Humanities

Find your edge in UVic's Faculty of Humanities.

The humanities are concerned with the complex, ever-evolving questions of what it means to be human. The humanities equip us to make critical and difficult choices, to recognize the difference between what is right and what is easy, and to take responsibility for our choices. 

The Faculty of Humanities offers a number of courses that reflect our values, mission and strengths. 

 

Courses - Fall 2019 

 

Humanities and the Making of the Intellectual Life - 
HUMA 120A A01

CRN: 11967

Tues, Wed, Fri, 10:30 am – 11:20 am, with Dr. Michael Reed

From the Greco-Roman through the Medieval and Renaissance periods, a survey of intellectual inquiry and of its traditions, including philosophy, religion, literature, art, music, mathematics, physics and astronomy. Explores the world of ideas which shaped our ways of thinking and of living together. Scholars from a number of disciplines contribute.

Dean's Seminar: Being Human - HUMA 295 A01

CRN: 11968

Thurs, 1:30 pm – 4:20 pm, with Professor Chris Goto-Jones

How do you know that you’re human? Or that you’re good at it? Am I? What kinds of practices enhance our humanity, and what might make us less human? Being human is complicated; being human well is even more complicated. This course considers how thinkers from different cultural and intellectual traditions have defined the best way to be human. Focused on a close reading of a small number of texts, this course moves from ancient China, through Europe, and into Silicon Valley, exploring the parameters of the human, including its frontiers with authenticity, the superhuman, and the transhuman.

Conceptions of Justice and Engaged Pedagogy - 
HUMA 495 A01 

CRN: 11969

Mon and Thurs, 2:30 pm – 3:50 pm, with Associate Professor Audrey Yap

This will be a class on justice and pedagogy taught both at UVic and in the Right Living Unit at Wilkinson Jail.  Students will have one class a week on campus and one class a week at the jail, participating in course activities alongside inmates.  There will be two general types of readings: some on the transformative power of pedagogy for social justice, and some on conceptions of justice and the nature of just societies.

 

Courses - Spring 2020

 

Bodies and Social Justice - HUMA 110 A01 

CRN: 21868

Tues, Wed, Fri, 11:30 am – 12:20 pm, with Associate Professor Annalee Lepp

This course engages in an interdisciplinary conversation about the relationship between bodies, power and social justice. By focusing on the diversity of bodies in both historical and contemporary contexts, we will explore such concepts as norm and other; regulation, stigma, and discipline; and body futures and resistances.

Post-Medieval Humanities and the Making of the Modern Mind - HUMA 120B 

CRN: 21869

Tues, Wed, Fri, 10:30 am – 11:20 am, with Dr. Michael Reed

From 1500 to the present, a survey of the main questions about the world, humankind, science and society as they have been addressed by scholars, scientists and artists. Explores how challenges to authority built the modern world and defined progress, doubt, individuality, equity and plurality. Scholars from a number of disciplines contribute.

Women and Graphic Narratives - HUMA 295 A01

CRN: 21870

Mon and Thurs, 3 pm – 4:20 pm, with professors Helene Cazes, Marina Bettaglio and Sheila Rabillard

Through different methodologies, this collaborative course addresses a diverse body of graphic texts from several countries and time periods. Offering an introduction to literary theory and to the reading of comics, it considers a new subject on the editorial landscape, a genre whose specific hybrid language is seemingly (and deceptively) easy to read. Furthermore, the course will invite a recognition of the difficult and late emergence of female authors in the editorial world of comics. Through a mix of lectures, group work, oral presentations and guest lectures, students will embark on a journey of discovery; they will engage in reflective learning through weekly journal entries (on alternate weeks) and write a final paper. Options to draw comic strips and to engage in artistic expression will be provided.

The Humanities in Action - HUMA 495 A01 

CRN: 21872

Thurs, 1:30 pm – 4:20 pm, with Assistant Teaching Professor Rebecca Gagan

This course will provide students with opportunities to build and reflect on the unique competencies of the Humanities student. Crucially, students will also develop the capacity to articulate their skills to a broader community audience. Finally, students will bring their Humanities skills into action, contributing to their community while building career experience and strengthening their knowledge of the workplace.