Undergraduate studies

EPHE undergraduate programs



Kinesiology (BSc)

The Kinesiology program is a science program that prepares you to enter the fields of movement analysis, exercise prescription and exercise management, or to undertake further study in medicine, physiotherapy, occupational therapy, chiropractic or massage therapy.

Overview

Careers in kinesiology

The Kinesiology program prepares students to thrive in the growing field of wellness, exercise training and skilled movement. Students study physical activity from a variety of scientific perspectives and apply their knowledge in sport, recreation and rehabilitative settings. This degree is an excellent foundation to a career in analysis of movement, exercise prescription and management or for future study in medicine, physiotherapy, occupational therapy, chiropractic and massage therapy.

Personal qualities/interests

Most people working in this field have the following personal qualities/interests:

  • They enjoy caring for and assisting others in identifying their needs and solving their concerns. Social persons like working and co-operating with others. They prefer to be involved in work that requires interpersonal contact.
  • They like to take responsibility for projects that require planning, decision making and coordinating the work of others. They are able to give direction and instructions easily. They enjoy organizing their own activities. They see themselves as independent and self-directing.
  • They are interested in initiating and creating different ways to solve questions and present information. They enjoy scientific subjects. Innovative persons prefer to be challenged with new and unexpected experiences. They adjust to change easily.

Workplace characteristics and demands

Work environment

Most people in this field work in a regulated inside climate.

Duites

Kinesiologists conduct fitness and human movement tests and assessments. They design and implement programs to maintain, rehabilitate or enhance movement and performance in the areas of sports, recreation, work and exercise.

Kinesiology graduates may complete additional graduate study to become a physiotherapist or occupational therapist.

Physiotherapists may focus their practice in particular clinical areas such as neurology, oncology, rheumatology, orthopedics, obstetrics, pediatrics, geriatrics, in the treatment of patients with cardiovascular and cardiopulmonary disorders, burns or sports injuries and in the field of ergonomics.

Employers

Kinesiology

  • Community centers
  • Federal government
  • Health and sports organizations
  • Municipal governments
  • Provincial governments
  • Recreational institutions
  • Self-employment
  • Sports and fitness consulting firms

Physiotherapy (requires additional study)

  • Clinics
  • Extended care facilities
  • Hospitals
  • Industry
  • Private practices
  • Rehabilitation centres
  • Sports organizations

Occupational therapy (requires additional study)

  • Clinics
  • Extended care facilities
  • Hospitals
  • Industry
  • Private practices
  • Rehabilitation centres
  • Sports organizations

Salaries

Occupation

Other professional occupations in therapy and assessment (NOC 3144-A)

Community/Area Wages ($/hr)
Low Median High
Canada 15.50 23.00 45.50
British Columbia 19.00 24.61 32.23

Note: Wage data last updated November 1, 2016

Source:Labour Market Information - ESDC

Related occupations

Program leaders and instructors in recreation and sport

  • aerobics instructor
  • camp counsellor
  • day camp leader
  • fitness instructor
  • gymnastics teacher
  • lifeguard
  • playground worker
  • recreation program leader
  • riding instructor
  • ski instructor
  • ski patrol
  • swimming instructor – sports

Recreation and sports program and service directors

  • director of recreation
  • director of sports administration
  • professional football team manager
  • professional hockey team manager
  • professional track and field team manager
  • recreation director
  • sport association director
  • sports federation director
  • sports programs director

Physiotherapy (requires additional study)

  • physical therapist
  • physiotherapist
  • registered physiotherapist
  • research physiotherapist

Occupational therapy (requires additional study)

  • clinical occupational therapist
  • community occupational therapist
  • occupational therapist
  • occupational therapist rehabilitation consultant
  • occupational therapist, case manager
  • occupational therapist, research and development



What our students say

Michelle Cox: Co-op helps affirm physiotherapy career goals

It was a combination of things that first brought Michelle Cox to UVic. “I grew up in Port Alberni, so I chose UVic because it was a good school and fairly close to home,” she says. “I was drawn to kinesiology because I've always been involved in sports and I’m interested in human biology.”

Cox, now 23, learned about co-op during her first year when some students spoke to her class about the program. She found her first placement the summer after second year, as an outdoor recreation leader at Atlantic College in Wales. “During my first work term, I learned how to climb, belay and mountain-board and gained valuable experience working with youth with intellectual, physical and emotional disadvantages,” she says. “I also gained a lot of confidence in leading and directing groups.”

Throughout the work term, Cox put her coursework to practical use in areas like anatomy, motor learning and program planning. She thoroughly enjoyed the experience, although there were adjustments to make living overseas. “It was the longest I've ever been away from home, so I missed people, and sharing a tiny room with three other girls for three months had its challenges,” she says. “But it was worth it, for sure!”

Next, Cox worked as a physiotherapy assistant at the Canadian Back Institute in Victoria. She learned about the inner workings of a clinic while she prepped clients for treatment, helped them with exercises and administered ultrasounds and electrical stimulation.

This relevant work experience helped Cox land her most recent co-op position as a research assistant with the Institute of Applied Physical Activity and Health Research at UVic. She worked on a project called Inclusion Works! and received a Canadian Institute for Health Research grant of over $4,000. “My main project was to research, write, pilot and evaluate the first module of a physical activity and nutrition intervention program for youth with intellectual and physical disabilities,” she says.

Currently living in Bristol, England, Cox plans to have some fun before taking her next steps towards a career in physiotherapy. “I'm going to travel as much as I can before applying to do my master’s degree in physiotherapy in 2013,” says Cox. “Someday, I hope to open my own wellness centre on Vancouver Island.” 


Admission requirements

Secondary school requirements

The Kinesiology program is a second-year entry program. You cannot apply for admission to the Kinesiology program directly from secondary school.

Although secondary school prerequisites are not required to apply for admission to the Kinesiology program, many of the courses required in the program have secondary school prerequisites. At a minimum, you should have completed Chemistry 11 and Pre-Calculus 11 or Principles of Mathematics 11. It is, however, recommended that you have completed Biology 12, Chemistry 11, Chemistry 12, Pre-Calculus 12 and Physics 12 (NB, if you haven't completed these courses you will most likely need to take additional courses at UVic).

If you are are interested in the Kinesiology program you should apply for admission to UVic and either the Faculty of Humanities, the Faculty of Social Sciences or the Faculty of Science. Each of these faculties has different secondary school admission prerequisites. You can view the Year 1 Faculty admission prerequisites for BC secondary school students in the University Calendar.

If you are interested in the Kinesiology program the Faculty of Science or the Faculty of Social Sciences are good choices of admission faculty. Your admission faculty, however, does not effect your chances of entering the Kinesiology program.

The courses that you take in your first year at UVic should be related of the Kinesiology yprogram, so you aren't wasting any time. The advantage of a second-year entry program is that it makes it easier to change direction if your interests change.

You need to apply for admission to the Kinesiology program by January 31 of your first year and if you application is successful you will be formally admitted to the program in September of that year.

Admission prerequisites

You apply for entry to the Kinesiology program when you have completed or have in progress at least 12 units of university-level courses, including:

  • a minimum of 6 units of science (from BIOL, CHEM, MATH, PHYS, STAT 255, EPHE 141, 241, 242)
  • 3 units of English: ENGL 135 or ENGR 110 and one of ENGL 146, ENGL 147,  ENGL 225 or ENGR 120
  • EPHE 143
  • a minimum grade point average (GPA) of 5.0 on the most recent session on the UVic 9.0 scale. For students currently registered in less than 12 units the GPA will be determined by using a combination of the GPA achieved in the current session and the GPA from the previous session applied to the number of units required to reach 12 units. Achieving the minimum GPA for the program does notensure acceptance.

The application deadline is January 31 for entry in September of the same year. All requirements for admission must be completed by April 30, and in the case of transfer applicants, documented with UVic by May 31.

Applicants are normally notified of admission decisions by email in late May or early June.

If your application for admission to the Kinesiology program is unsuccessful you can continue to take courses related to the program and apply again in a subsequent application round.

English requirement

All students in the Kinesiology program must complete ENGL 135 or ENGR 110 and one of ENGL 146, ENGL 147,  ENGL 225 or ENGR 120.

The requirement to complete 3.0 units of English in the Recreation and Health Education program is separate from the UVic Academic Writing Requirement (AWR).

Most students in the Recreation and Health Education program mee the UVic academic writing requirement with one of the ENGL courses that they take as part of the Recreation and Health Education program.

Students may also meet the UVic academic writing requirement by obtaining a score of at least 86% on the B.C. English 12 Provincial Examination or English 12 First Peoples Provincial Examination or who obtain a final grade of at least 86% in an approved English 12 equivalent course from other Canadian provinces within the three years immediately prior to admission to UVic. If you meet the UVic academic writing requirement by one of these means you must still complete ENGL 135 or ENGR 110 and one of ENGL 146, ENGL 147,  ENGL 225 or ENGR 120.

An AWR-designated 10L (i.e., 100 level) 1.5 unit transfer credit wil be accepted in lieu of 1.5 units of English required for application to, and as part of, the Recreation and Health Education program.

Co-operative education and work terms

What is co-op?

Co-op is an optional addition to the Kinesiology program. It can be added at the time of application to the program or at any point during the program.

Co-op involves alternating your academic studies with paid work experience in which you gain practical experience that will help you prepare to plan, implement, evaluate and supervise recreation, sport, fitness and health promotion policies and programs.

Adding Co-op to the Kinesiology program may extend the duration fo your program.

How many work terms will you complete?

You will complete three work terms to graduate with a co-op designation.

Who will you work for?

That depends on you! You can apply to posted co-op jobs or arrange your own work term by approaching an employer & discussing your options with the co-op coordinator. Want to travel the world while you work? Apply for a job with one of our international employers, or find a job with an organization elsewhere in Canada. As a recreation and health education student, you could work for:

  • municipal recreation departments;
  • provincial ministries;
  • rehabilitation centres;
  • outdoor education centres;
  • community schools;
  • therapeutic programs;
  • sport organizations;
  • fitness and wellness programs;
  • educational institutions;
  • residences for seniors;
  • residential and day camps for children and youth; and
  • many other leisure, rehabilitation, health, wellness and fitness organizations.

Assistance

You can find more specific information about co-operative education on the Co-operative Education Career Services website.

GPA calculation

Kinesiology program admission decisions are made based on GPA (i.e., grades).

Eligible applicants who have fulfilled the admission requirements and participated in an interview are offered a place in the program in order from highest GPA to lowest GPA, until the quota for the program is filled (NB, the current quota is 30).

Achieving the minimum GPA needed for application to the Recreation and Health Education program does not ensure acceptance into the program.

The GPA used for Recreation and Health Education program admission decisions is based on your most recently session of university or college study and must consist of a minimum of 12 units.

If you are currently registered in 12 or more units the GPA that you achieve upon completion of this session will be used to determine your GPA.

