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Graduate Studies handbook

You can download a PDF version of this handbook here.

Chair: Dr. Peter Gölz

Graduate Advisor: Dr. Elena Pnevmonidou

Graduate Secretary: Irina Gavrilova

Telephone: (250) 721-7316

Fax: (250) 721-7319

Web: http://www.uvic.ca/humanities/germanicslavic/graduates/index.php

Email: geru@uvic.ca

Mailing Address:                

Department of Germanic and Slavic Studies

University of Victoria

Clearihue Building, Room D243

PO Box 3045 STN CSC Victoria, BC    V8P 3P4 CANADA

Most recent handbook update: January 2013

Willkommen!

The Department of Germanic & Slavic Studies at the University of Victoria offers a high-quality academic program with a low faculty-to-student ratio. Graduate students work in close collaboration with faculty members on their thesis projects as well as their own professional development. Situated on the beautiful west coast of Canada, UVic offers an attractive and appealing living environment.

Above all else, the aim of our program is to foster critical thinking and intellectual curiosity among our students. The department is committed to maintaining a vibrant program that engages students to analyze, synthesize, and ultimately present important components of Germanic Studies, including cultural studies, literary and film studies, as well as applied linguistics. Major areas of specialization within the department include computer-assisted language learning (CALL), cultural studies, film studies, gender studies, Holocaust and memory studies, modern Austrian, German, and Swiss literature, Romanticism, second-language teaching methodologies, and transnational literature. Students are also encouraged to build an interdisciplinary foundation around their research interests and are thus encouraged to take related courses outside the department.

The M.A. in Germanic Studies is designed to prepare learners for a wide range of career options. Not only does this advanced degree help build a solid foundation for further doctoral studies, but it can also lead to myriad career opportunities, including work in the arts, business, communications, education, film studies, government, international organizations, library science, science and technology, and translation studies, among others. Our program offers a supportive, yet challenging, academic environment built on collaboration and lively intellectual exchange that can help lead our program graduates down various exciting career paths.

 

Germanic and Slavic Studies Graduate Faculty

 Peter Gölz, PhD (Queen’s)

Literary theory; contemporary literature; computer-assisted language learning; film; vampires, Kafka, Adolf Muschg

Elena Pnevmonidou, PhD (McGill)

Classicism and Romanticism, literature of the Weimar period and expressionist film, literary theory and gender studies

Charlotte Schallié, PhD (Brit Col)

Post-1945 German, Swiss and Austrian literature and culture; diasporic writing, transnational and transcultural literature and film; crime fiction; postmemory; translation studies

Ulf Schuetze, PhD (Brit Col)

Second language acquisition and pedagogy; intercultural communication; computer-assisted language learning; applied linguistics

Megan Swift, PhD (Toronto)

Russian modernism and postmodernism; St. Petersburg texts; narrative and genre theory; literature of emigration and exile

Helga Thorson, PhD (Minnesota)

Late 19th and early 20th century German and Austrian literature; literature and medicine, representations of the Holocaust; foreign language pedagogy; computer-assisted language learning

Serhy Yekelchyk, PhD (Alberta)

Culture and identities in Russia and Eastern Europe; Stalinism; 20th century Ukraine


Contents

1.    INTRODUCTION

1.1      The Germanic and Slavic Studies Graduate Studies Handbook.

1.2      General Information

1.3      The University of Victoria Calendar

1.4      Accessing Information

1.5      Financial Support

1.6      Orientation Events

2.    GENERAL INFORMATION

2.1      Library and Electronic Resources

2.2      Student Visas/International Students

 2.3     Housing

2.4      Other Facilities

2.5      Graduate Student Offices

2.6      Email / Mailbox

2.7      Photocopier

3.    ADMINISTRATION

3.1      Germanic Studies Graduate Advisor

3.2      Departmental Graduate Committee

3.3      Membership in the Faculty of Graduate Studies

3.4      Graduate Student Representative

3.5      Graduate Students’ Society

4.    GERMANIC STUDIES GRADUATE DEGREES IN CONJUNCTION WITH OTHER PROGRAMS 

4.1      Co-op Program: M.A. – General Information

4.2      Requirements

4.3      Interdisciplinary Programs: M.A.

5.    ADMISSION TO GRADUATE STUDIES IN GERMANIC STUDIES

5.1      General Information

5.2      Mature Student Admission

5.3      Timing and Deadlines of M.A. Applications

5.5      Admission Requirements for M.A. Applications

5.6      Transfer Credit from Other Universities

5.7      Admission to Non-Degree Course Work

6.    REGISTRATION

6.1      General Information

6.2      Leave of Absence and Withdrawal from Graduate Program

6.3      Auditing Courses

6.4     Fees

7.    GERMANIC STUDIES M.A. PROGRAM

7.1      Program Requirements

7.2      Time Limits

7.3      Standing

7.4      Master’s Thesis

7.5      Oral Examination

7.6      Supervisors and Examining Committees

7.7      Program Timeline

7.8      Program Checklist

8.    GRADUATE COURSES

8.1      Graduate Courses and Their Selection

8.2      Course Attendance

8.3      Grading Procedures

8.4      Marking of Graduate Papers

8.5      Student Course Evaluations

8.6      Directed Studies (Reading)

8.7      Graduate Courses Taken Elsewhere

 9.       APPEAL PROCEDURES

9.1      General Information

9.2      Academic Appeals

9.3      Procedural Appeals

10.      FINANCIAL ASSISTANCE

10.1       Information for International Students

10.2       University Fellowships

10.3       Departmental Funding. 29

10.4       Progress Expected of Students Holding Fellowships

10.5       Research Assistantships

10.6       Social Sciences and Humanities Research Council of Canada (SSHRC)

10.7       Graduate Student Travel Grants

11. EMPLOYABILITY

11.1       Professional Development

11.2       Career Services

12.  RESEARCH INVOLVING HUMAN SUBJECTS

13. STUDENT CONFERENCE PAPERS


1.       INTRODUCTION

1.1       The Germanic and Slavic Studies Graduate Studies Handbook

 

The Handbook you are reading, which is revised regularly, is intended to help faculty and graduate students in the efficient administration of graduate programs. The guidelines provided here describe normal practice; they may be changed or amended at any time, so students are advised to consult the Germanic and Slavic Studies Graduate Secretary as to possible changes. These guidelines supplement the policies and regulations outlined in the University of Victoria Graduate Studies Calendar.

The Department of Germanic and Slavic Studies offers a degree program leading to a Masters of Arts in Germanic Studies. The graduate program provides opportunities for student in the areas of cultural studies, literature, film, and second language teaching. There are also possibilities for interdisciplinary investigations with other departments and for Co-operative Education programs. For further information on these programs, please see section 4.

Students should consult their Supervisor (consult the Germanic Studies Graduate Advisor if the Supervisor has not yet been determined) in designing their program of study, but the responsibility for meeting the program’s requirements is their own. Given the nature of graduate studies, exceptions to normal procedures due to exceptional circumstances are possible, but all such instances require the approval of the Graduate Advisor, the Graduate Committee, and often that of the Dean of Graduate Studies.

The Department of Germanic and Slavic Studies aims to create a collegial environment in which students and faculty can work productively.

1.2       General Information

The University of Victoria (UVic) is a mid-sized “comprehensive” university offering undergraduate, graduate and professional degrees in a variety of disciplines. An autonomous degree-granting institution since 1963, it began its history in 1903 as Victoria College in affiliation with Montreal’s McGill University. UVic has a teaching staff of over 1,200 and approximately 19,000 students, 3,500 of whom are graduate students. The Department of Germanic and Slavic Studies offers an M.A. program that has been in existence since 1991.

1.3       The University of Victoria Calendar

The University of Victoria Graduate Calendar is available online at http://web.uvic.ca/calendar. The section entitled “General Information” at the beginning of the Calendar contains information pertinent to all members of the University. The “Graduate Programs” section contains information on the Department of Germanic and Slavic Studies. Individual course information can be found under “Course Listings.” The Faculty of Graduate Studies Admissions Handbook, available at http://www.registrar.uvic.ca/grad, contains useful information about admission procedures and other pertinent matters. By the end of June each year, the Department of Germanic and Slavic Studies posts its departmental brochure, listing all of the courses to be offered in the following year on their website http://web.uvic.ca/geru.

1.4       Accessing Information

Applicants may print a PDF application or apply online at http://registrar.uvic.ca/grad. Application forms and information packages are also available from:

            Graduate Admissions and Records

            University of Victoria

            PO Box 3025 STN CSC

            Victoria BC     V8W 3P2

            CANADA

            Telephone: (250) 472-4657

            Fax: (250) 472-5420

If you wish to apply online, you must provide a credit card number for the application fee. If you cannot pay the application fee this way, you may not apply online.

Online information about the Faculty of Graduate Studies can be obtained at http://web.uvic.ca/gradstudies. You can find more detailed information about the Department of Germanic and Slavic Studies on the department Website at http://web.uvic.ca/geru.

If you require further information on our graduate program, please contact Irina Gavrilova, the Graduate Secretary in the Department of Germanic and Slavic Studies at 250-721-7316 or email her at geru@uvic.ca.

1.5       Financial Support

 

University of Victoria Fellowships may be awarded to Germanic Studies graduate students of high academic standing. The minimum standard required for consideration is a cumulative GPA of A-. In addition, students may be considered for various other types of graduate or departmental scholarships, awards, and prizes, including the Germanic Studies graduate award. More information is available at http://web.uvic.ca/gradstudies/students/fees.php. It is also possible to receive a research or teaching assistantship as part of your overall graduate funding package.

All prospective students will be considered for the University of Victoria Fellowships or other funding awards, provided that they submit their application by February 15. Because funds are limited and assistantships generally do not cover full tuition costs and living expenses, prospective students with a first-class GPA (A- average or above) are encouraged to apply for external funding, most notably through the Social Sciences and Humanities Research Council (SSHRC) at http://www.sshrc-crsh.gc.ca/funding-financement/apply-demande/students-etudiants-eng.aspx.

For further information on available fellowships and awards please see section 10.

1.6       Orientation Events

In September, the Department offers an orientation session intended to familiarize new students with the program and to inform returning students of any changes in the established policies. Informational and social in nature, these events are organized and administered by the Graduate Advisor of the Department and by the Graduate Student Representative.

2.       GENERAL INFORMATION

2.1       Library and Electronic Resources

The main research library for the Humanities at the University of Victoria is the McPherson Library. It contains about 1.9 million volumes, 40,000 serial subscriptions, 2.3 million items in microform, 18,000 current periodicals and many thousands of records, tapes, compact disks, scores, films and videos. Its holdings include an outstanding collection of traditional canonical texts in German and their analysis and interpretation as well as one of the few collections of German-Canadian literature. In addition, the library is continually building on its already excellent collections of film studies, Holocaust studies, post-unification literature, transnational literature, as well as Swiss and Austrian literature. The library also possesses a first-rate collection of German films.

The online catalogue includes all material in the library. The library’s online subscriptions include several of the most notable research indices, including the MLA, the Humanities and Social Sciences, and the Periodicals Contents Indexes. The library offers an interlibrary loan service for books it does not hold, and subscribes to a variety of electronic journals and article delivery services to provide access to articles in journals not held locally. Further information is available at the Reference Desk in the McPherson Library or at http://library.uvic.ca.

The library offers information seminars, some of them specifically designed for graduate students, on how to use its resources. Students may also contact the Germanic Studies subject librarian for in-depth research assistance (see http://library.uvic.ca/site/lib/admin/subject.html).

2.2       Student Visas/International Students

Prospective graduate students from outside Canada need a study permit. In most cases this is not difficult to obtain. For detailed information, they should write as early as possible to the Canadian Embassy or Consulate in their own country. International students should not make provisions to travel to Canada until they have actually been admitted to the program and have evidence of financial resources to allow them to pursue their studies at the University of Victoria. International students should also keep in mind that, under current immigration policies, they cannot apply for Permanent Resident status while in Canada and that they cannot be employed outside the University without a valid work permit (this does not apply to their spouses).

 2.3      Housing

A limited amount of accommodation is available in the University residences for men and women registered full-time in the Faculty of Graduate Studies. The options include residence housing (single and double room accommodation), cluster housing (self-contained units consisting of four private bedrooms), and family housing (self-contained units for families). Information about the different types of on-campus accommodation, application procedures, and about off-campus housing can be obtained by accessing the Housing Office’s website at http://housing.uvic.ca.

2.4       Other Facilities

Germanic Studies graduate students can benefit from a number of facilities available on campus. For example, Counselling Services (250-721-8341), in addition to offering counselling for personal issues, provides a number of personal development and career workshops, including a Learning Skills Program and the Thesis/Dissertation Completion Group. Other facilities available include the Resource Centre for Students with a Disability (250-472-4947), Athletics and Recreation (250-721-8406), Child Care Services (250-721-8500), Interfaith Chaplain’s Office (250-721-8338), University Health Services (250-721-8492), and the Office of International and Exchange Students Services (250-721-6361). Many professional development opportunities are available through the Learning and Teaching Centre (http://www.ltc.uvic.ca) and the C. W. Lui Learning Commons, located on the main floor of McPherson Library in the Mearns Centre for Learning, offers various types of academic support, including the University of Victoria writing centre.

2.5       Graduate Student Offices

Depending on availability, Germanic Studies graduate students may have access to a shared office space. All students are expected to treat the office, as well as their fellow students, with respect and to adhere to the guidelines regarding shared office space as established by the Germanic Studies graduate students at the beginning of the year.

2.6       Email / Mailbox

 

All graduate students have an individual email address, as well as a shared mailbox (located in the photocopying room beside the Germanic and Slavic Studies main office). They are expected to check their mailboxes on a regular basis so as not to miss important announcements and deadlines.

2.7       Photocopier

Graduate students will obtain a copy code to the departmental photocopy machine upon entry into the program. The photocopier may be used for copies related to students’ research and studies, in accordance with Canadian copyright laws.

