Events

Exhibitions | Lectures | Tours | Workshops | Past Events


Upcoming

December 10: Exhibition: Celebrity Before Photography

January 14: Exhibition: TOME

January 30: Treasures and Tea: The Garden that Love Built

February 6: Treasures and Tea: The Plot Thickens: Reading Illustrated Victorian Serial Fiction in Special Collections

February 6: Exhibition: A Dance of Pen and Pencil: Illustrated Victorian Serials

February 13: Treasures and Tea: Survivals from the Classical Tradition, Remnants of the Liberal Order: Architectural Mnemonics in Victoria’s Urban Landscape POSTPONED

February 14: Reading: How She Read: Confronting the Romance of Empire

February 19: Paleography Workshop: Introduction to 16th and 17th Century English Manuscripts

February 25: Manuscripts on Mondays: Recent Detective Work in Special Collections

February 28: Workshop: Grant Writing to Support GLAM(orous) Research

March 6: Treasures and Tea: E.J. Hughes: The Letters of a Private Man

March 11: Manuscripts on Mondays: Don’t Throw Your Sword at the King’s Feet: Medieval Memory and Records of Landholding

March 13: Treasures and Tea: The Inner Lives of Adolescent Girls: Diaries, Journals, and Voice

March 19: Anarchist Archives Lecture Series: Archiving Revolution

March 20: Treasures and Tea: Experiencing the Middle East during the Great War: The Books of Lieutenant Goddard and Captain Page

March 25: Manuscripts on Mondays: Remediating a Medieval Manuscript in Special Collections

March 27: Treasures and Tea: Untold Stories of Campus Development: Constructing the University of Victoria in the 1990s

March 27: Workshop: Graduate Student Workshop


Exhibitions

December 10 - 24

Celebrity Before Photography

Curated by Jeanne Cannizzo

Celebrities existed before the invention of the camera. Then, as now, fans and followers demanded to 'see' their favourites. Cheap printed images circulated widely to meet that demand from the 18th century, until replaced by photographs. Engravings of actors, opera singers, playwrights, managers, and many other personalities associated with the world of theatre, were mass-produced. Scenes from performances which people had attended, or wished they had been present for, were popular as a souvenir from a notable experience; others collected prints featuring plays by certain playwrights. Details of period costumes or the actual gestures and conventions of dramatic performance peculiar to particular eras were popular with collectors, and scandals always helped sales.

Dates: December 10 - 24, 2018

Location: Special Collections and University Archives, Mearns Centre for Learning - McPherson Library, Room A005

image 


January 14 - February 26

TOME

Chantal Gibson, Artist-Educator and Writer

TOME is a mixed-media installation, an imagined history book made from coffee and cotton. This book sculpture is a topographical landscape of memory imagined from a larger historical narrative about the African Diaspora. Challenging traditional ways of knowing, it is to be read with the senses. Situated in the Mearns Centre for Learning - McPherson Library amongst other historical and literary works, this book speaks to the creativity that emerges from the struggle for visibility and inclusion.

Chantal Gibson (chantalgibson.com) is an artist-educator interested in the cultural production of knowledge. Her work explores the overlap between literary and visual art, challenging imperialist notions quietly embedded in everyday things - from academic schoolbooks to kitschy souvenir spoons. Her visual art has appeared at the ROM in Toronto and MBAM in Montreal and her first book How She Read is forthcoming in January 2019 (Caitlin Press). An award-winning instructor, she teaches writing and design communication in the School of Interactive Arts & Technology at Simon Fraser University.

Dates: January 14 - February 26, 2019

Location: Mearns Centre for Learning - McPherson Library

Related event: Reading: How She Read: Confronting the Romance of Empire on February 14, 2019. 3pm.

 


February 6 - March 8

A Dance of Pen and Pencil: Illustrated Victorian Serials

Curated by Dr. Mary Elizabeth Leighton and Dr. Lisa Surridge (Department of English)

In the early 1800s, books were largely unillustrated. By the 1830s and 1840s, however, innovations in wood- and steel-engraving techniques changed how Victorian readers consumed and conceptualized fiction. A new type of novel was born, often published in serial form, one that melded text and image as partners in meaning-making.

These illustrated serial novels offered Victorians a reading experience that was both verbal and visual, based on complex effects of flash-forward and flashback as the placement of illustrations revealed or recalled significant story elements. Victorians’ experience of what are now canonical novels thus differed markedly from that of modern readers, who are accustomed to reading single volumes with minimal illustration. Even if modern editions do reproduce illustrations, these do not appear as originally laid out. This exhibit celebrates the critical role of pictures in Victorian serials—stories delivered in both words and images, over time, and with illustrations playing a key role.

Dates: February 6 - March 8, 2019

Location: Special Collections and University Archives, Mearns Centre for Learning - McPherson Library, Room A005

 



Lectures

January 30

Treasures and Tea: The Garden that Love Built

Cathy Armstrong (Executive Director, The Land Conservancy)

Join Cathy Armstrong and volunteer docents from The Land Conservancy in discussing the legacy that lead to the creation of Abkhazi Garden, a local community treasure. A love story fraught with privilege and tragedy, the tale of Peggy Pemberton-Carter and Prince Nicholas Abkhazi is fitting for a blockbuster movie plot. Living in exile since escaping the Bolshevik Revolution, the Prince met Peggy in Paris in 1922. Though World War II saw them held in prisoner of war camps more than 8,000 km. apart, the two found their way back to one another to become engaged in New York City in 1946, and begin their new lives together in what would become known as Abkhazi Garden. 

Date: January 30, 2019

Time: 1-2 p.m.

Location: Special Collections and University Archives, Mearns Centre for Learning - McPherson Library, Room A003

Treasures and Tea brings together the campus and the community to explore and share highlights from Special Collections and University Archives. Refreshments follow the informal talks.

 


February 6

Treasures and Tea: The Plot Thickens: Reading Illustrated Victorian Serial Fiction in Special Collections

Mary Elizabeth Leighton and Lisa Surridge (Department of English)

In their new book, The Plot Thickens, Mary Elizabeth Leighton and Lisa Surridge uncover the overlooked narrative role of illustrations within Victorian serial fiction. In this presentation, they will share illustrated treasures from Special Collections, where they teach and do research, and the library whose holdings provided the foundation for their study published by Ohio University Press.

Date: Wednesday, February 6, 2019

Time: 3 p.m.

Location: Special Collections and University Archives, Mearns Centre for Learning - McPherson Library, Room A003

Treasures and Tea brings together the campus and the community to explore and share highlights from Special Collections and University Archives. Refreshments follow the informal talks.


February 13 POSTPONED

Treasures and Tea: Survivals from the Classical Tradition, Remnants of the Liberal Order: Architectural Mnemonics in Victoria’s Urban Landscape

Martin Segger, Author and Architectural Historian

Until very recent times, architecture was the major medium for mass communications. Buildings are as much about popular ideologies, instruments of conviction and persuasion, as they are about function and convenience. Join architectural historian Martin Segger for a leisurely virtual stroll through the architectural landscape of Downtown Victoria. Explore how the streets are alive with a complex set of narratives: commentaries on faith, power, politics, and money in the late 19th and early 20th centuries.

Date: Wednesday, February 13, 2019 POSTPONED

Time: 1-2 p.m.

Location: Special Collections and University Archives, Mearns Centre for Learning - McPherson Library, Room A003

Treasures and Tea brings together the campus and the community to explore and share highlights from Special Collections and University Archives. Refreshments follow the informal talks.

 


February 14

Reading: How She Read: Confronting the Romance of Empire

Chantal Gibson, Artist-Educator and Writer

Artist-educator Chantal Gibson reads from her recently published book How She Read: Confronting the Romance of Empire (Caitlin Press). Gibson’s work explores the cultural production of knowledge, and the overlap between literary and visual art, challenging imperialist notions quietly embedded in everyday things—from academic schoolbooks to kitschy souvenir spoons. Her visual art has appeared at the ROM in Toronto and MBAM in Montreal. An award-winning instructor, she teaches writing and design communication in the School of Interactive Arts & Technology at Simon Fraser University.

