauma informed, cultural safety, contextuality tailored and equity based approaches to health services. The findings from this analysis will highlight examples of accessible and appropriate supports, gaps, and recommendations for improving web-based services for people with chronic pain to be more equitable and accessible for people who are commonly marginalized and living with chronic pain."


Woodley, Baylee

Project title: The Visual and Generative Medieval Mind

Department: Art History & Visual Studies

Faculty supervisor: Dr. Catherine Harding and Dr. Evanthia Baboula

"Hugh of Saint Victor created The Mystic Ark as a pedagogical and meditational tool for his students, and it encourages a cognitively-generative cycle of visualization and meditation. I propose this cycle is one in which complex ideas, “such as the inexpressible nature of God,” are transferred between an invisible existence in the mind into visual thought. This cycle could provide continuous generation of new cognitive pathways. The Mystic Ark encourages this by gathering diverse concepts aiding in memory and understanding. Medieval memory is associated with creative thinking, and this cycle is an intriguing exemplum.

I propose to examine this cycle as the The Mystic Ark’s function using Abbot Suger’s Anagogical Window as a comparative, extant artwork. By comparing and contextualizing these works, this cycle can be understood as their activating function. Both programs streamline cognitively-generative art by providing organization and structure for students. This is applied today with adult colouring books promising mental clarity, and the generative possibilities of Buddhist mandalas. They are planned lines along which meditation is sustained, but specifically they are about generative memorization and the transmission and generation of complex ideas. They are vital educational tools developed by Hugh and Suger, and are still applicable as mental expansions productively engaging with concepts in defiance of passive representation."


Yoon-Potkins, Qwisun

Project title: Precarity and Aging: Emerging Challenges of Contemporary Late Life

Department: Interdisciplinary Studies, Social Justice Studies

Faculty supervisor: Dr. Karen Kobayashi

"My proposed research project focuses on precarity in the context of contemporary aging, specifically in regards to the effects of precarious experiences on the life course trajectories of older immigrants. The concept of precarity refers to the disadvantages experienced by certain populations as a result of inadequate social and economic supports. Disadvantages include experiences of injury, violence, and death; individuals who belong to marginalized, excluded, and disadvantaged populations, such as immigrants, are disproportionately exposed to these risks. To explore how precarity can influence and perpetuate inequality in the experiences of aging immigrants, I will conduct a systematic literature review of the research on aging, race, ethnicity, and immigration in multiple domains. The aim of this project is to identify the myriad types of vulnerability and disadvantage that can impact immigrants in later life, and to use this review as a foundation from which to make recommendations for future research, policy, and practice for this population. The need for studying precarity among older immigrants is timely as the Canadian population is both rapidly aging and becoming more ethno-culturally diverse. Since there is a paucity of research focusing on this particular social phenomenon, this project will make an important contribution to the literature on inequality as it is experienced by foreign-born older adults."

Student recipients 2015-2016


Adam Fitterer

Project title:

Department: Philosophy

Faculty supervisor: Dr. Colin Macleod

"I wish to study Christine Korsgaard's theory of practical identity, and her use of it to secure a rational foundation for moral obligations. I'm interested in comparing her notions to the moral foundation of the Thomist philosophers working in the Aristotelian tradition, as I suspect them to be similar.  Accordingly, I will investigate the advantages and disadvantages of each, as they generate very different moral philosophies."

Alanna Blackall

Project title:

Department: English

Faculty supervisor: Dr. Adrienne Williams Boyarin

"McPherson Library MS Eng.1, a late fifteenth-century copy of John Lydgate’s Fall of Princes, is one of few complete medieval manuscripts housed at UVic; it is our only Middle English manuscript. In 1978, Anthony Edwards assessed it in the journal Manuscripta and claimed, “the Victoria [Lydgate] manuscript is unlikely to be a text of great significance to students.” This project openly challenges Edward’s appraisal through study of the manuscript and its poem, with special focus on its marginalia. The Victoria Lydgate is a valuable resource, and its marginalia in particular opens multiple avenues of research on medieval and early modern readership and book ownership. Although the main text is Middle English, the marginalia is trilingual—Middle English, Latin, and French—and it consists of structural markings (e.g., section labels or titles not introduced by the original scribe), scribal notations and corrections, an early modern signature (“Wyllham Fermer”), and commentary on the text. There is ample marginalia to examine, and there is evidence that some has been washed (and may be recoverable under UV light). The main goal of this project is to transcribe and catalogue all of the marginalia; from there, research questions may grow or shrink based on evidence. Possibilities include: examination of the relationship of this manuscript to others (through available digitised copies), investigation of provenance and ownership, and study of reader interests and habits. This project will result in a record of all marginalia in MS Eng.1, for use by Special Collections and future students and researchers."

Alayna Payne

Project title:

Department: Nursing

Faculty supervisor: Dr. Debra Sheets

Technologies to Support Community-Dwelling Older Adults with Compromised Health and Independence
Community dwelling older adults with complex health conditions often experience a decline in independence and need support from family members (informal) or paid (formal) caregivers. In-home monitoring technologies offer great potential in reducing caregiver load. Effective caregiving support will arise from highly integrated systems that make intelligent decisions based on continuous, multidimensional data collection that captures variations in health, behavior, mobility and cognition. Modern computational methods can use the data to predict adverse events, detect unnoticed deterioration, and even intervene in the caregiver’s absence. The present study is unique in that it matches continuous sensor-based activity data from the home to gold standards of day-to-day functioning and cognitive function. We will gather sensor data in the homes of four at-risk clients. Patterns in the sensor data will be correlated with RAI-Homecare and independent measures of cognitive functioning and more immediate adverse events (e.g., delirium, falls, wondering). This study pilots a crucial step in the evolution of technology-driven caregiver support. It identifies algorithms that will be validated in the next study. Once validated, technology becomes a partner in caregiving.”


Alexander Hoffman

Project title:

Department: Psychology

Faculty supervisor: Dr. Scott Hofer

"I will be engaged in research activities associated with the Canadian Longitudinal Study on Aging (CLSA). The CLSA is a large, national, long-term study that will follow approximately 50,000 men and women between the ages of 45 and 85 for at least 20 years. The study will collect information on the changing biological, medical, psychological, social, lifestyle and economic aspects of people’s lives. I will assisting in a variety of research activities the Data Collection Site (DCS) at the Gorge Hospital where participants come to complete a comprehensive assessment that includes dexascan (i.e. bone density), EKG, echocardiogram, vision and hearing testing, cognitive testing, performance measures (e.g. gait, balance), etc. I will learn about clinical data collection for a national study involving older adults and I will focus on developing a specific research project that will inform my knowledge of geriatrics and prepare me for medical school."

Alexander Lam

Project title:

Department: Economics

Faculty supervisor: Dr. Elisabeth Gugl

"There is an emerging subfield in economics that considers how conceptions of social identity affect economic outcomes. The gender ratio of workers in different occupations may not only be determined by gender differences in education and work experience, but also by the degree to which an occupation conforms to (or defies) social gender norms and expectations. As such, the prevalence of male-dominated and female-dominated industries, such as engineering and nursing, respectively, may be explained by a theory of economics and identity. My plan is to use microeconomic theory to model how gender roles create and perpetuate gender-segregated labour markets. I also plan to analyze how social identities may change over time as a result of social forces or government policies, and how this may in turn affect gender segregation in labour markets."

Aliayta Foon-Dancoes

Project title:

Department: Music

Faculty supervisor: Prof. Ann Elliott-Goldschmid

"This year I will be tackling one of the most important and renowned pieces in the violin repertoire, Bach’s Ciaconna. A work for solo violin lasting fifteen minutes, it is  technically challenging with long and demanding chordal passages that require vast attention to detail, particularly voicing and left-hand gymnastics that have to be executed with utter precision.  As a result not only does the product have to be completely accurate – it is impossible to hide your mistakes, however minimal – but the performer alone has to also emotionally carry the audience, taking them on a journey that will remain fascinating throughout the length and intimacy of this solo work.

In order to achieve a high standard in its presentation, I propose a harmonic analysis of the Ciaconna as well as historical research regarding the era of its composition, with special focus on the performance practice of the time. This summer I participated in a two-week seminar with the renowned Baroque Orchestra, Tafelmusik. This gave me a platform from which to begin my research and achieve a historically informed rendition the Ciaconna. By March 9th I will be ready to present my research in a performance of a piece that has remained integral to the violin repertoire for four hundred years."


Alicia Williamson

Project title:

Department: Educational Psychology & Leadership Studies

Faculty supervisor: Dr. Valerie Irvine

"The project will carry out the implementation and evaluation of a robotics pilot in a k12 classroom, where learners will be able to choose how they want to join the class. I will help conduct the data collection through interviews during a limited term trial period. The goal is to determine the impact on quality of learning, class community, and attendance to learning. The results will be presented to the school community and via open access webinar. The writeup of results will be submitted for dissemination in the Canadian Journal of Learning and Technology and at research and professional conferences."

Alison Dennis

Project title: Alison Dennis

Department: English

Faculty supervisor: Dr. Erin Kelly

"Thomas Heywood (ca 1570-1641) may have been the most prolific of all early modern English playwrights; he claimed to have had “an entire hand or at least a maine finger in two hundred and twenty plays.” Only a few of these plays, however, are available in well-edited modern textbooks, much less regularly studied by undergraduate students. Even the few that do receive attention, however, such as A Woman Killed with Kindness, suggest that he was strongly interested in wide-ranging women’s experiences.

A first edition of Gynaikeion (1623), Heywood’s treatise on historical and mythic women from the classical period to the seventeenth century, is available in UVic’s Special Collections. By reading a selection of Thomas Heywood’s plays, as well as the obscure Gynaikeion in its entirety, I aim to answer the following questions: Which common or obscure themes link the different women in Heywood’s plays? What is in Gynaikeion that can deepen my insight into female characters in Heywood’s plays? And, finally, how are the ways women are portrayed in Heywood’s plays similar or different to other early modern plays?"


Alison Thomas

Project title:

Department: Earth & Ocean Sciences

Faculty supervisor: Dr. Vera Pospelova

"Reconstructing sea surface salinity change in the western North Pacific over the last ~18,000 years, using Operculodinium centrocarpum process length variation
My research project tests a method of quantitatively reconstructing past sea-surface salinity change in the North Pacific, using dinoflagellate cyst process lengths from the sedimentary record. Dinoflagellates are a group of marine plankton that produces resting stages or cysts. I will complete biometric measurements of cysts Protoceratium reticulatum (Operculodinium centrocarpum sensu Wall & Dale 1966) from a sediment core representing paleoceanographic change over the last 40 ka in the northern Japan Sea. Mertens et al. (2012) have shown that the average process length variation of Operculodinium centrocarpum can be related to seawater density or salinity. This work will use the proposed method for paleoenvironmental reconstruction and it has potential to reconstruct oceanographic conditions and document its variability well beyond the existing instrumental records at a sub-millennial scale resolution."


Alyssa Foote

Project title:

Department: Health Information Science

Faculty supervisor: Dr. Elizabeth Borycki

"People today are being encouraged to take their health into their own hands. Many people also like the convenience and ease of mobile applications. Thus I would like to investigate how mobileapplications can be used to help promote patient self-care along with the software features and functions required for a successful patient use and health system implementation, including full user acceptance, and how to integrate mobile applications with an existing EHR system."

Angela Harris and Lisa Harris

Project title:

Department: Interdisciplinary Studies

Faculty supervisor: Dr. Margo Matwychuk

"Recent research suggests that queer individuals are at increased risk for depression, anxiety, self-harm, suicide, substance abuse, and other serious mental health issues. Moreover, several studies indicate that queer people face unique barriers to accessing mental health services and receiving appropriate care for their mental health. The University of Victoria has recently affirmed its commitment to supporting student mental health by implementing the UVic Mental Health Strategy. A study on the accessibility and inclusivity of on-campus counselling services for queer students could potentially contribute to this larger project, especially in relation to its stated goals of eliminating barriers and building more inclusive campus services. In our study, we will conduct semi-structured interviews with queer students about the ideas they may have to make on-campus counselling services more accessible and inclusive. We will also interview counsellors at UVic Counselling Services to determine what policies and practices currently exist to promote a safe and inclusive environment for queer clients. The results of our study could potentially inform future counselling practices at UVic Counselling Services."


Angela Wignall

Project title:

Department: Nursing

Faculty supervisor: Dr. Lenora Marcellus

"I will be working with Dr. Marcellus on analyzing qualitative data generated through a CIHR funded project based on women’s experiences of accessing services and support in Victoria within the context of substance use during pregnancy. The data has already been collected. I will be working with the research team to conduct analysis and develop a manuscript for publication. I will also be involved in developing innovative community based knowledge translation strateiges. I will be preparing and giving a presentation with the team at CAR BC based on our findings."

Ariel Merriam

Project title:

Department: History

Faculty supervisor: Dr. Jordan Stanger-Ross

How did Japanese Canadians challenge their dispossession during World War II?: Inside the case files of the Custodian of Enemy Property
Following the attack on Pearl Harbour on 7 December 1941, the Canadian government began enacting “security measures” against Japanese Canadians living on the west coast of British Columbia. These included the immediate seizure of more than 1000 fishing boats owned by Japanese Canadians and the internment of male Japanese nationals. Japanese Canadians of all ages and origins were quickly classified as “enemy aliens” under the War Measures Act and, beginning in February 1942, 23000 were forced to leave their coastal homes and communities for internment camps in BC’s interior or for destinations east of the Rocky Mountains. During this displacement, Japanese-Canadian property, possessions, and finances were placed under the control of the Custodian of Enemy Property, which mediated access to property and held the power to dispose of it without consent.

The records of the Vancouver Office of the Custodian of Enemy Property offer insight into the experiences and mechanisms of this displacement and dispossession. Each case file contains correspondences between the Custodian and Japanese Canadians, mainly concerning access to finances and the status and sale of property and possessions. These records provide detailed narratives of family and economic life that can inform us on where displaced Japanese Canadians went and what was important to them. Most importantly, they reveal a dialogue between Japanese Canadians and the government that can deepen our understanding of how power functions. The dynamics of these correspondences were diverse, affected by factors of gender, class, time, and space, and they unfolded according to certain rules of argument that could enable Japanese Canadians to strategically gain access to possessions and freedoms by appealing to the practical, economic, and moral sensibilities of the Custodian. Analysis of these records can lend us a better understanding of how power operates and allow us to consider Japanese Canadians not simply as victims of oppression, but as agents of their own lives.”


Arnoldus van Roessel

Project title:

Department: Greek & Roman Studies

Faculty supervisor: Dr. Cedric Littlewood

"I intend to investigate the context of a series of metamorphoses in Ovid's Metamorphoses.  I am interested in how Ovid's Metamorphoses engages with the canonical epics of the Greek author Homer and the Latin author Virgil, in addition to Ovid's interaction with other poetic genres. I will focus on Metamorphoses 12, in which Ovid employs numerous Iliadic references to explore the concept of change within a literary tradition."

Aviva Lessard

Project title:

Department: Anthropology

Faculty supervisor: Prof. Brian Thom

"By drawing on the principles of ethnographic mapping, I want to produce a high-quality cyber map that re-enacts the events of the Oka Crisis and provides the Mohawk historical and political context. I have developed a preliminary digital map in Google Earth portraying the crisis in Quebec. This map marks the important locations during the events such as the blockades, contested areas and solidarity protests in the rest of Canada, as well as the historical borders and land allotments of the Mohawk people. The Google Earth medium challenges traditional cartography in the sense that viewers of the map are navigating themselves and interacting with information. I seek to further this research by enriching the map with video, photos and interview data, improve the layout and experiment with different mapping tools such as tourbuilder. I want to post it online on a website as an interactive educational tool geared toward enhancing high school curriculum. This digital map can offer Indigenous perspectives on a major historical event in Canada. Much of Indigenous knowledge and experiences are silenced in our current education system and teachers often do not have the resources to supplement the current curriculum. I will also conduct a scholarly review of historical cartography projects. Cyber cartography combined with ethnographic knowledge is an emerging approach to revealing Indigenous histories and contemporary issues. I will examine similar projects and begin to unravel some of the opportunities and ideological problems that go along with cartography."

Beatrice Toner

Project title:

Department: Women's Studies

Faculty supervisor: Dr. Annalee Lepp

"My research aims to reveal the shortcomings of our current elementary education system in regards to involving non-Indigenous children in learning about colonial violence in the context of historical and ongoing settler colonialism. These gaps in curriculum contribute to the maintenance of a white supremacist education system and allows children to be socialized without understanding their role in ongoing colonialism. My goal is to uncover how such violence histories can be taught in culturally safe ways, using Indigenous knowledge systems and ways of knowing as basis for this. I intend to design a series of workshops aimed at early elementary grades that could serve as a starting point for opening the conversation with children about land, language, residential schools, institutionalized violence, and colonialism. "

Ben Hawker

Project title:

Department: Computer Science

Faculty supervisor: Dr. Margaret-Anne Storey

"Working with Margaret-Anne Story and the CHISEL Group we are building innovative tools for the visual analysis of big data. I hope to help analysts make sense of large data sets by helping them identify the key concepts and structures expanding their knowledge from the bottom up. The tools will be centered around three domains.

  • Cyber Forensics — including network analysis and malware analysis.
  • Social Media — including data from Twitter and Reddit over time as well as geographic data.
  • Assembly Code — including malware disassembly and identification.

The tools developed will aim to support discovery, documentation, backtracking and collaboration over these data sets. In particular, these tools will attempt to bridge the gap between the machine and the analyst — allowing the machine to leverage its computational power and the analyst to leverage their decisional and intuitive powers. Another goal for the tools will be to assist the analyst in identifying starting points for their bottom up investigation, previously a pain point for large data sets."


Braden Siempelkamp

Project title:

Department: Biochemistry & Microbiology

Faculty supervisor: Dr. John Burke

"My research project will aim to characterise the molecular mechanism by which a number of novel mutations in the enzyme phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K) mediate primary immune disorders in patients. The goal of this project is to 1) clone these mutations into suitable expression vectors, 2) express and purify each of the different mutant enzymes, 3) characterise the lipid kinase and lipid binding of the mutants compared to the wild-type enzyme, and 4) analyse the structural determinants of how these mutations mediate function through a detailed structural study using hydrogen-deuterium exchange mass spectrometry."

