Events

Exhibitions | Lectures | Tours | Workshops | Past Events


Upcoming

January 13: Anarchist Archives Lecture Series: Rojava Revolution: Autonomous Self-Governance in Northern Syria

February 4: Greenboathouse Press: Books and Other Adventures

February 7: Workshop: Paper Circuits and Bibliocircuitry: Where Arts and Crafts Meets Electricity

February 10: Manuscripts on Mondays Palaeography Workshop: Introduction to Medieval Palaeography

February 11: Diversified Practices: The Art of Sandra Meigs

March 2: Paleography Workshop: Introduction to 16th and 17th Century English Manuscripts

March 13: Bookbinding Workshop: Mastering the Accordion Fold

March 20: Peter and Ana Lowens Lecture: "Finger-worn pages": On Reading by Touch

March 20: Workshop: Books Without Ink: A Hands-On Workshop


Exhibitions


Lectures

Special Collections and the University Archives works with the Pre-Digital Books Research Collective to bring together researchers, instructors, students, and members of the community to explore and share materials from the collections.

January 13

Anarchist Archives Lecture Series: Rojava Revolution: Autonomous Self-Governance in Northern Syria

Professor Ozlem Goner (Assistant Professor in the Department of Sociology and Anthropology, College of Staten Island, City University of New York)

In Spring 2011, the Syrian Kurdish Democratic Union Party (PYD) of Rojava, northern Syria established a People's Council of West Kurdistan around the concept of "democratic confederalism" wherein diverse peoples and political actors united under an autonomous anti-state structure of self-governance. Three regional "Cantons" formed a federated structure encompassing most of northern Syria. Rojava's revolution was defended by two militias--the People's Protection Units (YPG) and Women's Protection Units (YPJ). The emergence of a secular, feminist, anti-authoritarian system of self-governance in the midst of Syria's civil war was an extraordinary event and military victories against the Islamic State (notably the heroic rescue of minority Yezidi peoples besieged by Islamic State forces in the Sinjar mountains) brought the Rojava revolution to world attention.

Join Professor Ozlem Goner to learn about the roots of the Rojava revolution, its ecological, feminist, and anarchic democratic vision, as well as current threats to Rojava poised by Turkish armed forces in alliance with Russia.

Dr. Ozlem Goner is an Assistant Professor in the Department of Sociology and Anthropology, College of Staten Island, City University of New York. Goner has written on a range of issues, including memory and historicity; political economy and the environment; and outsider identities. In 2017, her book, Turkish National Identity and its Outsiders: Memories of State Violence in Dersim, was published by Routledge. She is a steering committee member of the US-based Emergency Committee for Rojava.

Date: Monday, January 13, 2020

Time: 7:00 p.m.

Location: Mearns Centre for Learning - McPherson Library, Room 129


 


February 4

Greenboathouse Press: Books and Other Adventures

Jason Dewinetz (Proprietor, Greenboathouse Press)

Alongside the annual production of one or two fine press books each year, activities at the Greenboathouse Press also include side-projects and events that provide far too many reasons to get far too little accomplished in the shop. From attending typecasting conferences and international book fairs to working alongside talented authors and printers on large-scale collaborative projects, this talk will explore the opportunities, adventures and pitfalls of a contemporary letterpress printer.

Date: Tuesday, February 4, 2020

Time: 2:00 p.m.

Location: Special Collections and University Archives, Mearns Centre for Learning - McPherson Library, Room A003

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February 11

Diversified Practices: The Art of Sandra Meigs

Helen Marzolf (Curator)

For more than four decades, acclaimed artist Sandra Meigs has continuously challenged viewers and readers of her work. Drawing from the fonds of the University of Victoria Archives, curator Helen Marzolf will compare one of Meigs' earliest installations, The Maelstrom, with the 2013 installation The Basement Panoramas, examining how Meigs constructs informal architectures drawn from her lived experience, transforming ephemeral and fleeting matter into "metaphors related to the psyche". Both The Maelstrom and The Basement Panoramas marked transitional moments in Meigs' life and career, and both offer insights to Meigs' practice, the product of a broad spread of aesthetic, intellectual, and philosophical investigation.

Meigs builds spaces of intense physicality. From her earliest projects at art school to her current projects, Meigs mobilizes the spatial and expressive potential of painting, writing and publishing, sound and music, film, performance and collaboration, robotic and mechanical sculpture. In her carefully constructed spaces, Meigs invites visitors to navigate unexpected interiorities.

Date: Tuesday, February 11, 2020

Time: 1:00 p.m.

Location: Special Collections and University Archives, Mearns Centre for Learning - McPherson Library, Room A003


 


March 20

Peter and Ana Lowens Lecture: "Finger-worn pages": On Reading by Touch

Dr. Vanessa Warne (Associate Professor, University of Manitoba)

Reading by touch, a skill that proliferated in the 19th century, transformed the experience of visual disability. In the decades following the publication of the first tactile books in English in the 1830s, many blind people learned to read. The expensive and bulky books that circulated between these readers were embossed in a variety of rival tactile scripts. William Moon, a blind person, activist and script inventor, published hundreds of these books. Moon claimed his books were so tactile that they could be read with a gloved hand or with the calloused fingers of a manual labourer. This lecture examines the beautiful and unusual books that Moon made and considers how Moon’s books, which are very rarely read today, can reveal both the present day and future of bookmaking for blind readers. This presentation is illustrated and will include detailed audio description of all images.