3.       ADMINISTRATION

3.1       Germanic Studies Graduate Advisor

The M.A. program is administered by the Graduate Advisor of the Germanic Studies Program, the Graduate Committee, and the Chair of the Department. The Graduate Advisor’s responsibilities include the following: recruiting and selecting applicants for admission and awards; reviewing all students’ CAPP (Curriculum Advising and Program Planning) reports; nominating students for awards; mediating between faculty members and students; assisting with vetting SSHRC and other grant proposals; and liaising with the Office of the Dean of Graduate Studies. Much of the Graduate Advisor’s work is carried out in consultation with the departmental Graduate Committee, which he or she chairs. Students should feel free to approach the Graduate Advisor about any concerns they might have about their program. Indeed, new students are encouraged to contact the Graduate Advisor prior to moving to Victoria and make an appointment with her or him upon their arrival at UVic.  

3.2       Departmental Graduate Committee

The Graduate Committee consists of all graduate faculty members in the department. The Graduate Committee’s tasks include, among other things, considering students for admission to the Graduate Program, recommending graduate course offerings, and ranking students’ applications in grant, fellowship, or scholarship competitions.  The Graduate Student Representative may be invited by special permission to Graduate Committee meetings (when there is no conflict of interest). 

3.3       Membership in the Faculty of Graduate Studies

All members of the departmental Graduate Committee and of Supervisory and Examining Committees, as well as instructors of graduate courses, must be members of the Faculty of Graduate Studies. The Chair of the Department, in consultation with the Graduate Advisor, will recommend new tenure-track faculty holding a Ph.D. for Faculty of Graduate Studies membership. The conditions for membership in the Faculty of Graduate Studies are:

  • an academic appointment at the University of Victoria;
  • a demonstrated commitment to scholarship, professional achievement, or (where appropriate) artistic achievement;
  • an expressed interest in, commitment to, and capabilities for the teaching and supervision of graduate students.

Please see the opening pages of this Handbook for an up-to-date list of graduate faculty in the department.

3.4       Graduate Student Representative

The Graduate Student Representative is an M.A. student elected annually by the Germanic Studies graduate student body. The Graduate Student Representative participates and votes in departmental meetings as well as meetings of the University of Victoria Graduate Students’ Society (see section 3.5). The Student Representative acts as an advocate for students’ issues and organizes events of interest to the students. Graduate students decide among themselves if they want to have one representative for the entire year or if they prefer to divide the tasks in two (one representative who participates in departmental meetings and one who represents the department at Graduate Students’ Society meetings) and/or if they prefer to change representatives each semester.

3.5       Graduate Students’ Society

The elected body of graduate student representatives, the Graduate Students’ Society (GSS), concerns itself with all matters pertaining to the welfare of its individual members. In addition to its primary mandate to lobby on academic and other issues of concern to graduate students, the GSS provides grants for travel to academic conferences as well as financial assistance for graduate students’ departmental activities. It also holds an orientation session to welcome new graduate students and introduce them to the UVic facilities. The Graduate Student Centre has meeting rooms for courses and other academic and social events, a reading room, and a casual pub/lounge, “Grad House.” Graduate Student Representatives attend GSS meetings. Students can find out about GSS academic, political, and social activities by attending the GSS General Meetings, by contacting the Germanic Studies Graduate Representative, by reading its newsletter, The Unacknowledged Source, and by visiting its website at http://gss.uvic.ca.

4.       GERMANIC STUDIES GRADUATE DEGREES IN CONJUNCTION WITH OTHER PROGRAMS

4.1       Co-op Program: M.A. – General Information

UVic offers a Humanities, Fine Arts, and Professional Writing Co-op Program through which graduate students in Germanic Studies can obtain co-op work term positions that allow them to balance work terms with study terms. While every effort is made to ensure that work term positions are situated in the vicinity of Victoria, prospective students should note that some employment opportunities may be out of town. Co-op students may also request a work term position overseas. Students undertake study and work terms in alternating sessions. Participation in this program enables students to acquire knowledge, practical skills for employment, and workplace experience.

4.2       Requirements

Co-op M.A. students are required to complete two work terms. A work term consists of four months of fulltime, paid employment, during which period students are required to pay the university a work term fee. Co-op graduate students must maintain a full course load, and satisfactorily complete the core courses required for their Co-op Program degree. Germanic Studies M.A. students must achieve a minimum B average each session. Students should take note that they are not allowed to have their final oral examination on their thesis before completing their work term requirements.

To participate in this program, students must submit an application to the Co-op Office early in the term in which they are applying (September or January). Applications and application deadlines are available at the Co-op Office in the University Centre (Room B202). For detailed information, students should consult “Co-operative Education Option” in the Graduate Studies Calendar or the website at http://coop.uvic.ca.

4.3       Interdisciplinary Programs: M.A.

Exceptional applicants who wish to undertake an M.A. degree between or outside existing programs may propose an Interdisciplinary Program. It is the applicant’s responsibility to arrange the details of the program. The Faculty of Graduate Studies and the department are under no obligation to arrange or approve interdisciplinary programs. Applications for such programs must be submitted to Graduate Admissions by April 30 (for September entry), by September 30 (for January entry), and by January 31 (for May entry).

For full details about interdisciplinary programs, see “Interdisciplinary Graduate Programs” in the Graduate Studies Calendar, or at visit the website at http://web.uvic.ca/gradstudies/students/interdisciplinary.php. Questions should be directed to Graduate Admissions.

5.       ADMISSION TO GRADUATE STUDIES IN GERMANIC STUDIES

5.1       General Information

All applicants must comply with the admission regulations specified in the Graduate Studies Calendar, the Graduate Studies Admissions Handbook, and in this Handbook. Applicants for a Master’s degree must have completed a Bachelor’s degree from a recognized institution. The Graduate Admissions and Records Office determines whether or not a particular institution is “recognized” for the purpose of admission to the Faculty of Graduate Studies. Any queries about the status of an institution should be directed to the Graduate Admissions and Records Office.

The University of Victoria accepts applications online for graduate studies. Please go to http://www.uvic.ca/graduatestudies/admissions/admissions/index.php  and follow the process outlined there. Applications should be submitted as early as possible, especially if a student wishes to be considered for university fellowships. In order to be considered for funding, complete applications must be submitted by February 15 (see section 10).

5.2       Mature Student Admission

Four years after completion of a B.A. degree, applicants whose grade point average is below 5.0 (B) may be admitted as mature students, provided they have four years of relevant professional experience since completion of their degree, and are recommended by the department.

To apply as a mature student, applicants must submit a regular application, along with a complete resume. The Director of Graduate Admissions and Records is responsible for determining whether an applicant merits admission in this category. Students admitted in this category cannot receive transfer credits for any courses completed prior to registering in the Faculty of Graduate Studies.

5.3       Timing and Deadlines of M.A. Applications

Applicants who hold any post-secondary transcripts from academic institutions outside of Canada should submit complete applications by the Graduate Studies’ deadline of December 15 (for September entry). Applications received after this date may still be accepted, but it may not be possible to process them in time for the February 15 departmental deadline.

Students who wish to be considered for funding must apply for September entry by February 15. M.A. applications received after February 15 will be considered, but applicants will not usually be eligible for the University of Victoria fellowship.

Depending on the circumstances, students admitted to the program in September may be allowed to postpone commencement of their studies until January, May, or July if there are places still available. However, students who wish to defer the beginning of their program until the following year are usually requested to reapply. Application documents are kept on file for one year. During that time, applicants may request that Graduate Admissions and Records reactivate their application; to do so, they must submit a new application and application fee.

5.5       Admission Requirements for M.A. Applications

To be competitive, applicants should have completed the equivalent of a Germanic Studies major.