Brendan Smithwick

Project title:

Department: Earth & Ocean Sciences

Faculty supervisor: Prof. Lucinda Leonard

"For my Honours research project, I will focus on the deployment of instrumentation for the assessment of submarine slope stability in the Kitimat Arm Fjord, British Columbia. The project is an extension of research that I began during a Co-op work term with the Geological Survey of Canada at the Pacific Geoscience Centre, and it will contribute to a larger-scale geohazard assessment of waterways in northern British Columbia.

The Kitimat Arm Fjord is vulnerable to submarine slope failures that may cause tsunamis. In 1974 and 1975 dock facilities at Kitimat were impacted by significant tsunamis generated by submarine slope failures. Future failures remain a concern, especially given the extensive development at the head of the fjord.

Submarine slope stability is strongly affected by marine sediment pore pressure. If the pore pressure is greater than the hydrostatic pressure the slope may be unstable. Groundwater leaching into the slope can cause heightened pore pressure. Monitoring of slopes affected by groundwater leaching will provide critical data on conditions leading to slope failure.

My objective is to analyze available data, including multibeam sonar, seismic reflection data, and marine sediment cores, to determine ideal locations for the deployment of instruments in submarine slopes of the Kitimat Arm Fjord. Locations of possible groundwater leaching will be identified and targeted for deployment of piezometers, which will provide measurements of marine sediment pore pressure for submarine slope stability assessment. The project will also involve instrument testing to determine optimum deployment strategies."


Brett Koenig

Project title:

Department: Sociology

Faculty supervisor: Dr. André Smith

"The research that I am proposing is to look at the local street-involved population’s interaction with Victoria’s healthcare system. Essentially, it will seek to better understand the reasoning behind why or why not this population seeks services from the healthcare system in the city. The research will also look into which services are being accessed and in what capacity. For instance, it will look into hospital use, clinic use, and alternative service use. Potential areas to explore will be services that are accessed, such as sexual health testing or counselling; perceived treatment during these healthcare interactions; and reasons for accessing certain services instead of others. The research will be carried out with the intention of gaining insight into other identity categories, such as age, race, and sexual orientation, in hopes of better understanding the intersections between street-involvement and other social barriers as they relate to healthcare access. By understanding this marginalized population’s interaction with the healthcare system, the research will gain better insight into the barriers to accessing healthcare that certain populations face."

Brianna Crighton

Project title:

Department: Exercise Science, Physical & Health Education

Faculty supervisor: Dr. Sandra Hundza and Dr. Marc Klimstra

"Predictive validity of gait parameters and gait initiation for prospectively identifying fall risk in older adults.

Gait has been investigated in order to assess whether it can be useful as a way of predicting healthy older adults at risk of falling, however, there is little information with regards to this and gait initiation. The objective of this study will be to investigate the differences in gait parameters and initiation in healthy older adults with no history of falling, and healthy older adults with history of falling, and to investigate if these characteristics can be used to make predictions about future falls in older adults.  Participants will be 25 healthy older adults (aged 70+) with no history of falling, and healthy older adults (70+) who have fallen at least once in the last year. A history will be taken of the participants to track any fall incidences in the past and the participants will track any falls that may occur in the future for a period of one year. Outcomes measures will be CoM, CoP, step variability, and velocity. Data gathering procedures will be done with two force plates and gaitRite mat. Participants will perform gait initiation on the force plates 10 times and on the gaitRite 20 times, both cognitively loaded and unloaded. This study aims to identify whether gait can be used as a prospective fall intervention method, allowing for early prevention and thereby reducing the expenses and increasing the quality of life of at risk adults."


Cameron Dallas

Project title:

Department: Mechanical Engineering

Faculty supervisor: Dr. Curran Crawford

"The purpose of the research project is to design and optimize the mechanical and controls systems of an experimental small wind turbine. Wind power is an integral part of the quickly expanding renewable energy industry and small wind turbines can be used to provide power to residential areas, cabins, off grid developments or large ships. Preliminary testing has confirmed that the essential systems of the wind turbine are operational. The next step is to design and integrate a yaw drive controller to continuously track the wind direction and adjust the turbine accordingly to maximize efficiency and power harnessed from the wind.

The preliminary results revealed that there may be laminar separation bubbles forming along the airfoils, negatively affecting the lift coefficient. Methods to avert this, such as tripping the flow at the leading edge of the airfoils, will be investigated. This is projected to dramatically improve performance.

Once the yaw controller is installed and the separation bubbles are mitigated, steady state tests will be conducted to study the turbine under known conditions. Once the data from the initial tests is analyzed, the turbine will be stationed in normal environmental conditions where data will be collected to determine how the turbine functions in routine operating conditions."                     


Cameron Fish

Project title:

Department: History

Faculty supervisor: Professor Brian McKercher

“My project will consist of an analysis of the United States’ diplomatic posture in East Asia from the end of the Roosevelt presidency into the Cold War era. It will focus especially on how Roosevelt’s designs for the former colonies of France and Britain were altered after his death and the emergence of the Cold War. In my research, I intend to examine the course of the relationship between the United States and the Soviet Union in order to identify whether cooperation rather than conflict could have been the norm in the immediate post-colonial space of East Asia. Emphasis will be placed on the personal relationships between Roosevelt, Stalin, Churchill and later Truman as well as the views of the State Department and American Intelligence. The source material for this project will consist mainly of internal documents, mostly from the State Department concerning the Yalta and Potsdam Conferences. While the American point of view will be the primary focus, Russian, British and French perspectives will also be treated to varying degrees using a similar methodology.”

Chloe Lampman

Project title:

Department: Mathematics & Statistics

Faculty supervisor: Dr. Gary MacGillivray

"We will study a discrete-time dynamic graph domination problem where the goal is to maintain a dominating set, Dt, subject to the condition that, at each time t = 1, 2, …, a specified vertex not in Dt is replaced by one of its neighbours in Dt.  The goal is to investigate structural properties of edge-critical graphs. A graph G is edge-critical when adding an edge joining any pair of non-adjacent vertices of G decreases the number of vertices needed in a dynamic dominating set.  The project has four main phases.

Phase 1:  (1 month) Review existing results on domination critical graphs beginning with the original paper by Sumner and Blitch from 1983, the forthcoming survey paper by Fujita, Furuya and MacGillivray, and finally the recently submitted manuscript on structural properties of dynamic domination vertex-critical graphs by Klostermeyer and MacGillivray.

Phase 2:  (1.5 months) Search for constructions and examples of dynamic-domination edge-critical graphs, bounds on the number of vertices required in the dynamic dominating set, and a characterization of the graphs where the number of required vertices is small. The starting point will be the results of a similar flavour as those reviewed in phase one.

Phase 3:  (1.5 months) Investigate which of the structural properties of domination critical graphs (such as Hamiltonicity) may also be properties of dynamic domination edge-critical graphs.

Phase 4:  (1 month) Prepare a poster for the research fair and a manuscript detailing the research done."


Christie Lombardi

Project title:

Department: Chemistry

Faculty supervisor: Dr. Cornelia Bohne

"Kinetic studies of the binding dynamics of guests with cucurbit[n]urils have indicated that they are versatile macrocycles for a wide range of applications including drug delivery and supramolecular catalysis.  These and other applications rely on an understanding of host-guest equilibrium constants and binding mechanisms.  My proposed research project is to use fluorescence and stopped-flow experiments to determine the binding constants and mechanism of calcium cations with cucurbit[7]uril and compare the results with what has previously been determined for sodium cations.  It is hoped that a direct comparison of binding dynamics of these cations with cucurbit[7]uril will provide valuable insight into the utility of this macrocycle for practical applications that rely on exploitation of the kinetics of a supramolecular host-guest system to achieve a specific function."

Christina Price

Project title:

Department: Environmental Studies

Faculty supervisor: Dr. Jessica Demspey

"This project will focus on investigating the sources of funding for private land trusts in Canada. This would include researching how corporate donor identity and levels of support have changed over the past few decades, and deciphering whether organizations are receiving more or less corporate funding and from which different types of businesses. This will be done by delving into publicly available donor information and sifting through the annual reports of as many of the top private land trust organizations in Canada as solid information can be found for. This research will contribute to research being done by Jessica Dempsey and her grad student Karen Kalynka into non-state or private conservation efforts in Canada. This is an understudied yet important area of research into private conservation and the economic incentives for conservation. By discovering from whom land trusts are receiving funding, and if trends are visible over time, we can better understand how land trusts are able to fund land management for conservation and know more about the incentives for corporations to partner with and support land trust organizations."

Colin Scarffe

Project title:

Department: Economics

Faculty supervisor: Dr. Chris Auld

"It has been well documented that there is positive correlation between an individual’s level of education and voter participation. However, what has not been well documented is the relationship between education and voter tendencies. In other words, as education level increases, how do political preferences change? I plan to empirically investigate the effect of education on political ideology.  Exploiting large disaggregated survey data on individual education, political preferences, and demographics, I will develop and estimate multivariate statistical models which reveal the effect of education on voting patterns."

Daniel Hudson

Project title:

Department: Mathematics & Statistics

Faculty supervisor: Dr. Heath Emerson

"I will be conduction research into equivariant K-theory modules. The goal of the project is to construct interesting examples of spaces equipped with an action the higher-dimensional compact torus T. Such a ‘T-space’ has an associated T-equivariant K-theory module associated to it. I aim to understand how to classify such modules and to apply the classification to the geometric examples. Secondly, I aim to build on this background work to construct examples of T-spaces in which one has a natural T-equivariant symmetry. Such a symmetry has an invariant associated to it, which can be interpreted in two ways by the work of the supervisor Emerson (and co-authors). One interpretation is geometric, and involves the fixed-point manifold of the symmetry. The other is global and homological in nature, and involves the module trace of the module map on T-equivariant K-theory induced by the symmetry. The equality of the two description is an equivariant version of the Lefschetz fixed-point formula, which is already a published result. But there lack examples of situations where it applies. My goal is therefore to construct such examples."

Daniele Goulet

Project title:

Department: Child & Youth Care

Faculty supervisor: Prof. Jin-Sun Yoon

"Based upon the findings from my department’s JCURA research project last year, my research focus will be on transfer students (new students coming on campus with diplomas from other institutions) and why they do not feel a sense of belonging at the School of Child and Youth Care (SCYC). Upon data collection and analysis, I will provide recommendations for the Child and Youth Care Students’ Society and SCYC on ways to improve the transfer students' sense of belonging. My data collection methodology will be to facilitate a focus group of eligible transfer students using semi-structured group interview process. I will be working collaboratively with another JCURA student who will focus her study on another identified group of students who have indicated that they do not feel a strong sense of belonging. Together, we will work collaboratively with our supervisor but have our individual research pursuits with our specified target population."

Danielle Bruce

Project title:

Department: Public Health & Social Policy

Faculty supervisor: Dr. Catherine Worthington

"The JCURA student will be responsible for several tasks related to an ongoing research study entitled “Western Canada HIV Supported Housing Study: Outcome Measures Development”. This study is developing a standardized outcomes measurement tool to be used by supportive housing programs for people living with HIV/AIDS (Dr. Peter AIDS Foundation and McLaren Housing Society in Vancouver, BC; SHARP Foundation in Calgary, AB; and Sanctum Housing in Saskatoon, SK).

The student will support and review qualitative coding of service user interviews regarding their experiences in supported housing programs. This will allow the student to become familiar with the study, the prevailing issues in each agency, and to gain skills in qualitative data analysis.

In partnership with the research team, the student will incorporate results from the service user interviews into program logic models that each agency is developing for its programs.

The student will be responsible for creating a standardized logic model format or infographic to be used for each of the four agencies involved in the project. Standardizing logic models will allow the research team to draw conclusions about a final outcomes measurement tool."


Devon Chan

Project title:

Department: Exercise Science, Physical & Health Education

Faculty supervisor: Dr. Sandra Hundza and Dr. Marc Klimstra

"Older adults over the age of 65 risk experiencing one or more falls each year, in which 1 out of 10 falls results in serious injury (Tinetti, 2003). Subsequently, serious injuries following a fall can lead to long-term consequences such as impaired mobility and balance. In order to reduce fall risk through intervention strategies, a clinician requires a method of identifying older adults at risk of falling before the event occurs.  Many clinical balance and mobility measurment tools are available to distinguish “fallers” from “non-fallers”. The prospective predictive sensitivity and specificity of a selection of tools has been tested (Scott 2004)  however, the potential of a composite tool combining predictive power of multiple tools has yet to be explored and the battery of tools to be included requires expansion.  To that end, the purpose of this research project is to distinguish which balance and mobility clincal test or combination of tests best prospectively identifies fallers and non-fallers. This research project will include The Short Physical Performance Battery, Fuller Advanced Balance Scale, Berg Balance Scale, Clinical Test of Sensory Organization and Balance, and the Community Balance and Mobility Scale 5-Step, 30 Seconds Sit-to-Stand, Timed “Up and Go”, peak expiratory flow, hand grip strength, ankle range of motion, knee proprioception, and visual acuity using scores collected over a 1 year period. As part of a larger project that includes gait parameters and cognitive testing, this project will contribute towards the goal of determining the best composite measures of fall risk."

Devon McKinnon

Project title:

Department: Germanic & Slavic Studies

Faculty supervisor: Dr. Serhy Yekelchyk

"Remembering the Gulag: Memory and Amnesia in Post-Communist Russia

I propose to research how the system of Soviet labor camps for political prisoners, known as the Gulag, and their victims have been remembered in Russia after the fall of communism. I am going to trace the changes in the official politics of memory from condemnation of the Gulag and commemoration of its prisoners in the early years of the Yeltsin presidency to Putin’s identification with the Soviet repressive apparatus. I am also going to study society’s response to the marginalization of Stalinist terror and eventual silencing of those insisting on their right to remember, in particular the Memorial Society. I was originally attracted to this topic by news reports about the recent controversy in Russia surrounding the Perm-36 museum, a preserved Gulag site, which the present-day Russian authorities want to redefine as a museum of labor productivity in support of the Soviet war effort. I believe the memory of the Gulag to be a compelling area of study, as it remains a source of the political divide inside Russia, pitting admirers of Stalin as a strong leader against those who want the atrocities committed under his leadership to be acknowledged and remembered. The state’s position in these debates is reflective of the current political system and state of democracy in Russia. I intend to consult published studies by historians and sociologists and to comb through news reports about memorial practices in contemporary Russia."


Eleni Gibson

Project title:

Department: Geography

Faculty supervisor: Dr. Cam Owens

"I am applying for a JCURA scholarship to assist in a project I will undertake through a Directed Studies course under the supervision of Dr. Cam Owens. This project will consist of assisting Dr. Owens in conducting preliminary research for a book we will be writing highlighting sustainability initiatives in the Cascadia region. The project involves three major deliverables. First, I will compile a detailed literature review of other sources that, similar to our proposal, document sustainability efforts in particular regions. The specific purpose of this critical review is to inform us on best practices, useful and effective frameworks, layouts, and structures for our own book. As a second deliverable, using this preliminary research, as well as my own creative thinking and observations drawn from various media outlets (books on popular science/social issues, social media, blogs, magazines, news, etc), I will draft a document that details innovative visual formatting and interactive features to inspire the design of our book. Finally, I will conduct an initial literature review of both academic and non-academic sources to synthesize relevant material about sustainability efforts in the region. The research project will lay the foundations for Dr. Owens' book and will allow me to begin to explore the world of publishing and effective communication, as well as delve deeper into sustainability in Cascadia."

Elizabeth Gerow

Project title:

Department: Music

Faculty supervisor: Dr. Harald Krebs

"The German composer Josephine Lang (1815-80) wrote over 300 songs, only about half of which were published.  I am proposing to select two or three of her songs that have never appeared in print or been performed publicly, and to prepare an edition of them and perform them. Preparing an edition involves deciphering all existing sketches and drafts of a song (both its music and its German text), determining the latest version, and creating a readable copy using computer software. Dr. Harald Krebs, who has written a book on the composer (Oxford, 2007), has copies of all of Lang’s song manuscripts, and will guide me in making my selection and in the editorial process. Prof. Susan Young, my voice instructor, will supervise the preparation of the performance. During the editing process, I will learn to read the 19th-century script in which the poetic text is written; to make editorial decisions in ambiguous situations, based on my knowledge of music theory; and to use Sibelius notation software. I will also learn about Lang’s life, musical style, and personality (immersion in a composer’s manuscripts provides many insights into the latter!). I shall prepare a short talk about the songs, including some background about the composer, the music, and the poetry, but focusing mainly on the challenges of the editing process. I shall present the talk, and shall perform the songs at the Research Fair on March 9, 2016."

Ellery Rose Lamm

Project title:

Department: Writing

Faculty supervisor: Prof. Maureen Bradley

"Last semester I worked with Maureen Bradley in Writing 320 to make a claymation film, which has been selected to screen at the Montreal World Film Festival in late August. This film combined clay animation along with a audio recording of a story told by my grandmother. I would love the opportunity to continue my passion for storytelling and film, combining audio interviews and visual medium to create three short films over the course of the next two semesters. I will combine people's stories with visuals in various mediums such as stop-motion, live-action and computer animation. This project will allow me to experiment and build on my animation skills and create short films to add to my professional portfolio."

Emily Agopsowicz

Project title:

Department: Curriculum & Instruction

Faculty supervisor: Dr. Kathy Sanford

"I would like to explore the effect of storytelling pedagogy on building classroom community, particularly amongst ELL students in a public school classroom setting. I intend to create a storytelling unit focusing on personal storytelling during my 10 week teaching practicum and investigate whether the unit had a positive impact on the social and emotional connections between students. Through my previous research I have found that personal storytelling can be a valuable learning tool for adolescents, not only because it  provides a context to practice speaking and listening skills, but also helps to create trust and empathy between teachers and students alike. Personal storytelling by virtue of its highly personal and social nature supports the 21st century framework for learning and this will be at the centre of my research.My research project will consist of the following: I will build upon a literature review to see what relevant research has already been done in the area. I will consult with the Storytelling Guild of Victoria and participate in a storytelling workshop to learn strategies for storytelling. I will implement a storytelling unit during my upcoming practicum. Throughout my research I will keep a reflective journal in order to document my progress."

