Our graduate programs

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Our holistic graduate programs aim to nourish the next generation of experts in health informatics

What is health information science?

It is the study of the nature or principles of information and its application or power within healthcare delivery systems.

We offer four graduate degree programs:

We offer our graduate students an optional co-op opportunity which provides paid, hands-on employment experience in health informatics.

If you need advice regarding eligibility for our graduate programs, course selection or choosing a supervisor, please contact our .

If you need other assistance including course registration or obtaining forms, please contact our .

Feel free to contact our for any questions or clarifications.

If you are a current student and have had a journal paper or indexed conference proceeding accepted or published, please share this information with our office so we can recognize your achievement. Please send the full citation in APA format to the .

Below is a list of some publications that our students have authored or co-authored papers accepted for publication.

2017

  1. Antonio, M. G., Courtney, K. L., Lingler, J. H., & Matthews, J. T. (2017). Translating Behavior Change Techniques to New Delivery Mediums. Studies in health technology and informatics, 234, 18.

  2. Antonio, M. G., (2017) Revisiting Patient Portal Aims - A Scoping Review. Poster presented at ITCH 2017, Victoria, Canada.

  3. Bezeau, J. (2017). Integrating a Modern Django Python Web Framework with Open Source MUMPS/VistA HER For BYOD Responsive Web Design. Poster presented at the ITCH 2017, Victoria, Canada.

  4. Davis, S., Roudsari, A. V., & Courtney, K. L. (2017). Designing Personal Health Record Technology for Shared Decision Making. Studies in Health Technology and Informatics. 234, 75-80.

  5. Farmer, S. (2017). The Advance Practice Nurse Informaticist. Poster presented at ITCH 2017, Victoria, Canada.

  6. Frishch, N. C., Atherton, P., Borycki, E. M., Mickelson, G., Black, A., Lauscher, H. N., Cordeiro, J. (2017). Expanding the Reach of Continuing Educational Offerings Through a Web-Based Virtual Network: The Experience of InspireNet. Presented at ITCH 2017, Victoria, Canada.

  7. Griffith, J., & Monkman, H. (2017). Usability and eHealth Literacy Evaluation of a Mobile Health Application Prototype to Track Diagnostic Imaging Examinations. Studies in health technology and informatics, 234, 150.

  8. Griffith, J. (2017). Recognizing Sex and Gender in the Design of a Mobile Health Application for Multiple Sclerosis. Poster presented at the ITCH 2017, Victoria, Canada.

  9. Hart, R. and Kuo, M. H. (February 2017). Better Data Quality for Better Healthcare Research Results - A Case Study. Presented at ITCH 2017, Victoria, Canada.

  10. Li, Y. (2017). Improving the Usability and Safety of a Clinical Documentation Tool by Conducting Several Layers of User Testing. Poster presented at the ITCH 2017, Victoria, Canada.

  11. Loewen, L. (2017). Measuring Business Intelligence Success in Healthcare: A Conceptual Model. Poster presented at the ITCH 2017, Victoria, Canada.

  12. McDonald, K., Courtney, K. L., & Frisch, N. (2017). Developing Effective Case Scenarios for Interprofessional Electronic Health Record Research. Studies in health technology and informatics, 234, 217.

  13. Nash, H. (2017). Medication-Related Information Sharing Between Care Settings: A description and modeling of workflow for elderly long term care residents that require short-term hospital care. Poster presented at the ITCH 2017, Victoria, Canada.

  14. Salemohamed, N. (2017) Exploring the Movement of Knowledge about Chronic Pain through an Online Learning Platform: How Healthcare Providers in Ontario Use Project ECHO. Poster presented at ITCH 2017, Victoria, Canada.

  15. Tuden, D. S., Borycki, E. M., & Kushniruk, A. W. (2017). Clinical Simulation: Evaluating the Usability of a Health Information System in a Telenurse Call Centre. Studies in health technology and informatics, 234, 340

  16. Zarei, R., & Kuo, A. (2017). Design and Development of a Web-Based Self-Monitoring System to Support Wellness Coaching. Studies in health technology and informatics, 234, 401.

2016

2015

  1. Abrahamson K, Anderson JG, Borycki EM, Kushniruk AW, Malovec S, Espejo A, Anderson M. (2015). The Impact of University Provided Nurse Electronic Medical Record Training on Health Care Organizations: An Exploratory Simulation Approach. Studies in Health Information Technology and Informatics, 208, 1-6. doi: 10.3233/978-1-61499-488-6-1

  2. Kushniruk AW, Monkman H, Tuden D, Bellwood P, Borycki EM. (2015). Integrating Heuristic Evaluation with Cognitive Walkthrough: Development of a Hybrid Usability Inspection Method. Studies in Health Information   Technology and Informatics, 208, 221-225. doi: 10.3233/978-1-61499-488-6-221

  3. Lau F, Barwich D, Hilliard N, Partridge C, Hobson B, Price M, McGregor D, Bassi J, Lee D, Kim J, Pyke J, Randhawa G. (2015). A Knowledge Translation Project on Best Practices in End-of-life Care. Studies in Health   Information Technology and Informatics, 208, 237-241. doi: 10.3233/978-1-61499-488-6-237

  4. Kushniruk AW, Monkman H. (2015). A See Through The Future: Augmented Reality and Health Information Systems. Studies in Health Information Technology and Informatics, 208, 281-285. doi: 10.3233/978-1-         61499-488-6-281

  5. Kushniruk AW, Monkman H. (2015). Optimizing the Efficacy of Multimedia Consumer Health Information. Studies in Health Information Technology and Informatics, 208, 286-290. doi: 10.3233/978-1-61499-488-6-286

  6. Kushniruk AW, Monkman H. (2015). Using Personal Health Records to Scaffold Perceived Self-Efficacy for Health Promotion. Studies in Health Information Technology and Informatics, 208, 291-295. doi: 10.3233/978-   1-61499-488-6-291

  7. Thompson C. (2015). Health Information Needs for Child-in-Care. Studies in Health Information Technology and Informatics, 216, 886 doi: 10.3233/978-1-61499-564-7-886

All students in the School of Health Information Science must follow the Guidelines for Professional Conduct.  The faculty supports models for professional conduct based on the following guidelines:

  • Submission of oneself to a professional code of ethics
  • Exercise of personal discipline, accountability and judgement
  • Acceptance of personal responsibility for continued competency and learning
  • Willingness to serve the public, client or patient and place them before oneself
  • Ability to recognize one’s own limitations
  • Maintenance of confidentiality of information (including all electronic communication) appropriate to the purposes and trust given when that information was acquired
  • Acceptance that one’s professional abilities, personal integrity and the attitudes one demonstrates in relationships with other persons are the measures of professional conduct

Health Informatics Professionals are embedded in a web of relationships that are subject to important ethical constraints.  These include professional relationships with health care professionals, researchers, health care institutions and other agencies as well working with the relationships of electronic health records and the subjects of those records within in our professional practice.  Two codes of ethics guide our professional conduct: