Events

Exhibitions | Lectures | Tours | Workshops | Past Events


Upcoming

August 20: Orient Expressions: Asian Book Arts from UVic Libraries’ Special Collections

September 10: Manuscripts on Mondays: Marketing Monkish Antifeminism to a Lay Audience: John Shirley, Lydgate’s Fall of Princes, and Marginalia on Women

September 17: Science Literacy Week: Botanical British Columbia and Beyond

September 19: Anarchist Archives Lecture Series: Taking the Rap: Women Doing Time for Society’s Crimes

September 27: Treasures and Tea: How Poetry Changed the World: Elizabeth Barrett's "The Cry of the Children" and Industrial Reform

October 1: Echoing 'The Cry of the Children': Elizabeth Barrett's Poetry and Industrial Reform Literature

October 20: Treasures and Tea: How to Talk About Type

October 29: Gothic Beginnings and Monstrous Legacies: An Exhibition Celebrating 200 Years of Mary Shelley’s Frankenstein

October 29: Treasures and Tea: Gothic Beginnings and Monstrous Legacies: A Panel and Exhibition Celebrating 200 Years of Mary Shelley’s Frankenstein


Exhibitions

August 20 - September 13

Orient Expressions: Asian Book Arts from UVic Libraries’ Special Collections

Curated by Ying Liu and Tad Suzuki

This exhibition highlights Chinese and Japanese rare books and manuscripts from UVic Libraries’ Special Collections. Rare materials featuring unique craftsmanship – such as calligraphy and seals – are a window into the book arts in China and Japan. This exhibition features publications and objects including a Chinese imperial edict issued by the Jianquing Emperor (1760-1820), publications produced by early Chinese immigrants in Victoria, graphic novels from the 19th century to present-day manga, early Japanese photographs, seals and seal art, and travel literature and art from the early 19th century.

Dates: August 20 - September 13, 2018

Location: Special Collections and University Archives, Mearns Centre for Learning - McPherson Library, Room A005


September 17-21

Science Literacy Week: Botanical British Columbia and Beyond

Curated by Jane Morrison and Heather Dean

This exhibit highlights aspects of the Special Collections and University Archives holdings relating to botany, presenting publications and archives about BC botany, and featuring historical texts on botany and the cultural and medicinal uses of plants.

The exhibit will has three main features: publications relating to BC and beyond; Chester Lyons as author of Trees, shrubs, and flowers to know in British Columbia and records from his archives that illustrate his botanical work; Alan Austin’s work on seaweed inventory in coastal BC – records from his archives and publications that illustrate this.

Dates: September 17-21, 2018

Location: Special Collections and University Archives, Mearns Centre for Learning - McPherson Library, Room A005

 


October 1-15

Echoing 'The Cry of the Children': Elizabeth Barrett's Poetry and Industrial Reform Literature

Curated by Denae Dyck (Department of English)

Written in response to the accounts of child labour in Britain by the writer and government official R. H. Horne, the poem “The Cry of the Children” by Elizabeth Barrett Browning (EBB) catalyzed factory reform. Horne’s account, published in the reports of the Royal Commission for the Employment of Children and Factories (1842), shocked society through its harrowing descriptions of the exploited workers and inspired much protest literature. As it sounds its calls for change, “The Cry of the Children” both echoed this broader cultural formation of industrial reform literature and set the tone for subsequent protests. Influential in Britain as well as in the United States of America, this poem established EBB’s international reputation as a poet whose work is both politically engaged and formally innovative.

Dates: October 1-15, 2018

Location: Special Collections and University Archives, Mearns Centre for Learning - McPherson Library

 


October 29-November 30

Gothic Beginnings and Monstrous Legacies: An Exhibition Celebrating 200 Years of Mary Shelley's Frankenstein

Curated by Lindsey Seatter and Caroline Winter (Department of English)

This exhibition celebrates the 200th anniversary of Mary Shelley's Frankenstein by highlighting rare books and materials that illuminate the text's literary influences and cultural inheritances. The exhibit features items from UVic Libraries' Special Collections, including fantastical Gothic novels, some of Shelley's illustrated publications, and a diverse sampling of visual, literary, and theatrical adaptations—including materials from Canadian playwrights Alden Nowlan and Walter Learning.

Dates: October 29-November 30, 2018

Location: Special Collections and University Archives, Mearns Centre for Learning - McPherson Library, Room A005

 



Lectures

September 10

Manuscripts on Mondays: Marketing Monkish Antifeminism to a Lay Audience: John Shirley, Lydgate’s Fall of Princes, and Marginalia on Women

Dr. Kathryn Kerby-Fulton (Faculty Emeritus, University of Notre Dame)

The Benedictine monk John Lydgate, despite his cloistered life, became one of the most popular vernacular writers of his day, leaving behind a massive oeuvre. But he did not achieve his popularity without help. John Shirley, whose book production activity in the 1420s-1440s promoted the works of Lydgate almost as a modern advertiser or agent would, reached especially those outside court circles. It is to Shirley alone that we owe many attributions of Lydgate’s poems (and of Chaucer’s), as well as some of the earliest attempts to mitigate Lydgate’s antifeminism via the addition of playful marginal glosses and verse prefaces. This lecture offers background to the treatment of antifeminism in a manuscript (MS Eng. 1) in Special Collections, a copy of Lydgate’s popular Fall of Princes, by highlighting Shirley’s efforts to rescue the poet’s monkish tone deafness on women.

Date: September 10, 2018

Time: 1-2 p.m.

Location: Mearns Centre for Learning - McPherson Library, Room 210

Manuscripts on Mondays provides an opportunity for the campus and the community to explore medieval and early modern manuscripts from Special Collections. These handwritten documents, including Books of Hours, a genealogical scroll, and legal documents, are a window into the past.

 


September 19

Anarchist Archives Lecture Series: Taking the Rap: Women Doing Time for Society’s Crimes

Ann Hansen (Author)

Join author Ann Hansen for the launch of her new book Taking the Rap: Women Doing Time for Society’s Crimes. In 1984, anarchist urban guerilla Ann Hansen was sentenced to life in prison for bombing a hydro substation that was bringing industrial development to northern Vancouver Island; a factory in Toronto (Litton Systems) producing guidance systems for nuclear-armed Cruise Missiles; and Red Hot Video outlets marketing violent pornography in Victoria and Vancouver. Taking the Rap is a memoir of resistance and survival in Canada’s notorious Prison for Women and two subsequent stints in more ‘up-to-date’ institutions.  Following the lecture, discuss Hansen’s archives with the author, and Allan Antliff, academic director of UVic’s Anarchist Archives.

Date: September 19, 2018

Time: 11:30 a.m.-12:30 p.m.

Location: Mearns Centre for Learning - McPherson Library, Room 129

 image


September 27

Treasures and Tea: How Poetry Changed the World: Elizabeth Barrett's "The Cry of the Children" and Industrial Reform

Dr. Alison Chapman (Professor, Department of English) and Denae Dyck (PhD candidate, Department of English)

In the 1840s, Victorian Britain witnessed heated discussion about industrialisation and urban poverty, especially about child labour in factories. R. H. Horne's report for the Royal Commission (1842) astounded the Victorians with accounts of children working up to 16 hours each day. ​Special Collections holds important material related to this topic, including the poem that was most influential in effecting legislative reform: Elizabeth Barrett's "The Cry of the Children". This talk will cover the two earliest publications of this poem, in  Blackwood's Edinburgh Magazine and in Barrett's 1844 Poems (a new Special Collections purchase), discussing such issues as its political impact, periodical context, transatlantic circulation, and innovative poetics.

Date: September 27, 2018

Time: 1-2 p.m.