If you are registered in less than 12 units in the current session, the GPA will be determined by using a combination of the GPA from the current session and the GPA from all of the courses in your previous session applied to the number of units required to reach the 12 units.

Visit the Office of the Registrar webpage for an explanation of how GPAs are calculated at UVic.

Interviews

All eligible Kinesiology co-op program applicants must participate in an application interview. Kinesiology major applicants do not attend an interview.

Application interviews are held in late March or early April.

Application interviews are intended to provide you with information about the Kinesiology co-op program, as well as answer any questions you might have about the program.

The application interviews are not used to make admission decisions.

Application interview sign-up information will be sent to you by email.

Indigenous applicants

The University of Victoria's Faculty of Education reserves 5% of the positions in all of the faculty's programs for Indigenous applicants who meet the Faculty of Education's minimum program entrance requirements and Indigenous application requirements. This provision also applies to programs offered by the School of Exercise Science, Physical and Health Education.

If you wish to apply to the Kinesiology program on the grounds of your aboriginal status you should apply online and self-identify when prompted.

Transfer students

If you are interested in transferring to the Kinesiologyprogram from another recognized institution or who have completed other recognized tertiary studies you need to apply for admission using the standard UVic procedures (i.e., both admission to UVic and Kinesiology program). The grades for transfer courses being used to meet Kinesiology program application prerequisites must be documented with UVic by May 31.

As part of the admission process a transfer credit evaluation of your previous studies will be undertaken (NB, you will receive a formal statement of this transfer credit evaluation) and this will give you a better idea of what courses you will need to take in order to maximize your chances of being accepted into the Recreation and Health Education program, as well as what courses you will need to take as part of the program (i.e., It will identify the courses that you have already completed that can be used for credit in your new program).

Sometimes students lodge an application for admission to UVic to determine what transfer credits they will receive and then make a decision about whether they will continue with their program application based on those transfer credits.

If you are transfer from a university or college in British Columbia you can look-up your potential transfer credits using the BC Transfer Guide

Occasionally, transfer students are able to manage application to UVic and application for admission to the Kinesiology in one step. If this is not possible you can take many courses related to an Recreation and Health Education program without being formally in the program. You should note, however, that the longer it takes you to gain admission to the Recreation and Health Education program the more difficult it becomes to take courses (i.e., particularly EPHE courses) related to the degree because many upper level EPHE courses are restricted to students in the program or registration priority is given to students in the program, which means that you cannot access them or they may have filled-up before you get a chance to register in them.

Up to 30 units of a 60 unit degree (i.e., half of a degree) can be completed through approved transfer credits (i.e., courses that are deemed to be equivalent to a UVic course but offered elsewhere). There are also restrictions on the number of upper level courses (i.e., 300-400 level) that must be completed at UVic (i.e., 18.0 units of the required 21.0 upper-level units must be taken at UVic). Course substitutions are not possible.

Visiting Canadian students

If you wish to register in an EPHE course as a visiting student you must complete an application for admission to UVic and provide a letter of permission or equivalent from your home institution, transcripts, and evidence of English competency. Visit the Admissions Office webpage for more information and to begin the application process.

Although your home institution may provide you with a letter of permission realting to courses offered by the School of Exercise Science, Physical and Health Education (EPHE), not all EPHE courses are open to visiting students.

Incoming international exchange students

If you are an international exchange student coming to UVic you are welcome to register in courses offered by the School of Exercise Science, Physical and Health Education (EPHE) that are not reserved soley for EPHE students and for which you have the required prerequisites.

EPHE courses have four types of restrictions:

  1. Prerequisite-based, in which you must have completed another course or courses to be able to register in a course.
  2. Time-based, in which a course is reserved for EPHE students until a specific date, after which registration opens to other students.
  3. Level-based, in which a course are is reserved for students who have completed a specified number of units.
  4. Program-based, in which a course is reserved for students who have been admitted to a program in the School of Exercise Science, Physical and Health Education (i.e., these courses can't be taken even if there are space available).

If you believe that you are eligible to register in an EPHE course based on courses you have completed at your home institution but are blocked by a prerequisite or year level restriction you can apply for a course registration waiver. To submit a waiver request you need you to complete an EPHE Waiver form. Your request is more likely to be granted if you include supporting documentation (e.g., proof that you have completed or are registered in a course prerequisite at another university or college). EPHE waiver forms should be returned in person to the EPHE office (i.e., McKinnon Building, Room 120) or by email to the .

You can identify the restrictions associated with EPHE courses by reviewing  the comments associated with each course in the timetable and the University Calendar or the EPHE course schedule (see the "Program details" section ).

You should contact the International Office for information about coming to UVic as an exchange student.

Ready to apply

My UVic application is where you to go to apply for admission to the Kinesiology program it you are:

When applying for admission to UVic you will be asked to indicate your "program area." If your intention is to apply for admission to the Recreation and Health Education program in the future, the correct program area is “Pre-Education,” which means that you intend to apply for admission to a program offered in the Faculty of Education at a later point in time (NB, the Recreation and Health Education program is administratively located in the Faculty of Education). Alternatively, you can indicate your program area as “Undeclared,” which means that you haven't decided on your major area of study.

Program details (for UVic students)

Program sequence - Kinesiology major

The following is the list of required courses and the recommended sequence for the Kinesiology major program as outlined in the current University Calendar. If there are any discrepancies between this website and the Calendar, the Calendar will take precedence.

Students' programs are normally governed by the Calendar regulations in effect at the date of their first registration in the faculty. If program requirements change before you finish your degree, you may, with approval, choose to be governed by the new regulations. If you have questions about the program sequence contact the .

Year one

Units
BIOL 150A and 150B, or 184 and 186, or 190A and 190B* (see Note 1.) 3.0
CHEM 101 and 102* (see Note 1.) 3.0
EPHE 141 1.5
EPHE 143 1.5
EPHE 155 1.5
ENGL 135 and one from 146, 147, or 225 3.0
One Elective (see Note 2.) 1.5
Total academic units 15.0

Year two

Units
MATH 100 or 102 or 109 1.5
STAT 255 1.5
PHYS 110 or 102A* (see Note 1.) 1.5
EPHE 201 1.5
EPHE 241 1.5
EPHE 242 1.5
EPHE 245 1.5
EPHE 253 1.5
Two eectives (see Note 2.) 3.0
Total academic units 15.0

Year three

Units
EPHE 341 1.5
EPHE 344 1.5
EPHE 360 1.5
EPHE 380 1.5
EPHE 355 1.5
EPHE 300-400 level electives 3.0
Three electives (see Note 2.) 4.5
Total academic units 15.0

Year four

Units
EPHE 441 1.5
EPHE 444 1.5
EPHE 447 (NB, taken across two terms) 1.5
EPHE 300-400 level electives 4.5
Four electives (see Note 2.) 6.0
Total academic units 15.0

Total Units for degree

60.0

Note 1.

Although secondary school courses are not required for admission to the BSc Kinesiology program, many of the university courses required in the program have secondary school prerequisites. If you want to apply to this program, you should take a minimum of Biology 11, Chemistry 11 (Chemistry 12 is recommended), Principles of Math 12 or Pre-Calculus 12, and Physics 11 (Physics 12 is recommended).

The following list of secondary school prerequisites and UVic alternatives is provided as a guide only. Prerequisites may change, and you are advised to check course descriptions in the UVic Calendar before making registration decisions.

BIOL 150A and 150B, or 184 and 186:

  • There are no prerequisites for BIOL 150A or 150B; students without secondary school Biology must take BIOL 150A and 150B.
  • Either Biology 11 or Biology 12 is a prerequisite for BIOL 184 and 186, so students with secondary school Biology can choose to take either BIOL 150A and 150B or BIOL 184 and 186.

CHEM 101 and 102:

  • Students with Chemistry 11 and Chemistry 12 can take CHEM 101 and 102.
  • Students with only Chemistry 11 can take CHEM 101, but must take Chemistry 12 or UVic CHEM 091 before taking CHEM 102.
  • Students with only Chemistry 12 will need to complete Chemistry 11 (NB, not available at UVic) before they can register in CHEM 101 and then CHEM 102.

MATH 100 or MATH 102 or 109:

  • Students with a minimum grade of 73% in Principles of Mathematics 12 or Pre-calculus 12 can take MATH 100.
  • Students with a Principles of Mathematics 12 or Pre-calculus 12 can take MATH 102.
  • Student with a minimum grade of 73% in Principles of Mathematics 12 or Pre-calculus 12 can take MATH 109.
  • Students with only Mathematics 11 or Pre-calculus 11 must take MATH 120 before taking MATH 100 or MATH 102 or MATH 109. Students must obtain a minimum grade of C+ in MATH 120 to take MATH 100, or a minimum grade of C in MATH 120 to take MATH 102, or a minimum grade of C+ in MATH 120 to take MATH 109.

PHYS 110 or 102A:

  • The Department of Physics and Astronomy recommends a background equivalent to Physics 12 for PHYS 110.
  • Students with no secondary school Physics or only Physics 11 may take PHYS 102A in lieu of PHYS 110.

Note 2.

Please refer to the Electives section for details of the approved elective structure in the Kinesiology program.

Program sequence - Kinesiology co-op

The following is the list of required courses and the recommended sequence for the Kinesiology co-op program as outlined in the current University Calendar. If there are any discrepancies between this website and the Calendar, the Calendar will take precedence.

Students' programs are normally governed by the Calendar regulations in effect at the date of their first registration in the faculty. If program requirements change before you finish your degree, you may, with approval, choose to be governed by the new regulations. If you have questions about the program sequence contact the . If you have questions about work terms contact the .

Year one

Units
BIOL 150A and 150B, or 184 and 186, or 190A and 190B* (see Note 1.) 3.0
CHEM 101 and 102* (see Note 1.) 3.0
EPHE 141 1.5
EPHE 143 1.5
EPHE 155 1.5
ENGL 135 and one from 146, 147, or 225 3.0
One Elective (see Note 2.) 1.5
Total academic units 15.0

Year two

Units
MATH 100 or 102 or 109 1.5
STAT 255 1.5
PHYS 110 or 102A* (see Note 2.) 1.5
EPHE 200 0.0
EPHE 201 1.5
EPHE 241 1.5
EPHE 242 1.5
EPHE 245 1.5
EPHE 253 1.5
Two eectives (see Note 2.) 3.0
Total academic units 15.0

Year three

Units
EPHE 341 1.5
EPHE 344 1.5
EPHE 359 (summer) 1.5
EPHE 360 1.5
EPHE 380 1.5
EPHE 300-400 level electives 3.0
Three electives (see Note 2.) 4.5
Total academic units 15.0

Year four

Units
EPHE 355
EPHE 441 1.5
EPHE 444 1.5
EPHE 300-400 level electives 4.5
Four electives (see Note 2.) 6.0
Total academic units 15.0
Total Units for Degree 60.0

Note 1.

