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Rare plant thrives in campus teaching garden

July 23, 2019 - Ring

A cluster of rare pink star-shaped blossoms will soon be blooming in UVic’s David Turpin Native Plant garden— planted earlier this spring by ethnobotanist Fiona Hamersley Chambers and her environmental studies students. The Pink Sand Verbena, a federally red-listed endangered species, was considered extinct in Canada until it was rediscovered in 2000 along a beach on the BC West Coast Trail.

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Study shows human disturbance affects fish diversity

April 11, 2018 - Ring

In a study that spans Canada's Pacific Coast, UVic researchers have confirmed that human disturbance of seagrass meadows results in lower fish diversity. While human activity is known to impact a variety of ecosystems, the effect of human activity on coastal biodiversity is largely unknown. Coastal seagrass meadows are important nursery grounds for commercial and ecologically significant fish species.

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Controlling invasive species on campus

October 5, 2016 - Ring

A small army of volunteers is on the march to eradicate the spread of plant species that threaten native-growing flora on the UVic campus. Their project on invasive species management is one of four projects approved and funded this year by the Campus Sustainability Fund, which provides one-time allocations to campus projects that focus on water savings, sustainability awareness and learning opportunities.

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New app identifies hundreds of BC central coast species

April 25, 2016 - Media tip

From seaweeds and sea stars to wolves and eagles, a new app provides experts and amateurs with a tool to identify over 700 species in the Great Bear Rainforest to help deepen our appreciation of the biodiversity along BC’s central coast. The guide for phone, computer and tablet is a collaborative project developed by UVic's Brian Starzomski and including grad studentChanda Brietzke and alumna Kelly Fretwell.

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Bullfrog research takes big leap forward

January 7, 2014 - Ring

Bullfrogs—to most of us they’re just big, green, bug-eyed critters that hop and croak and (usually) make us laugh. They’re also invasive in some regions, including southern Vancouver Island. But to scientists studying environmental health, bullfrogs are an ideal “sentinel” species for monitoring the effects of pollutants such as pesticides, drugs and industrial effluents.

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