Emma De Vynck

Project title:

Department: Social Work

Faculty supervisor: Dr. Patricia MacKenzie

"If my application is successful, I hope to explore the student experience of navigating religion and/or spirituality while at university. I think that spiritual life is an oft-neglected piece at university, and I hope to draw more attention to this vital component of wellbeing and stimulate dialogue. I believe that this topic could speak meaningfully to many students of various religious and spiritual journeys.

I am involved with MultiFaith Services in the creation of a survey for students. This survey will aim to find ways to improve their services for students. I have been given permission to consider the results of the survey in my own research explorations. I would like to embark on a study of existing literature on the topic of university and religious and spiritual life, and incorporate what I have learnt through my work with MultiFaith services into a comprehensive report/presentation. I hope to have student voices woven throughout my project. If possible, I would like to create an informal platform—such as an anonymous blog—for students to share their stories regarding this topic. I think this platform could serve as a meaningful site of qualitative research, and ultimately, social support for students."


Eric Henwood-Greer

Project title:

Department: English

Faculty supervisor: Dr. Mary Elizabeth Leighton

"In July 1889, London police discovered a male brothel operating in Cleveland Street, frequented by aristocrats and employing Post Office telegraph boys.  The scandal erupted in the newly-prevalent tabloid press where it was popularized by teclmiques of "new journalism."  My JCURA research project will analyze contemporary press coverage of the "Cleveland Street Scandal," as it came to be known, which marks a turning point in Victorian culture because it made public the "vice" of male homosexuality for the first time.  Newspapers-notably The Illustrated Police News­ delighted in covering the case and subsequent trials in a similar manner to their earlier coverage of gruesome crimes such as the Whitechapel ("Jack-the-Ripper") murders.

The primary focus of my JCURA project will be how newspaper coverage differed depending on the paper's  intended readership-from the lurid Police News with its condenmation of the aristocrats, interviews with the prostitutes and detailed illustrations, to the Times' conservative coverage, including a bias against the prostitutes' testimonies. I will also investigate how this case constructed British public awareness of homosexuality, leading to Oscar Wilde's famous 1895 conviction for gross indecency and indeed future persecutions, including that of Alan Turing.  My research will include primary newspaper evidence, as well as general secondary material on Victorian sexuality. I will establish the importance of the tabloid press coverage of the "Cleveland Street Scandal," not only for how it informed the Victorian public's view of homosexuality but also for how it continues to resonate-a resonance only briefly touched upon in previous research."


Eric Holdijk

Project title:

Department: History

Faculty supervisor: Dr. Kristin Semmens

"Playing with the Past: Video Games, The Great War and Popular Memory

Game studies – an interdisciplinary approach to examining electronic and physical games – is a growth industry in the academic world. Historians, while initially slow to examine this new media, are realizing the potential of games as texts to be analyzed, pedagogical tools and forums for the generation of historical meaning. The study of games and how they represent and play with the past is the basis for a new subdiscpline of public history: historical game studies. The chief question of this field is how do games convey meaning? A consensus on the answer has yet to be reached and this thesis will position itself within this evolving discussion.

As Robert Rosenstone argued for historical film in 1988, historians cannot simply use the same methods and standards for games as they would in the analysis of a historical monograph. Using video games which represent the Great War (1914 – 1918), my thesis will argue that while historians can and should analyze games in terms of their visual and textual representations of history, the most important aspect is a game's procedural rhetoric – i.e. how a game makes arguments about (past) reality through the rules that it imposes on players.

While my thesis will consider the entire corpus of the Great War's video game historiography, it will focus its analysis on three games in particular: Valiant Hearts, Verdun and Commander: The Great War. Each of these games will be analyzed for its portrayal of a certain aspect of the Great War: Valiant Hearts for its use of artifacts to tell stories, Verdun for its simulation of trench warfare through game levels and Commander: The Great War for its emphasis on the grand strategy in the war."


Evan Wilde

Project title:

Department: Computer Science

Faculty supervisor: Dr. Daniel German

"With an average of over 900 top-level merges into the Linux kernel per release, maintenance of older versions of the kernel becomes nearly impossible. Maintainers must be able to understand how changes to the current vision of the kernel fit into older versions of the kernel. This presents the need for a tool to provide meaningful explanation of what is happening in the Kernel. Our goal is to design a web-based system capable of visualizing the commit and release information of the Linux kernel in a meaningful way."

Evelyn Feldman

Project title:

Department: Greek & Roman Studies

Faculty supervisor: Dr. Mark Nugent

"To research and write a thesis on ancient Roman libraries, to examine the Roman library and the ways Romans interacted with books for both education and leisure."

H. Claire le Nobel

Project title:

Department: Music

Faculty supervisor: Dr. Andrew Schloss and Prof. Paul Walde

"This research award will provide me with the opportunity to explore the creative applications of new technology in a cross-disciplinary practice, combining visual art and music. I will be able to work with the physical media necessary for sculptural installation, as well as hardware and software that allow for interactive control in my work. My purpose as an interdisciplinary artist is to create a subjective experience for people to become conscious of their existence through the perception of sound-related phenomena. My work inspires an awareness of self, space, and moment, and those who experience my work become educated about our physical and perceptual relationships with sound.

By working between the disciplines of visual art and electronic and computer music, my practice is liberated from a singular, defined context. Instead, I am able to embrace the various creative and technical approaches that these disciplines offer, while speaking to different artistic traditions from a new perspective. Working with Dr. Schloss and Professor Walde on a research-based sound art project will be a successful and transformative learning experience."


Haggai Liu

Project title:

Department: Mathematics & Statistics

Faculty supervisor: Dr. Peter Dukes

"I will be working on a blend of combinatorial designs, geometry, graph theory and computing. A possible specific project is a series of tests of the Nash-Williams conjecture on triangle decompositions of dense graphs."

Heather Derocher

Project title:

Department: Biochemistry & Microbiology

Faculty supervisor: Dr. Brad Nelson

"Endometrial cancers are classified into four molecular subtypes: Polymerase Epsilon (POLE) mutants, microsatellite instability, copy number high, and copy number low. These subtypes have distinct genetic, molecular, and clinical characteristics. The immune response to cancer is emerging as a major determinant of prognosis in a wide range of human cancers. There are recent reports that the POLE mutant subtype of endometrial cancer engenders extraordinarily strong immune responses that may underlie the excellent prognosis associated with this subtype. However, we lack a comprehensive understanding of the immune cell subsets that mediate protective immunity to POLE tumors, and far the other molecular subtypes of endometrial cancer know less about the immune response. The goal of this project is to perform the most comprehensive analysis to date of tumor infiltrating lymphocyte patterns across the molecular and clinical subtypes of endometrial cancer using a 450 patient tissue microarray (TMA). We will perform multicolour immunohistochemistry (IHC) staining using panels of antibodies against standard immune markers, including CD8/CD3/CD20, CD4/CD25/FoxP3, CD79a/CD138, PD-L1/PD-1/CD3, CD303/CD1a/CD208, CD68/CD16a/CD56, IDO-1/PD-L1/CD8, MHC I, and MHCII. Slides will be scanned using a Vectra multispectral imagine system (Perkin Elmer), and TIL subsets will be enumerated using inform software (Perkin Elmer). The 450 cases have undergone molecular subtyping and there is clinical data available for the patients. The immunohistochemistry data will be compared to clinical data from patients to see how the immune system responds in these four molecular subtypes of endometrial cancer."

Heather Haukioja

Project title:

Department: Sociology

Faculty supervisor: Dr. Karen Kobayashi

"Through the use of a mixed methods approach (both qualitative and quantitative), this sociological research project seeks to examine the informal and formal healthcare sectors that are currently in place for older adults in North America. This project seeks to analyze the experiences (both positive and negative) that older adults and their family members have had with either or both the informal or formal healthcare sector. Furthermore, this project seeks to identify ways that will reform the current healthcare system in order to maximize the wellbeing and health of aging population."

Hilary Desmarais

Project title:

Department: Exercise Science, Physical & Health Education

Faculty supervisor: Dr. Viviene Temple

"The noted motor development researcher Jane E. Clark said in her 2007 Alliance Scholar Lecture that “Motor skills do not just come as birthday presents. They must be nurtured, promoted and practiced”. Although Clark’s conclusion might seem self-evident, very few studies have examined the development of gross motor skills prospectively during the elementary years. This longitudinal study will examine the development of locomotor skills and object control skills of a cohort of children from kindergarten to grade 4. Further, change in the motor proficiency of children ‘at risk’ of motor delay in kindergarten will be compared to the rest of the cohort."

Hollis Roberts

Project title:

Department: Visual Arts

Faculty supervisor: Prof. Megan Dickie

"My work explores themes of trust, consumerism, preconceived knowledge and family. It is meant to disrupt spaces that would otherwise seem mundane. I want to ask the viewer to reflect on their own notions of vulnerability, intimacy, and passive relationships with the objects that surround them. By removing the function of the objects, my work will prompt the viewer to have a dialogue with themselves about how to interact with the work and how it challenges their perceptions. I intend to focus my research on the connection between design and function. I am also inspired by discussion of objects and their relationship to the human body. I will analyze this through writings by theorists such as Jacques Derrida, Sarah Ahmed. With this research I will create a series of objects that will occupy a liminal space. The pieces will represent the familiar while simultaneously disrupting it. I will repurpose found objects and manipulate the form so that they resemble items found within the home but confuse the original form. This kind of disruption will evoke disorientation, and displacement, not only in the objects themselves but also in the viewer and how they occupy the space with these objects."

Ida Jorgenson

Project title:

Department: Environmental Studies

Faculty supervisor: Dr. James Rowe

"I will be undertaking a historical analysis of climate change denial. I am particularly interested in what appears to be a new form of denial – climate change denial 2.0 – that accepts the validity of climate science while willfully neglecting required action. This seemingly new form denies the reality of climate change in deed if not in word. I will be developing a research paper that historicizes climate change denial and then seeks to understand how it is shifting under current conditions when the scientific consensus on climate change is hardening. How are historical deniers responding to this hardened consensus?"

Irina Ridzuan

Project title:

Department: Art History & Visual Studies

Faculty supervisor: Dr. Evanthia Baboula

"Garden of Déduit: The Influence of Byzantine Gardens on the Roman de Ia Rose

The Roman de Ia Rose is a 13th century French poem, written by Guillaume de Lorris and later completed by Jean de Meun, about a young man's dream of a guarded garden and his conquest of a rose. The allegorical themes and literary devices employed by the poets have led scholars to attribute the renaissance of the Hellenistic romance genre in 12th century Byzantium as the source of literary inspiration. However, little attention has been paid to the accompanying illustrations of the manuscripts in regards to this thesis.

This research proposes to examine the poem's illustrated garden setting, the Garden of Déduit, in the light of Byzantine garden representations. Byzantine illustrations are related to the ambiguous perception of a garden as an Edenic space and an earthly pleasure place. I argue that French painters made use of that Byzantine-derived ambiguity as a thematic device that strengthens the poem's allegorical nature. I will locate this project within the relationship between France and Byzantium after the siege of Constantinople by the Crusaders in 1204. This was a catalytic event that brought Byzantine and earlier Greek traditions into the French arts and literature scene, and one  that is  becoming an area of academic focus.

This project aims to situate Byzantine aesthetics into the artistic and cultural changes in medieval art that later brought about the European Renaissance."


Jack Baker

Project title:

Department: Geography

Faculty supervisor: Dr. David Atkinson

"Assessing the state of icefields in the Rockies is an important component to predicting the trajectory of water resources into the future. Several major Canadian and US rivers rise in the Canadian Rockies, yet field measurements from the source icefields and glaciers are rare; particularly measurements that go through the winter accumulation season. Another important component that is missing from many analyses is the impact that day-to-day weather events have on icefields that feed the valley glaciers. It is evident that the frequency of unusual weather events is increasing; one major event has the potential to change the course of a melt or accumulation season. These need to be factored into the more traditional, seasonally averaged climatology-based assessments that relate glacier response to atmospheric drivers on the broad scale.

This project will make use of a new data set gathered at a weather station located in the Canadian Rockies on Columbia Icefield, operated by Prof. Atkinson, and relate it to day-to-day weather events using weather maps. Of interest is determining where moisture comes from, the frequency of summertime snow and melt events, and the relationship between high and low pressure systems with surface melting response. I expect to improve my use of spreadsheets and I am hoping to learn some more advanced programming, perhaps using R language."


Jack McCaskill

Project title:

Department: Political Science

Faculty supervisor: Dr. Amy Verdun

"The North American Free Trade Agreement (NAFTA) enables Canada, the United States (US) and Mexico to trade freely with one another. An investor-state dispute settlement facilitates differences. NAFTA Article 11 empowers foreign investors to challenge the regulatory measures. A growing concern is that NAFTA leads to non-state actors impeding Canada’s ability to pursue policy relating to labour and environmentalism. Using interviews and assessing court cases, I will research how NAFTA has affected Canada’s sovereignty. I will interview various stakeholders. My project supervisor, Amy Verdun, will teach me about doing interviews with officials."

Janina Esquivel

Project title:

Department: Nursing

Faculty supervisor: Dr. Karen MacKinnon

"The project I am proposing is to explore changing work relationships between RN’s and LPN’s using a systematic review research method known as the Joanna Briggs Institute (JBI) approach. The JBI is an internationally renowned leader in evidence-based health care that provides a systematic process for finding and appraising evidence; a process supported by training, tools, a peer-review process, and networking to inform best practices. This method was initiated to have a collaborative approach for evaluating evidence from a variety of sources. In this way, healthcare professionals could have access to the best international evidence and consequently improve patient outcomes globally. Overall, JBI is one of the top Internet resources that supports evidence-based nursing practice, allowing easy use and access to high quality resources.

Regarding student development, working with JBI would provide invaluable learning and a chance to expand my knowledge by exposure to strong relationships between academic, research, practice, and policy partners. Specifically, I will focus on how the research review approach supports evidence informed practice and how it contributes to knowledge translation. Additionally, I will learn about the process of developing and conducting a systematic review with the focus on intradisciplinary collaborative relationships. Furthermore, this project will enable me to participate and learn how to search for relevant and appropriate research studies through team collaboration. Finally, I will learn to facilitate the review process of research papers. Overall, this academic project would be an incredible opportunity for learning, where knowledge and skill in academic inquiry can be challenged."


Jeffery Simpson

Project title:

Department: Germanic & Slavic Studies

Faculty supervisor: Dr. Julia Rochtchina

"This research project will provide an in-depth examination of the pre-Christian deities of the Slavic people, both etymologically as well as textually, through surviving works of the period in both English and the vernacular tongue. Due to the relative scarcity of surviving sources, little is known about the deities of the pagan Slavs, and the amount of academic work on the topic, especially in English is very little. Despite this, there is an obvious desire to determine the origins and meanings of these gods as evidenced by the quickly-growing neo-pagan cult in not only Russia, but Canada as well, headed by such influential men as Lev Sylenko and Volodomyr Shaian, both of whom were Ukrainian residents of Ontario. So great is the need by modern historians and neo-paganists alike to discover their Slavic heritage, forgeries such as the infamous Book of Veles have been created in an attempt to forge a national identity, which up until the late 20th century, was still being used as material in Slavic high schools.

This project not only hopes to explore and reveal the mysteries associated with the topic, but also to add to the body of English scholarship, making it more accessible for future students and enthusiasts to better understand the religious views of the pre-Christian Slavic people."


Jeremy Thomsen

Project title:

Department: Greek & Roman Studies

Faculty supervisor: Dr. Laurel Bowman

"The Hymn to Demeter tells the story of the abduction and rape of Persephone by Hades, and Demeter's heart-wrenching search for, and ultimate reunion with, her lost daughter. The Eleusinian Mysteries are one of the oldest and perhaps most famous of the ancient Greek mystery religions. In my research, I intend to demonstrate how the Hymn to Demeter provides many valuable insights into the Eleusinian Mysteries, its core rites, and its understanding and expression of birth, love, sex, death, and the afterlife."

Jesse Bachmann

Project title:

Department: Germanic & Slavic Studies

Faculty supervisor: Dr. Matt Pollard

"Friedrich Nietzsche’s infamous reputation originates in the notion that his philosophy has often been deemed infectious and dangerous, particularly for youth. The role Nietzsche played as an inspiration for the 1924 Leopold and Loeb case, resulting in the “trial of the century” as well as his misappropriation by the Nazis are indicative of this widespread connection between his writing and criminality / immorality. A more recent example of the “danger” of Nietzsche’s philosophy can be found in Black Metal. Emerging in Norway in the early 90’s as an extreme, highly transgressive sub-genre of Heavy Metal, Black Metal exhibited a combination of violence, Satanism, Neo-Nazism, and Nietzschean influences. More specifically, as the basis for the scene’s extremity and transgressive nature, Black Metal expressed a loose ideology that echoed Nietzschean philosophy. The goal of this project will be to investigate the nature of the link between Nietzsche and Black metal with the intent of proposing a series of theses around which to build a presentation. Preliminary research angles will investigate topics such as: What attracted Black Metal musicians to Nietzsche’s thought? How strongly did Nietzsche’s philosophy influence both the outlook but also the music of Black Metal musicians? Can Nietzsche’s philosophy actually be identified as a causal factor behind the violent and transgressive elements of Black Metal - if at all? If or if not, the questions remain: how do we understand the relationship between Black Metal and Nietzsche?"

Jesse Spooner

Project title:

Department: Biochemistry & Microbiology

Faculty supervisor: Dr. Caroline Cameron

"My honour’s project will revolve around a new project being initiated in the Cameron laboratory, in collaboration with Dr. Marty Boulanger (UVic), Dr. Tara Moriarty (University of Toronto) and Dr. Chris Kenyon (University of Antwerp, Belgium).  The overall research project will investigate the role of the protein products encoded by a novel operon found within the T. pallidum genome, encompassing open reading frames Tp0480-Tp0484.

We hypothesize this operon encodes proteins involved in human extracellular matrix component “mimicking”, thus facilitating a novel mechanism of immune evasion.  This mechanism could explain, at least partially, why Treponema pallidum can remain latent, with no associated host response, for up to 50 years following initial infection. 