Although secondary school courses are not required for admission to the BSc Kinesiology program, many of the university courses required in the program have secondary school prerequisites. If you want to apply to this program, you should take a minimum of Biology 11, Chemistry 11 (Chemistry 12 is recommended), Principles of Math 12 or Pre-Calculus 12, and Physics 11 (Physics 12 is recommended).

The following list of secondary school prerequisites and UVic alternatives is provided as a guide only. Prerequisites may change, and you are advised to check course descriptions in the UVic Calendar before making registration decisions.

BIOL 150A and 150B, or 184 and 186:

  • There are no prerequisites for BIOL 150A or 150B; students without secondary school Biology must take BIOL 150A and 150B.
  • Either Biology 11 or Biology 12 is a prerequisite for BIOL 184 and 186, so students with secondary school Biology can choose to take either BIOL 150A and 150B or BIOL 184 and 186.

CHEM 101 and 102:

  • Students with Chemistry 11 and Chemistry 12 can take CHEM 101 and 102.
  • Students with only Chemistry 11 can take CHEM 101, but must take Chemistry 12 or UVic CHEM 091 before taking CHEM 102.
  • Students with only Chemistry 12 will need to complete Chemistry 11 (NB, not available at UVic) before they can register in CHEM 101 and then CHEM 102.

MATH 100 or MATH 102 or 109:

  • Students with a minimum grade of 73% in Principles of Mathematics 12 or Pre-calculus 12 can take MATH 100.
  • Students with a Principles of Mathematics 12 or Pre-calculus 12 can take MATH 102.
  • Student with a minimum grade of 73% in Principles of Mathematics 12 or Pre-calculus 12 can take MATH 109.
  • Students with only Mathematics 11 or Pre-calculus 11 must take MATH 120 before taking MATH 100 or MATH 102 or MATH 109. Students must obtain a minimum grade of C+ in MATH 120 to take MATH 100, or a minimum grade of C in MATH 120 to take MATH 102, or a minimum grade of C+ in MATH 120 to take MATH 109.

PHYS 110 or 102A:

  • The Department of Physics and Astronomy recommends a background equivalent to Physics 12 for PHYS 110.
  • Students with no secondary school Physics or only Physics 11 may take PHYS 102A in lieu of PHYS 110.

Note 2.

Please refer to the Electives section for details of the approved elective structure in the Kinesiology program.

Electives

Electives that must be completed by BSc (Kinesiology) students admitted in the most recent catalogue term, include:

7.5 units of 300- or 400-level EPHE electives
Any 300- or 400-level EPHE course (excluding program requirements) for which you have the necessary prerequisites and for which there are no program restrictions, except EPHE 359 and 447
Possible selections (i.e., subject to availability) include: EPHE 342, 346, 347, 348, 351, 357, 361, 445, 455, 456, 494 (NB, can be taken twice)
6.0 units of 300- or 400-level science electives
Any 300- or 400-level course offered in the following departments: Biochemistry and Microbiology, Biology, Chemistry, Computer Science, Mathematics and Statistics, Physics and Astronomy, except BIOL 334, 351, 359, 400, CHEM 300A, PHYS 330, and courses designated for non-science students
ANTH 312, 352, 410 (NB, Depending on the topic), 452
MEDS 301, 325, 410, 487, 490 (NB, Depending on the topic)
PSYC 317, 345A, 351B, 351D, 400A, 451B, 451D, 490 (NB, Depending on the topic)
Note: It is your responsibility to meet the prerequisite requirements of any course that you intend to use as a 300- or 400-level science elective. This will require forethought and planning on your part. The prerequisites associated with individual courses can be viewed in the University Calendar.
3.0 units of 300- or 400-level discipline-related electives
Any 300- or 400-level course offered in the Faculty of Science, except BIOL 334, 351, 359, 400, CHEM 300A, PHYS 330, and courses designated for non-science students
Any 300- or 400-level ANTH course
Any 300- or 400-level CSC course
Any 300- or 400-level EPHE course (excluding EPHE 341, 344, 355, 359 (NB, unless approved after withdrawl from Co-op), 360, 380, 441, 444, 447, 499)
Any 300- or 400-level HINF course
Any 300- or 400-level HLTH course
Any 300- or 400-level INTS course
Any 300- or 400-level MEDS course
Any 300- or 400-level PSYC course
PHIL 331
Additional courses may be approved by the BSc (Kinesiology) Program Co-ordinator
Note: It is your responsibility to meet the prerequisite requirements of any course that you intend to use as a 300- or 400-level discipline related elective. This will require forethought and planning on your part. The prerequisites associated with individual courses can be viewed in the University Calendar.
3.0 units of 100 or above science electives
Any 100 or higher level course offered in the following departments: Biochemistry and Microbiology, Biology, Chemistry, Computer Science, Mathematics and Statistics, Physics and Astronomy, except BIOL 334, 351, 359, 400, CHEM 300A, PHYS 330, and courses designated for non-science students
ANTH 250, 312, 352, 410, 452
MEDS 301, 325, 410, 487, 490 (NB, Depending on the topic)
PSYC 201, 251, 317, 345A, 351B, 351D, 400A, 451B, 451D, 490 (NB, Depending on the topic)
Note: Students will often select their 100 or above science electives with a view to meeting the prerequisites associated with their preferred 300- or 400-level science electives and/or their preferred 300- or 400-level discipline related electives. 
3.0 units of 100 or above electives
Any 100 or higher level course for which you have the necessary prerequisites and for which there are no program restrictions (NB, No more than 1.5 units of the 3.0 units of 100 or above electives can be EPHE activity courses)
Note: Students will often select their 100 or above electives with a view to meeting the prerequisites associated with their preferred 300- or 400-level science electives and/or their preferred 300- or 400-level discipline related electives.

Note.

Students wishing to use courses not listed above must have them approved by the BSc (Kinesiology) Program Co-ordinator and that approval documented by the School of Exercise Science, Physical and Health Education (EPHE) Academic Adviser on the student's degree program. Students can view their degree program and generate their own Degree Evaluation (i.e., CAPP report) by signing into "My page" and then accessing the "Degree Evaluation" option on the "Grades & Records" tab under "Student Services."

Last Updated: July 11, 2017

Teacher preparation and second teaching areas

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Honours

The Honours option in the BSc Kinesiology program is intended for motivated, self-directed students who wish to engage in research during their undergraduate program. If you are planning to work as a kinesiologist, the honours program develops competencies in reading and implementing relevant research findings in kinesiology practice, as well as, in conducting research to enhance professional practice. If you are considering post-graduate study, the honours program may be of benefit when applying for admission to degrees such as MA, MSc, MD, MSc (PT) or MSc (OT).

If you are currently in the Kinesiology Major and Major Co-op programs and wish to seek an honours degree, you would normally apply at the start of your third year in the program. Complete Section 1 of the Honours Application Form and submit it to the EPHE academic adviser. If you meet the honours eligibility requirements, you will need to find a supervisor for your honours thesis before being accepted into the program. Review the research profiles of faculty to determine who to approach. Instructions for finding a supervisor are available on the application form.

The honours admission requirements are:

  • A minimum 6.0 grade point average in all EPHE courses (excluding 100 level EPHE courses)
  • A grade point average of 5.0 in non-EPHE courses

All requirements should be completed within five academic years. 

An honours degree will be awarded to students who:

  • Obtain a graduating average of at least 5.0
  • Obtain a grade point average of at least 5.5 for all 300 and 400-level EPHE courses
  • Obtain a grade of at least B in EPHE 499. If you achieve a grade lower than B in EPHE 499, you will graduate under the Major program, providing all other requirements for the degree are fulfilled.
  • Complete an Honours thesis that normally includes:
    • Hours of work equivalent to 3.0 units of course work (approx. 36 hr).
    • In-depth involvement with working on a research project.
    • A written document of sufficient substance in both length and content which is directly presenting research related to the honours project.
    • Oral presentation to the kinesiology honours peer cohort in the spring of the year you graduate.

Recommended sequence of required courses for the BSc (Kinesiology) Honours program

Note: Years 1 and 2 are the same as for the BSc (Kinesiology) major program.

Year three

Requirement Units
EPHE 341* 1.5
EPHE 344* 1.5
EPHE 357 1.5
EPHE 360* 1.5
EPHE 380* 1.5
One of EPHE 355 or 456 1.5
EPHE 300-400 level 1.5
Three Electives 4.5
Total academic units 15.0

Year four

Requirement Units
EPHE 441* 1.5
EPHE 444* 1.5
EPHE 447 (full-year course, must register in both terms) 1.5
EPHE 499 (full-year course, on pro forma registration, tick Sep-Apr) 3.0
EPHE 300-400 level 4.5
Three Electives 4.5
Total academic units 16.5
Total Units for Degree 61.5

Course schedule, prerequisites and restrictions

This information is provided as an aid to student course planning and is subject to change. Not all courses are offered every year. Students should verify all information in the timetable when it becomes available before making important course planning decisions.

SUMMER SESSION 2017

Check the course links for the course description and Summer timetable. Registration starts on March 20th.

Course

Instructor

Term dates

Prerequisites & restrictions

EPHE 134 - Yoga Carole Miller Term 4
May 8-June 7
None
EPHE 142 - Personal Health, Wellness & Potential John Buxcey Term 5
June 8-30
None
EPHE 155 - Introduction to Nutrition: Concepts and Controversies Greg Mulligan Term 5
June 8-30
None
EPHE 356 - Principles of Facility Administration Doug Nichols Term 4
May 8-June 7
Reserved for BA, Recreation and Health Education program
EPHE 359 - Fiscal & Legal Management in Recreation and Health Doug Nichols Term 4
May 8-June 7
Prerequisite: One co-op work term
BA, Recreation and Health Education and BSc, Kinesiology programs

WINTER SESSION 2017-18

Note: Visit the course links for descriptions only at this point. The Winter 2017-18 timetable is not yet available for viewing.