About the book: http://caitlin-press.com/our-books/how-she-read/

Date: Thursday, February 14, 2019

Time: 3-4 p.m.

Location: Special Collections and University Archives, Mearns Centre for Learning - McPherson Library, Room A003 

 


February 25

Manuscripts on Mondays: Recent Detective Work in Special Collections

Dr. Adrienne Williams Boyarin (Department of English)

Dr. Adrienne Williams Boyarin will introduce and discuss several recent breakthroughs made by undergraduate and graduate students working on medieval and early modern manuscripts in UVic's Special Collections. Highlights include the only known personal seal of Hubert de Burgh (one of the most powerful men in England at the time of the Magna Carta), the story of a prayerbook that travelled along pilgrimage routes, and a fragment of a medical book translated from Arabic by the 11th century monk and physician Constantine the African.

Date: Monday, February 25, 2019

Time: 1-2 p.m.

Location: Special Collections and University Archives, Mearns Centre for Learning - McPherson Library, Room A003

Manuscripts on Mondays provides an opportunity for the campus and the community to explore medieval and early modern manuscripts from Special Collections. These handwritten documents, including Books of Hours, a genealogical scroll, and legal documents, are a window into the past.


March 6

Treasures and Tea: E.J. Hughes: The Letters of a Private Man

Robert Amos, R.C.A.

E. J. Hughes (1913-2007) is, next to Emily Carr, western Canada's most famous artist. His paintings are sold for millions of dollars and his work is in prominent national collections. Yet he was a notoriously private man, living at Shawnigan Lake and Duncan during most of his professional career. Amos will provide an illustrated lecture exploring the E. J. Hughes archives and paintings, with special attention to materials held by UVic Libraries.

Date: March 6, 2019

Time: 1-2 p.m.

Location: Special Collections and University Archives, Mearns Centre for Learning - McPherson Library, Room A003

Treasures and Tea brings together the campus and the community to explore and share highlights from Special Collections and University Archives. Refreshments follow the informal talks.

 


March 11

Manuscripts on Mondays: Don’t Throw Your Sword at the King’s Feet: Medieval Memory and Records of Landholding

Dr. Kenneth Duggan (Department of History, Vancouver Island University)

Throwing a sword at the king's feet to prove one's right to certain lands and privileges is not the best way to win a legal case in medieval England. Producing a charter (a document that records a grant of lands and/or privileges) was ideal. But what could people do if they no longer or never had a charter? This was a problem that people faced in 13th century England, especially between 1278-1294. During this period, King Edward I (1272–1307) required everyone to show by what right they held their lands and privileges from the crown. A powerful magnate reportedly threw a sword – which his ancestor had used at the battle of Hastings in 1066 – at the king’s feet, claiming that that sword was his right. Other people opted for less aggressive (and certainly less risky) methods. This lecture will discuss the means by which both minor and great landholders ensured that rights to lands and privileges were communicated to and remembered by a large group of people in 13th century England.

Date: March 11, 2019

Time: 1-2 p.m.

Location: Special Collections and University Archives, Mearns Centre for Learning - McPherson Library, Room A003

Manuscripts on Mondays provides an opportunity for the campus and the community to explore medieval and early modern manuscripts from Special Collections. These handwritten documents, including Books of Hours, a genealogical scroll, and legal documents, are a window into the past.

 


March 13

Treasures and Tea: The Inner Lives of Adolescent Girls: Diaries, Journals, and Voice

Dr. Daniel Scott (Associate Professor Emeritus, School of Child & Youth Care) and Shannon McFerran (Author)

Many adolescents – traditionally more girls than boys – write their way through life events, feelings and crises, in private diaries or journals. The Girls Diary Project, a five-year participatory research project, explored original diary material in order to reveal insights into the development of self-awareness and self-presentation in adolescent girls. The project studied primary source writing, including close to 3,000 pages of Lara Gilbert’s adolescent writing, held in the University Archives at UVic. This presentation will explore some of the themes, approaches, and research potential of adolescent diary material.