My honours project will encompass three goals:

  1. In collaboration with Dr. Boulanger, design primers to amplify regions of the ORFs that have the highest chance for successfully producing soluble protein upon heterologous expression.
  2. Clone these PCR fragments into appropriate expression vectors, and express and purify the corresponding recombinant proteins.
  3. In collaboration with Dr. Moriarty, design primers to amplify the full length ORFs for heterologous expression in a non-infectious strain of the spirochete Borrelia burgdorferi.  These constructs will then be used in Dr. Moriarty’s artificial bloodstream model and for intravital microscopy within a living mouse, to determine the gain-of-function conferred by heterologous expression of these treponemal proteins within the non-infectious spirochete.

These investigations are expected to uncover a completely novel and highly exciting mechanism of successful host evasion."


Joseph Takeda

Project title:

Department: English

Faculty supervisor: Dr. Nicole Shukin

"“Unless the stone bursts with telling,” explains the narrator of Joy Kogawa’s Obasan, “there is in my life no living word.” Kogawa's appraisal of the silencing force of Japanese-Canadian internment on both bodies and the environment echoes contemporary political scholar Glen Coulthard's theory of “grounded normativity.” As decolonial praxis, “grounded normativity” refers to the “modalities of Indigenous land-connected practices” that reflect the land as a “system of reciprocal relations and obligations” (Red Skin, White Masks, 13). Political wrongs, for Kogawa and Coulthard, affect not only human actors but also the environmental objects that inhabit the land. While new materialist thought and long-standing Indigenous epistemologies discuss the ethical and ontological relationships between humans and land, contemporary diasporic criticism tends to deconstruct concepts of land. Notions of a “homeland,” for diasporic scholars, are often discussed as discursive productions of the West which fail to address complex questions of belonging.

Marie Clements’ play Burning Vision sets the stage for a critical encounter between diasporic, ecological, and Indigenous thought. Set during World War II uranium mining on Sahtu Dene lands, Burning Vision questions the entanglements of colonialism, capitalism, diaspora, ecological crisis, and political apology. Informed by scholars such as Larissa Lai, Leanne Simpson, and Jane Bennett, my reading of Burning Vision unsettles two material actors that animate the ecology and the contemporary politics of land—rock and water— to ask two major questions: how does decolonizing ecological and diasporic thought affect understandings of land and how could land function as a technology of reconciliation?"


Kailey Allan

Project title:

Department: Mechanical Engineering

Faculty supervisor: Dr. Rishi Gupta

"The current state of modern (or stabilized) rammed earth structures in BC is unknown. It is unclear whether modern rammed earth will experience the same longevity as the ancient structures remaining today such as, the Great Wall of China. This research aims to address the following question: have the two modern rammed walls at the University of Victoria’s First Peoples House felt the effects of environmental weathering over the period of it’s 7 year life? A rebound hammer, infrared camera, and a new method developed to quantify surface deterioration were used in Non-Destructive Testing (NDT). The results provided insight into the compressive strength, thermal envelope and surface condition of the walls. Relationships between wind direction and wind speed are presented. It is postulated that the wall that is most exposed to a combination of both effects will exhibit the largest forms of deterioration. This hypothesis was addressed using results from NDT and local wind data.

Currently, little literature is available on the longevity of modern rammed earth. It is intended that this research provide the public with literature that will aid in the development of future modern rammed earth technology."


Katherine Savoy

Project title:

Department: Pacific & Asian Studies

Faculty supervisor: Dr. Tim Iles

"This project performs a detailed analysis and critique of escapism in select works of Japanese fantasy, exploring the meta-mechanism of in-text escapism and its relation to that of the audience. In this analysis, I will look at the role of, and understand, fantasy from the diegetic perspectives within the text, and the interaction between fantasy and the real. I will then examine how this relationship is situated beyond the text, looking between the narrative and its context."

Katherine Thwaites

Project title:

Department: Women's Studies

Faculty supervisor: Dr. Annalee Lepp

"My proposed research project will explore the implicit codes embedded in superhero fan subcultures through the limited representation of diverse subjects. With the majority of superheroes in leading comic book titles being White, cisgendered, and heterosexual men, fans who do not see themselves reflected in these identities employ unique and diverse strategies that help to produce space for them in a medium where they are often rendered invisible in the margins. I will interview 15 to 20 superhero comic fans whose identities do not comply with the limited frame of references that form the hegemony of this medium. These interviews will explore the reasons why they enjoy the superhero narrative, how they relate to the characters in these narratives, the strategies they use to engage in fan subcultures, their sense of inclusion and safety in fan spaces (both physical and online) and whether they consider an increased diversification of characters valuable/necessary for the future of the medium."

Kelsey Legault

Project title:

Department: Computer Science

Faculty supervisor: Dr. Yvonne Coady

"New communication tools used by mass media are concurrently emerging through the medium of software development. The efficiency and availability of these communication technologies (online advertising, user data analysis, instant messaging, etc.,) are influencing trends in popular culture and shaping the ways in which we communicate to one another, formulating a brand new culture that I am committed to exploring. I am passionate about investigating how popular culture is affected by the manipulation of mass media and software development, and how these entities influence the way in which we communicate.

Mass media has been majorly influencing popular culture through new communication technologies for the past century. 1Grossberg, Wartella, and Whitney explain in their article about popular culture that it is important to continue to question the way in which communication technologies affect popular culture, because the context and use case of these technologies will always correlate with forever changing historical and cultural situations.

Citation:

1. Grossberg, Lawrence, Ellen Wartella, and D. Charles Whitney. Mediamaking.
Thousand Oaks, Calif.: Sage Publications, 1998. Google Book Search. Web. February 25, 2015."


Kenda Chang-Swanson

Project title:

Department: Interdisciplinary Studies

Faculty supervisor: Dr. Martha McMahon

"My research project will explore how the realities of climate change can be presented to students in ways that enable them to engage the issues rather than leave them depressed or disempowered. The focus will be on enabling and encouraging community engagement by students as ways of learning about mitigating and adapting to climate change. The interconnections between social justice and climate change issues and a methodological lens of intersectionality will inform this interdisciplinary project. I will study food as a concrete case where undergraduates can see and study the opportunities for individual and community engagement in local initiatives as well as have the chance to study emerging regional and global networks of response to the issues of climate change. This is a research project that is grounded in recognizing the deep connections between social justice and ecological justice."

Kiera Anne Powell Smith

Project title:

Department: Geography

Faculty supervisor: Dr. Johannes Feddema

“Characterizing the Mixed Severity Fire Regime of the Sinclair Restoration Area, Kootenay National Park

The Sinclair Restoration Area, in Kootenay National Park would have historically been typified by an open grassland Douglas fir ecosystem ideal for winter and transitional habitat of the provincially blue listed Rocky Mountain Bighorn Sheep. This landscape structure was likely maintained by a mixed severity fire regime that included low severity decadal grass fires and high severity centennial stand replacing fires. Due to a policy of fire suppression, the last burn in the area likely occurred in the late 1880s. This management strategy resulted in a dense forest structure now unsuitable and undesirable for wildlife. Parks Canada managers are restoring this area by emulating the natural disturbance dynamic, maintained by fire in the past, through prescribed burning.

This project will directly aid mangers in determining objectives for prescribed burns by informing them of the recurrence interval of prehistorical fires and the historic forest structure. Tree cookies with fire scars will be collected from Douglas fir trees to describe the year and frequency of past fire events. Increment core samples will be collected from a minimum of 20 neighbouring trees to determine stand in-fill dynamics. Dendrochronological methods will provide insight on climate variation, historic fire frequency, return intervals, and the effects of fire on forest composition and structure, over length of the tree-ring record. To assist with ongoing management initiatives, recommendations will be made as to the desirable fire return interval needed to restore the natural forest structure.”


Kimberly Kuffner

Project title:

Department: Medieval Studies

Faculty supervisor: Dr. Erin McGuire

"Lamps from the Viking Age

When discussing artefacts from the Viking Age, there has often been a focus on more ornate and detailed objects such as weapons, brooches, or pendants; however, common domestic objects are often left out of the spotlight. The objects found in the domestic sphere help to provide opportunities for us to learn more about the habits of a Viking person as they went about their daily lives. One such object that is frequently overlooked is the lamp. These lamps are constructed of steatite, clay, or metal and were used as a source of light and heat in the dark dwellings of the Vikings.

Experimental archaeology provides an actualistic approach to archaeological research. Drawing on both published accounts of archaeological experiments and relevant excavation reports, it is my goal to design and implement a series of replicative experiments to examine Viking Age lamp technology. In doing so, I hope to achieve a number of research objectives. First, I will explore the construction process for the lamps. This will include the relative ease in which they are created with the tools Vikings would have had available to them. Second, I will experiment with several different lamp shapes, wick types, and fuel sources based on archaeological finds to discover which types, if any, are able to produce more light or heat, (and less smoke), and thus be considered a more useful product overall. Finally, I will explore options for the use of these lamps to discover if they were used for more than just light and warmth. This project will contribute to the growing body of literature associated with experimental archaeology."


Kyle McCreanor

Project title:

Department: Hispanic & Italian Studies

Faculty supervisor: Prof. Matthew Koch

"Terrorism and Resistance in the Basque Country, 1959-1975
My research project will address the philosophy and actions of the Basque revolutionary guerrilla organization, Euskadi ta Askatasuna (ETA) from its origin until the end of the Franco Regime. It will engage the definition of 'terrorism' and explore the applicability of the term to the Basque Conflict during the Franco Regime."

Kylie Pettifer

Project title:

Department: Geography

Faculty supervisor: Dr. Michele-Lee Moore

"Globally, we have the most educated generation of young people in history with a desire to live prosperous lives in safe and socially just countries. Yet, unemployment rates among youth remain high, not only reinforcing the cycle of poverty, but in many cases leading to civil unrest. At the same time, humanity is facing one of its largest challenges in history: climate change and the socio-environmental threat of a business-as-usual economic model. Could a solution be to address these issues in tandem? My research aims to explore this question in the Canadian context. How can we transform our private sector to promote more resilient socio-ecological systems? Is there a way to reduce Canada’s high un-and under-employment of youth in the process? I will address these questions by looking at the role of youth as change agents in the private sector. Specifically I will look at the opportunities, barriers and motivations of youth in Canada to engaging in intra- and entrepreneurship efforts for social and environmental change by interviewing young people age 18-30 that have been able to pursue profitable change endeavors such as starting a social enterprise at that age in the last 10 years, surveying youth on university campuses about their motivations and barriers towards these types of private sector roles  and examining alternative business models to better understand how we can support youth that want to engage in social enterprise and foster innovation for a greener, more resilient economy."

Kyra McLeod

Project title:

Department: Visual Arts

Faculty supervisor: Prof. Robert Youds

"I plan to explore the tensions in urban settings that arise from the global pressure put on individuals to become global citizens. As globalization expands and deepens into every aspect of our culture, it minimizes the importance of local community and puts a new focus on the global citizen. As a result, urban life is emphasized while the natural world is increasingly exploited. Through the mediums of sculpture and painting, I intend to study the relationship we form with our urban and natural environments in this context. From destroying nature in favour of urban development to reinstating nature within these developments, my research questions the conceptions of the natural world and the role it plays in our identity as both global and urban citizens. I intend to analyze Canadian political ecology and the myths surrounding Canada and the natural world. Using visual juxtapositions, I will highlight the tensions individuals face in adopting a global identity at the expense of national values. My research will be focused on studio based practice to create a body of work that challenges and explores notions of urban identity and the natural world."

Landon MacGillivray

Project title:

Department: Chemistry

Faculty supervisor: Dr. Scott McIndoe and Dr. Fraser Hof

"My honours’ project will be jointly run in the Hof and McIndoe groups. The impact of this work will be to develop ‘smart’ sensors that give unprecedented chemical understanding of life processes important to human development and disease.

Calixarenes are bowl shaped molecules that can strongly bind cationic molecules in their open cavity. The Hof research group has found that calixarenes decorated with fluorescent appendages are quenched through self-aggregation. This phenomenon suggests that these molecules can be used as sensors for certain biomolecules (called trimethyllysines), which bind to the sensors, disaggregate them, and restore a bright fluorescence.

1. My plan is to prepare the appropriate calixarene, functionalize it with a fluorescent tag, and examine the self-quenching behavior of the fluorescent calixarene at various concentrations. I will also synthesize peptides containing a lysine residue that is modified such that tri-, di- and mono-methylated lysine products are isolated. I will then determine which degree of methylation expresses the best binding affinity for the calixarene pocket by monitoring the increase in fluorescent activity upon addition to a self-quenching fluorescent calixarene system.

2. Additionally, I will monitor the loss of fluorescence upon addition of demethylase enzymes. The enzyme JMJD2a causes demethylation of lysine residues, and is linked to the development of aggressive cancers. The processing of peptides by JMJD2a will be monitored in real time by both fluorescence and Electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (ESI-MS)—the area of expertise of the McIndoe group. Both analyses are unprecedented for this class of enzymes, and the combination of both methods in a single analysis is a specialized kind of analysis being developed by the McIndoe group that will help us to understand the individual steps in the reaction in minute detail."


Laurence Godard

Project title:

Department: Linguistics

Faculty supervisor: Dr. Ewa Czaykowska-Higgins

"When a language is lost or under pressure of disappearing, it is not only a means of communication that is threatened but also the world views and the culture of individuals and communities that are associated with these languages. As shown in the report of the Truth and Reconciliation Commission (2015), in the Canadian context, language and cultural loss has resulted from drastic population loss and from oppressive and marginalizing policies enacted by the government, and reinforced through residential schools. The effects of this oppression are still felt today: the 2014 Report of the Status of B.C. First Nation Languages specifies that all Indigenous languages of B.C. are in critical state of endangerment. As part of a reclamation and decolonization process, numerous communities have initiated cultural and language revitalization efforts. These initiatives have led researchers worldwide to begin to explore the question: what is the role of language revitalization in the healing process of Indigenous communities and individuals? This research project proposes to contribute to this emergent body of literature and to our understanding of the connection between language and healing by considering healing through a holistic view of wellness. As well, this research also aims to assist non-Indigenous people, including the researcher (me), to have a better understanding of the possible positive impacts of language revitalization for Indigenous communities and individuals.  The project will be based upon a survey of published work as well as interviews with individuals who are involved in language revitalization initiatives. The project will use the principles of Grounded Theory and Feminist Theory and will be framed within an Indigenist paradigm, informed by Indigenous world views."

Libby Edwards

Project title:

Department: Philosophy

Faculty supervisor: Dr. Cindy Holder

"I am interested in exploring sites of moral tension as they exist within the context of human rights. Specifically, I am eager to explore the ways in which moral tensions present in communities struggling for recognition of basic human rights act as catalysts for moral creativity and moral transformation. This research project will involve first and foremost an investigation into the philosophy of human rights and an in-depth exploration of the question: “what are we talking about when we talk about ‘human rights’?”. It will also necessarily include an elucidation of John Wall’s notion of moral creativity as it is given in his book Moral Creativity: Paul Ricoeur and the Poetics of Possibility (2005). Briefly stated, Wall defends a view in which creativity is posited as a “primordial human capability” that is presupposed in moral life (2005). When properly channelled, our moral creativity works to create new social relations and moral worlds. Working within this framework, I will conduct further research into the nature of various human rights struggles across the globe in order to identify moral tensions present in these contexts. Ultimately, I seek to examine sites of moral tension to the end of revealing the ways in which they motivate moral creativity and lead to the transformation of social relations and moral worlds."

Lindsay Cavanaugh

Project title:

Department: Curriculum & Instruction

Faculty supervisor: Dr. Kathy Sanford

"Drawing on queer theory and feminist discourses, I will be examining and constructing practical ways that educators can foster queer-affirming spaces – spaces that positively acknowledge the diversity of gender and sexual identities both through curricular learning and school atmosphere.  I am interested in learning about various barriers teachers face to integrating knowledge of gender and sexuality in their classrooms. I believe that overcoming these obstacles will enable educators to better support LGBTQ* learners.

In my research so far, I have investigated the idea of consciousness-raising – the sharing of personal stories – as a means for fostering and strengthening community bonds.  I now wish to develop consciousness-raising techniques that teachers can apply in their classrooms – lesson activities that bridge curriculum expectations with conversations about gender and sexuality.  In this research project, I would apply my understanding of consciousness-raising while teaching English on my upcoming practicum.  Before introducing this material, however, I would gauge the school’s attitudes and knowledge about LGBTQ* identities through administrating surveys to staff and students (following UVic’s Human Research Ethics).  After applying consciousness-raising methodologies, I would follow up with the students and staff where possible and with consent, to see if attitudes and understandings have shifted at all.  I anticipate this research to be purely qualitative – based on observations, interviews, and surveys."


Lisa Szostek

Project title:

Department: Biology

Faculty supervisor: Dr. Julia Baum

"Kiritimati, Kiribati is a remote Pacific atoll whose citizens are faced with challenges such as climate change and overfishing which threaten the local fish stocks that most residents rely on for subsistence fishing. In addition to these stressors, a storm unprecedented in size and vigour hit the atoll in January 2015. My research project aims to understand how this storm affected coral reef benthos communities on Kiritimati. As extreme weather events are becoming more common, this research could provide essential information for island and coastal nations that have or will experience large storms. This project will be done by analyzing the coral reef composition and cover in photos taken of the coral reef benthos before (August 2014), during (January 2015) and after (May and July 2015) the storm at various sites around the atoll. Subsequent steps include statistical analysis and formal reporting of the findings. This project is especially interesting to me because I had the chance to volunteer on two intensive trips to Kiritimati this summer during which much of the data I will be using was collected (May and July 2015). It will allow me to experience all aspects of conducting scientific research including preparing for a field season, collecting data, analyzing data, conducting statistical analyses and writing a formal report."


Lucy Bartlett

Project title:

Department: Psychology

Faculty supervisor: Dr. James Tanaka

"Facial expressions are the window into our emotions, allowing us to decipher and interpret what we are feeling in a particular moment. As "face experts", most people can quickly and accurately produce and decode facial expressions. Autism spectrum disorder (ASD) is typified by poor social skills, as well as impairments in expression perception and difficulty generating appropriate facial affect. Individuals with ASD may instead produce emotionally flat or ambiguous expressions which further jeopardize effective facial communication, and by extension, social skills.