Date: Friday, March 20, 2020

Time: 2:30 p.m.

Location: Special Collections and University Archives, Mearns Centre for Learning - McPherson Library, Room A003


 



Tours

We welcome members of the campus and community for tours of our collection holdings.  To request a tour, please contact us at: .


Workshops

Special Collections and University Archives hosts workshops that prepare graduate students for in-depth research with rare books and archives.


February 7

Workshop: Paper Circuits and Bibliocircuitry: Where Arts and Crafts meets Electricity

Tiffany Chan (UVic Libraries)

What if "electronic book" didn't only mean something you read on a screen? What if circuits weren't hidden in a black box but things you could touch, feel, or design by hand? In this workshop, we'll explore the world of paper circuits - electric circuits embedded in or on paper using materials such as copper tape or conductive ink - and "bibliocircuitry," a similar practice involving books specifically.

We’ll do a brief tour of example projects and how they’re made before breaking into hands-on activities. Participants can make a light-up Valentine’s card or work on other projects, with guidance and depending on interest. No experience making circuits is assumed or required. There will not be any coding, but there may be optional copy/pasting.

Free and open to the public.

As space is limited, please register at: https://www.eventbrite.ca/e/paper-circuits-and-bibliocircuitry-where-arts-and-crafts-meets-electricity-tickets-86202392677.

Date: Friday, February 7, 2020

Time: 4:00-5:30 p.m.

Location: Special Collections and University Archives, Mearns Centre for Learning - McPherson Library, Room 025

 


February 10

Manuscripts on Mondays Palaeography Workshop: Introduction to Medieval Palaeography

Dr. Adrienne Williams Boyarin (Department of English)

Ever wonder how scholars manage to read old handwriting? Composed of unfamiliar scripts and often highly abbreviated, medieval handwriting can look indecipherable to the untrained eye. But medieval scribes followed regular and predictable rules when they wrote, in a limited number of script shapes and styles. This 90 minute workshop will use manuscripts from UVic's Special Collections to teach you some of the basics of palaeography (that is, the study of old handwriting). Come with a pencil and paper, or a laptop if you prefer, and ready to learn and practice - see if you can read a manuscript on this Monday!

Free and open to the public.

Date: Monday, February 10, 2020

Time: 12:30 p.m.

Location: Special Collections and University Archives, Mearns Centre for Learning - McPherson Library, Room A003


 


March 2

Paleography Workshop: Introduction to 16th and 17th Century English Manuscripts

Dr. Erin Kelly (Department of English)

Did you know that UVic Special Collections holds examples of 16th and 17th century English manuscripts (including letters, legal documents, and armorial records)? By the end of this 90 minute workshop, you’ll be able to read these texts and to work with the increasing numbers of digitized manuscript documents available online. Dr. Erin E. Kelly (Department of English) will introduce you to the most common hands, give you a chance to try writing with a quill, and help you transcribe some documents. This workshop will be of particular use to graduate students interested in early modern English history and culture. All are welcome.

Free and open to the public.

As space is limited, please register at: https://www.eventbrite.ca/e/paleography-workshop-introduction-to-16th-and-17th-century-english-manuscr-tickets-86622729917.

Date: Monday, March 2, 2020

Time: 12:30 p.m.

Location: Special Collections and University Archives, Mearns Centre for Learning - McPherson Library, Room A003

 


March 13

Bookbinding Workshop: Mastering the Accordion Fold

Joan Byers (Canadian Bookbinders and Book Artists Guild)

This two-hour workshop will focus on a unique bookbinding technique: the accordion fold. Participants will learn how to fold the perfect accordion book for use in chapbooks and other book variations. This workshop provides an opportunity for participants to experiment with making a book with a folded structure.

Free and open to the public.

As space is limited, please register at: https://www.eventbrite.ca/e/bookbinding-workshop-mastering-the-accordion-fold-tickets-86202163993.

Date: Friday, March 13, 2020

Time: 4:00-6:00 p.m.

Location: Special Collections and University Archives, Mearns Centre for Learning - McPherson Library, Room A003

 


March 20

Workshop: Books Without Ink: A Hands-On Workshop

This workshop features a collection of rare and fragile 19th century books designed for and by blind readers. Embossed in now obsolete scripts, early alternatives to braille, these books reflect the preferences of readers who rejected the identification of reading with seeing and reimagined text as tactile. Please join Dr. Vanessa Warne of the University of Manitoba to explore the history of disability and accessible design and to examine - by touch or by sight - the inkless books, magazines, and maps that redefined what it means to read.

Date: Friday, March 20, 2020

Time: 4:00-5:30 p.m.

Location: Special Collections and University Archives, Mearns Centre for Learning - McPherson Library, Room A003

 



Past Events

Information related to past events and exhibitions held in Special Collections and University Archives is available here.