Date: March 13, 2019

Time: 1-2 p.m.

Location: Special Collections and University Archives, Mearns Centre for Learning - McPherson Library, Room A003

Treasures and Tea brings together the campus and the community to explore and share highlights from Special Collections and University Archives. Refreshments follow the informal talks.

 


March 19

Anarchist Archives Lecture Series: Archiving Revolution

Josh MacPhee, Designer, Artist, and Archivist

Join artist-activist Josh MacPhee, co-founder of New York's Interference Archive, for a talk on 'activating' archival materials through exhibitions, publications, workshops, film screenings and more. The Interference Archive, which opened its doors in December 2011, is an autonomous space and archive unlike any other in New York City. This growing repository of social movement history from below serves as an all-volunteer run social center within which to study, process, debate, use, and produce work that reflects people's struggles around the globe, past and present.

Date: March 19, 2019

Time: 1-2 p.m.

Location: Mearns Centre for Learning - McPherson Library, Room 210

 


March 20

Treasures and Tea: Experiencing the Middle East during the Great War: The Books of Lieutenant Goddard and Captain Page

Dr. Marcus Milwright (Art History and Visual Studies)

The Middle East was one of the most important theatres of conflict during World War I. The Ottoman Empire allied itself with Germany in 1914, fighting through to the signing of the Treaty of Mudros on October 30, 1918. This talk focuses on the experiences of two men who fought in the Palestine and Mesopotamian campaigns. These experiences are recorded in annotations to published books held in UVic Libraries' Special Collections. The first book is a copy of Archibald Wavell's, The Palestine Campaigns, which contains sketches and notes by one Lieutenant Goddard, formerly of the 3rd Carabiniers (Prince of Wales Dragoon Guards). The second book, a two-volume study by Edmund Candler entitled, The Long Road to Baghdad, was donated by Herbert Vero Shaw Page, formerly a Captain in the Napier Rifles. The book functioned as a scrapbook detailing Page's varied experiences in Iraq, including poetry, correspondence, news clippings and photographs. The talk will contextualize these two documents, suggesting ways they can be employed as primary sources on this crucial period in the history of the region.

Date: Wednesday, March 20, 2019

Time: 1:30-2:30 p.m.

Location: Special Collections and University Archives, Mearns Centre for Learning - McPherson Library, Room A003

Treasures and Tea brings together the campus and the community to explore and share highlights from Special Collections and University Archives. Refreshments follow the informal talks.


March 25

Manuscripts on Mondays: Remediating a Medieval Manuscript in Special Collections

Rachelle Ann Tan (Department of English)

Graduate student Rachelle Ann Tan (English) will introduce the Regla de la Sagrada Orden de Penitencia (c. 1528-1530) and describe her Master’s work on the manuscript. Unedited and apparently un(der)studied, this book is of considerable historical interest for its formulation of the Third Order Regular Franciscans in Spain. Since no other copies of this Regla (Rule) are documented, Rachelle’s project aims to make the text more accessible, through the creation of a digital edition, a transcription of the text, and a translation into English.

Date: Monday, March 25, 2019

Time: 1-2 p.m.

Location: Special Collections and University Archives, Mearns Centre for Learning - McPherson Library, Room A003

Manuscripts on Mondays provides an opportunity for the campus and the community to explore medieval and early modern manuscripts from Special Collections. These handwritten documents, including Books of Hours, a genealogical scroll, and legal documents, are a window into the past.

 


March 27

Treasures and Tea: Untold Stories of Campus Development: Constructing the University of Victoria in the 1990s

Don Lovell, Retired Architect

In the 1990s, UVic’s campus changed dramatically and during this decade the university added over one million square feet of building space. This unprecedented growth increased the existing university facilities by fifty per cent. Join Don Lovell as he reflects on his tenure as Architect, Manager Design and Campus Planning, during this epic period of construction. Mr. Lovell will highlight 18 projects from this period, narrating behind-the-scenes stories from this era of campus history.