To ameliorate these deficits, we will provide a low cost, safe, evidence-based intervention using an engaging, game-style training program called "FaceMaze". FaceMaze utilizes expression recognition software that analyzes expression quality in real-time, as well as gives feedback to the user. In a Pac-Man-style game interface, users have fun practicing expression production and receive instantaneous feedback about expression type and strength. We hypothesize a functional link between identifying and producing facial expressions, where practice in expression production positively influences expression identification. Game-play should improve facial expression production and perception, and by extension, elevate the quality of social interactions leading to a higher quality of life."


Luke Fair

Project title:

Department: Visual Arts

Faculty supervisor: Prof. Robert Youds

"Canadian culture is often identified as having a strong connection to the environment in its northern condition. Starting in the early twentieth century, Canadian artists sought to create art that could build Canadian identity apart from European styles and subject matter. Though clearly evident in Canadian culture, the grandeur of environment appears to be more romantic and mythological than true representation. These artworks have created the look and feel of an environmental state thought to be 'natural'. I am interested in how the experience of a 'natural' place can influence ones thoughts and emotions. Experiencing artworks that are influenced by place therefore has insight into the experience of the artist.

I would like to investigate such art forms that have contributed to the Canadian mythology of environment and create art that is inspired by the myths themselves rather than the actual land. My research will involve exploring different visual art, performing art, music and literature inspired by 'Canadian' landscape. Such research will not be limited by political 'Canadian' borders but rather geographical areas in order to explore the tie between place and identity. I will primarily use painting and sculpture to convey my interpretations of the land that the researched artist experienced. The art work created will bypass the traditional way of pictorially representing landscape and enter an abstracted realm using geographical inspired artworks as the source. In addition to the JCURA exhibit, my proposed research will seek to exhibit in local galleries and public locations around Victoria."


Madeline Guy

Project title:

Department: Nursing

Faculty supervisor: Dr. Lenora Marcellus

"The HerWay Home program is an integrated primary maternity program in Victoria that provides support for pregnant and newly parenting women coping with substance use, mental health issues, violence and trauma, poverty, unstable housing, and other social issues. Dr. Marcellus has received a CIHR grant to interview women and men who are clients of this program about their experiences and recommendations for health care providers and communities on how to best support families. I will be working with Dr. Marcellus to conduct qualitative analysis of data specifically focused on how participants define success related to how the HerWay Home program works. Following analysis, we will be preparing a manuscript for publication and a presentation or poster for the February 2016 Perinatal Services BC conference."

Maria Finnsdottir

Project title:

Department: Sociology

Faculty supervisor: Dr. Zheng Wu

"I propose to study issues related to social inequality in education using Statistics Canada databases. The focus will be on identifying key variables that account unequal access to higher education in a subset of the Canadian population (to be determined in consultation with my supervisor)."

Mark McIntyre

Project title:

Department: Anthropology

Faculty supervisor: Dr. Alexandrine Boudreault-Fournier

“In the age of digital supremacy, where an infinite amount of music is available at the click of a button, there has been a resurgence of formerly obsolete musical formats.  Vinyl records, a medium thought to have faded into oblivion when CDs were embraced as the industry standard, have since seen a resurgence among underground music labels and their major label counterparts, selling over 4 million units in 2014.  Physical media in the age of the MP3 is rare, yet both independent and major record labels have embraced the vinyl medium.  Interestingly, in tandem with the vinyl revival, cassette tapes have become the medium of choice for independent bands interested in distributing their music and ideas on the cheap.  While many online platforms allow the free distribution of music, cassette tapes can be found on merchandise tables of independent Victoria bands whose music spans the underground spectrums of folk, punk rock, garage, noise, metal, and indie rock.  This project will seek to understand why Victoria bands, record labels, and consumers prefer the physical medium of the cassette tape in the MP3 era and the importance that cassettes play in Victoria’s underground music communities.

This project’s methodology will consist of a literature review, interviews with bands, labels, record shop owners, and consumers, and deep hanging out at venues where cassettes are bought and sold, namely concerts and record stores.  As this research involves human subjects, I will seek ethics approval from the University of Victoria’s Human Ethics Board.”


Mary Drohan

Project title:

Department: Social Work

Faculty supervisor: Dr. Bruce Wallace, Social Work and Centre for Addictions Research (CARBC)

"Meth pipes: An exploratory study of harm reduction services for users of methamphetamine in Victoria, BC
Needle exchange programs that offer sterile needles and syringes have been implemented by service providers as a harm reduction practice in response to high rate of HIV, Hepatitis C (HCV), and other blood-borne illnesses among people who are injection drug users. More recently, some service providers have begun to offer safer smoking crack pipe kits. The intention behind these harm reduction measures is primarily to reduce the risk of the transmission of blood-borne illnesses by the practice of sharing consumption equipment. AIDS Vancouver Island (AVI) operates the primary needle exchange for the greater Victoria area and also provides safer smoking crack pipe kits.

The Centre for Addictions Research of BC (CARBC) has found that the rate of crystal methamphetamine use in so-called Victoria has steadily increased from 2010-2015 through The BC Alcohol and Other Drug (AOD) Monitoring Project’s High Risk Population Survey. Recognizing these trends in the community they serve, AVI implemented a meth pipe pilot program in June 2014.

In this exploratory research project I aim to investigate the needs of crystal methamphetamine users in Victoria and assess how their needs are being met and risk is reduced by the pilot project. To do this I will conduct a survey of clients who use crystal methamphetamine to create a small sample from which to draw preliminary findings. This information will inform service implementation at AVI as well as provide insights for much needed further research to best support the emerging needs the trend towards crystal methamphetamine use requires."


Mary Makowski

Project title:

Department: Psychology

Faculty supervisor: Dr. Ulrich Mueller

"It has been argued that the ability to work together with others (i.e., to cooperate with others) toward a shared goal is particularly pronounced in humans compared to other species. Recent research on the development of cooperation indicates that cooperative behaviours already emerge in the second year of life. However, it is unclear to what extent these behaviours reflect an understanding of working toward a shared goal. Using an experimental paradigm, the aim of the present study is to examine whether an understanding of shared goals underlies 1- to 2-year-old children's cooperative behaviours. The infants will work with a research assistant toward completing a task that cannot completed by either one alone, thus cooperation is required. The task will be interrupted, and in one condition the experimenter will express an interest in continuing the task, and in the other condition the experimenter will signal that she is not interested in the task anymore. The researcher's disinterest reflects that the original goal is no longer desired by the researcher. The infants' reactions (e.g., their communication to reengage the experimenter) once the researcher has signaled her disinterest in the task will indicate whether they understand shared goals. Through the testing of infant social cognitive capacities, the project will contribute to and clarify research findings from studies conducted by Warneken and Tomasello (2006). The proposed project will extend the existing body of knowledge concerning infant development through the analysis of cooperative behavior."

Melissa Starke

Project title:

Department: Chemistry

Faculty supervisor: Dr. Fraser Hof

"Post-translational methylation (PTM) is understood to have a very important role in proteins. The pre-enrichment of methylated proteins is essential for identification, however current techniques are not very effective. During my research I plan to pre-enrich methylated proteins using a supramolecular methyl-affinity column, which will be optimized to increase selectivity for methylated proteins over unmethylated proteins. Proteomics analysis on these pre-enriched methylated proteins is expected to give improved identification of methylation sites over the non-enriched protein samples. This analysis is intended to increase our understanding of PTM in proteins, confirming known methylation sites and identifying unknown methylation sites."


Nicholas Guerreiro

Project title:

Department: Theatre

Faculty supervisor: Dr. Anthony Vickery

"HMS Parliament, or the Lady who loved a Government Clerk is a Canadian political satire from the 1880s that criticizes the corruption of John A. MacDonald's second government by casting him as the captain on an ersatz version of Gilbert and Sullivan's HMS Pinafore. Although the topical nature of this text makes its humour inaccessible to modern readers, I believe that, with careful annotation, playwright William H. Fuller's imaginative libretto will reveal its secrets. By using archival material and other primary sources to provide context I will endeavor to use HMS Parliament to show how the strong links between British and Early Canadian identity, both artistically and politically, are revealed in both the form and content of this popular operetta."

Nick Benson

Project title:

Department: Mathematics & Statistics

Faculty supervisor: Dr. Kieka Mynhardt

"The problem of placing (a maximum number of) independent queens on an n-by-n chessboard, and its counterpart of using (the fewest number of) queens to dominate an n-by-n chessboard, are well-known problems in graph theory, since they are are easy to state and pleasant to view, but give rise to some surprisingly difficult questions. They are also well-known in computer science, since they can be used to illustrate basic algorithmic techniques in an intuitive way, yet they demand continually more inventive algorithms to solve the larger cases. This summer, Kieka and I have been studying the generalization of these problems to chessboards of more than two players, and have found that this problem maintains the intrigues of the two-player case while adding interesting dynamics of its own. (A couple of examples: independence is no longer an easy problem, and, due to board constructions relying heavily on the parity of n, the dominating number sequence is no longer monotonic!) We have proven (or in some cases generalized) a variety of results, but have encountered many questions as well. We would like to use this upcoming year to delve further into this problem, and to prepare an enjoyable poster and paper."

Nicola Craig Hora

Project title:

Department: Pacific & Asian Studies

Faculty supervisor: Dr. Tim Iles

"I will be examining how Japanese society is dealing with the issues that have arisen as a result of urbanisation and the increasing dependence on urbanised spaces in Japan. The issue that I will be concentrating my research on is alienation as a result of living in an urban environment. Alienation is a central theme in contemporary Japanese horror, which generally takes place in an urban setting. My research project will provide a historical overview of urbanisation in Japan to allow for a better understanding of how the contemporary issue of alienation has arisen. There will be an analysis of a number of texts from the contemporary horror genre to examine how the general public is reacting to these issues, including common fears and concerns."


Nova Hanson

Project title:

Department: Biology

Faculty supervisor: Dr. Rana El-Sabaawi

"I am investigating the differences in nutrient excretion between multiple morphological variants of the three-spine stickleback, Gasterosteus aculeatus, which can result in ecosystem-level impacts on nutrient cycling. The morphological variation that I am interested in are the distinct phenotypes that determine body armour level, with full, partial and low being the different possible phenotypes. My honours project for my undergraduate degree will focus on two local populations of stickleback, one from Swan Lake (freshwater with low armour level), and the other from Gorge Waterway (marine with full armour level)."


Pam Blackstone

Project title:

Department: Linguistics

Faculty supervisor: Dr. Li-Shih Huang

"Anglophones experience certain pronunciation challenges in learning French as a second language (FSL), due—among other things—to differences in the phonological inventories of the two languages. Both research and my own learning experience have shown that certain French vowel sounds present great difficulty for English speakers. Researchers (e.g., Levy 2004; Garrott, 2009) have provided evidence for possible cross-linguistic interference in this regard— findings that are supported by research on FSL acquisition among Japanese and Spanish L1s (e.g., Kamiyama & Vaissière, 2009; Pillot-Loiseau, Antolík, & Kamiyama, 2013; Kartushina & Frauenfelder, 2014). However, research on FSL vowel production in L1s other than those mentioned is scanty.

This study will examine the relationship between the existence of certain sounds (/y, ø, ɛ̃, ɔ̃, ɑ̃, ʁ/ and/or nearby phonemes) in a person's L1 phonological inventory and that individual's successful production of certain L2 French sounds. Through a web-based survey and collection of oral samples, it will involve four groups of participants: one English-speaking and three non-anglophone FSL groups. The languages involved will be determined by the backgrounds of students undertaking an L2 French program who indicate willingness to participate in the study. The web survey will collect background information such as duration and frequency of French exposure, age, gender, and so on. Word lists containing the target sounds within a carrier sentence will be used to elicit the French L2 oral samples, which will be evaluated for intelligibility (i.e., proximity to L1 French sound) by three L1 French speakers.

The findings of this study could have implications for the teaching of French pronunciation, helping instructors identify which phonemes may present the most difficulty for students with a particular L1. It will also contribute to the body of research on cross-linguistic interference, particularly involving speakers of L1s other than English, Japanese, and Spanish.

L1= first language or mother tongue
L2 = second language"


Pamela Langevin

Project title:

Department: Curriculum & Instruction

Faculty supervisor: Dr. Valerie Irvine

“Pamela's project will carry out the implementation and evaluation of a robotics pilot in a K-12 classroom, where learners will be able to choose how they want to join the class. She will help conduct the data collection through interviews during a limited term trial period. The goal is to determine the impact on quality of learning, class community, and attendance to learning. The results will be presented to the school community and via open access webinar. The writeup of results will be submitted for dissemination in the Canadian Journal of Learning and Technology and at research and professional conferences.”

Patrick Dwyer

Project title:

Department: Psychology

Faculty supervisor: Dr. Stephen Lindsay

"We will conduct empirical studies of eyewitness identification performance among individuals who do versus do not self-identify as being on the autism spectrum.  We will measure a number of other factors previously shown to be related to eyewitness identification accuracy, such as response latency and self-rated confidence."

Patrick Teichreb

Project title:

Department: Sociology

Faculty supervisor: Dr. André Smith

"In my proposed research project, I will examine the social factors that inhibit the successful treatment of depression and anxiety disorders and to what extent fictional and non-fictional media contribute to upholding these social barriers."


Petra Francesca Bell Peters

Project title:

Department: Medical Sciences

Faculty supervisor: Dr. Brian Christie

"The tau protein is a microtubule-associated protein, which facilitates tubulin assembly into microtubules and is essential for structural integrity as well as axonal transport. When tau becomes hyperphosphorylated, it aggregates into neurofibrillary tangles disrupting proper cellular functioning. These neurofibrillary tangles are seen dispersed throughout Alzheimers diseased brains, as well as those with neurodegenerative diseases resulting from repeated traumatic brain injury. Understanding the upstream cause of tau phosphorylation is critical in the fight to develop new treatments against tau-mediated neurodegeneration. My project will look at determining the relative phosphorylation levels of tau protein following mild traumatic brain injury (mTBI), as well as quantifying activities of two tau-associated kinases, GSK3-β and CDK5, to determine if changes in these accompany changes in tau protein phosphorylation. Relative levels of tau phosphorylation and activities of GSK3-β and CDK5 will be measured by Western blotting for phosphorylation of tau residues shown to induce microtubule disassembly, and post-translational modifications shown to activate or inhibit GSK3-β and CDK5.

By comparing animals that have received a single concussion with those that have received multiple concussions we will be able to determine the threshold and additive biochemical effects of multiple concussions on kinase activity and tau hyper-phosphorylation. Measuring these at different time points after the final concussion will allow us to create a better picture of what is happening biochemically within the cell to cause these changes, and observe the duration of these changes."


Regina Grishko

Project title:

Department: French

Faculty supervisor: Dr. Catherine Léger

"At the beginning of the 18th century, under the reign of Peter the Great, French culture, literature and language became prestigious in Russia. During this period and subsequently, numerous loanwords, particularly nouns, found their way into the Russian language. For this project, I will examine morphological adaptations of French loanwords into Russian. The language has incorporated into its lexicon numerous nominal borrowings, while transforming them so to respect the rules of word construction in Russian. For instance, the equivalent of French constitution in Russian is constitutsiya; while the root was preserved intact, the nominal suffix -tsiya is used instead of French -tion, creating a whole series of Russian words having French roots and Russian suffixes (presentatsiya, illustratsiya, etc.). However, other lexical items were borrowed from French, without any morphological adaptation; this is the case for engagement, règlement, etc. Therefore, this study will shed light on the different borrowing processes in Russian. Being an international student from Russia, this research will allow me to combine my two passions, French and Russian. It will thus permit me to learn in depth about the long-standing French influence on Russia."

Rhea Ashmead

Project title:

Department: Biology

Faculty supervisor: Dr. Francis Choy

"My research project involves the expression and purification of recombinant alpha -N-acetylglucosaminidase (Naglu-PTD4). My goal is to transfect Spodoptera frugiperda cells to stably express Naglu-PTD4 and then to purify Naglu-PTD4 using high performance column chromatography. The object of this research is to potentially improve the transducibility of Naglu to traverse the cell membrane and the blood brain barrier by using a PTD4 domain. My aim is to improve the delivery of functional Naglu to the central nervous system and make enzyme replacement therapy a more viable treatment for Sanfilippo disease."

Richard May

Project title:

Department: Computer Science

Faculty supervisor: Dr. Sue Whitesides

"My proposed research project is to prove a lower bound on the number of moves required to solve the Tower of Hanoi puzzle, for any number of pegs. I have already researched this topic, and am in the process of writing a finalized academic paper on my results. These results are already presentable, however I am looking into additional problems in the field of Computer Science, and may change the focus of my project if I can gather enough research."

Robert Keel

Project title:

Department: Economics

Faculty supervisor: Dr. Paul Schure

"I would like to conduct an empirical examination of the relationship between the Immigrant Investor program and the price of houses in Vancouver. This program was established in 1986 with the stated goal of making it easier for high net worth individuals to immigrate to Canada. Vancouver's rising housing prices have fueled speculation that demand is being driven by wealthy foreign buyers. The goal of my research project will be to gather empirical data and test the validity of this assumption."

Robyn White

Project title:

Department: Curriculum & Instruction

Faculty supervisor: Dr. Kathy Sanford

"My proposed research topic is to explore ways in which teachers and students view the importance of performative arts programs in schools (i.e., drama/theatre and dance). Through observation, interviews and possibly focus group meetings with teachers and students involved in these programs, I will focus specifically on how  programs build communities, foster relationships and identities for students that they might not otherwise have. I want to explore the potentially profound impact on students’ socio-emotional learning and how various educators through arts education build socially and emotionally safe learning spaces. I will explore the important 'life skills' that arts classrooms focus on, for example development of relationships, time management, accountability, working collaboratively and positively with all types of people that might be in similar social circles, etc. In addition, I want to explore these components of a safe learning community, and find ways to incorporate arts education into the academic classroom in meaningful, contextual, and appropriate ways."