First Term, Sep-Dec 2017

Course Instructor Prerequisites & restrictions

EPHE 105 - Swimming

TBD Education programs only until July 10, then any program & year
EPHE 106 - Track & Field TBD As above
EPHE 109 - Recreational Dance Wendy MacDougall As above
EPHE 113 - Golf TBD As above
EPHE 116 - Badminton Jaime Sharpe As above
EPHE 121 - Soccer TBD As above
EPHE 137 - Experiential Outdoor Education Chris Filler Reserved for EPHE Programs only
EPHE 141 - Human Anatomy Kathy Gaul None
EPHE 142 - Personal Health, Wellness & Potential Lara Lauzon None
EPHE 143 - Multidisciplinary Foundations of Physical Activity A01: Paul Whitinui
A02: TBD
A03: Steve Meikle
None
Note: A03 is a distance education section, offered online.
EPHE 155 - Introduction to Nutrition: Concepts and Controversies Sam Liu None
EPHE 200 - Co-op Seminar Nancy Reed BSc, Kinesiology Co-op and BA, Recreation & Health Education programs
EPHE 201 - Qualitative Analysis of Human Movement Marc Klimstra EPHE programs until July 10, then open to any program 2nd year & above.
EPHE 242 - Introduction to Human Cellular Physiology Lynneth Stuart-Hill New for Winter 2017-18:
Prerequisite: one of BIOL 150B, BIOL 186, BIOL 190B, or Biology 12
EPHE 243 - Foundations of Recreation & Leisure John Meldrum EPHE programs until July 10, then open to any program 2nd year & above.
EPHE 245 - Motor Learning Olav Krigolson As above.
EPHE 252 - Leadership Methods in Recreation & Health Lara Lauzon As above.
EPHE 253 - Program Planning TBD As above.
EPHE 270 - Foundations of Outdoor Recreation Nancy Reed As above.
EPHE 310 - PE for General Classroom Teachers: A A01: TBD
A02: TBD
BEd, Elementary Curriculum program
EPHE 344 - Care & Prevention of Athletic Injuries TBD EPHE programs only.
EPHE 347 - Sport in Society TBD EPHE programs until July 10, then open to any program 2nd year & above.
EPHE 351 - Community and Population Health PJ Naylor As above.
EPHE 352 - Instructional Techniques in Individual Activities, Secondary TBD BEd Secondary Curriculum, PE teaching area.
EPHE 355 - Functional Anatomy Sandra Hundza Prerequisites: EPHE 201 & 241
Reserved for BSc Kinesiology program
EPHE 357 - Introduction to Research Viviene Temple EPHE programs until July 10, then open to any program 2nd year & above.
EPHE 358 - Management in Recreation & Health TBD Pre- or corequisite: One co-op work term
Reserved for BSc, Kinesiology and BA, Recreation & Health Education
EPHE 360 - Exercise Prescription TBD Prerequisite: EPHE 241 or permission of the school.
Reserved for EPHE programs only.
EPHE 361 - Coaching Studies TBD Reserved for EPHE programs only.
Note: Full-year course
EPHE 435 - Cultural and Outdoor Physical Activity TBD BEd Elementary Curriculum 
New for 2017-18: or with permission of school
EPHE 441 - Exercise Physiology Kathy Gaul Prerequisites: EPHE 241 & 242
Reserved for EPHE programs 3rd year & above.
EPHE 445 - Developmental and Adaptive Physical Activity Viviene Temple BA, Recreation & Health Education 4th year & above until July 10, then open to any EPHE program 4th year & above.
EPHE 447 - Kinesiology Seminar & Practicum Lynneth Stuart-Hill Prerequisite: EPHE 253
Reserved for BSc Kinesiology 4th year & above.
Note: This is a full-year course.
EPHE 487 A01 - Special Topics: Neuro Motor Contol and Disease Olav Krigolson Registration by permission. Contact Dr. Krigolson for course description and permission to register.
EPHE 494 - Directed Studies various By special arrangement
EPHE 499 - Honours Thesis or Tutorial various EPHE Honours
EPHE 764 - Curriculum and Instruction in Secondary PE Sandy Gibbons Reserved for Professional Year or Post-degree Professional Program or permission of the school.

WINTER SESSION 2017-18

Second Term, Jan-Apr 2018

Course Instructor Prerequisites & restrictions

EPHE 107 A01 & A02 - Gymnastics

Jackie Wiebe Education programs only until July 10, then any program & year

EPHE 117 - Tennis

TBD As above.

EPHE 120 - Basketball

Craig Beaucamp As above.
EPHE 122 - Volleyball Kai Riecken As above.
EPHE 133 - Strength Training John Buxcey As above.
EPHE 134 - Yoga Ann Kilbertus As above.
EPHE 141 - Human Anatomy Sandra Hundza None
EPHE 142 - Personal Health, Wellness & Potential A01: Lara Lauzon
A02: John Buxcey
None
EPHE 143 - Multidisciplinary Foundations of Physical Activity A01: TBD
A02: TBD
A03: TBD
None
Note: A03 is a distance education section, offered online.
EPHE 155 - Introduction to Nutrition: Concepts and Controversies Sam Liu None
EPHE 156 - The Science of Batman Paul Zehr None
EPHE 241 - Introduction to Human Systemic Physiology Lynneth Stuart-Hill Prerequisite: EPHE 141
EPHE 244 - Canadian Recreation Delivery Systems Joan Wharf Higgins EPHE programs until July 10, then open to any program 2nd year & above.
EPHE 246 - Teaching Strategies for Active Health Lara Lauzon As above.
EPHE 250 - Inclusion of Students with Special Needs in PE Viviene Temple BEd Secondary Curriculum with PE teaching area, or with permission.
EPHE 252 - Leadership Methods for Recreation & Health Education Steven Meikle Note: This is a distance education section, offered online.
EPHE 253 - Program Planning Paul Whitinui EPHE programs until July 10, then open to any program 2nd year and above.
EPHE 311 - PE for General Classroom Teachers: B A01: TBD
A02: TBD
BEd Elementary Curriculum Program
EPHE 312 - Overview of Elementary or Middle School PE TBD Reserved for BEd Post degree Professional Program, Elementary Education
EPHE 341 - Biomechanics Marc Klimstra

Prerequisites: EPHE 201; one of MATH 100 or 102 or 109; and one of PHYS 102, 102A or 110
Reserved for EPHE programs.

EPHE 344 - Care and Prevention of Athletic Injuries TBD

Prerequisite: EPHE 241 or permission
Reserved for EPHE programs.

EPHE 346 - Motor Development and Physical Maturation TBD

Reserved for EPHE programs.

EPHE 348 - Psychology of Physical Activity TBD

Prerequisites: PYSC 100A & 100B.
Reserved for EPHE programs until July 10, then open to any program 2nd year & above.

EPHE 355 - Functional Anatomy Sandra Hundza

Prerequisites: EPHE 201 & 241
Reserved for BSc, Kinesiology.

EPHE 361 - Coaching Studies TBD

Note: This is the second half of a full-year course.

EPHE 380 - Motor Control Olav Krigolson

Prerequisites: EPHE 241 & 245
Reserved for EPHE programs.

EPHE 443 - Organization and Administration of PE TBD

Reserved for BEd Secondary Curriculum with PE teaching area, 3rd year & above.

EPHE 444 - Measurement and Evaluation in Exercise Science Melissa Clarke Reserved for EPHE programs 3rd year & above.
EPHE 447 - Kinesiology Seminar and Practicum Lynneth Stuart-Hill Note: This is the second half of a full-year course.
EPHE 452 - Teaching Strategies for Games in PE TBD Reserved for BEd Secondary Curriculum with PE teaching area.
EPHE 454 - Marketing for Health and Social Change Joan Wharf Higgins Prerequisite: 2 co-op work terms
Reserved for BA, Recreation & Health Education 4th year & above.
EPHE 455 - Nutrition for Exercise and Health Gregg Mulligan

Prerequisite: EPHE 155
Reserved for 3rd year and above.

EPHE 456 - Occupational Ergonomics Marc Klimstra Prerequisite: EPHE 241
Reserved for EPHE programs 3rd year & above until July 10, then open to any program 3rd year & above.
EPHE 487 - Special Topics: Chronic Disease Solutions: Exercise and eHealth Sam Liu Registration by permission. Contact Dr. Liu for course description and permission to register.
EPHE 494 - Directed Studies various By special arrangement
EPHE 499 - Honours Thesis or Tutorial various EPHE Honours

Last revised: 26 June 2017

Course registration waivers

If you believe that you are eligible to register in an EPHE course but are blocked by a prerequisite, year level or program area restriction you can apply for a course registration waiver. To submit a waiver request you need you to complete an EPHE Waiver form. Your request is more likely to be granted if you include supporting documentation (e.g., proof that you have completed or are registered in a course prerequisite at another university or college). EPHE waiver forms should be returned in person to the EPHE office (i.e., McKinnon Building, Room 120) or by email to the .

Student athletes

The main priority of the School of Exercise Science, Physical and Health Education is your academic development, however, the school also wishes to support you as a student athlete.

If you are having difficulty organizing your schedule around your training and/or competitive commitments you should consult with the .

If you find that class activities conflict with your training or competitive commitments you should discuss those conflicts with the appropriate course instructor to determine if any accommodations might be possible. In some instances, however, it might be advisable to delay taking a class until you can fully devote yourself to it.

It is not unusual for student athletes to reduce their course load during the terms when their competitive commitments are high (e.g., take four or three courses per term). If you elect to do this, you should ensure that it will not adversely effect your athlete status, student loan(s) or scholarship(s).

Take a course at another Canadian university or college

It is possible to register in a course or courses at another approved post-secondary institution for credit towards your Kinesiologydegree. To do this you need to obtain prior approval from the EPHE academic adviser in the form of a Letter of Permission (LOP). This letter is sent to UVic Records and to the university or college concerned and exempts you from the payment of a UVic credit transfer evaluation fee. You must still pay any fees levied by the college or university that you attend. A copy of the LOP is also placed in your EPHE student file.

You should note that there are limits on the number of trasnfer credit coruses that you use in your UVic degree. At least 30 units of your degree must be completed at UVic and you must complete at least 18 units of your required 21 units of 300- and 400-level courses at UVic..

To be able to prepare an LOP for you the EPHE academic will need to know the following:

  • your name and student number;
  • the name of the institution that you wish to attend;
  • the name and course number of the course(s_ you wish to undertake;
  • the name and the course numbers of the respective equivalent UVic course(s); and
  • the expected start and end dates of your registration in the external course(s).

Take a course overseas

It is possible to register in a course or courses at a foreign approved post-secondary institution for credit towards your Recreation and Health Education degree.

You can find a list organized by country of the universities with which UVic has active partnership agreements on the International Office website. The entry for each institution includes the transfer credit history of courses that have been previously taken at that university. This is only a guide, and does not a guarantee that a courses would currently transfer to UVic in the same way. It is also possible to have courses that have not been previously taken evaluated. To do this you need to obtain prior approval from the EPHE academic adviser in the form of a Letter of Permission (LOP). This letter is sent to UVic Records and to the university or college concerned and exempts you from the payment of a UVic credit transfer evaluation fee. You must still pay any fees levied by the college or university that you attend. A copy of the LOP is also placed in your EPHE student file.

If you would like to study at a foreign partner university you should consult with an adviser in the International Office.

EPHE co-op work term exchange - France

The School of Exercise Science, Physical and Health Education currently has an exchange agreement with the University of Valenciennes and Hainault-Cambresis (UVHC) in France for EPHE students to participate in a co-op work term. If you go to UVHC you must be in good academic standing (normally a B average or equivalent at UVic) and have completed at least one year of your program of study. Recommended minimum level of French should be equal to level B1 (independent user in understanding, speaking, writing) according to the Common European Framework of Reference for Languages.  

