Dr. Eric Sager

Dr. Eric Sager
Position
Adjunct Professor and Emeritus
Department of History
Credentials

BA, PhD (UBC), FRSC

Contact

Area

Canadian history, labour history, family history.

Faces of UVic Research video

Bio

I received my PhD in British history from the University of British Columbia in 1975, after completing a doctoral thesis on the peace movement in nineteenth-century England. I taught at the University of British Columbia (1974-75) and the University of Winnipeg (1975-76). Between 1976 and 1979, and in 1981-82, I was Assistant Professor (Research) with the Atlantic Canada Shipping Project at Memorial University of Newfoundland. I taught at Erindale College (University of Toronto) from 1979 to 1981 and 1982-83, before joining the History Department at Victoria in 1983.  I have worked extensively with information from Canada's censuses in the late 19th and early 20th centuries. I was Director of the Canadian Families Project (1996-2001) and a co-investigator with the Canadian Century Research Infrastructure Project (2003-09). My current research project is on "The Problem of Inequality in the Canadian Liberal Order."

Selected publications

Books:

  • Seafaring Labour: The Merchant Marine of Atlantic Canada, 1820-1914 (Montreal & Kingston: McGill-Queen's University Press, 321 + xviii pages, 1989).
  • Maritime Capital: The Shipping Industry of Atlantic Canada, 1820-1914 (Montreal & Kingston: McGill-Queen's University Press, 289 + xviii pages, 1990) (by Eric W. Sager with Gerald E. Panting).
  • Ships and Memories: Merchant Seafarers in Canada's Age of Steam (Vancouver: UBC Press, 1993). Discovering Darwin: The 1930s in History and Memory (Darwin: The Historical Society of the Northern Territory, 1993).
  • Unwilling Idlers: The Urban Unemployed and their Families in Late Victorian Canada (Toronto: University of Toronto Press, 1998)(co-authored with Peter Baskerville)
  • Household Counts: Canadian Households and Families in 1901 (University of Toronto Press, 2007)(co-edited with P. Baskerville).