In addition to the above, applicants will not usually be admitted to the M.A. program unless they have achieved at least a minimum overall B+ average (6.0 GPA), or a minimum A- average (7.0 GPA) in the final year of all their undergraduate work.

In some cases, students may be required to do extra work at the undergraduate level to make up for the deficiencies in their academic background.

5.6       Transfer Credit from Other Universities

Applications for transfer of credits granted to courses at other accredited and recognized post-secondary institutions or at UVic must be approved by the Graduate Advisor. The final decision, however, rests with the Faculty of Graduate Studies.

At least half of the graduate program units must be completed as part of the student’s degree program at UVic.

In order to qualify for transfer, courses must meet all of the following conditions:

  • must be a graduate or senior undergraduate level course;
  • must be completed with a grade of at least 5.0 (B) or equivalent (Pass/Fail courses or equivalent are not acceptable);
  • must not be used to meet the minimum admission standards of the Faculty of Graduate Studies;
  • must not have been used to obtain any degree;
  • must have been completed within the previous ten years.

For further information, please consult the Graduate Studies Calendar.

5.7       Admission to Non-Degree Course Work

Applicants wanting to take courses in the Faculty of Graduate Studies that are not for credit toward a degree at the University of Victoria may be admitted as non-degree students under the following categories.

 

Visiting Students

Visiting students are admitted on the basis of a Letter of Permission which specifies courses allowed for credit toward a graduate degree at another accredited and recognized institution. Applicants must complete an application for admission and provide a Letter of Permission or equivalent from the home institution. International students will be required to provide transcripts and evidence of English competency.

Exchange Students

Exchange students can be admitted under the provisions of the Western Deans’ Agreement or other formal exchange agreements. If a student is admitted as an exchange student, all UVic tuition fees will be waived. Applicants must submit documentation from their home institution certifying the applicant as an exchange student under the provisions of an approved exchange agreement. Courses to be taken toward their degree must be specified in the documentation. International students will be required to provide transcripts and evidence of English competency.

Non-Degree Students

Students who wish to improve their academic background may be admitted as non-degree students. Applicants must meet the same entrance requirements and follow the same application procedures as degree-seeking applicants (see sections 5.4 and 5.5), and must specify on the application form the course(s) they wish to take.

6.       REGISTRATION

6.1       General Information

 

All students are required to register for credit for every term unless they have officially applied for a leave of absence or formally withdrawn from their program. Students who fail to do so are considered to have abandoned their program, and that program will be terminated and they will be “Withdrawn Without Permission.” Students who wish to reactivate their abandoned program must submit a letter of appeal to the Dean of Graduate Studies. Readmission requires the approval of both the department and the Faculty of Graduate Studies.

6.2       Leave of Absence and Withdrawal from Graduate Program

Students in degree programs who require a leave of absence or wish to withdraw must do so formally.

Leave of Absence: Leaves of absence are available to students for a variety of reasons or circumstances. Tuition fees are not assessed during leaves. While students are on a leave, all supervisory processes are suspended. Students can neither undertake any academic or research work nor use any of the University’s facilities during the period of the leave. Students granted parental or compassionate/medical leave will retain the full value of a University of Victoria Graduate Fellowship or other award whose terms and conditions are established by the Faculty of Graduate Studies. Such awards will be suspended at the onset of the leave and reinstated when the student re-registers. Other awards will be paid according to the conditions established by the donor or granting agency. All leave arrangements must be discussed as early as possible with the Supervisor so that appropriate adjustments can be made prior to the beginning of the leave. Leaves of absence are normally granted in 4-month blocks to coincide with the usual registration terms. Short-term leaves of less than one term should be managed with the student’s academic unit. For information on applying for a leave of absence for reasons associated with a disability, contact the coordinator of the Resource Centre for Students with a Disability at inforcsd@uvic.ca or 250-472-4947.

There are three types of leaves of absence:

  1. Personal Leave
  2. Parental Leave
  3. Compassionate/Medical Leave

Please refer to the Graduate Handbook for the policies related to each of these types of leave.

Withdrawal With Dean’s Permission: Students who wish to withdraw indefinitely from their program in the Faculty of Graduate Studies, and have their record indicate that they were in good standing when they withdrew, must apply in writing to the Dean. A supporting memo from their Supervisor should accompany the application. Time spent “Withdrawn With Permission” is not counted as part of the total time allowed for completion of the degree program. Students who wish to reactivate their terminated program must submit a letter of appeal to the Faculty of Graduate Studies. Readmission is not guaranteed and requires the approval of both the department and Graduate Studies. Readmission does not guarantee that any courses or fee instalments from the terminated program will be transferred to the reactivated program.

Withdrawal Without Permission: Students who withdraw without permission prior to reaching the maximum time limit for their graduate degree program are considered to have abandoned their program. Students who wish to have their abandoned program reactivated must submit a letter of appeal to the Dean of Graduate Studies. Readmission requires the approval of both the department and the Faculty of Graduate Studies. If approval is granted, a reinstatement fee must be paid to the Graduate Admissions and Records Office. The time spent “Withdrawn Without Permission” will be counted as part of the total allowable time to degree completion.

6.3       Auditing Courses

 

Students may, with the permission of the instructor, audit a course by submitting a

Graduate Course Change form (available at http://web.uvic.ca/gradstudies/forms.php). Students must register concurrently in credit courses and/or thesis credits in order to maintain their full-time status.

 6.4      Fees

All students are required to pay some universal fees in addition to their tuition as part of being a student at the University of Victoria and in the Faculty of Graduate Studies, including fees for the Graduate Student Society, Athletic and Recreation, Universal Bus Pass, Extended Healthcare Plan, and Dental Plan. In addition to tuition fees and other fees, newcomers should be aware of the general costs of living in Victoria.

7.       GERMANIC STUDIES M.A. PROGRAM

The Department offers an M.A. program that consists of course work and a Master’s thesis. 

 

7.1       Program Requirements

The M.A. program in Germanic Studies consists of a minimum of 15 units of graduate credit. This includes at least 9 units (i.e., 6 courses) of course work (3 units of which may be drawn from courses in Germanic Studies at the senior undergraduate level, and a thesis worth 6 units (minimum 70 pages). There will be a final oral examination (also known as the defence) of the thesis.

In exceptional circumstances, a candidate may be allowed to take 6 units of course work (i.e., 4 courses) , 1.5 of which may be drawn from courses in Germanic Studies at the senior undergraduate level, and write a thesis (minimum 100 pages) worth 9 units. For this, the permission of both the Graduate Advisor and the Chair must be obtained.

The exact courses in which students should enrol are determined in consultation with their individual Supervisor(s). The Graduate Advisor may serve in this capacity if no Supervisor has been determined. Each term a student enrols in either a senior undergraduate level course or a course outside the department; the student’s Supervisor (or Graduate Advisor if the Supervisor has not yet been determined) would need to sign a “Graduate Course Change Form” available on the Graduate Studies webpage (http://web.uvic.ca/gradstudies/forms.php).

7.2       Time Limits

For a full-time student, the M.A. program should take approximately two years. As a course of full-time study, the M.A. program expects that students conduct research during the summer term even when departmental graduate courses are not in session.