If you would like to participate in an EPHE co-op work term exchange you should contact the the .

Scholarships

UVic scholarships

In recognition of outstanding students, UVic awards more than 5 million dollars in Entrance and In-Course Scholarships each year. Scholarships are non-repayable and are awarded to students on the basis of academic merit or excellence.

EPHE scholarships and awards

Jamie Cassels Undergraduate Research Awards (JCURA)

JCURA was started in 2009-10 as the Undergraduate Research Scholarship program by the Vice-President Academic and Provost. The program, designed to provide support for exceptional undergraduate students who might otherwise not be able to have direct research experience, is administered by the Learning and Teaching Centre on behalf of the Provost's Office. Eligible students include all full-time third and fourth-year undergraduate students in excellent academic standing. Award winners complete a research project under the mentorship of a faculty supervisor. Successful student applicants receive $1,500 credited directly to their UVic account.

Conference and travel grants

Student conference awards

Undergraduate and master's students may be awarded up to $150 by the School of Exercise Science, Physical and Health Education to support conference presentations and attendance. PhD students may be awarded up to $250.

Examples of eligible events:

  • BC Recreation and Parks Association Conference (attendance by BCRPA award recipient)
  • Canadian Society for Exercise Physiology Conference (attendance by CSEP award recipient)
  • Physical and Health Education Canada Student Leadership Conference (attendance by PHE Award recipient)
  • Quality Daily PE Provincial Conference

Guidelines:

  • You can be awarded $150.00 only once per degree as an undergrad or master's student or $250 twice as a PhD student.
  • You must be the first author on a paper or poster presentation related to your research or be attending a conference as an award recipient.
  • You must be a registered UVic student at the time of acceptance of your conference presentation.
  • Your Honours supervisor or program coordinator for undergrad students, or the graduate adviser for grad students, must approve and support your application.
  • A preliminary abstract and proof of acceptance of your abstract must be submitted with your application.
  • Award recipients may be asked to present their papers or posters to fellow students.

How to apply:

  1. Complete the application form.
  2. Get the support of the Honours supervisor, program coordinator, or grad adviser.
  3. Attach a copy of your abstract and confirmation of acceptance from the conference organizers.
  4. Submit the signed form to the EPHE Office, McKinnon Room 120, to the attention of the Administrative Officer (you will be notified of the result by email).

Other travel gants

For details, deadlines and application forms:

Applying to graduate

You will not be considered for graduation automatically. You must submit an application for a specific convocation (Spring or Fall). Application forms for undergraduate students are available online or at the Undergraduate Records office (i.e., main floor, University Centre). You can find more information about graduation procedures from the Convocation website.
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Physical education teaching (BA or BSc)

For many years, the Bachelor of Education (Secondary Curriculum) program (BEd) with physical education teaching area has been the premier PE program in BC and has played a leadership role in the development of similar programs in the province. We are proud of the significant role our school has played in preparing teachers to promote fitness in secondary schools.

Change is coming. Ready, set, go!

New curriculum directives are focusing on the processes of learning and the expanding responsibility of the PE curriculum to address broader issues of health. To meet the needs of future students, we are making changes and creating new routes for students wanting to become physical education teachers in secondary schools.

Beginning in September 2018, students intending on becoming a PE teacher will complete an undergraduate degree program that includes a PE concentration of EPHE courses before entering the secondary post-degree professional program (PDPP) - Diploma or Bachelor of Education. Students may complete these courses while doing the BA in Recreation and Health Education, the BSc in Kinesiology, or another undergraduate degree from an accredited university.

For more information about:

  • Changes to the BEd Secondary Curriculum program: , Program Leader.
  • Advising for students in the current 5-year BEd program and information about the PDPP for prospective students: , MacLaurin building.
  • Advising for the BA in Recreation and Health Education and the BSc Kinesiology programs: , McKinnon building.
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Recreation and Health Education (BA)

The Recreation and Health Education program is an interdisciplinary program that prepares you to enter the fields of recreation, wellness and health promotion, leadership and administration.

Overview

Careers in recreation and health education

The Recreation and Health Education program is an interdisciplinary program that prepares you to enter the fields of recreation, wellness and health promotion, leadership and administration. This degree is an excellent foundation to work in the public and not for profit sectors as it provides graduates with a foundation that supports social change. Course work focuses on planning, implementing, evaluating and supervision recreation, leisure, fitness, wellness and health promotional programs, services and policies.

Personal qualities/interests

Most people working in this field have the following personal qualities/interests:

  • They enjoy caring for and assisting others in identifying their needs and solving their concerns. Social persons like working and co-operating with others. They prefer to be involved in work that requires interpersonal contact.
  • They like to take responsibility for projects that require planning, decision making and co-ordinating the work of others. They are able to give direction and instructions easily. They enjoy organizing their own activities. They see themselves as independent and self-directing.
  • They are interested in initiating and creating different ways to solve questions and present information. They enjoy scientific subjects. Innovative persons prefer to be challenged with new and unexpected experiences. They adjust to change easily.

Workplace characteristics and demands

Work environment

Most people in this field work in a regulated inside climate. Some people in this field work outside be exposed to variations in weather conditions and seasonal weather patterns.

Main duties

Recreation service managers and directors perform some or all of the following duties:

  • Plan, organize, direct, control and evaluate the operations of recreation, sports and fitness programs and services
  • Provide technical and professional advice on recreation, sports and fitness matters
  • Prepare budget estimates and develop policies and procedures to implement programs
  • Manage the operations of a sports governing agency
  • Organize and administer national and provincial training, coaching, officiating and other programs associated with a particular sport
  • Manage the operations of a professional athletic team
  • Recruit professional coaches and athletes
  • Direct fundraising drives and arrange for sponsorships from public and private organizations
  • Develop long range plans and negotiate business contracts.

Health and social policy development and program administrators perform some or all of the following duties:

  • Participate in the development of health or social policies by providing advice to senior government managers
  • Organize departmental unit and establish procedures to meet departmental objectives set by senior management
  • Direct and advise health or social policy researchers, consultants or program officers who conduct research, prepare documents or administer programs for individuals and communities in areas such as health and social services, employment and immigration, labour or housing
  • Plan, administer and control budgets for research and administration, support services and equipment and supplies
  • Organize and direct committees and working groups to plan, manage or evaluate health and social services projects and programs
  • Interview, hire and provide training for staff.

Employers

Recreation, sports and fitness program and service directors are employed by municipalities, community and private recreational and fitness organizations, sports governing agencies and professional athletic team organizations.

Health and social policy development and program administrators plan, organize, direct, control and evaluate the development and administration of health care policies, social policies and related programs designed to protect and promote the health and social welfare of individuals and communities. They are employed by all levels of government.

Salaries

Occupation

Recreation, sports and fitness program and service directors (NOC 0513-0)

Community/Area Wages ($/hr)
Low Median High
Canada 16.20 27.00 46.50
British Columbia 10.85 26.03 47.07

Occupation

Health polcy reserachers, consultants and program officers (NOC 4165-A)

Community/Area Wages ($/hr)
Low Median High
Canada 19.00 33.00 49.45
British Columbia 20.98 33.88 45.60

Note: Wage data last updated November 1, 2016

Source:Labour Market Information - ESDC

Related occupations

Program leaders and instructors in recreation, sport and fitness:

  • aerobics instructor
  • camp counsellor
  • certified personal trainer
  • day camp leader
  • fitness appraiser
  • fitness instructor
  • gymnastics teacher
  • personal trainer
  • playground worker
  • recreation program leader
  • recreation technician
  • riding instructor
  • ski instructor
  • swimming instructor – sports

Recreation, sports and fitness policy researchers, consultants and program officers:

  • fitness policy analyst
  • recreation consultant
  • recreologist
  • sports analyst
  • sports and recreation consultant
  • sports consultant
  • sports policy analyst
  • sports program supervisor
Health and social policy development and program adminsitrators:
  • assistant chief health inspector
  • environmental health services director
  • health and welfare manager
  • health care insurance plan director
  • health care insurance refund claims director
  • health education director
  • health information and promotion chief
  • health information and promotion director
  • health program operations manager
  • health programs assistant director
  • health promotion chief
  • health services director
  • health strategies manager
  • industrial hygiene and health director
  • local health services director
  • office of health promotion chief
  • public health director
  • public health municipal officer
  • public health nursing educational director

What our students say

Heidi Hopkins: Helping youth to connect with nature

“We provide two main programs,” says Jennifer Garret, Power To Be’s director of operations (pictured on right). “Our adaptive recreation programming creates outdoor recreation opportunities for those who face barriers such as a disability or illness that make spending time in nature challenging. Our wilderness school is a 5-year nature-based program that provides outdoor leadership and activity opportunities for youth who are at risk for falling through the cracks.”

The organization has also provided opportunities for students like UVic co-op student Heidi Hopkins to take part behind-the-scenes—Hopkins recently spent a co-op work term with Power to Be and made a real impact on her employers.

“Heidi has been a great fit with our team and has been working on a manual that compiles information about organizations, services, programs and contacts," says Garret. “She’s also been helping with intake for our wilderness school program. She’s been a great fit with our team.”

As a recreation and health education student, Hopkins has brought her knowledge of nutrition and recreation into the workplace, and recently helped plan the meals for a 3-day kayak and camping trip as part of the wilderness school.

“These trips help the youth get back to basics, learn about nature and feel a balance that is difficult to find in the city,” says Hopkins. “During our outdoor experiences we strive to provide the youth with the tools needed to develop as leaders. It’s been inspiring to work on this type of project with staff who are dedicated to making long-term differences in the lives of these youth.”

Garrett is equally impressed by Heidi, and co-op students in general. “Hiring students helps us maximize our donations and extend our resources, but it also gives staff an opportunity to mentor—it’s refreshing to welcome new people and new ideas.”


Kira Peterson: Love of sports leads to VANOC position

Kira Peterson, who is now working full-time for the Vancouver Organizing Committee for the 2010 Olympic and Paralympic Winter Games (VANOC) after graduating in 2008, first developed her event planning skills while working as a co-op student. She completed her first work term as a coordinator with Burton Snowboards’ Chill Program, which helps at-risk youth in Vancouver take part in snowboarding activities. After this experience, Peterson was determined to add more events to her résumé. She was set on working for Gymnastics Canada Gymnastique in Ottawa, so she approached the organization and successfully secured a co-op work term. “I worked as an assistant to the events coordinator and learned so much about organizing sporting events. I ended up taking most of my electives by distance education so that I could immerse myself in this position.” 

Peterson continued event planning in sports on her fourth and final co-op work term with the Canadian Snowboard Federation (CSF), which she also helped set up. “I really fell in love with event planning while working with the CSF,” she says. “By the time I planned the athletes’ after-party for the 2007 Nokia Snowboard FIS World Cup in Calgary, I was fully hooked.”

