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Head space

November 15, 2018 - News

UVic researcher Olav Krigolson is helping NASA study the mental stress of a long space mission to Mars. He'll use portable electroencephalography (EEG) systems in the form of MUSE headbands and PEER research software to monitor the brain activity of crew members.

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Brain research sheds light on a mystery

June 5, 2018 - Media release

A breakthrough in brain research has promising implications for health and may lead to new answers about depression, attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) and Parkinson’s disease. A recent study brings researchers one step closer to a better understanding of a mysterious area of the brain located deep in the cerebral cortex.

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Singing to fight the stigma and social isolation of dementia

April 25, 2018 - Ring

"Voices in Motion" is an intergenerational community choir for persons with dementia, their family caregivers and high school students. It's also a UVic research study looking into how participation in an intergenerational choir might foster social engagement and caregiver well-being, improve quality of life for persons with dementia, and reduce some of the stigma surrounding memory loss.

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The Mercer Report visits UVic and exercises its brain

January 17, 2018 - Ring

On Jan. 16, the Rick Mercer Report launched its final season on CBC. The first episode features the comedian and satirist's visit to UVic campus last fall in which Mercer gets a brainwave assessment in Olav Krigolson's neuroeconomics lab, test-drives a 3D-printed prosthetic at the Victoria Hand Project lab and attempts to sing opera with music prof. Benjamin Butterfield.

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Can brainwaves predict baseball performance?

August 8, 2017 - Ring

Many consider baseball to be one of the most difficult skills in any sport. So, what makes a batter successful? Some think it requires that the athlete be in “the zone”—a mental state in which performance is optimal. But what is “the zone”? Can it be quantified? Olav Krigolson, UVic neuroscientist, paired up with Anthony Pluta, a pro-ball-player-turned-grad-student to find out.

Read more: Can brainwaves predict baseball performance?