UVic requires that M.A. students (full-time and part-time) complete all the requirements for their degree within five years (60 months) from the date of the first registration in the Faculty of Graduate Studies. If necessary, students may request an extension of this five-year deadline to the Graduate Advisor, giving a rationale for the request, and outlining the work still to be completed and a timeline of when it will be done. The Graduate Advisor will forward her or his recommendation to the Dean of Graduate Studies for approval. A supporting memo from the student’s Supervisor will be required.

Students should be aware that they will be charged a larger re-registration fee for each term in which they register beyond five years.

7.3       Standing

M.A. students must maintain a GPA of at least 5.0 (B) for each session in which they are registered. Students with a sessional or cumulative average below 5.0 will not be allowed to register in the next session until their academic performance has been reviewed by their Supervisory Committee and the continuation in the Faculty is approved by the Dean. Every grade of 4.0 (B-) or lower in a course taken for credit in the Faculty of Graduate Studies must be reviewed by the Supervisory Committee of the student and the Graduate Advisor and a recommendation made to the Dean of Graduate Studies. Such students will not be allowed to register in the next session until approved to do so by the Dean. Conditions may be imposed by the Faculty (upon the advice of the Supervisory Committee) for continuation in the program; if not met within the specified time limit, the student will be withdrawn. A student whose thesis is not progressing satisfactorily, or who otherwise fails to meet academic standards, will be withdrawn from the Faculty of Graduate Studies with the advice and consent of the department.

7.4       Master’s Thesis

The Master’s thesis is an original piece of writing (70 pages minimum) that provides evidence of some new contribution to the field of existing knowledge or a new perspective on existing knowledge. In general it should demonstrate a candidate’s command of the subject area as well as her or his employment of appropriate research methods and methods of critical analysis. The thesis should be well organized and academically written. Students are encouraged to download a copy of the Thesis Guidelines, which contains guidelines for the preparation of the thesis http://registrar.uvic.ca/grad/documents/ThesisGuidelines.pdf, including the necessarily formatting guidelines.

7.5       Oral Examination

The final oral Examining Committee is comprised of the student’s Supervisory Committee plus a Chair appointed by the Faculty of Graduate Studies plus an External Examiner who has had no previous involvement with graduate supervision of the candidate.

Following the procedures set out by the Faculty of Graduate Studies, the student will first give a brief 10-20 minute summary of the thesis. She or he will then be asked questions, first, by the External Examiner of the Examining Committee, followed by the other members of the Supervisory Committee (the Supervisor should go last), and subsequently by any members of the Faculty of Graduate Studies in attendance and by other members of the audience. To prepare for this event, students are encouraged to seek advice from their Supervisors and/or the Graduate Advisor.

Normally, the examination will take no longer than an hour and a half. The final oral

examination is open to the university community, and a notice announcing the event is circulated in the department. The student may invite whomever he or she wishes to attend the exam.

Examining Committees can award the following “grades,” taking into account the quality of both the Master’s thesis and the oral examination: Pass, Adjourned, and Fail. “Adjourned” requires that the student have a new oral examination no later than six months from the date of the first examination. “Fail” results when two members of the Examining Committee are opposed to passing the student. Students reserve the right to appeal a Fail grade (see section 9).

The following conditions must be met in order for the oral examination to take place:

  • Students must be enrolled in thesis credits during the semester of their oral examination;
  • When both members of the Supervisory Committee have accepted the thesis as the final version, the student must then submit four (4) clean copies of the thesis (with a title page) to the Graduate Advisor at least twenty (20) working days before the oral examination is scheduled. Failure to do so will result in the examination being postponed;
  • All other requirements for the degree must have been satisfied;
  • The Supervisor, the Graduate Advisor, and the Graduate Secretary will then schedule the date, time, and place of the oral examination;
  • The Graduate Secretary will send a completed Request for Oral Examination  (http://web.uvic.ca/gradstudies/forms.php) to the Dean of Graduate Studies including the time, place, the name of the External Examiner and Committee Members, the signatures of the latter, and the title of the thesis, at least twenty (20) working days before the date scheduled for the oral examination.

Students are strongly advised to plan ahead to ensure that they meet the necessary deadlines for the completion of their Master’s thesis and the oral examination. They should set a firm deadline for the completion of their thesis in order to ensure that their Examination Committee members will be on campus on the date of the eventual oral examination. When scheduling their final examination, Master’s students should allow enough time before the end of the term in case revisions need to be made – otherwise they will need to pay the necessary fees for the new term as well.


7.6       Supervisors and Examining Committees

The following guidelines must be followed when forming Supervisory and Examining Committees:

  • All members of the Master’s with thesis Supervisory and Examining Committees must be on the Faculty Membership list or be approved by the Dean of Graduate Studies.
  • The Supervisory Committee must have at least two members.
  • The first member ‐ the Supervisor ‐ must be from the home academic unit.
  • The second member is normally from the home academic unit.
  • The External Examiner must be from outside of the home academic unit, having had no previous involvement in the graduate supervision of the candidate. However, the external examiner can be from within the home academic unit, providing that there is at least one non-unit member on the Supervisory Committee.
  • Any Supervisory or Examining Committee members added which are over and above those outlined above do not require special approval of the Faculty of Graduate Studies, as long as they are current members of the Faculty of Graduate Studies or have been approved by the Dean of Graduate Studies.

Once a student has determined a Supervisor and written a thesis proposal, the Supervisory Committee can be formed. The Supervisory Committee normally consists of a minimum of a Supervisor and one other member (normally a member of the department). The composition of the Supervisory Committee is determined in consultation with the student’s Supervisor. Normally the student would approach the potential supervisory member(s) by requesting that s/he read the student’s thesis proposal before making a decision. It is recommended that the Supervisory Committee be formed towards the end of the first semester or beginning of the second semester of study in the program.

The Examining Committee consists of the Supervisory Committee and an External Examiner (outside the department). The External Examiner is chosen in consultation with the student’s Supervisor. The student’s Supervisor normally asks the External Examiner if s/he is willing to serve in this capacity. All committee members must be members of the Faculty of Graduate Studies. Although the External Examiner need not be determined until the Supervisory Committee has agreed that the thesis is satisfactory and ready to defend, it is recommended that the External Examiner be established several months (if not a year) prior to the final examination.

The Supervisor will provide comments on the Master’s thesis in draft form and will assist the student in preparing for the final oral examination. The second member of the Supervisory Committee should be given the opportunity to read and comment on the thesis in draft form before the final version is officially submitted. Nevertheless, students are encouraged to consult with both members of their Supervisory Committee any time they see fit.

Students should obviously benefit from their Supervisors’ expertise, but they are responsible for conducting their own research, and for producing a study that meets the standards of an M.A. thesis. In turn, Supervisors bear the responsibility for ensuring the successful and timely completion of the students’ program. This includes reading drafts of the Master’s thesis in a timely manner, offering feedback on such matters as to how the students ought to prepare for the final oral examination, and communicating to the students that the thesis is ready for defence. Supervisors will not allow Master’s theses to be submitted for approval unless they are completed to their satisfaction and read and approved by the second member of the Supervisory Committee. If they plan to be absent from the University for an extended period of time, Supervisors must give their students advance notice and make suitable arrangements with the students and the Graduate Advisor for the continued supervision of their students.