Samantha Bahan

Project title:

Department: Religious Studies

Faculty supervisor: Dr. Paul Bramadat

The phrase “spiritual but not religious” has commonly been used by researchers seeking to understand the spirituality of individuals who have shifted away from institutionalized religion. However, the meaning of this category has evolved in the millennial generation, insomuch as many have spiritual experiences very similar to their “spiritual but not religious” counterparts, but intentionally avoid identification with the term “spiritual”; consequently, these individuals are going undetected in academic literature. In an effort to clarify contemporary understandings of spirituality for non-religious millennials, I intend to administer a three part survey using Survey Monkey and a snowball sample to persons in Canada born in 1980 or later. This survey focuses on: personal non-religious identification; emotions, practices and settings related to experiences of interconnectedness or something transcendent; and the personal significance for such experiences. The survey’s design makes no direct reference to the terms “spiritual” or “spirituality” (though that is what is being investigated), going beyond contrasting categories of “religion”, “spirituality”, and “spiritual but not religious” to create an opportunity to hear from individuals who do not perceive these terms to be appropriate descriptors of their experience. Implementing this survey will require approval of a Human Research Ethics Application. This research is important given the incredible growth of the non-religious population in Canada, predominantly in British Columbia over recent years. It will contribute to clarifying the attitudinal trends of millennials towards religion and spiritual practices, and may offer insight into future shifts of religious establishment attendees in cities such as Victoria BC.”


Samuel Hogman

Project title:

Department: Exercise Science, Physical & Health Education

Faculty supervisor: Dr. Marc Klimstra

"Currently, the Canadian men’s national rowing team utilizes a regular test to measure the aerobic baseline fitness of the athletes over time. The test involves a standardized warm-up followed by a 20 minute work piece at a prescribed intensity on the rowing ergometer. Immediately following the piece, blood lactate is measured. The goal is to find an intensity for the athletes that results in a blood lactate measurement of less than 2 mmol/L. This tests their baseline aerobic fitness in a way that is currently not implemented in rowing programs, nor is it’s value yet recognized. Ideally, with the training program, the athletes’ prescribed intensities will increase while maintaining the necessary low blood lactate levels as they become fitter. The aim of this present study is to analyze the effectiveness, validity and reliability of this testing protocol, applied to University male rowers. Specifically, the monthly administration of the protocol will be carried out, and the results and associated variables will be analyzed. If the protocol proves to be an effective tool in accurately and effectively tracking the baseline fitness of the athletes and it is deemed readily applicable to competitive rowing programs, it may be utilized by more coaches as a useful tool to direct and prescribe rowing training."

Sarah Maleska

Project title:

Department: Earth & Ocean Sciences

Faculty supervisor: Dr. Adam Monahan

"Urbanization is known to influence local climates. In particular, urban areas tend to be warmer (especially at night) than neighbouring rural areas. My research will use long time series of observations from the School-Based Weather Station Network to characterize the urban heat island in the CRD by constructing maps of mean temperature across the region for different seasons and times of day. Using GIS techniques to classify the surface types near the weather stations, I will investigate how temperature variations are influenced by urbanization (and other factors such as proximity to water). Time permitting, I will also investigate the how the urban heat island affects other meteorological variables (such as wind). Beyond assessing the effect of urbanization on the climate of Victoria, this work will provide a benchmark temperature climatology for the region."

Saromi Kim

Project title:

Department: Art History & Visual Studies

Faculty supervisor: Dr. Lianne McLarty

“I will explore what we may learn from media and how identity is constructed, and reinforced within it. I will specifically look at the various representations of Asians in film and TV shows as well as interview people on their ideas of them. I intend to research the Asian stereotypes such as the model minority, the exotic hyper-sexual female, the effeminate funny  man, the Kung Fu fighting master as well as the development of those roles over the last few decades. My research will be concluded in an experimental documentary where I explore different identities with regards to films, TV shows and even Youtube channels we watch. I want to challenge and question how much media influences society as well as our identities. 

As a young woman born in Canada with parents who emigrated from South Korea there is a hard feat trying to identify with many of the Hollywood movies playing today. I realized growing up I put these stereotypes onto myself and allowed other people to place them onto me because that is what I learned from media. I would like to uncover what makes someone like me "exotic" and what types of conventions Hollywood uses to create an ideal world. I would like to continue with my anotherfansview website by placing myself into current films but also research and write in a critical view what roles minority groups in particular play to create meaning within a film.”


Saul Brown

Project title:

Department: Political Science

Faculty supervisor: Dr. James Tully

“Since time immemorial, the Heiltsuk have developed and maintained sophisticated laws, known as Gvi’ilas, to govern our territories, manage relationships, and resolve disputes. Despite the imposition of the Canadian legal system over Indigenous peoples and territories, our Gvi’ilas have persisted. According to my late great grandfather, Hemas Mauxmisa’gami, Gvi’ilas refers to our “power” or authority over all matters that affect our lives.

My project explores Heiltsuk Gvi’ilas, with a focus on marine stewardship and governance. I will examine Heiltsuk creation stories that embody our Gvi’ilas. I will implore a methodology that mirrors the legal rigor of the Canadian judicial system to analyze our creation stories. This methodology is similar to case briefing that law students use to analyze and synthesize Canadian court cases, however it includes truth grounding from my Heiltsuk worldview. This research is timely in light of the recent conflicts between the Heiltsuk and Department of Fisheries and Ocean (DFO). On March 29, 2015, a Heiltsuk delegation occupied a DFO office to insist on the recognition of Heiltsuk authority to regulate commercial fishing activities in our territory. This action is a prime example of Heiltsuk people abiding by our Gvi’ilas, protecting herring from the threat of over-fishing. As a result, the DFO agreed not to open the waters to commercial gill-net fleets and promised to hold talks to avoid another confrontation next year. My project will illuminate the Heiltsuk Gvi’ilas that should be guiding these discussions and any activities across Heiltsuk territory and waters.”


Simon Moffatt

Project title:

Department: Mechanical Engineering

Faculty supervisor: Dr. Peter Oshkai and Prof. Afzal Suleman

"Investigation of aspects of the design and development of Pintle Injectors for Liquid Propellant Rocket Engines to reduce time and cost required to produce new engine designs. Pintle Injectors are more reliable, easier to manufacture, and more efficient than traditional injectors. This research could increase fuel efficiency of rocket engines and reduce their emissions."

Sydney McIvor

Project title:

Department: Economics

Faculty supervisor: Dr. Herbert Schuetze

"I plan to examine wage differentials across the public and private labour markets. It is well known that wages and benefits tend to be higher in the public sector when compared to private sector outcomes. Indeed a number of recent government initiatives appear to be aimed at reducing this differential. However, the differential, in part, might be explained by the existence of Pay Equity and Employment Equity legislation that applies to the public but not private sector. While a number of econometric studies have examined public-private wage differentials relatively few have focused on the role of Pay and Employment Equity in explaining the differences across sectors. Utilizing Canadian Census data I will attempt to identify the role played by Pay and Employment Equity legislation in explaining differences in wage outcomes across the two sectors. In particular, utilizing a econometric decomposition approach that will allow me to sort between those aspects of the overall differential that are due to pure public-private pay differences and those that may be attributable to Pay and Employment Equity legislation."

Taylor Smith

Project title:

Department: Anthropology

Faculty supervisor: Dr. Helen Kurki

"The field of paleopathology, study of health and disease in the past, has its origins in Medicine, and continues some of the traditions of that field, such as the publication of case studies. Case studies outline a particular case of a disease, trauma, or anomaly in an individual, with little attention paid to what it means to the population. Yet, paleopathology has evolved since the mid 20th century into a discipline aligned with Bioarchaeology and taking a more holistic, population-focused perspective. Why then are paleopathological case studies still prevalent in the literature? What role do they serve? Are they a critically engaged component of the literature that serves to align diagnostic approaches in Medicine with Bioarchaeology’s focus on paleodemography and biocultural perpectives? This research will address these questions through a literature review of relevant paleopathological journals – such as The International Journal of Osteoarchaeology, and The International Journal of Paleopathology. I will examine the frequency of case studies in these journals through time and track when and in what contexts case studies are cited in other bioarchaeological studies. Given the similar origins of medical and paleopathological case studies I will compare their approaches, focusing on how diseases are diagnosed, and to what degree the biocultural perspective informs their interpretations. The goal of this research is to provide a critically reflective examination of the factors underlying the prevalence of the case study in paleopathology and how they have shaped and been shaped by the evolution of the discipline at the divergence from its medical origins."


Tyler Irwin

Project title:

Department: Biology

Faculty supervisor: Dr. Juergen Ehlting

"Wood is an extraordinary, sustainable feedstock for construction, pulp and paper, and potentially for bioenergy production. Wood is largely composed of secondary cell walls containing carbohydrates (such as cellulose) and lignin. The latter provides mechanical stability, but negatively impacts pulp and bioethanol generation. To better understand the genetic architecture of wood biogenesis, genome wide genetic association studies have been performed previously, linking genetic variation within a population of poplar trees with wood trait variations. Among other genes, it was suggested that a putative solute carrier gene, named SLC, in Populus trichocarpa was genetically associated with secondary cell wall biogenesis and lignin biosynthesis. SLC belongs to a large family of transporters involved in nitrate, peptide, and secondary metabolite transport, but its actual physiological function is unknown. The connection and possible role of SLC in secondary cell wall biogenesis will be examined in my Honours research by using reverse genetic approaches: Poplar trees and isolated roots will be used to characterize transgenic plants overexpressing or down-regulating SLC. The mutants will be analyzed through chemical analysis using HPLC to test for changes in secondary metabolites in the mutants compared to wild-type. Furthermore, a nutrient experiment will be performed by growing mutant whole plants under different nitrogen fertilization regimes. This will test the hypothesis that differences in nutrient uptake efficiencies may indirectly explain the observed association of SLC with wood chemistry traits. In summary, the purpose of this project is to gain insight into the biological role of SLC using a functional genomics approach."

Victoria Philibert

Project title:

Department: Pacific & Asian Studies

Faculty supervisor: Dr. Katsuhiko Endo

"I wish to research and critically evaluate recent natalist policy in Japan to address the declining population. Specifically, I am interested in the strategies and protocols employed by the government, their efficacy, in what capacity they are influencing the attitudes and actions of the targeted generations involved, and how all this intersects with Japanese feminism."

Warda Ibrahim

Project title:

Department: Child & Youth Care

Faculty supervisor: Prof. Jin-Sun Yoon

"Last year, the JCURA research student projects conducted surveys to both on campus and distance students in the undergraduate program. The focus was on their sense of belonging to the School of Child and Youth Care (SCYC) and the Child and Youth Care Students’ Society (CYCSS). They provided several recommendations for further study. I will focus my research towards examining the factors that exist as to why international students do not feel as though they belong within the Child and Youth Care community. Furthermore, my research aims to provide informative recommendations for the CYCSS and SCYC to promote improvements of international students' sense of belonging. My research methodology will be to facilitate a focus group with a sample population of International students using a semi-structured interview process and then to do a thorough qualitative analysis. I will be working collaboratively with another JCURA student who will focus her study on another identified group of students who have indicated that they do not feel a strong sense of belonging. Together, we will work collaboratively with our supervisor but have our individual research pursuits with our specified target population."

Yasmine El-Hamamsy

Project title:

Department: Political Science

Faculty supervisor: Dr. Feng Xu

“The Malaysian government recognizes the refugees and forced migrants within its borders as illegal immigrants. Despite this, the state acts as transit country for increasing numbers of refugees from surrounding regions looking for temporary (and undocumented) work while awaiting relocation. My research as part of this JCURA grant will examine how the Malaysian state and the international community respond to forced migrants in Malaysia, particularly in terms of their 'illegal' status. In particular, I will examine how these responses and systems materially affect migrants, and how various characteristics of migrants (e.g. class, language, religion and/ or gender) may influence their experiences as migrants. My research will involve both secondary and primary research, the latter based on my work as an intern at the Malaysian Social Research Institute (MSRI) in Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia in the summer & fall of 2015. This internship will allow me to collect empirical data of the region's migrants and carryout interviews with individuals working with MSRI such as the Institute’s teachers, nurses, translators and facilitators, many of which are refugees themselves. My research will then be available to MSRI for their databases and used to develop an honours thesis. Under Dr. Xu’s supervision, I will submit an ethics application and develop interview questions. Dr. Xu’s extensive experience with primary research and her expertise in migration and Asian politics will support this project, and will help me strengthen my own research skills.”


Yuebo Yang

Project title:

Department: Medical Sciences

Faculty supervisor: Dr. Brian Christie

"Changes of synaptic and extrasynaptic NMDA receptors in the Fmr1 knockout mice with hippocampal NMDA receptor hypofunction
The N-methyl-D-aspartate receptors (NMDARs) are ionotropic glutamate receptors which regulate synaptic plasticity. NMDARs show varied subunit composition in different developmental stages with a general trend towards a decreasing contribution from the NR2B subunit during development in association with an increasing contribution of NR2A-containing NMDARs in the synaptic current in mature neurons. NMDARs present at the synapse with dominant NR2A-containing receptors and on the extrasynaptic membrane with dominant NR2B-containing receptors. Emerging evidence has demonstrated that synaptic NMDARs initiate changes in synaptic efficacy and promote pro-survival events, whereas extrasynaptic NMDARs are coupled to cell death pathways, suggesting activation of synaptic and extrasynaptic NMDAR may have diverse actions. In adult Fmr1 knockout mice, a mouse of neurodevelopmental disorder: Fragile X Syndrome (FXS), our previous findings have reported that behavioral impairment in a DG-dependent learning and memory task is in association with a region-specific impairment in NMDAR-dependent synaptic plasticity. These DG-specific deficits decreased NR1, NR2A and NR2B subunits. We propose to investigate the developmental profile of synaptic and extrasynaptic NMDAR subunits in the DG by western blot analysis in Fmr1 KO and wildtype mice at postnatal days 14, 28 and 60. Electrophysiology will be performed to examine synaptic and extrasynaptic NMDAR responses with the use of memantine (≤ 4 uM, preferentially blocks extrasynaptic NMDAR activity without disrupting synaptic function) (Garcia-Munoz et al., 2014). Understanding changes in extrasynaptic and synaptic NMDAR expressions may shed light on enhancing NMDAR-dependent synaptic function in the hippocampus of FXS."

Student recipients 2014-2015

Department Student recipient Faculty supervisor
Anthropology Bradley Clements Dr. Andrea Walsh
Anthropology Shawn Curé   Dr. Andrea Walsh
Anthropology (Indigenous Studies) David Parent Dr. Robert Hancock
Anthropology Nicholas Wees Dr. Alexanderine Boudreault-Fournier
Art History & Visual Studies Holly Cecil Prof. Erin Campbell
Art History & Visual Studies Aimee Hawker Dr. Catherine Harding
Art History & Visual Studies Laurie White Prof. Allan Antliff
Biochemistry & Microbiology (Centre on Aging) James Dunbar Dr. Debra Sheets
Biochemistry & Microbiology Karthik Gopalakrishnan Dr. Brian Christie
Biochemistry & Microbiology Hayden McClure Dr. Terry Pearson
Biochemistry & Microbiology Kate McWilliams Dr. Terry Pearson
Biology Laila Drabkin Dr. Brian Christie
Biology Graeme Keais Dr. Ben Koop
Biology Kelly Turner Dr. Francis Choy
Biology Peter Watson Dr. Bob Chow
Chemistry Karlee Bamford Prof. Neil Burford and Dr. Scott McIndoe
Chemistry Rehan Higgins Prof. Robin Hicks
Chemistry Tasha Jarisz Prof. Dennis Hore
Chemistry Andrew Roberts Dr. Fraser Hof and Dr. Scott McIndoe
Child & Youth Care Annika Benoit-Jansson Prof Jin-Sun Yoon
Child & Youth Care Laura Sharp Prof Jin-Sun Yoon
Computer Science Xinghang Ye Dr. Jianping Pan
Curriculum & Instruction David Fletcher Dr. Kathy Sanford
Curriculum & Instruction Rachel Lallouz Dr. Kathy Sanford
Curriculum & Instruction Emily Tench Dr. Kathy Sanford
Earth & Ocean Sciences Michael Conlin Dr. Kristin Morell
Earth & Ocean Sciences Maura Dewey Dr. Colin Goldblatt
Earth & Ocean Sciences Curtis Martin Dr. Diana Varela
Economics Maya Kryzan Prof. Cornelis van Kooten
Economics Craig Logan Dr. Kenneth Stewart
Economics Carolyn Tsao Dr. Chris Auld
Educational Psychology & Leadership Studies Alison Hill Dr. Valerie Irvine
Electrical & Computer Engineering Peter Kremler Dr. Kin Fun Li
English Katherine Goertz Dr. Misao Dean
English James Kendrick Dr. Sheila Rabillard
English Tye Landels Dr. Richard van Oort
English Brianna Wright Dr. Janelle Jenstad and Dr. Kim McLean-Fiander
Environmental Studies Peter Gibbs Dr. Karena Shaw
Environmental Studies Nina Moffat Dr. Trevor Lantz
Environmental Studies Megan Spencer Dr. Jessica Dempsey
Exercise Science, Physical & Health Education Isaac Davies Dr. Marc Klimstra
Exercise Science, Physical & Health Education Travis Gordon Dr. Sandra Hundza and Dr. Marc Klimstra
Exercise Science, Physical & Health Education Steven Noble Dr. Catherine Gaul
Exercise Science, Physical & Health Education Stephanie Norman Dr. Catherine Gaul
French Taryn Burgar Dr. Claire Carlin  
French Phelan Hourigan Dr. Marc Lapprand
Geography Colin Crawford Dr. Reuben Rose-Redwood
Geography Stephen Finnis Dr. Maycira Costa
Geography Travis Muir Dr. Chris Darimont
Geography Megan Neufeld Dr. Cameron Owens
Germanic & Slavic Studies Alexandra Hill Dr. Megan Swift
Germanic & Slavic Studies Lucas McKinnon Prof. Elena Pnevmonidou
Greek & Roman Studies Elliott Fuller Prof. Brendan Burke
Greek & Roman Studies Mac MacDonald Prof. Brendan Burke
Hispanic & Italian Studies Elise Côté Dr. Pablo Restrepo-Gautier
Hispanic & Italian Studies Kirsten (Kay) Gallivan Dr. Beatriz de Alba-Koch
Hispanic & Italian Studies Jennifer McLean Dr. Lloyd Howard
History Alissa Cartwright Prof. Jason Colby
History Erin Cotton Dr. Eric Sager
History Céilidhe Maher Dr. Perry Biddiscombe
History Derek Turkington Dr. Wendy Wickwire
Linguistics Alexah Konnelly Dr. Alexandra D’Arcy
Linguistics Severne Robertson-Hooper Dr. Suzanne Urbancyzk
Linguistics Jeness Weisgerber  Dr. Li-Shih Huang
Mathematics & Statistics Zhiyu Gong Dr. Junling Ma and Dr. Reinhard Illner
Mathematics & Statistics Shayla Redlin  Dr. Gary MacGillivray
Mathematics & Statistics Chadi Saad-Roy Prof. Pauline van den Driessche
Mathematics & Statistics Robin Spillette Dr. Laura Cowen
Mechanical Engineering Edward Alley Dr. Zuomin Dong
Mechanical Engineering John Edgar Prof. Stephanie Willerth
Mechanical Engineering Tyler Klassen Dr. Scott Iverson
Medieval Studies Sarah Jenkinson Prof. Helene Cazes
Nursing Jasmine Cox Dr. Debra Sheets
Nursing Courtney Ellis Dr. Katherine Bertoni
Nursing Courtney Greenway Dr. Karen MacKinnon and Dr. Lynne Young  
Nursing Richelle Stanley Dr. Debra Sheets
Pacific & Asian Studies Patrick Musgrave Dr. Katsuhiko Endo
Pacific & Asian Studies N’Donna Russell Dr. Timothy Iles
Philosophy Jasmin Brown Dr. Patrick Rysiew
Philosophy Bianca Crewe Dr. Cindy Holder
Philosophy Katie Lauriston Dr. Colin Macleod
Philosophy Jessica Parker Prof. Dr. David Scott
Physics & Astronomy James Hartwick Prof. Justin Albert
Physics & Astronomy Marlene Machemy Dr. Pavel Kovtun
Physics & Astronomy Douglas Rennehan Dr. Arif Babul
Political Science Scott Aubrey Dr. Scott Watson
Political Science Chase Blair Dr. Janni Aragon
Political Science Sophia Ciavarella Dr. Janni Aragon
Political Science Kristoffer Jorgensen Dr. Marlea Clarke
Psychology Catalina Dau Dr. Steve Lindsay
Psychology David Drohan Prof. Scott Hofer
Psychology Jacob Koudys Dr. Colette Smart and Dr. Jodie Gawryluk
Psychology Phil MacIntyre Dr. Jodie Gawryluk and Dr. Mauricio Garcia-Barrera
Public Administration/Public Health & Social Policy Candace McKivett Dr. Charlotte Reading
Social Work Julie Casey Dr. Robina Thomas
Social Work Nicole Siemens Prof. Gayle Ployer
Sociology Zachary Lewis Dr. André Smith
Sociology Renay Maurice Dr. Cecilia Benoit
Sociology Jason Miller Dr. André Smith
Theatre Brandon (Chase) Hiebert Prof. Jan Wood
Theatre Emma Leck Dr. Allana Lindgren and Prof. Conrad Alexandrowicz
Visual Arts Elizabeth Charters Prof. Robert Youds
Visual Arts Hovey Eyres Prof. Lynda Gammon
Visual Arts Olivia Prior Prof. Jennifer Stillwell
Women's Studies and Political Science (Social Justice Studies) Lane Foster-Adamson Dr. Laura Parisi
Women's Studies Bo Ya (Lena) Li Dr. Jo-Anne Lee
Women's Studies Fenn Olson-Mayes Dr. Annalee Lepp
Writing Jerry Flexer Prof. David Leach
Writing Cody Gies Prof. Lee Henderson