Location: Special Collections and University Archives, Mearns Centre for Learning - McPherson Library, Room A003

Treasures and Tea brings together the campus and the community to explore and share highlights from Special Collections and University Archives. Refreshments follow the informal talks.


October 20

Treasures and Tea: How to Talk About Type

Robin Mitchell Cranfield (Graphic Designer, Art Director, Illustrator, and Principal, hundreds & thousands design)

Presented in collaboration with the Alcuin Society

In this talk award winning graphic designer Robin Mitchell Cranfield will introduce the culture of typography. As we go through our day, we read hundreds, even thousands, of typeset words. But while one of the earliest things we learn is how to read, many of us never learn how to really see the type that forms those messages. Considering typography critically reveals layers of meaning in our designed environment, from advertisements to book covers to our social media platforms. The general public is increasingly familiar with a handful of iconic or even infamous fonts by name, but is often unable, or sometimes apprehensive, to articulate how they feel about them. Why is Helvetica so famous? Is it a sign of bad taste not to like it? Why is Comic Sans so offensive? This talk is designed to address and then move beyond these few well known fonts, to develop a common language that we can all use to talk about type and to begin to consider typography from a larger cultural perspective.

Space is limited. Please RSVP: https://www.eventbrite.com/e/how-to-talk-about-type-tickets-50887141811

Date: Saturday, October 20, 2018

Time: 4:00 p.m.

Location: Mearns Centre for Learning - McPherson Library, Room 129

Treasures and Tea brings together the campus and the community to explore and share highlights from Special Collections and University Archives. Refreshments follow the informal talks.

 


October 29

Treasures and Tea: Gothic Beginnings and Monstrous Legacies: A Panel and Exhibition Celebrating 200 Years of Mary Shelley's Frankenstein

Panelists: David Eso, Robert Miles, and Caroline Winter (Department of English)
Moderator: Lindsey Seatter (Department of English)

In the summer of 1816, on the banks of Lake Geneva, a young Mary Shelley wrote a ghost story about the re-animation of a corpse as a means of entertaining her literary friends. Today, 200 years since its publication, Shelley's Frankenstein has become a touchstone text with prolific and lasting impacts in the fields of literature, science, art, and philosophy. Drawing on materials from the University of Victoria Libraries' Special Collections and featuring speakers from the Department of English, this panel will explore the literary influences and cultural inheritances of Frankenstein by exploring its gothic beginnings and monstrous legacies.

As space is limited, please RSVP: https://onlineacademiccommunity.uvic.ca/frankenreads/frankenweek-events/special-collections-exhibit-launch/

This event is part of FrankenWeek at the University of Victoria. FrankenWeek is a series of interdisciplinary events celebrating the history, text, themes, and performance of Mary Shelley’s Frankenstein. FrankenWeek events are open to the University of Victoria's students, faculty, and staff, as well as the general public. For more information, please visit https://oac.uvic.ca/frankenreads/.

Date: October 29, 2018

Time: 2:00 p.m.

Location: Mearns Centre for Learning - McPherson Library, Room 210

Treasures and Tea brings together the campus and the community to explore and share highlights from Special Collections and University Archives. Refreshments follow the informal talks.

 



Tours

We welcome members of the campus and community for tours of our collection holdings.  To request a tour, please contact us at: .


Workshops

Special Collections and University Archives hosts workshops that prepare graduate students for in-depth research with rare books and archives.



Past Events

Treasures and Tea, Spring 2015

Treasures and Tea, Fall 2015

Unravelling the Code(x): History of the Book Speaker Series and Symposium, 2015-16

Treasures and Tea, Spring 2016

Treasures and Tea, Spring 2017

Manuscripts in the Curriculum, Spring 2017

Manuscripts on Mondays/Treasures and Tea, Fall 2017

Manuscripts on Mondays/Treasures and Tea, Spring 2018

Manuscripts on Mondays/Treasures and Tea, Fall 2018

Past Exhibits, 2017-