Students are expected to familiarize themselves with the Faculty of Graduate Studies document “Responsibilities in the Supervisory Relationship Policy” available at http://web.uvic.ca/gradstudies/students/supervisor.php. This document describes academic relationships between Academic Supervisors, members of Supervisory Committees, and graduate students.  It is always a good idea to discuss both the individual Supervisor’s as well as student’s expectations at every stage of the program.  For example: What is a reasonable turn-around time for a Supervisor to provide comments on a student’s thesis or section thereof? At what point should the second member of the Supervisory Committee begin to supply feedback?, etc.

7.7       Program Timeline

 

A typical semester course load is two to three courses per semester. Students should register for thesis credits during the summer terms and any term after they have completed their coursework  and/or need the credits to maintain their full-time status. It is expected that students make substantial progress on their thesis during the summer terms in order to ensure the timely completion of the program.

 

First Year

Before September:

-          Register for Netlink ID (necessary to access uSource)

-          Sign up for a UVic email account

-          Obtain student ID card (now or early September)

-          Consult with Graduate Advisor about course registration

-          Register for courses for winter term (Fall/Spring courses)

September:

-          Set up personal photocopy code and receive departmental keys

-          Pay fall tuition (due last day of September)

-          Begin GER 501 and other courses in which you are registered

October:

-          Determine Supervisor (if not already known)

-          Submit SSHRC application (if applicable)

December:

-          Finalize thesis proposal (part of Ger 501 course requirements)

January-April:

-          Pay spring tuition (due last day of January)

-          Complete coursework

-          (March/April) Register for thesis credits (Ger 599) or other course(s) for summer term

May-Aug:

-          Renew student ID card

-          Pay summer tuition (due last day of May)

-          (End of June) Register for winter term (Fall/Spring courses)

 

Second Year

September-December:

-          Renew student ID card

-          Pay fall tuition (due last day of September)

-          Complete any remaining coursework/thesis

January-April:

-          Pay spring tuition (due last day of January)

-          Complete any remaining coursework/thesis

-          (March/April) Register for thesis credits (Ger 599) for summer term

*You must be registered in thesis credits at time of oral examination.

May-August:

-          Pay summer tuition (due last day of May)

-          Renew student ID card

-          (Late June/Early July) Submit ‘Request for Oral Examination’ form at least 20 working days prior to anticipated oral exam date

-          (Late July/Early August) Take oral examination (thesis defence)

This gives you enough time to complete any revision and submit the final version of your thesis by the August 31 deadline.

If you have not completed all of these requirements in the expected two-year timeframe, you will need to register and pay fees and tuition for any remaining semesters of your study. Please note that funding is generally only available during students’ first two years in the program.

7.8       Program Checklist

  • Read and familiarize yourself with the Graduate Calendar to ensure your   understanding of University policies and program guidelines
  • Register for Netlink ID (necessary for accessing library, etc.)
  • Register for a UVic email account
  • Get a student ID card at the University Centre

(Must be renewed in September and summer term)

  • Get keys/photocopier code from departmental Administrative Assistant
  • Determine the best choice for a Supervisor – then ASK!

 

  • Discuss your program with your Supervisor (the Graduate Advisor if your Supervisor has not yet been determined) to ensure all requirements are met
  • Maintain continual registration!

If you are taking any undergraduate courses or courses outside the department, your Supervisor as well as the instructor of the course(s) need to provide approval on a Graduate Course Change form.

  • Complete 9 units of coursework
  • Prepare a thesis proposal (Part of Ger 501 course requirements)
  • Form a Supervisory Committee together with your Supervisor
  • Write thesis, maintaining good communication with your Supervisor regarding your progress
  • Submit application for graduation (approximately 6 months in advance)
  • In consultation with your Supervisor, find an appropriate External Examiner
  • Plan intended oral examination date carefully with Supervisory Committee (be mindful of deadlines and provide your committee with at least two weeks to read the thesis!). The Supervisory Committee must feel that the thesis is ready for defence before the examination can be officially scheduled.
  • Once thesis is approved by Supervisory Committee, submit ‘Request for Oral         Examination’ form at least 20 working days prior to anticipated oral exam date
  • Defend!
  • Submit thesis to Graduate Studies, paying close attention to formatting guidelines (http://registrar.uvic.ca/grad/documents/ThesisGuidelines.pdf)
  • Celebrate!

8.       GRADUATE COURSES

8.1       Graduate Courses and Their Selection

Normally, the department offers three graduate courses in the winter term (Fall and Spring terms combined). GER 501 (Introduction to Bibliography, Methods and Research, and Theory of Literary Criticisms) is generally offered in the fall term every year. A variety of other courses is offered based on the research and teaching interests of departmental members. Given the small size of the Germanic Studies graduate program, graduate courses may be cross-listed with other departments or taught in conjunction with undergraduate courses. Faculty teach their respective area courses on a rotation principle.

8.2       Course Attendance

Weekly attendance in graduate courses is expected. A student who must be absent from a course for a serious reason is expected to contact the instructor before the missed class and explain why she or he will not be in attendance. Individual instructors will announce in their course syllabi their policy for any students’ unwarranted absences, and will notify the Graduate Advisor of any repeated instances.

8.3       Grading Procedures

Instructors are required to state in their syllabus the number, length, and relative weight of all assignments. The specific aims and expectations of individual assignments, such as seminar reports, annotated bibliographies, and research essays, are also typically outlined in writing either in the syllabus or in handouts distributed in class in the first two weeks of the term. A statement regarding the instructor’s policy on late papers and extensions must also be attached to the course’s syllabus.

Apart from grades, instructors typically provide detailed written commentary on each assignment submitted. These comments indicate areas of both strength and weakness in the work, and provide the student with an explanation of the grade received.

8.4       Marking of Graduate Papers

Graduate papers are expected to be well researched (making use of sources that are additional to any research bibliography that the instructor may have provided), appropriately documented following the MLA bibliographic style, carefully proofread, and professionally presented.

The following chart indicates the guidelines followed by instructors:

A+

9

90 - 100

Exceptional Work

Technically flawless and original work demonstrating insight, understanding and independent application or extension of course expectations; often publishable.

A

8

85 - 89

Outstanding Work

Demonstrates a very high level of integration of material demonstrating insight, understanding and independent application or extension of course expectations.

A-

7

80 - 84

Excellent Work

Represents a high level of integration, comprehensiveness and complexity, as well as mastery of relevant techniques/concepts.

B+

6

77 - 79

Very good work

Represents a satisfactory level of integration, comprehensiveness, and complexity; demonstrates a sound level of analysis with no major weaknesses.

B

5

73 - 76

Acceptable work that fulfills the expectations of the course

Represents a satisfactory level of integration of key concepts/procedures. However, comprehensiveness or technical skills may be lacking.

B-

4

70 - 72

Unacceptable work revealing some deficiencies in knowledge, understanding or techniques

Represents an unacceptable level of integration, comprehensiveness and complexity. Mastery of some relevant techniques or concepts lacking. Every grade of 4.0 (B-) or lower in a course taken for credit in the Faculty of Graduate Studies must be reviewed by the supervisory committee of the student and a recommendation made to the Dean of Graduate Studies. Such students will not be allowed to register in the next session until approved to do so by the Dean.