Student recipients 2013-2014

Department Student Recipient Faculty Supervisor

Anthropology

Amy Becker

Dr. Brian Thom

Anthropology

Angela Dyck

Dr. Erin McGuire

Anthropology

Sharonne Specker

Prof. Alexandrine Boudreault-Fournier

Biochemistry & Microbiology

Kellie Brown

Dr. Caroline Cameron

Biochemistry & Microbiology

Emily MacLean

Dr. Jeremy Wulff

Biochemistry & Microbiology

Steven Wong

Dr. Alisdair Boraston

Biology

Marissa Davies

Dr. Terri Lacourse

Biology

Mary Elrick  

Dr. Julian Lum

Biology

Nick Slater

Adjunct Prof. Patrick Walter

Biology

Misha Warbanski

Dr. Rana El-Sabaawi

Centre on Aging

Johanna Berryman

Dr. Debra Sheets

Centre on Aging

Sarah Gibson

Dr. Debra Sheets

Chemistry

Amarjot Dev

Dr. Fraser Hof

Chemistry

Amelia Hesketh

Dr. Scott McIndoe

Chemistry

Janessa Li

Dr. Fraser Hof

Chemistry

Daniel Motyka

Dr. Dennis Hore

Child & Youth Care

Nasim Naraghi

Dr. Gord Miller

Child & Youth Care

Kaeli Rose Sort

Prof. Jin-Sun Yoon and Dr. Gord Miller

Child & Youth Care

Christina Yee

Dr. Gord Miller

Computer Science

Charlie Magnuson

Dr. Ulrike Stege

Curriculum and Instruction

Aaron Bailey   

Dr. Valerie Irvine

Curriculum and Instruction

Jamie Burren

Dr. Jilliane Code

Earth & Ocean Sciences

Jinny Donovan

Dr. Dante Canil and Dr. Stephen Rowins

Earth & Ocean Sciences

Robert Fajber

Dr. Adam Monahan

Earth & Ocean Sciences

Jeremy Gosselin

Dr. Stan Dosso

Economics

Qinlu (Louisa) Chen

Dr. David Giles

Economics

Nicholas Garmulewicz

Dr. Kenneth Stewart

Economics

Rachel Lott

Dr. Elisabeth Gugl

Economics

Zoey Verdun

Dr. Chris Auld

Educational Psychology & Leadership Studies

Hannah Caird

Dr. Allyson Hadwin

Educational Psychology & Leadership Studies

Neta Herage

Dr. Jillianne Code

English

Patrick Close

Dr. Jentery Sayers

English

Quinn MacDonald

Dr. Stephen Ross

English

Raya MacKenzie

Dr. Alison Chapman

English

Kaelan Unrau

Dr. Janelle Jenstad and Dr. Erin Kelly

Environmental Studies

Craig Axford

Dr. James Rowe

Environmental Studies

Christopher Madsen

Dr. Brian Starzomski

Exercise Science, Physical & Health Education

Simone Beattie

Dr. E. Paul Zehr

Exercise Science, Physical & Health Education

Megan Cox

Dr. Sandra Hundza

Exercise Science, Physical & Health Education

Molly Hulbert

Dr. Sandra Hundza

Exercise Science, Physical & Health Education

Kristy Inouye

Dr. Sandra Hundza

French

Rachel Baker

Dr. Marie Vautier

French

Andrea Cownden

Dr. Marc Lapprand

French

Spencer Trerice

Dr. Marc Lapprand

Geography

Montanna Diakun

Dr. Dennis Jelinski

Geography

Paige Erickson-McGee

Dr. Cameron Owens

Geography

Sean Grisdale

Dr. Reuben Rose-Redwood

Geography

Bradd Tuck

Dr. Rosaline Canessa

Germanic & Slavic Studies

Erin Lowey

Dr. Ulf Schuetze

Germanic & Slavic Studies

Rowan Meredith

Dr. Megan Swift

Germanic & Slavic Studies

Lauren Thompson

Dr. Helga Thorson

Greek & Roman Studies

Nick Falzon 

Prof. Brendan Burke

Greek & Roman Studies

Rose Pappas-Acreman 

Dr. Ingrid Holmberg

Health Information Science

Robert Bittner

Dr. Karen Courtney

Health Information Science

Naima Salemohamed

Dr. Karen Courtney

Hispanic and Italian Studies

Aidan Fridman

Dr. Maria Bettaglio

Hispanic and Italian Studies

Kathleen Mullaney

Dr. Dan Russek

History

Benjamin Fast

Dr. Lynne Marks

History

Courtney Reynoldson

Dr. Tom Saunders

History

Monique Ulysses

Dr. Jason Colby

History in Art

Caroline Baicy

Dr. Astri Wright

History in Art

Justin Barski

Dr. Allan Antliff

History in Art

Evelyn Brotherston

Dr. Catherine Harding and Dr. Evanthia Baboula

Indigenous Studies Minor

Jodi Beniuk 

Dr. Catherine Richardson

Linguistics

Nicole Edgar

Dr. Alexandra D'Arcy

Linguistics

Geoff Stevenson

Dr. Suzanne Urbanczyk

Mathematics & Statistics

Danika Law

Dr. Gary MacGillivray

Mathematics & Statistics

Carolyn Tsao

Dr. Mary Lesperance

Mathematics & Statistics

Maria Warren

Dr. Ian Putnam

Mathematics & Statistics

Stephanie Yurchak

Dr. Laura Cowen

Mechanical Engineering

Anaïssia Franca

Dr. Ned Djilali

Mechanical Engineering

Craig King

Dr. Stephanie Willerth

Mechanical Engineering

Aakash Rao

Dr. Curran Crawford

Medical Sciences

Ross Prager

Dr. Leigh Anne Swayne

Medical Sciences

Scott Sawchuk

Dr. Brian Christie

Medieval Studies

Jennifer McLean

Dr. Hélène Cazes

Medieval Studies

Josef Méthot

Dr. Hélène Cazes

Music

Sondra Moyls

Mr. Kirk McNally

Nursing

Scott Beck

Dr. Lenora Marcellus

Nursing

Marilise Engeland

Dr. Debra Sheets

Nursing

Rosanna Sheppard

Ms. Wanda Martin with Dr. Marjorie MacDonald

Pacific & Asian Studies

Jessica Dearman 

Dr. Katsuhiko Endo

Pacific & Asian Studies

Alice Yi-Tzu Lai

Prof. Cody Poulton

Philosophy

Zacharius Braciszewicz

Dr. Margaret Cameron

Philosophy

Austin Horn

Dr. Scott Woodcock

Philosophy

Fiona Schick

Dr. Audrey Yap

Physics & Astronomy

James Hartwick

Dr. Justin Albert

Political Science

Heather Clifford

Dr. James Lawson

Political Science

Nicola Simpson

Dr. James Lawson

Political Science

Maria Tulli

Dr. Janni Aragon

Psychology

Nicholas Hargrove

Dr. Ronald Skelton

Psychology

Ryan Lim

Dr. Mauricio Garcia-Barrera

Psychology

Naomi Ridley   

Dr. Ulrich Mueller

Psychology

Kelly Sutton

Dr. Mauricio Garcia-Barrera

Public Health & Social Policy

Alexandra Kent

Dr. Charlotte Reading

Public Health & Social Policy

Marla Turner

Dr. Catherine Worthington

Religious Studies

Karin Dayton

Dr. Martin Adam

Social Justice Studies

Nadine Graham

Dr. Audrey Yap

Social Justice Studies

Jesse Henderson

Dr. Margo Matwychuk

Social Work

Alex Filippelli

Dr. Pat MacKenzie

Social Work

Melanie Nicol

Prof. Gayle Ployer

Sociology

Lyanna Renaud

Dr. Helga Hallgrímsdóttir

Sociology

Renée Rogers

Dr. Andrew Wender

Sociology

Brad van Dyck

Dr. Neena Chappell

Sociology

Isabela Vera

Dr. André Smith

Theatre

Alannah Bloch

Dr. Allana Lindgren  

Theatre

Jocelyne Lamarche

Dr. Allana Lindgren

Visual Arts

Abigail Laycock

Prof. Daniel Laskarin

Visual Arts

Graham Macaulay

Prof. Jennifer Stillwell

Women's Studies

Katrina Fukuda

Dr. Heather Tapley

Women's Studies

Carly Greene Hill

Dr. Annalee Lepp

Writing

Bethany Hughes

Prof. Lee Henderson

Writing

Benjamin Willems

Dr. Tim Lilburn

Student recipients 2012-2013

Department Student Recipient Faculty Supervisor

Anthropology

Sebastian Irvine

Dr. April Nowell

Anthropology

Sarah Leckie

Dr. Brian Thom

Anthropology

Emma Weatherley

Dr. Peter Stahl

Biochemistry & Microbiology

Melissa Fowler

Dr. Terry Pearson

Biochemistry & Microbiology

Kathleen Kolehmainen

Dr. Paul Romaniuk

Biochemistry & Microbiology

Daniel Moller

Dr. Martin Boulanger

Biology

Jake Gambling

Dr. Perry Howard

Biology

Barbara Gauthier

Dr. Laura Arbour

Biology

Esther Wagner

Dr. Tom Reimchen

Biology

Maryann Watson

Dr. Julia Baum

Business

Connor Bildfell

Dr. Carmen Galang

Centre on Aging

Jessica Dakin

Dr. Kelli Stajduhar and Ms. Darcee Bidgood

Centre on Aging

Laura Walzak

Dr. Holly Tuokko

Chemistry

William FitzGerald

Prof. Dennis Hore

Chemistry

Colin Hammond

Prof. Jeremy Wulff

Chemistry

Marie Malone

Prof. Fraser Hof

Chemistry

Taylor Quon

Prof. Fraser Hof

Child & Youth Care

Angela Cooper

Prof. Jin-Sun Yoon

Child & Youth Care

Jessica Renfrew

Dr. Gord Miller

Child & Youth Care

Mattie Walker

Dr. J.N. ("Cole") Little

Computer Science

Monique Du Plessis

Dr. Ulrike Stege

Computer Science

Jordan Ell

Dr. Daniela Damian

Computer Science

Trevor Maryka

Prof. Daniel German

Curriculum and Instruction

Aaron Bailey

Dr. Valerie Irvine

Curriculum and Instruction

Jamie Elbert

Dr. Jillianne Code

Earth & Ocean Sciences

Lucas Kavanagh

Dr. Colin Goldblatt

Earth & Ocean Sciences

Pearce Luck

Dr. Laurence Coogan

Earth & Ocean Sciences

Kei Quinn

Dr. Stephen Johnston

Economics

Dania Clarke

Dr. Pascal Courty

Economics

Man Wan Lai

Dr. Pascal Courty

Economics

Monica Mow

Dr. Pascal Courty

Economics

Derrick Persson

Dr. Elisabeth Gugl

Educational Psychology & Leadership Studies

Adrianna Haffey

Dr. Allyson Hadwin

Educational Psychology & Leadership Studies

Jeffrey Horncastle

Dr. Jillianne Code

Electrical & Computer Engineering

David Rusk

Dr. Kin Fun Li

Electrical & Computer Engineering

Elaine Yan

Dr. Kin Fun Li

English

Jayme Collins

Dr. Evelyn Cobley

English

Taylor "Amy" Coté

Dr. Lisa Surridge

English

Megan Halford

Dr. Mary Elizabeth Leighton

Environmental Studies

Rebecca Segal

Dr. Trevor Lantz

Environmental Studies

Tanya Taggart-Hodge

Prof. Eric Higgs

European Studies Program

Yang You

Dr. Emannuel Brunet-Jailly

Exercise Science, Physical & Health Education

Drew Commandeur

Dr. Marc Klimstra and Dr. Sandra Hundza

Exercise Science, Physical & Health Education

Christina McLean

Dr. Joan Wharf Higgins

Exercise Science, Physical & Health Education

Nikita Pardiwala

Dr. Viviene Temple

Exercise Science, Physical & Health Education

Michael Slater

Dr. Geri Van Gyn

French

Dylan Trerice

Dr. Catherine Leger

French

Emily Walker

Dr. Emile Fromet de Rosnay

Geography

Kayla Cheeke

Dr. Cameron Owens

Geography

Kalyani Child

Dr. Chris Darimont

Geography

Georgia Clyde

Dr. Cameron Owens

Geography

Lauren Ka-Po Law

Dr. Philip Dearden

Germanic & Slavic Studies

Taylor Antoniazzi

Dr. Peter Golz

Germanic & Slavic Studies

Carley Campbell

Dr. Serhy Yekelchyk

Germanic & Slavic Studies

Elise Polkinghorne

Dr. Charlotte Schallié

Greek & Roman Studies

Glenn Beauvais

Dr. Ingrid Holmberg

Greek & Roman Studies

Susana Reyes

Prof. Brendan Burke

Hispanic and Italian Studies

Cory Kreger

Dr. Dan Russek

Hispanic and Italian Studies

Dex McNally

Dr. Sonya Bird and Prof. Lloyd Howard

Hispanic and Italian Studies

Andrea Meyes

Dr. Maria Bettaglio

History

Hannah Anderson

Dr. Rachel Cleves

History

Morgan Balderson

Dr. Christine O'Bonsawin

History

Montanna Rose Mills

Dr. Jordan Stanger-Ross

History

Andrew Wong

Dr. Zhongping Chen

History in Art

Sara Fruchtman

Dr. Evanthia Baboula and Dr. Marcus Milwright

History in Art

Alexandra Macdonald

Dr. Dennine Dudley

History in Art

Christine Oldridge

Dr. Catherine Harding

Indigenous Studies Minor

Ryan Nicolson

Dr. Christine O'Bonsawin

Linguistics

Kazuya Bamba

Dr. Martha McGinnis and Dr. Leslie Saxon

Linguistics

Dylan Barkowsky

Dr. Li-Shih Huang

Linguistics

Matthew Windsor

Dr. Leslie Saxon

Mathematics & Statistics

Dean Koch

Dr. Laura Cowen

Mathematics & Statistics

Rylan Miszkiel

Dr. Gary MacGillivray

Mathematics & Statistics

Jacqueline Warren

Dr. Gary MacGillivray

Mathematics & Statistics

Stephanie Yurchak

Dr. Alfonso Gracia-Saz

Mechanical Engineering

Pranav Shrestha

Dr. Daniela Constantinescu

Mechanical Engineering

Pranay Shrestha

Prof. Rustom Bhiladvala

Mechanical Engineering

Reed Teyber

Dr. Andrew Rowe

Medical Sciences

Brett Hryciw

Dr. Brian Christie

Medical Sciences

Eric McGinnis

Dr. Brian Christie

Medieval Studies

Elisabeth Hill

Dr. Iain Higgins

Medieval Studies

Sarah White

Dr. Joseph Grossi

Nursing

Sophia Gardezy

Dr. Debra Sheets

Nursing

Suzy Prowse

Dr. Lenora Marcellus

Nursing

Brittany Reed

Dr. Debra Sheets

Pacific & Asian Studies

Hugh Davis

Dr. Timothy Iles

Philosophy

Brendan Downey

Dr. Cindy Holder

Philosophy

Jamaal Hyder

Dr. Patrick Rysiew

Philosophy

Zoey Ockenden

Dr. Scott Woodcock

Physics & Astronomy

Alice Koning

Dr. Jon Willis

Physics & Astronomy

Ryan Porter

Dr. Richard Keeler

Political Science

George Benson

Dr. Matt James

Political Science

Alannah James

Dr. Janni Aragon

Political Science

Adrienne Sanders

Dr. James Tully

Psychology

David Jewett

Dr. Mauricio Garcia-Barrera

Psychology

Meghan Richey

Dr. Elizabeth Brimacombe

Public Health & Social Policy

Dylan Collins

Dr. Charlotte Reading

Religious Studies

Kelly Lindsay

Dr. Martin Adam

Religious Studies

Rosa Lea McBee

Prof. Tamsin Jones

Social Justice Studies

Tanya Cooper

Dr. Margo Matwychuk

Social Justice Studies

Jessamyn Polson

Dr. Marlea Clarke

Social Work

Jonas Breuhan

Dr. Leslie Brown

Social Work

Jenna Simonds

Prof. Jacquie Green

Sociology

Bryan Benner

Dr. Helga Hallgrimsdottir

Sociology

Olivia Guerra

Prof. André Smith

Sociology

Olivia Merritt

Dr. Neena Chappell

Theatre

Stewart Gibbs

Dr. Jennifer Wise

Theatre

Sarah Johnson

Dr. Warwick Dobson

Theatre

Jennifer Taylor

Dr. Jennifer Wise

Visual Arts

Bronwyn McMillin

Prof. Daniel Laskarin

Visual Arts

Willie Seo

Prof. Robert Youds

Women's Studies

Renay Maurice

Dr. Annalee Lepp

Women's Studies

Kyla Slobodin

Dr. Thea Cacchionni

Writing

Claire Garneau

Prof. Maureen Bradley

Writing

Liz Snell

Prof. David Leach

Student recipients 2011-2012

Department Student Recipient Faculty Supervisor

Anthropology

Melanie Callas

Dr. Eric Roth

Anthropology

Claire Rawlinson

Dr. Erin McGuire

Biochemistry & Microbiology

Shannon Brown

Dr. Marty Boulanger

Biochemistry & Microbiology

Danelle Chan

Dr. Robert Burke

Biology

Lauren Braun

Dr. Bob Chow

Biology

Elizabeth Hoffman

Dr. Terri Lacourse

Biology

Geoffrey Morris

Dr. Francis Choy

Chemistry

Rebecca Dixon

