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Expert Q&A on Pride 2019 and 50 years of gender rights in Canada

June 5, 2019 - Expert advisory

Aaron Devor—the world’s first Chair in Transgender Studies at UVic and founder and academic director of UVic’s Transgender Archives—is available to media for comment as Canada prepares to mark the 50th anniversary of the decriminalization of homosexuality and people prepare for Pride 2019 festivals in cities across the continent to honour the 50th anniversary of the Stonewall uprising.

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Cultural re-centring model

March 29, 2019 - News

How does one “speak back” to violence experienced by Indigenous girls, young women, two-spirit youth, even whole communities impacted from centuries of oppression? This question frames the work of Sisters Rising, an Indigenous-led, community-based research project that honours Indigenous youth who have experienced sexualized, gender-based violence by offering traditional land- and arts-based teachings.

Read more: Cultural re-centring model
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UVic Chair in Transgender Studies nationally recognized for exceptional contributions

December 8, 2017 - Media release

Aaron Devor, the Chair in Transgender Studies at UVic, received national acclaim in late November for his exceptional contributions to inclusivity and social change—with a 2017 Equity Award from the Canadian Association of University Teachers, the national voice for academic staff at universities and colleges across the country.

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“Our women have always carved”

March 1, 2017 - Ring

The newest exhibit at UVic's Legacy Art Gallery Downtown seeks to correct gendered colonial myths with works by Ellen Neel, a woman carver of the Northwest Coast. Ellen Newman Neel (Kwagiulth, Kwickwasutaineuk and 'Namgis) is often described as the first Northwest Coast woman carver. A prolific artist, she was only 49 years old when she passed away in the 1960s. But her defiance of gender barriers and federal law carries deep resonance for all Canadians to this day—and her artistic legacy lives on in the work of her children, grandchildren and great-grandchildren.

Read more: “Our women have always carved”