C+

3

65 - 69

C

2

60 - 64

D

1

50 - 59

F

0

0 - 49

Failing grade

Unsatisfactory performance. Wrote final examination and completed course requirements.

CTN

Excluded Grade

N/A

Continuing

Denotes the first half of a full-year course.

Students in the Faculty of Graduate Studies must achieve a grade point average of at least 5.0 (B) for every session in which they are registered. Individual departments or schools may set higher standards. Students with a sessional or cumulative average below 5.0 will not be allowed to register in the next session until their academic performance has been reviewed by their supervisory committee and continuation in the Faculty of Graduate Studies is approved by the Dean. Some academic units may employ a percentage system for evaluating student's work.

Other Failing or Temporary Grades

N

0

0 - 49

Did not write examination or otherwise complete course requirements by the end of term or session. This grade is intended to be final.

COM

N/A

N/A

Used only for 0 unit courses and other graduate courses designated by the Senate. Such courses are identified in the course listings.

INC

N/A

N/A

Incomplete (requires "Request for Extension of Grade" form). Used for those graduate credit courses designated by the Senate and identified in the course listings; also used, with Dean's permission, for those graduate credit courses with regular grading (A to F, including N) which are not complete by the end of the term or session due to exceptional circumstances beyond the control of the instructor or student. INC must be replaced by a final grade not later than the end of the next term.

INP

N/A

N/A

In Progress. Used only for work terms; dissertations; theses; projects; comprehensive examinations and seminars offered on the same basis as dissertations or theses and designated by Senate (identified in the course listings). In the case of work terms, a final grade must replace INP within two months of the end of term. For dissertations, theses, designated seminars, projects and comprehensives, a final grade must replace INP by the end of the program. If the student does not complete the degree requirements within the time limit for the degree, the final grades will be N.

N/X

Excluded Grade

N/A

Did not complete course requirements by the end of the term; no supplemental. Used only for co-op work terms and for courses designated by Senate. Such courses are identified in the course listings. The grade is EXCLUDED from the calculation of all grade point averages.

F/X

Excluded Grade

N/A

Unsatisfactory performance. Completed course requirements; no supplemental. Used only for co-op work terms and for courses designated by Senate. Such courses are identified in the course listings. The grade is EXCLUDED from the calculation of all grade point averages.

CIC

N/A

N/A

Co-op Interrupted Course. Temporary grade. See "General Regulations: Graduate Co-op".

* These percentage ranges are standardized and will be used by all instructors in determining letter grades effective May 2012.
The percentage is not recorded on the student academic record or displayed on the student official transcript; the official 9 point grading system and letter grades are displayed on the academic record and official transcript.
The University Senate has approved transition from the 9 point grading system to a percentage grading system and the implementation is planned to take effect May 2014.

8.5       Student Course Evaluations

In any of the last two meetings of each graduate course, a questionnaire is distributed to all students in order to provide a forum for teaching evaluation. An area for more general written comments is also provided. The instructor appoints a student to collect the finished questionnaires, seal them in an envelope provided, and deliver the envelope to the office of the Germanic Studies Graduate Secretary. The instructor must leave the room while the students are completing the questionnaires, after informing them that their responses will be processed in such a way as to assure their complete anonymity. The instructor sees the evaluations only after the final grades have been submitted and, even then, he or she sees only the tabulated results, together with a typewritten transcript of the handwritten comments; the original forms are destroyed.

When appropriate, the results will be discussed between the instructor, the Chair of the Department, and the Graduate Advisor.

8.6       Directed Studies (Reading)

In exceptional situations, directed reading courses can be arranged between a graduate faculty member and a graduate student or small group of graduate students. These are usually discouraged, however, because they are usually taught extra-to-load by the faculty member. Directed Studies courses must be approved by the student’s Supervisor, the Graduate Advisor, and the Faculty of Graduate Studies. The instructor of the Directed Studies course should fill out the Pro forma proposal form and seek the required signatures for approval (http://web.uvic.ca/gradstudies/forms.php).

8.7       Graduate Courses Taken Elsewhere

Outside the Department

Students may register in graduate courses outside of the department that may contribute to their research or strengthen their background for the program, to a maximum of 3 units; however, as long as the student fulfills the core requirements for the program and the Supervisory Committee and department agree, then any amount of units from another department may be taken. The student will also have to provide sufficient reasoning as to why the courses outside the department are beneficial for his/her program. If the student is taking a multitude of courses outside of the department, it is recommended that the student pursue an Interdisciplinary program.  Each term a student enrols in either a senior undergraduate level course or a course outside the department, the student’s Supervisor (or Graduate Advisor if the Supervisor has not yet been determined) would need to sign a “Graduate Course Change Form” (http://web.uvic.ca/gradstudies/forms.php).

Outside the University

Students currently registered in the graduate program who wish to undertake studies at another institution for transfer credit toward their program here must seek the approval of the Graduate Advisor and the Dean of Graduate Studies.

The application must:

  • specify the host institution, and the exact course and unit value;
  • include the calendar description or course syllabus;
  • be supported in writing by the Graduate Advisor and the Supervisor.

If permission is granted, the student must either temporarily withdraw or register concurrently in thesis credits (Ger 599) or a Co-op work term at UVic. Students are expected to make arrangements for an official transcript to be sent directly to Graduate Admissions and Records upon completion of the course work.

Students may be eligible for “exchange” status under the provisions of the Western Deans’ Agreement or other formal exchange agreements entered between the Department of Germanic and Slavic Studies and other institutions. Specific details of agreements and procedures are available from the Graduate Admissions and Records Office.

 9.      APPEAL PROCEDURES

9.1       General Information

There are two categories of appeals. The procedure to be followed depends upon whether an appeal is academic or procedural. Authority for determining whether a matter should be considered an academic or procedural appeal rests with the Dean of Graduate Studies.

For full guidelines regarding appeal procedures see “Appeals” in the Graduate Studies Calendar.

9.2       Academic Appeals

Academic appeals are those that deal with the evaluation of the academic merit of students’ work. Examples include, but are not limited to:

  • the grade assigned in courses graded on the University’s “A+ to F” scale;
  • the outcome of a public final oral examination;
  • the outcome of an assessment to determine if a student’s academic performance warrants continued enrolment in the Faculty of Graduate Studies.

Qualitative decisions about students’ work fall within the responsibilities of the Graduate Advisor and the Graduate Committee, but the Office of the Dean ensures that proper procedures are followed, academic decisions are arrived at fairly, and the processes used are consistent and fair. At her or his discretion, the Graduate Advisor may invite other Graduate Faculty to assist in rendering an academic decision.

9.3       Procedural Appeals

Procedural appeals are those that deal with a claim that the established procedures of the Faculty of Graduate Studies have not been followed, or that the regulations of the Graduate Faculty have been unfairly applied. Examples of procedural appeals include such matters as exceptions to fee assessments, time limits, late registration, etc.

10.     FINANCIAL ASSISTANCE

10.1     Information for International Students

Citizenship and Immigration Canada does not require an employment authorization for international students working on the campus of the institution where they are registered if a) the student has a valid and subsisting student authorization, 2) the student is registered on a full-time basis, and 3) the student is only working on the campus where she or he is registered. Students who are hired as Teaching or Research Assistants must ensure that they provide the Graduate Secretary with a copy of their student authorization in order for their appointments to be processed.

