Media: news releases

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Federal government invests in new centre for Indigenous law and reconciliation at UVic

March 19, 2019 - Media release

The construction of a national centre for Indigenous law and reconciliation at the University of Victoria received major funding support today with the federal government's announcement of $9.1 million for the transformative project. The centre of excellence for the study and understanding of Indigenous laws will house the world's first joint degree in Indigenous legal orders and Canadian common law (JD/JID), launched at UVic last September.

Read more: Federal government invests in new centre for Indigenous law and reconciliation at UVic
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Methane-snacking crabs suggest hedge against climate change

February 26, 2019 - Media release

Tanner crabs observed feasting at a bubbling methane seep on the deep seafloor in the northeast Pacific Ocean may be developing a way to adapt to climate change, says a marine ecologist from the University of Victoria whose work with Oregon-based researchers establishes for the first time that a commercially-harvested species is feeding on the energy source.

Read more: Methane-snacking crabs suggest hedge against climate change
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UVic’s Ideafest runs March 4-9

February 25, 2019 - Media release

How have whales influenced human culture and history? Why are we reluctant to accept scientific findings on topics like vaccination or climate change? Where do Indigenous law, women and human rights intersect? Explore these thought-provoking questions and many more at the University of Victoria's eighth annual Ideafest.

Read more: UVic’s Ideafest runs March 4-9
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The future of chocolate is unclear

January 29, 2019 - Media release

A new paper by UVic geographer Sophia Carodenuto reveals troubling questions and provides specific recommendations for the future of cocoa farming in some of the world’s key cocoa-producing countries—Côte d'Ivoire, Ghana and Cameroon—amidst the pressures of climate change, soil erosion and excessive forest loss.

Read more: The future of chocolate is unclear