Peterson’s relationship with the CSF didn’t end when she finished her co-op work term. As Coordinator, Freestyle Skiing & Snowboard, Sport for VANOC she works closely with her former employers and is using many of the skills she learned while with the CSF. “The biggest thing I learned while on my work terms was how to be flexible and adaptable. This has helped me in my job with VANOC coordinating volunteers, creating training material, and interacting with athletes.”

Whether it’s working with a team of 15 or a team of a thousand, collaboration is key for Peterson. Her work terms with Gymnastics Canada and the Canadian Snowboard Federation led to positive co-op experiences for herself, and also helped UVic Co-op and Career build relationships with these two new employers.

So what’s in store for Peterson after February 2010? She hopes to continue working in action sport events. “The experiences and challenges that I’ve faced in my co-op positions and at VANOC have been priceless and I’m positive that I can use them to create a future for myself.”

Update on Kira Peterson: After graduation, Peterson began working as alumni relations coordinator with UBC's Faculty of Medicine's Alumni Affairs office.


Sarah Rinaslarson: Working with disabled children inspires Indigenous student

“My experience was far more rewarding than I could have imagined. Although some days were difficult, the staff were always there to lend a hand or provide moral support. I am so blessed to have been given this opportunity,” says Sarah.

Though she was hesitant about taking part in the UVic Co-operative Education Program at first, the insight she gained through her work terms at the Queen Alexandra Centre has inspired her to pursue a career in occupational therapy. While at the camp, Sarah worked in the camp office and with the children directly.

Sarah has already applied to UBC’s Master of Occupational Therapy program and is excited to move to the “big city” of Vancouver. She feels that her experiences with UVic Co-op have given her the tools she needs to succeed.

“I have grown as a person, I’ve matured and I’ve been given the opportunity to see society from another perspective. I am now aware of those around me that may have a disabling condition or impairment and I am sensitive to their needs,” she says.

But ultimately, Sarah’s goal is to honour her family through her career choice. “I am a very family-oriented person and I want to choose a career and life path that will make myself and them proud. I have always seen a future for myself in the health field, helping people to change their lives for the better,” she says.

Update on Sarah: Sarah is currently completing her Master's degree in Occupational Therapy at UBC and is a recent winner of a Métis Health Career Award from the National Aboriginal Achievement Foundation.

Admission requirements

Secondary school requirements

The Recreation and Health Education program is a second-year entry program. You cannot apply for admission to the Recreation and Health Education program directly from secondary school.

If you are are interested in the Recreation and Health Education program you should apply for admission to UVic and either the Faculty of Humanities, the Faculty of Social Sciences or the Faculty of Science. Each of these faculties has different secondary school admission prerequisites. You can view the Year 1 Faculty admission prerequisites for BC secondary school students in the University Calendar.

If you are interested in the Recreation and Health Education program the Faculty fo Social Sciences is a good choice of admission faculty. Your admission faculty, however, does not effect your chances of entering the Recreation and Health Education program.

The courses that you take in your first year at UVic should be related of the Recreation and Health Education program, so you aren't wasting any time. The advatnage of a second-year entry program is that it makes it easier to change direction if your interests change.

You need to apply for admission to the Recreation and Health Education program by January 31 of your first year and if you application is successful you will be formally admitted to the program in September of that year.

Admission prerequisites

You apply for entry to the Recreation and Health Education program when you have completed or have in progress at least 12 units of university-level courses, including:

  • 3.0 units of English (ENGL 135 and one of 146 or 147);
  • EPHE 143; and
  • a minimum grade point average (GPA) of 4.0 (on a 9-point scale) on the most recent session. For students currently registered in less than 12 units the GPA will be determined by using a combination of the GPA achieved in the current session and the GPA from the previous session applied to the number of units required to reach 12 units. Achieving the minimum GPA for the program does not ensure acceptance.

The application deadline is January 31 for entry in September of the same year. All requirements for admission must be completed by April 30, and in the case of transfer applicants, documented with UVic by May 31.

Applicants are normally notified of admission decisions by email in late May or early June.

If your application for admission to the  Recreation and Health Education program is unsuccessful you can continue to take courses related to the program and apply again in a subsequent application round.

English requirement

All students in the Recreation and Health Education program must complete ENGL 135 and one of ENGL 146 or ENGL 147.

The requirement to complete 3.0 units of English in the Recreation and Health Education program is separate from the UVic Academic Writing Requirement (AWR).

Most students in the Recreation and Health Education program mee the UVic academic writing requirement with one of the ENGL courses that they take as part of the Recreation and Health Education program.

Students may also meet the UVic academic writing requirement by obtaining a score of at least 86% on the B.C. English 12 Provincial Examination or English 12 First Peoples Provincial Examination or who obtain a final grade of at least 86% in an approved English 12 equivalent course from other Canadian provinces within the three years immediately prior to admission to UVic. If you meet the UVic academic writing requirement by one of these means you must still complete ENGL 135 and one of ENGL 146 or ENGL 147.

An AWR-designated 10L (i.e., 100 level) 1.5 unit transfer credit wil be accepted in lieu of 1.5 units of English required for application to, and as part of, the Recreation and Health Education program.

Co-operative education and work terms

What is co-op?

The Recreation and Health Edcuation program is a mandatory co-op program.

When you accepted into the Recreation and Health Education program you will be automatically enrolled in co-op.

Co-op involves alternating your academic studies with paid work experience in which you gain practical experience that will help you prepare to plan, implement, evaluate and supervise recreation, sport, fitness and health promotion policies and programs.

How many work terms will you complete?

You will complete four work terms to graduate with a co-op designation.

Who will you work for?

You can apply to posted co-op jobs or arrange your own work term by approaching an employer & discussing your options with the co-op coordinator. Want to travel the world while you work? Apply for a job with one of our international employers, or find a job with an organization elsewhere in Canada. As a recreation and health education student, you could work for:

  • municipal recreation departments;
  • provincial ministries;
  • rehabilitation centres;
  • outdoor education centres;
  • community schools;
  • therapeutic programs;
  • sport organizations;
  • fitness and wellness programs;
  • educational institutions;
  • residences for seniors;
  • residential and day camps for children and youth; and
  • many other leisure, rehabilitation, health, wellness and fitness organizations.

Assistance

You can find more specific information about co-operative education on the Co-operative Education Career Services website.

GPA calculation

Recreation and Health Education program admission decisions are made based on GPA (i.e., grades).

Eligible applicants who have fulfilled the admission requirements and participated in an interview are offered a place in the program in order from highest GPA to lowest GPA, until the quota for the program is filled (NB, the current quota is 30).

Achieving the minimum GPA needed for application to the Recreation and Health Education program does not ensure acceptance into the program.

The GPA used for Recreation and Health Education program admission decisions is based on your most recently session of university or college study and must consist of a minimum of 12 units.

If you are currently registered in 12 or more units the GPA that you achieve upon completion of this session will be used to determine your GPA.

If you are registered in less than 12 units in the current session, the GPA will be determined by using a combination of the GPA from the current session and the GPA from all of the courses in your previous session applied to the number of units required to reach the 12 units.

Visit the Office of the Registrar webpage for an explanation of how GPAs are calculated at UVic.

Interviews

All eligible Recreation and Health Education program applicants must participate in an application interview.

Application interviews are held in late March or early April.

Application interviews are intended to provide you with information about the Recreation and Health Education program, as well as answer any questions you might have about the program.

The application interviews are not used to make admission decisions.

Application interview sign-up information will be sent to you by email.

Indigenous applicants

The University of Victoria's Faculty of Education reserves 5% of the positions in all of the faculty's programs for Indigenous applicants who meet the Faculty of Education's minimum program entrance requirements and Indigenous application requirements. This provision also applies to programs offered by the School of Exercise Science, Physical and Health Education.

If you wish to apply to the Recreation and Health Education program on the grounds of your aboriginal status you should apply online and self-identify when prompted.

Transfer students

If you are interested in transferring to the Recreation and Health Education program from another recognized institution or who have completed other recognized tertiary studies you need to apply for admission using the standard UVic procedures (i.e., both admission to UVic and Recreation and Health Education program). The grades for transfer courses being used to meet Recreation and Health Education program application prerequisites must be documented with UVic by May 31.

As part of the admission process a transfer credit evaluation of your previous studies will be undertaken (NB, you will receive a formal statement of this transfer credit evaluation) and this will give you a better idea of what courses you will need to take in order to maximize your chances of being accepted into the Recreation and Health Education program, as well as what courses you will need to take as part of the program (i.e., It will identify the courses that you have already completed that can be used for credit in your new program).

Sometimes students lodge an application for admission to UVic to determine what transfer credits they will receive and then make a decision about whether they will continue with their program application based on those transfer credits.

If you are transfer from a university or college in British Columbia you can look-up your potential transfer credits using the BC Transfer Guide

Occasionally, transfer students are able to manage application to UVic and application for admission to the Recreation and Health Education program in one step. If this is not possible you can take many courses related to an Recreation and Health Education program without being formally in the program. You should note, however, that the longer it takes you to gain admission to the Recreation and Health Education program the more difficult it becomes to take courses (i.e., particularly EPHE courses) related to the degree because many upper level EPHE courses are restricted to students in the program or registration priority is given to students in the program, which means that you cannot access them or they may have filled-up before you get a chance to register in them.

Up to 30 units of a 60 unit degree (i.e., half of a degree) can be completed through approved transfer credits (i.e., courses that are deemed to be equivalent to a UVic course but offered elsewhere). There are also restrictions on the number of upper level courses (i.e., 300-400 level) that must be completed at UVic (i.e., 18.0 units of the required 21.0 upper-level units must be taken at UVic). Course substitutions are not possible.

Visiting Canadian students

If you wish to register in an EPHE course as a visiting student you must complete an application for admission to UVic and provide a letter of permission or equivalent from your home institution, transcripts, and evidence of English competency. Visit the Admissions Office webpage for more information and to begin the application process.

Although your home institution may provide you with a letter of permission realting to courses offered by the School of Exercise Science, Physical and Health Education (EPHE), not all EPHE courses are open to visiting students.

Incoming international exchange students

If you are an international exchange student coming to UVic you are welcome to register in courses offered by the School of Exercise Science, Physical and Health Education (EPHE) that are not reserved soley for EPHE students and for which you have the required prerequisites.

EPHE courses have four types of restrictions:

  1. Prerequisite-based, in which you must have completed another course or courses to be able to register in a course.
  2. Time-based, in which a course is reserved for EPHE students until a specific date, after which registration opens to other students.
  3. Level-based, in which a course are is reserved for students who have completed a specified number of units.
  4. Program-based, in which a course is reserved for students who have been admitted to a program in the School of Exercise Science, Physical and Health Education (i.e., these courses can't be taken even if there are space available).