In addition, every person who works in Canada is required to have a valid Social Insurance Number (SIN) obtained from Human Resources Development Canada (HRDC). To apply, students must have a valid Student Authorization and a letter offering employment (signed by both the student and the employer). Application forms are available at http://www.servicecanada.gc.ca/en/sc/sin/index.shtml.

10.2     University Fellowships

These may be awarded by the Faculty of Graduate Studies to new M.A. students who have outstanding academic records. The amount of these fellowships may vary from year to year. Fellowship holders must maintain continuous full-time registration during the tenure of the award. In addition, they are not allowed to hold another major award (e.g., SSHRC) in conjunction with a University Fellowship. Should students be offered such an award after acceptance of the University Fellowship, the Fellowship must be forfeited.

10.3     Departmental Funding

Depending on the departmental budget, incoming Master’s students may be offered a funding package that includes departmental funding. This funding could take the form of a research or teaching assistantship and/or other types of awards.

10.4     Progress Expected of Students Holding Fellowships

Students must maintain a minimum A- (7.0 GPA) average in order to retain their departmental and Graduate Studies funding. Students granted parental or compassionate/medical leave will retain the full value of a University of Victoria Graduate Fellowship or other award whose terms and conditions are established by the Faculty of Graduate Studies. Such awards will be suspended at the onset of the leave and reinstated when the student re-registers. Other awards will be paid according to the conditions established by the donor or granting agency. Students who fail to maintain their full-time status or take an official leave of absence from their program will normally lose their departmental funding as well.

10.5     Research Assistantships

M.A. students can also work as Teaching Assistants (TAs), Research Assistants (RAs) or on Work Study programs within the University. TA and RA salaries are estimated on an hourly basis and must comply with the salary guidelines of the University.

Assistantships in the Department of Germanic and Slavic Studies vary considerably, depending on the needs of the department, faculty research projects, and demand for marking assistance by individual faculty members.

10.6     Social Sciences and Humanities Research Council of Canada (SSHRC)

The Social Sciences and Humanities Research Council of Canada (SSHRC) offers 12-month, non-renewable Masters Canada Graduate Scholarships (CGS) valued in 2009/10 at $17,500. Canadian citizens or permanent residents are eligible to apply if – at the time of taking up the award – they will be entering an M.A. program, or will have completed no more than 12 months of full-time M.A. study. Students are not allowed to hold a CGS in conjunction with a University Fellowship. CGS holders usually also receive President’s Research Scholarships from the Faculty of Graduate Studies, valued at $4,000 in 2009/10.

Applications and Scheduling

Applications (including all supporting documents) are due to the Graduate Advisor by early November. Students are strongly encouraged to begin drafting their proposal as much in advance of this deadline as possible, and to solicit feedback from their Supervisor (if they have one), a faculty member specializing in their field of interest, or the Graduate Advisor. They are also advised to keep copies of their applications. Workshops on the SSHRC application process are usually offered by the Faculty of Graduate Studies early in the fall semester.

Vetting of Applications

Applications are vetted by the Graduate Advisor, in consultation with the Graduate Committee. The Graduate Advisor appends to each application a support letter. According to SSHRC and University guidelines, the Graduate Advisor must rank the applications before forwarding them (with all supporting documents) to the Dean of the Faculty of Graduate Studies in late December. A University Selection Committee, appointed by the Dean, will rank all University applications, and forward the top 30 (the number may vary from year to year) to SSHRC, who will announce the results in the Spring.

10.7     Graduate Student Travel Grants

Students may apply for a Travel Grant from the Faculty of Graduate Studies (which represents combined support from both the Faculty and the Graduate Students’ Society) to assist in travelling to academically related conferences or to do research. There is a limited amount of funding given out each month, and it is distributed on a first-come, first-served basis. Applications are available at

http://web.uvic.ca/gradstudies/fund/documents/TravelGrantapplication-new.pdf
and should be handed in to the Graduate Secretary as soon as possible – and before the travel/conference – to reserve funding for the month in which the student plans to travel.

To be eligible to receive a Travel Grant, students must be registered full-time in the term in which they plan to travel; must not owe outstanding fees to the university; must not have received a travel grant during the period (April 1 – March 31), based on the dates of travel; and, if they are presenting a paper, must include with the application a copy of the letter of acceptance. There are four award amounts:

Category 1: A maximum of $600 for a student presenting a paper at a conference outside BC, Alberta, or Washington State.

Category 2: A maximum of $400 for a student presenting a paper at a conference in BC, Alberta, or Washington State (but outside of Vancouver and Vancouver Island).

Category 3: A maximum of $300 to be used to attend conferences/workshops or to conduct research outside of BC, Alberta, or Washington state.

Category 4: A maximum of $150 to present or attend conferences/workshops or do research in Vancouver, Seattle or on Vancouver Island.

11. EMPLOYABILITY

11.1     Professional Development

The Department of Germanic and Slavic Studies remains committed to providing excellent academic training and preparation for a range of future careers. In addition, the department hosts many related events, including author readings, film showings, lectures by Germanic Studies scholars, as well as an in-house lecture series (Der Deutsche Abend an der Uni) that students may attend. Students are also encouraged to present their research informally to the department or to host their own graduate conferences, workshops, or symposia.

M.A. graduates have found positions in a variety of places outside as well as inside of academe. A Master’s degree in Germanic Studies gives you a competitive advantage in the local, national and international job market. It opens the door in a large number of professions, including careers in:

Academia and Education                                            Library Science

Editing and Publishing                                                Non-profit Organizations

Government and Politics                                             Research

International Business                                                Translation and interpretation

International Organizations                                         Travel and hospitality industry

Journalism                                                                 Travel writing

 

11.2     Career Services

In seeking non-academic career opportunities, students can benefit from the programs and services offered at UVic’s Career Services office. Ranging from work search strategies to internships, most of these services are offered free of charge. For detailed information, these non-academic careers exploration programs can be accessed at http://www.stec.uvic.ca.

12.  RESEARCH INVOLVING HUMAN SUBJECTS

In order to protect the rights and safety of research participants and researchers, the University requires that all students whose research involves human participants must receive approval from the Human Research Ethics Board (HREB) prior to conducting such research. All UVic Faculty, Graduate Students and Staff conducting research with human participants, human tissues, cadavers or information databases are required to obtain Ethics approval before commencing research under UVic Research Policy 1250. If you are not sure if you require Ethics approval, refer to

http://www.research.uvic.ca/ethics/Ethics_Tips_for_Grad_Students.pdf and contact the relevant ethics office.

Violations of this policy will be investigated by the Office of Research Services and may result in the cancellation of a student’s registration and/or withdrawal from the University. Ethical research guidelines as well as application procedures and materials are available at http://research.uvic.ca/ORS/main_ors.htm.          

13. STUDENT CONFERENCE PAPERS

Students are encouraged to present their research to the department. This provides an excellent opportunity for the students to share their work in a familiar, non-threatening environment. In this collegial and supportive venue, students can receive feedback on issues ranging from the content of the paper to its manner of delivery. Interested students should contact the Graduate Advisor. The Graduate Advisor will also periodically inform students about relevant graduate conferences and periodicals. In addition, graduate students are encouraged to work together to host their own conference, symposium, or workshop and should contact the UVic Graduate Student Society for possible funding opportunities.


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