Prof. Dennis Hore

Chemistry

Manuel Ma

Prof. Fraser Hof

Chemistry

Tsuki Naka

Prof. Dennis Hore

Child & Youth Care

Julia-Anne Cameron

Dr. Doug Magnuson

Child & Youth Care

Danielle Jimeno

Dr. Doug Magnuson

Computer Science

Naomi Harrington

Dr. Yvonne Coady

Curriculum and Instruction

Matt Christie

Dr. Jason Price

Curriculum and Instruction

David Fainstein

Dr. Valerie Irvine

Earth & Ocean Sciences

Jordan Clark

Prof. Tom Pedersen

Earth & Ocean Sciences

Rohanna Gibson

Prof. Stephen Johnston

Economics

Matthew Agbay

Dr. Herbert J. Schuetze

Economics

Alisha Chicoine

Dr. Herbert J. Schuetze

Economics

Brad Hackinen

Dr. Herbert J. Schuetze

Economics

Samantha Taylor

Dr. Herbert J. Schuetze

Educational Psychology & Leadership Studies

Renee Jordan

Dr. Donna McGhie-Richmond

Electrical & Computer Engineering

Stephanie Fulcher

Dr. Kin Fun Li

Electrical & Computer Engineering

Mark Johnson

Dr. Kin Fun Li

English

Cameron Butt

Dr. Erin Ellerbeck

English

Willow Falconer

Dr. Mary Elizabeth Leighton

English

Megan Welsh

Dr. Richard Pickard

Environmental Studies

Chloe Donatelli

Dr. Wendy Wickwire

European Studies Program

Michael Lenaghan

Dr. Emmanuel Brunet-Jailly

Exercise Science, Physical & Health Education

Lisette Cheng

Dr. Viviene Temple

Exercise Science, Physical & Health Education

Michelle Cox

Dr. Viviene Temple

Exercise Science, Physical & Health Education

Sarah Monsees

Dr. Sandra Hundza

Exercise Science, Physical & Health Education

Andrew Robb

Dr. Geraldine Van Gyn

French

Gabrielle Berron-Styan

Dr. Yvonne Hsieh

French

Bernadette Perry

Dr. Hélène Cazes

Geography

Kira Hoffman

Dr. Dan Smith

Geography

Kimberly House

Dr. Trisalyn Nelson

Geography

Malcolm MacLean

Dr. Cameron Owens

Geography

Alison Stockwell

Dr. Rosaline Canessa

Germanic & Slavic Studies

Rebecca Rogers

Dr. Megan Swift

Germanic & Slavic Studies

Elizabeth Sharp

Dr. Elena Pnevmonidou

Greek & Roman Studies

Charlotte Dawe

Dr. Gregory Rowe

Greek & Roman Studies

Melissa Mann

Dr. Brendan Burke

Greek & Roman Studies

Ana Wagner

Dr. Brendan Burke

Hispanic and Italian Studies

Emma Gerlach

Dr. Marina Bettaglio

Hispanic and Italian Studies

Andrea Meyes

Dr. Marina Bettaglio

History

Shiraz Higgins

Dr. Jason Colby

History

Bryan Smith

Dr. David Zimmerman

History

David Swanson

Dr. Robert Alexander

History

Simon Teague

Dr. Jason Colby

History in Art

Ryan Church

Dr. Erin Campbell

History in Art

Regan Shrumm

Dr. Evanthia Baboula

Linguistics

Brittney O'Neill

Dr. Li-Shih Huang

Mathematics & Statistics

Marcel Celaya

Dr. Gary McGillivray

Mathematics & Statistics

Takaaki Ichu

Dr. Mary Lesperance

Mathematics & Statistics

Jesse Short-Gershman

Dr. Peter Dukes

Mechanical Engineering

Alan Magni

Dr. Curran Crawford

Mechanical Engineering

Stephanie Morrison

Dr. Stephanie Willerth

Mechanical Engineering

Maxym Rukosuyev

Dr. Martin B. G. Jun

Medical Sciences

Kevin Bushell

Dr. Brian Christie

Medieval Studies

Courtney Burrell

Dr. John Tucker

Medieval Studies

Kelly Ditmars

Dr. Shamma Boyarin

Music

Thor Kell

Mr. Kirk McNally

Music

Stefan Maier

Dr. Jonathan Goldman

Music

Dominique Ryser

Mr. Kirk McNally

Nursing

Melissa Buchanan

Dr. Lenora Marcellus

Nursing

Cherie Geering Curry

Dr. Lenora Marcellus

Pacific & Asian Studies

Elise May Farand

Dr. Hiroko Noro

Pacific & Asian Studies

Shaun Kellett-Lemon

Dr. Timothy Iles

Pacific & Asian Studies

Erin Lofting

Dr. Cody Poulton

Philosophy

Jonathan Baron

Dr. Scott Woodcock

Philosophy

Megan Hyska

Dr. Margaret Cameron

Philosophy

Bianca Torchia

Prof. Cindy Holder

Physics & Astronomy

Trystyn Berg

Drs Sara Ellison and Kim Venn

Physics & Astronomy

Brendan Thorn

Dr. Kim Venn

Political Science

Emily Barner

Dr. Janni Aragon

Political Science

Russell Claus

Dr. James Lawson

Political Science

Adrian Hartrick

Dr. Michael Webb

Political Science

Geneva List

Dr. Marlea Clarke

Psychology

Emma Fraser

Dr. Robert Gifford

Psychology

Lara Oberg

Dr. Colette Smart and Dr. Mauricio Garcia-Barrera

Psychology

Kassandra Plante

Dr. Frederick Grouzet

Psychology

Tina Quade

Dr. Stuart MacDonald

Religious Studies

Sarah Moselle

Dr. Paul Bramadat

Social Justice Studies

Johanna McBurnie

Dr. Bill Carroll

Social Justice Studies

Erin Legare

Dr. Heather Tapley

SociologyΩ

Adam Finch

Dr. Bill Carroll

Sociology

Alexander Luscombe

Prof. Kevin Walby

Sociology

Barbara Merrick

Dr. Steve Garlick

Theatre

Randi Edmundson

Dr. Warwick Dobson

Theatre

Sarah Johnson

Dr. Warwick Dobson

Visual Arts

Elyse Portal

Assoc. Prof. Lynda Gammon

Visual Arts

Danielle Proteau

Prof. Megan Dickie

Women's Studies

Jasmine Nielsen

Dr. Jo-Anne Lee

Women's Studies

Taylor Teal

Dr. Thea Cacchioni

Writing

Connor Gaston

Prof. Maureen Bradley

Writing

Caitlin Bergman Jessen

Prof. Joan MacLeod

Student recipients 2010-2011

Department Student Recipient Faculty Supervisor

Anthropology

Amy Krull

Dr. Helen Kurki

Anthropology

Georgina Lorimer

Dr. Ann Stahl

Biochemistry & Microbiology

Lincoln Foerster

Dr. Martin Boulanger

Biochemistry & Microbiology

Celina Horn

Dr. Juan Ausio

Biology

Keith Johnstone

Dr. Julian Lum

Biology

Aimee Kernick

Dr. Brian Christie

Biology

Tracy MacKeracher

Dr. Brad Anholt

Business

Jill Doucette

Dr. Charlene Zietsma

Business

Jin Liang

Dr. Basma Majerbi

Chemistry

Nikita Kuklev

Dr. David Steuerman

Chemistry

Hollis Roth

Dr. Dennis Hore

Chemistry

Miranda Skjel

Dr. Lisa Rosenberg

Computer Science

David Audet

Dr. Kui Wu

Computer Science

Andreas Bergen

Dr. Yvonne Coady

Computer Science

Warren Koch

Dr. Valerie King

Curriculum and Instruction

Dallas Hermanson

Dr. Valerie Irvine

Earth & Ocean Sciences

Danielle Mountjoy

Dr. Dante Canil

Earth & Ocean Sciences

Tess Zyla

Dr. George Spence

Economics

Laurie Kan

Dr. Chris Auld and Mr. Martin Farnham

Economics

Andrew Mollard

Dr. Graham Voss

Economics

John Sim

Dr. Pascal Courty

Educational Psychology & Leadership Studies

Andrea James

Dr. Gina Harrison

Electrical & Computer Engineering

Christian McMechan

Dr. Poman So

Electrical & Computer Engineering

Brendan Morgan

Dr. Alexandra Branzan Albu

English

Kelly Berthelot

Dr. Elizabeth Grove-White

English

Natalia Esling

Dr. Janelle Jenstad

English

Emma Gerlach

Dr. Luke Carson

Environmental Studies

Stuart Higgs

Dr. Eric Higgs

Environmental Studies

Elizabeth Sargeant

Dr. John Volpe

Exercise Science, Physical & Health Education

Shannon Clarke

Dr. PJ Naylor

Exercise Science, Physical & Health Education

Dawn Curtis

Dr. Viviene Temple and Dr. Geri Van Gyn

Exercise Science, Physical & Health Education

Lauren Talley

Dr. Geri Van Gyn and Dr. Viviene Temple

French

Adrian Cocking

Dr. Helene Cazes

French

Nichelle Soetaert

Dr. Marc Lapprand

Geography

Skye Augustine

Dr. Philip Dearden

Geography

Mathieu Bourbonnais

Dr. Trisalyn Nelson

Geography

Amy Ganton

Dr. Rosaline Canessa and Dr. Peter Keller

Germanic & Slavic Studies

Nathan Horgan

Dr. Helga Thorson

Germanic & Slavic Studies

Alyssa Marren

Dr. Julia Rochtchina

Greek & Roman Studies

Diotima Coad

Dr. Greg Rowe

Greek & Roman Studies

Ruben Post

Dr. Geof Kron

Health Information Science

Paule Bellwood

Ms. Elizabeth Borycki

Health Information Science

Rebecca Campbell

Dr. Andre Kushniruk

Hispanic and Italian Studies

Amanda Bolz

Prof. Dan Russek

Hispanic and Italian Studies

Ariana Galeano Garcia

Dr. Maria Bettaglio

History

Katrina Eschner

Dr. Jordan Stanger-Ross

History

Kara Johancsik

Dr. Jason Colby

History

Timothy Noddings

Dr. Rachel Cleves

History in Art

Gwendolyn Donaldson

Dr. Marcus Milwright

History in Art

Julie Gennai

Dr. Allan Antliff

Linguistics

Kathleen Connors

Dr. Suzanne Urbanczyk

Linguistics

Marcelle Wheeler

Dr. John Esling

Mathematics & Statistics

Wanda Boyer

Dr. Gary MacGillivray

Mathematics & Statistics

Catherine Shenton

Dr. Gary MacGillivray

Mechanical Engineering

Geoff Burton

Dr. Martin Jun

Mechanical Engineering

Heshan Fernando

Dr. Curran Crawford

Medical Sciences

Russ Gothard

Dr. Brian Christie

Medieval Studies

Courtney Burrell

Dr. John Tucker

Nursing

Kaitlyn Noye

Dr. Judy Burgess

Nursing

Marlene van Vuuren

Dr. Judy Burgess

Pacific & Asian Studies

Ruji Auethavornpipat

Dr. Leslie Butt

Pacific & Asian Studies

Nicole McFadyen

Dr. Leslie Butt

Political Science

Myles Carroll-Preyde

Dr. Avigail Eisenberg

Political Science

Joshua Kepkay

Dr. Janni Aragon

Psychology

Jamie Bartfai

Dr. Ulrich Mueller

Psychology

Alyssa Idler

Dr. Frederick Grouzet

Psychology

Sonja Catherine Murchison

Dr. Ron Skelton

Religious Studies

Pamela Andrews

Dr. Martin Adam

Sociology

Russ Dawson

Dr. Steve Garlick

Sociology

Kyle Phillippe

Dr. Steve Garlick

Theatre

Eric Smith

Dr. Warwick Dobson

Theatre

Liam Volke

Dr. Jennifer Wise

Visual Arts

Laura Anderson

Prof. Lucy Pullen

Visual Arts

Aubrey Burke

Dr. Daniel Laskarin

Women's Studies

Sinead Charbonneau

Dr. Christine St. Peter

Women's Studies

Tara Paterson

Dr. Laura Parisi

Writing

Martin Ainsley

Mr. Bill Gaston

Writing

Megan Hyska

Prof. Lorna Crozier

Student recipients 2009-2010

Student Recipient
Department Faculty Supervisor

Ashton, Dean

Pacific & Asian Studies

Dr. Richard King

Bell, Jonathan

Exercise Science, Physical & Health Education

Dr. Geri Van Gyn

Buzzalino, Sabrina

Women's Studies

Dr. Laura Parisi

Caulfield, Rachel

Psychology

Dr. Mauricio Garcia-Barrera

Churchley, Ross

Mathematics & Statistics

Dr. Jing Huang

Cross, Liam

Chemistry

Dr. Dennis Hore

Czop, Jordan

Child & Youth Care

Dr. Doug Magnuson

Davies, Julius

Computer Science

Dr. Daniel German

Down, Nathalie

Women's Studies

Dr. Jo-Anne Lee

Duclos, Buck C.

Pacific & Asian Studies

Dr. Robert Christopher Morgan

Earnshaw, Jacob

Anthropology

Dr. Quentin Mackie

English, Willow

Biology

Dr. Louise Page

Forster, Martina

Exercise Science, Physical & Health Education

Dr. P. J. Naylor

Fritze, Christine

Germanic & Slavic Studies

Dr. Charlotte Schallie

Gambling, Samantha

Biology

Dr. Tom Reimchen

Gerlach, Emma

Hispanic & Italian Studies

Dr. Pablo Restrepo-Gautier

Gonzalez, Selina

Mathematics & Statistics

Dr. Laura Cowen

Grants, Jennifer

Biochemistry/Microbiology

Dr. Paul J. Romaniuk

Hermanson, Dallas

Curriculum & Instruction

Dr. Valerie Irvine

Hoxsey, Dann

Sociology

Dr. Steve Garlick

Koenig, Mason

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Prof. Bill Linwood

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Dr. Feng Xu

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Dr. Allana Lindgren

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Ms. Sandra Meigs

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Dr. Laurel Bowman

Manning, Cara

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Dr. Roberta Hamme

Marass, Francesco

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Dr. Ulrike Stege

Martin, Spencer

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Dr. Brad Nelson

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Dr. Doug Magnuson

Meixner, Tamara

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Dr. James Tanaka

Morris, Rebecca

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Dr. Karen Kobayashi

Owen, Greg

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Dr. Lisa Surridge and Dr. Mary Elizabeth Leighton

Price, Andrea

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Dr. Vera Pospelova

Regehr, Kyeren

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Prof. Lorna Crozier

Robinson, Anna

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Dr. Marie Vautier

St. Clair, Morag

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Dr. Janelle Jenstad

Service, Christina

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Dr. Trisalyn Nelson

Sita, Danica

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Dr. Pablo Restrepo-Gautier

Smith, Sarah

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Dr. Sonya Bird

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Dr. Dennis Jelinski

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Dr. Eric Higgs

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Dr. Warwick Dobson

Student in Economics

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Dr. Carl Mosk

Tonkin, Ryan

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Dr. James Young

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Dr. Merwan Engineer

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Dr. Brendan Burke

Vincent, Serge

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Dr. Reuven Gordon

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Dr. Robin Hicks

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Dr. Ming Xiang

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Dr. Simon Devereaux

Wilson, Chelsea

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Dr. Helen Kurki

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Dr. Daniela Constantinescu

Zoehner, Amelja

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Dr. Allan Antliff