If you believe that you are eligible to register in an EPHE course based on courses you have completed at your home institution but are blocked by a prerequisite or year level restriction you can apply for a course registration waiver. To submit a waiver request you need you to complete an EPHE Waiver form. Your request is more likely to be granted if you include supporting documentation (e.g., proof that you have completed or are registered in a course prerequisite at another university or college). EPHE waiver forms should be returned in person to the EPHE office (i.e., McKinnon Building, Room 120) or by email to the .

You can identify the restrictions associated with EPHE courses by reviewing  the comments associated with each course in the timetable and the University Calendar or the EPHE course schedule (see the "Program details" section ).

You should contact the International Office for information about coming to UVic as an exchange student.

Ready to apply

My UVic application is where you to go to apply for admission to the Recreation and Health Education program it you are:

When applying for admission to UVic you will be asked to indicate your "program area." If your intention is to apply for admission to the Recreation and Health Education program in the future, the correct program area is “Pre-Education,” which means that you intend to apply for admission to a program offered in the Faculty of Education at a later point in time (NB, the Recreation and Health Education program is administratively located in the Faculty of Education). Alternatively, you can indicate your program area as “Undeclared,” which means that you haven't decided on your major area of study.

Program details (for UVic students)

Program sequence

The following is the list of required courses and the recommended sequence for the Recreation and Health Education Co-operative Education program as outlined in the current University Calendar. If there are any discrepancies between this website and the Calendar, the Calendar will take precedence.

Students' programs are normally governed by the Calendar regulations in effect at the date of their first registration in the faculty. If program requirements change before you finish your degree, you may, with approval, choose to be governed by the new regulations. Questions? Contact the EPHE adviser.

YEAR ONE

Units

September - April

One of CSC 100 or 110 1.5
ENGL135, and one of 146 or 147 3.0
EPHE 141 1.5
EPHE 142 1.5
EPHE 143 1.5
PSYC 100A and 100B 3.0
One of SOCI 100A or 100B 1.5
One Elective (see Note 1) 1.5
Total academic units 15.0

YEAR TWO

Units

September - April

EPHE 200 0.0
EPHE 241 1.5
EPHE 243 1.5
EPHE 244 1.5
EPHE 252 1.5
EPHE 253 1.5
EPHE 270 1.5
Four Electives (see Note 1) 6.0

May - August

Work Term I (see Note 4)
Total academic units 15.0

YEAR THREE

Units

September - December

One of EPHE 104– 137 0.5
EPHE 351 1.5
EPHE 358 1.5
EPHE 360 1.5
One Elective 1.5

January - April

Work Term II

May - August

ENGL 225 1.5
EPHE 359 1.5
EPHE 356 1.5
ED-D 417 1.5
ED-D 418 1.5
One Elective (see Note 1) 1.5
Total academic units 15.5

YEAR FOUR

Units

September - December

Work Term III

January - April

Two of ADMN (approved by EPHE Adviser) (see Note 2) 3.0
Two of EPHE 104– 137 1.0
Two Electives (see Note 1) 3.0

May - August

Work Term IV
Total academic units 7.0

YEAR FIVE

Units

September - April

EPHE 454 (note change effective September 2016: this course will be offered in one term only. See Note 3 below.) 1.5
EPHE 445 1.5
Three Electives (see Note 1) 4.5
Total academic units 7.5
Total Units for Degree 60.0

Note 1

Of the 18.0 units of electives in the program, normally 7.5 units must be at the 300 or 400 level. You must have the appropriate prerequisites to take any of these elective courses. If you are taking a transfer course via distance, be sure that the course transfers at a 300 or 400 level.

Note 2

ADMN courses refer to the distance education courses offered through the School of Public Administration. Some courses require attendance at workshops, others are completed through on-line education. Administration courses are not usually listed in the Course Schedule.  You cannot register in your required ADMN electives yourself. You need to contact the School of Public Administration directly. You should email the School’s program manager, Heather Kirkham (hkirkham@uvic.ca). Heather will register you in your preferred course(s) if there are places available. You will need to provide Heather with your name, student number and the course numbers you wish to register in.

Note 3

EPHE 454 must be taken during the last year on campus and after completion of at least two co-operative education work terms. Effective September 2016, this course will change from being year long to offered in one term only.

Note 4

Options for work terms sometimes include back to back or part-time work term opportunities. This results in a re-structuring of the course and work term rotation schedule.

Electives

The Recreation and Health Education degree contains 18.0 units of electives, including 10.5 units of electives that can be selected from any 100 or above course, and 7.5 units of electives that can be selected from any 300 or 400 level course.

You should be aware that some elective courses may have prerequisites to register in them. It is your responsibility to ensure that you have completed any necessary prerequisites.

Teacher preparation and second teaching areas

Sorry - the content for this section is still being developed. Please check back later.

Honours

What is Honours?

The Recreation and Health Education Honours program is intended for motivated, self-directed students who want to engage in research during their undergraduate program.

To be eligible to be admitted to the Honours program you need a minimum 7.0 GPA in all EPHE courses (excluding EPHE 104-137 courses).

How to apply

To apply for admission to the Recreation and Health Education Honours program you should complete Section 1 of the Honours Application Form and submit it to the EPHE academic adviser. If you meet the Honours eligibility requirements, the academic will indicate your eligibility for admission on the form and return it to you.You then need to find a member of EPHE faculty who is willing to supervisor for your Honours thesis. Once you identify a potential supervisor you should approach them and ask them if they will supervisor you. If they agree they will should indicate their in principle support to supervise your these on your Honours Application Form, which you then need to return to the academic adviser. The academic adviser will then add Honours to your curricula and  notify you by email that you have been admitted to the Recreation and Health Education Honours program.

Course sequence

The Honours program follows the same course sequence requirements as the BA Major Program, with the following modifications:

  • Addition of EPHE 357 - Research Methods (1.5 units)
  • Addition of EPHE 499 - Honours Thesis or Tutorial (3.0 units)
  • Reduction of 3.0 units of 300-400 level electives

The total number of academic units completed in the Recreation and Health Education Honours degree is 61.5.

Graduating with a Recreation and Health Education Honours degree

An Honours degree will be awarded to you if you obtain:

  1. A graduating GPA of at least 7.0
  2. A grade of at least A- in EPHE 499 (NB, a student who achieves a grade lower than A- in EPHE 499 will graduate under the Major program, providing all other requirements for the degree are fulfilled)

Course schedule, prerequisites and restrictions

This information is provided as an aid to student course planning and is subject to change. Not all courses are offered every year. Students should verify all information in the timetable when it becomes available before making important course planning decisions.

SUMMER SESSION 2017

Check the course links for the course description and Summer timetable. Registration starts on March 20th.

Course

Instructor

Term dates

Prerequisites & restrictions

EPHE 134 - Yoga Carole Miller Term 4
May 8-June 7
None
EPHE 142 - Personal Health, Wellness & Potential John Buxcey Term 5
June 8-30
None
EPHE 155 - Introduction to Nutrition: Concepts and Controversies Greg Mulligan Term 5
June 8-30
None
EPHE 356 - Principles of Facility Administration Doug Nichols Term 4
May 8-June 7
Reserved for BA, Recreation and Health Education program
EPHE 359 - Fiscal & Legal Management in Recreation and Health Doug Nichols Term 4
May 8-June 7
Prerequisite: One co-op work term
BA, Recreation and Health Education and BSc, Kinesiology programs

WINTER SESSION 2017-18

Note: Visit the course links for descriptions only at this point. The Winter 2017-18 timetable is not yet available for viewing.

First Term, Sep-Dec 2017

Course Instructor Prerequisites & restrictions

EPHE 105 - Swimming

TBD Education programs only until July 10, then any program & year
EPHE 106 - Track & Field TBD As above
EPHE 109 - Recreational Dance Wendy MacDougall As above
EPHE 113 - Golf TBD As above
EPHE 116 - Badminton Jaime Sharpe As above
EPHE 121 - Soccer TBD As above
EPHE 137 - Experiential Outdoor Education Chris Filler Reserved for EPHE Programs only
EPHE 141 - Human Anatomy Kathy Gaul None
EPHE 142 - Personal Health, Wellness & Potential Lara Lauzon None
EPHE 143 - Multidisciplinary Foundations of Physical Activity A01: Paul Whitinui
A02: TBD
A03: Steve Meikle
None
Note: A03 is a distance education section, offered online.
EPHE 155 - Introduction to Nutrition: Concepts and Controversies Sam Liu None
EPHE 200 - Co-op Seminar Nancy Reed BSc, Kinesiology Co-op and BA, Recreation & Health Education programs
EPHE 201 - Qualitative Analysis of Human Movement Marc Klimstra EPHE programs until July 10, then open to any program 2nd year & above.
EPHE 242 - Introduction to Human Cellular Physiology Lynneth Stuart-Hill New for Winter 2017-18:
Prerequisite: one of BIOL 150B, BIOL 186, BIOL 190B, or Biology 12
EPHE 243 - Foundations of Recreation & Leisure John Meldrum EPHE programs until July 10, then open to any program 2nd year & above.
EPHE 245 - Motor Learning Olav Krigolson As above.
EPHE 252 - Leadership Methods in Recreation & Health Lara Lauzon As above.
EPHE 253 - Program Planning TBD As above.
EPHE 270 - Foundations of Outdoor Recreation Nancy Reed As above.
EPHE 310 - PE for General Classroom Teachers: A A01: TBD
A02: TBD
BEd, Elementary Curriculum program
EPHE 344 - Care & Prevention of Athletic Injuries TBD EPHE programs only.
EPHE 347 - Sport in Society TBD EPHE programs until July 10, then open to any program 2nd year & above.
EPHE 351 - Community and Population Health PJ Naylor As above.
EPHE 352 - Instructional Techniques in Individual Activities, Secondary TBD BEd Secondary Curriculum, PE teaching area.
EPHE 355 - Functional Anatomy Sandra Hundza Prerequisites: EPHE 201 & 241
Reserved for BSc Kinesiology program
EPHE 357 - Introduction to Research Viviene Temple EPHE programs until July 10, then open to any program 2nd year & above.
EPHE 358 - Management in Recreation & Health TBD Pre- or corequisite: One co-op work term
Reserved for BSc, Kinesiology and BA, Recreation & Health Education
EPHE 360 - Exercise Prescription TBD Prerequisite: EPHE 241 or permission of the school.
Reserved for EPHE programs only.
EPHE 361 - Coaching Studies TBD Reserved for EPHE programs only.
Note: Full-year course
EPHE 435 - Cultural and Outdoor Physical Activity TBD BEd Elementary Curriculum 
New for 2017-18: or with permission of school
EPHE 441 - Exercise Physiology Kathy Gaul Prerequisites: EPHE 241 & 242
Reserved for EPHE programs 3rd year & above.
EPHE 445 - Developmental and Adaptive Physical Activity Viviene Temple BA, Recreation & Health Education 4th year & above until July 10, then open to any EPHE program 4th year & above.
EPHE 447 - Kinesiology Seminar & Practicum Lynneth Stuart-Hill Prerequisite: EPHE 253
Reserved for BSc Kinesiology 4th year & above.
Note: This is a full-year course.
EPHE 487 A01 - Special Topics: Neuro Motor Contol and Disease Olav Krigolson Registration by permission. Contact Dr. Krigolson for course description and permission to register.
EPHE 494 - Directed Studies various By special arrangement
EPHE 499 - Honours Thesis or Tutorial various EPHE Honours
EPHE 764 - Curriculum and Instruction in Secondary PE Sandy Gibbons Reserved for Professional Year or Post-degree Professional Program or permission of the school.