Date: March 27, 2019

Time: 1-2 p.m.

Location: Special Collections and University Archives, Mearns Centre for Learning - McPherson Library, Room A003

Treasures and Tea brings together the campus and the community to explore and share highlights from Special Collections and University Archives. Refreshments follow the informal talks.

 



Tours

We welcome members of the campus and community for tours of our collection holdings.  To request a tour, please contact us at: .


Workshops

Special Collections and University Archives hosts workshops that prepare graduate students for in-depth research with rare books and archives.


February 19

Paleography Workshop: Introduction to 16th and 17th century English Manuscripts

Dr. Erin Kelly (Department of English)

Did you know that UVic Special Collections holds examples of 16th and 17th century English manuscripts (including letters, legal documents, and armorial records)? By the end of this 90 minute workshop, you’ll be able to read these texts and to work with the increasing numbers of digitized manuscript documents available online. Dr. Erin E. Kelly (Department of English) will introduce you to the most common hands, give you a chance to try writing with a quill, and help you transcribe some documents. This workshop will be of particular use to graduate students interested in early modern English history and culture. All are welcome.

Space is limited to 15 participants. Please register online here.

Date: Tuesday, February 19, 2019

Time: 2-3:30 p.m.

Location: Special Collections and University Archives, Mearns Centre for Learning - McPherson Library, Room 025

 


February 28

Grant Writing to Support GLAM(orous) Research

Christine Walde (Grants and Awards Librarian, UVic Libraries)

Galleries, libraries, archives, and museums (GLAM) around the world provide grants to support research in their collections. This session will provide graduate students with an overview of how to match their research interests with relevant collections, and how to write a successful grant application to support research as a visiting scholar. The goal of this hour long session will be to:

  • Match your research interests with collections in cultural heritage institutions
  • Determine granting sources to support your research with rare books and archives
  • Provide tips on how to write a successful grant for research in a cultural heritage institution

Space is limited. Please register online here.

Date: Thursday, February 28, 2019

Time: 5 p.m.

Location: Special Collections and University Archives, Mearns Centre for Learning - McPherson Library, Room A003

 


March 27

Graduate Student Workshop

This two-hour workshop will introduce participants to resources for graduate students in UVic Libraries, ranging from managing your academic workflow to digital scholarship and working with archives. This hands-on session will provide you with an opportunity to develop your research skills. The following topics will be covered:

Building Your Academic Workflow

Learn how to develop a research workflow – based on strategies developed by educational psychologists – and how three key library resources can support your research: the Assignment Calculator, the Research Toolkit, and the Thesis Bootcamp.

Digital Scholarship

Learn how to preserve and turn your scholarship into a larger community engagement tool. Students will learn about library resources in Digital Scholarship, including free workshops and one-on-one consultations, as well as the library-supported exhibition platforms. Students will learn the basics of metadata and exhibit building as part of this session.

Introduction to Archives

Archival documents, including letters, diaries, photographs, and drafts (and more!), can provide the basis for innovative research. Learn how to find and use archives to support your research through hands-on work with rare and unique materials from Special Collections and University Archives.

Refreshments will be provided.

Space is limited. Please register online here.

Date: Wednesday, March 27, 2019

Time: 5-7 p.m.

Location: Special Collections and University Archives, Mearns Centre for Learning - McPherson Library, Room A003

 



Past Events

Treasures and Tea, Spring 2015

Treasures and Tea, Fall 2015

Unravelling the Code(x): History of the Book Speaker Series and Symposium, 2015-16

Treasures and Tea, Spring 2016

Treasures and Tea, Spring 2017

Manuscripts in the Curriculum, Spring 2017

Manuscripts on Mondays/Treasures and Tea, Fall 2017

Manuscripts on Mondays/Treasures and Tea, Spring 2018

Manuscripts on Mondays/Treasures and Tea, Fall 2018

Manuscripts on Mondays/Treasures and Tea, Spring 2019

Past Exhibits, 2017-