Dr. Christine O'Bonsawin (Abenaki)

Dr. Christine O'Bonsawin (Abenaki)
Position
Associate Professor
History and Indigenous Studies
Credentials

BSM (Brock), MA, PhD (Western Ontario)

Contact
Office: Cle B303

Bio

I received a B.A. in Sport Management from Brock University and my MA and Ph.D. in the area of sport history (Kinesiology) from The University of Western Ontario. As a graduate student, I studied out of the International Centre for Olympic Studies at Western where my research primarily focused on Olympic and Indigenous sport histories. As a faculty member in the Department of History and in my capacity as the Director of Indigenous Studies at UVic, I remain committed to researching, writing, and teaching in areas related to sport, Olympic, and Indigenous histories.

Selected publications

Edited Collections:

  • Forsyth, Janice, Christine O’Bonsawin, and Michael Heine (eds.), Intersections and Intersectionalities in Olympic and Paralympic Studies. London, ON: International Centre for Olympic Studies, 2014.

Articles and Chapters:

  • “From Black Power to Indigenous Activism: The Olympic Movement and the Marginalization of Oppressed Peoples (1968-2012).” Journal of Sport History 42, no. 2 (2015): 200-219.
  • “Showdown at Eagleridge Bluffs: The 2010 Vancouver Olympic Winter Games, the Olympic Sustainability Smokescreen, and the Protection of Indigenous Lands.” In Intersections and Intersectionalities in Olympic and Paralympic Studies, edited by Janice Forsyth and Christine O’Bonsawin, Michael Heine, 82-88. London, ON: International Centre for Olympic Studies, 2014.
  • “Indigenous Peoples and Canadian-Hosted Olympic Games.” In Aboriginal Peoples and Sport in Canada: Historical Foundations and Contemporary Issues, edited by Janice Forsyth and Audrey R. Giles, 35-63. Vancouver, BC: UBC Press, 2013. * 2014 NASSH Anthology Award
  • “Igniting a Resistance Movement: Understanding Indigenous Opposition to the 2010 Olympic Torch Relay.” In Critical Dialogues on the Olympic and Paralympic Games, edited by Janice Forsyth and Michael K. Heine, 99-104. London, ON: International Centre for Olympic Studies, 2012.
  • “‘There Will Be No Law that Will Come Against Us’: An Important Episode of Indigenous Resistance and Activism in Olympic History.” In The Palgrave Handbook of Olympic Studies, edited by Helen J. Lenskyj and Stephen Wagg, 474-486. Hampshire and New York: Palgrave Macmillan, 2012.
  • “‘No Olympics on Stolen Native Land’: Contesting Olympic Narratives and Asserting Indigenous Rights within the Discourse of the 2010 Vancouver Games.” Sport in Society 13, no. 1 (2010): 143-156.
  • “From Savagery to Civic Organization: The Non-Participation of Canadian Indians in the Anthropology Days of the 1904 St. Louis Olympic Games.” In The 1904 Anthropology Days and Olympic Games: Sport, Race, and American Imperialism, edited by Susan Brownell, 217-242. Lincoln, NE: University of Nebraska Press, 2008. * 2008 NASSH Anthology Award

Courses

IS 200A Indigenous Studies Foundations
IS 200B Introduction to Indigenous Studies
IS 400 Special Topics Seminar in Indigenous Studies – Indigeneity, Research, and the Academy
IS 400 Special Topics Seminar in Indigenous Studies – Indigenous Theory and Applied Pathways
HSTR 385B History of the Modern Olympic Games