WINTER SESSION 2017-18

Second Term, Jan-Apr 2018

Course Instructor Prerequisites & restrictions

EPHE 107 A01 & A02 - Gymnastics

Jackie Wiebe Education programs only until July 10, then any program & year

EPHE 117 - Tennis

TBD As above.

EPHE 120 - Basketball

Craig Beaucamp As above.
EPHE 122 - Volleyball Kai Riecken As above.
EPHE 133 - Strength Training John Buxcey As above.
EPHE 134 - Yoga Ann Kilbertus As above.
EPHE 141 - Human Anatomy Sandra Hundza None
EPHE 142 - Personal Health, Wellness & Potential A01: Lara Lauzon
A02: John Buxcey
None
EPHE 143 - Multidisciplinary Foundations of Physical Activity A01: TBD
A02: TBD
A03: TBD
None
Note: A03 is a distance education section, offered online.
EPHE 155 - Introduction to Nutrition: Concepts and Controversies Sam Liu None
EPHE 156 - The Science of Batman Paul Zehr None
EPHE 241 - Introduction to Human Systemic Physiology Lynneth Stuart-Hill Prerequisite: EPHE 141
EPHE 244 - Canadian Recreation Delivery Systems Joan Wharf Higgins EPHE programs until July 10, then open to any program 2nd year & above.
EPHE 246 - Teaching Strategies for Active Health Lara Lauzon As above.
EPHE 250 - Inclusion of Students with Special Needs in PE Viviene Temple BEd Secondary Curriculum with PE teaching area, or with permission.
EPHE 252 - Leadership Methods for Recreation & Health Education Steven Meikle Note: This is a distance education section, offered online.
EPHE 253 - Program Planning Paul Whitinui EPHE programs until July 10, then open to any program 2nd year and above.
EPHE 311 - PE for General Classroom Teachers: B A01: TBD
A02: TBD
BEd Elementary Curriculum Program
EPHE 312 - Overview of Elementary or Middle School PE TBD Reserved for BEd Post degree Professional Program, Elementary Education
EPHE 341 - Biomechanics Marc Klimstra

Prerequisites: EPHE 201; one of MATH 100 or 102 or 109; and one of PHYS 102, 102A or 110
Reserved for EPHE programs.

EPHE 344 - Care and Prevention of Athletic Injuries TBD

Prerequisite: EPHE 241 or permission
Reserved for EPHE programs.

EPHE 346 - Motor Development and Physical Maturation TBD

Reserved for EPHE programs.

EPHE 348 - Psychology of Physical Activity TBD

Prerequisites: PYSC 100A & 100B.
Reserved for EPHE programs until July 10, then open to any program 2nd year & above.

EPHE 355 - Functional Anatomy Sandra Hundza

Prerequisites: EPHE 201 & 241
Reserved for BSc, Kinesiology.

EPHE 361 - Coaching Studies TBD

Note: This is the second half of a full-year course.

EPHE 380 - Motor Control Olav Krigolson

Prerequisites: EPHE 241 & 245
Reserved for EPHE programs.

EPHE 443 - Organization and Administration of PE TBD

Reserved for BEd Secondary Curriculum with PE teaching area, 3rd year & above.

EPHE 444 - Measurement and Evaluation in Exercise Science Melissa Clarke Reserved for EPHE programs 3rd year & above.
EPHE 447 - Kinesiology Seminar and Practicum Lynneth Stuart-Hill Note: This is the second half of a full-year course.
EPHE 452 - Teaching Strategies for Games in PE TBD Reserved for BEd Secondary Curriculum with PE teaching area.
EPHE 454 - Marketing for Health and Social Change Joan Wharf Higgins Prerequisite: 2 co-op work terms
Reserved for BA, Recreation & Health Education 4th year & above.
EPHE 455 - Nutrition for Exercise and Health Gregg Mulligan

Prerequisite: EPHE 155
Reserved for 3rd year and above.

EPHE 456 - Occupational Ergonomics Marc Klimstra Prerequisite: EPHE 241
Reserved for EPHE programs 3rd year & above until July 10, then open to any program 3rd year & above.
EPHE 487 - Special Topics: Chronic Disease Solutions: Exercise and eHealth Sam Liu Registration by permission. Contact Dr. Liu for course description and permission to register.
EPHE 494 - Directed Studies various By special arrangement
EPHE 499 - Honours Thesis or Tutorial various EPHE Honours

Last revised: 26 June 2017

Course registration waivers

If you believe that you are eligible to register in an EPHE course but are blocked by a prerequisite, year level or program area restriction you can apply for a course registration waiver. To submit a waiver request you need you to complete an EPHE Waiver form. Your request is more likely to be granted if you include supporting documentation (e.g., proof that you have completed or are registered in a course prerequisite at another university or college). EPHE waiver forms should be returned in person to the EPHE office (i.e., McKinnon Building, Room 120) or by email to the .

Student athletes

The main priority of the School of Exercise Science, Physical and Health Education is your academic development, however, the school also wishes to support you as a student athlete.

If you are having difficulty organizing your schedule around your training and/or competitive commitments you should consult with the .

If you find that class activities conflict with your training or competitive commitments you should discuss those conflicts with the appropriate course instructor to determine if any accommodations might be possible. In some instances, however, it might be advisable to delay taking a class until you can fully devote yourself to it.

It is not unusual for student athletes to reduce their course load during the terms when their competitive commitments are high (e.g., take four or three courses per term). If you elect to do this, you should ensure that it will not adversely effect your athlete status, student loan(s) or scholarship(s).

Take a course at another Canadian university or college

It is possible to register in a course or courses at another approved post-secondary institution for credit towards your Recreation and Health Education degree. To do this you need to obtain prior approval from the EPHE academic adviser in the form of a Letter of Permission (LOP). This letter is sent to UVic Records and to the university or college concerned and exempts you from the payment of a UVic credit transfer evaluation fee. You must still pay any fees levied by the college or university that you attend. A copy of the LOP is also placed in your EPHE student file.

You should note that there are limits on the number of trasnfer credit coruses that you use in your UVic degree. At least 30 units of your degree must be completed at UVic and you must complete at least 18 units of your required 21 units of 300- and 400-level courses at UVic..

To be able to prepare an LOP for you the EPHE academic will need to know the following:

  • your name and student number;
  • the name of the institution that you wish to attend;
  • the name and course number of the course(s_ you wish to undertake;
  • the name and the course numbers of the respective equivalent UVic course(s); and
  • the expected start and end dates of your registration in the external course(s).

Take a course overseas

It is possible to register in a course or courses at a foreign approved post-secondary institution for credit towards your Recreation and Health Education degree.

You can find a list organized by country of the universities with which UVic has active partnership agreements on the International Office website. The entry for each institution includes the transfer credit history of courses that have been previously taken at that university. This is only a guide, and does not a guarantee that a courses would currently transfer to UVic in the same way. It is also possible to have courses that have not  been previously taken evaluated. 

To do this you need to obtain prior approval from the EPHE academic adviser in the form of a Letter of Permission (LOP). This letter is sent to UVic Records and to the university or college concerned and exempts you from the payment of a UVic credit transfer evaluation fee. You must still pay any fees levied by the college or university that you attend. A copy of the LOP is also placed in your EPHE student file.

If you would like to study at a foreign partner university you should consult with an adviser in the International Office.

EPHE co-op work term exchange - France

The School of Exercise Science, Physical and Health Education currently has an exchange agreement with the University of Valenciennes and Hainault-Cambresis (UVHC) in France for EPHE students to participate in a co-op work term. If you go to UVHC you must be in good academic standing (normally a B average or equivalent at UVic) and have completed at least one year of your program of study. Recommended minimum level of French should be equal to level B1 (independent user in understanding, speaking, writing) according to the Common European Framework of Reference for Languages.  

If you would like to participate in an EPHE co-op work term exchange you should contact the the .

Scholarships

UVic scholarships

In recognition of outstanding students, UVic awards more than 5 million dollars in Entrance and In-Course Scholarships each year. Scholarships are non-repayable and are awarded to students on the basis of academic merit or excellence.

EPHE scholarships and awards

Jamie Cassels Undergraduate Research Awards (JCURA)

JCURA was started in 2009-10 as the Undergraduate Research Scholarship program by the Vice-President Academic and Provost. The program, designed to provide support for exceptional undergraduate students who might otherwise not be able to have direct research experience, is administered by the Learning and Teaching Centre on behalf of the Provost's Office. Eligible students include all full-time third and fourth-year undergraduate students in excellent academic standing. Award winners complete a research project under the mentorship of a faculty supervisor. Successful student applicants receive $1,500 credited directly to their UVic account.

Conference and travel grants

Student conference awards

Undergraduate and master's students may be awarded up to $150 by the School of Exercise Science, Physical and Health Education to support conference presentations and attendance. PhD students may be awarded up to $250.

Examples of eligible events:

  • BC Recreation and Parks Association Conference (attendance by BCRPA award recipient)
  • Canadian Society for Exercise Physiology Conference (attendance by CSEP award recipient)
  • Physical and Health Education Canada Student Leadership Conference (attendance by PHE Award recipient)
  • Quality Daily PE Provincial Conference

Guidelines:

  • You can be awarded $150.00 only once per degree as an undergrad or master's student or $250 twice as a PhD student.
  • You must be the first author on a paper or poster presentation related to your research or be attending a conference as an award recipient.
  • You must be a registered UVic student at the time of acceptance of your conference presentation.
  • Your Honours supervisor or program coordinator for undergrad students, or the graduate adviser for grad students, must approve and support your application.
  • A preliminary abstract and proof of acceptance of your abstract must be submitted with your application.
  • Award recipients may be asked to present their papers or posters to fellow students.

How to apply:

  1. Complete the application form.
  2. Get the support of the Honours supervisor, program coordinator, or grad adviser.
  3. Attach a copy of your abstract and confirmation of acceptance from the conference organizers.
  4. Submit the signed form to the EPHE Office, McKinnon Room 120, to the attention of the Administrative Officer (you will be notified of the result by email).

Other travel gants

For details, deadlines and application forms:

Applying to graduate

You will not be considered for graduation automatically. You must submit an application for a specific convocation (Spring or Fall). Application forms for undergraduate students are available online or at the Undergraduate Records office (i.e., main floor, University Centre). You can find more information about graduation procedures from the Convocation website.
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