Physical sciences and engineering, mathematics and computer science

UVic Professor Ian Manners

Specializing in synthetic self-assembled materials, Canada 150 Research Chair Ian Manners joins a team of UVic scientists leading the way in nanotechnology, advanced imaging technologies, biomedical devices, and materials for energy applications.

UVic chemist Natia Frank and a student in a science lab

UVic chemist Natia Frank has developed a material that will make computers and smartphones faster, more durable and more energy-efficient. The invention is part of an international effort to reduce power consumption and heat produced by processors.

UVic bioengineer Mohsen Akbari testing high-tech bandage with grad students

UVic bioengineer Mohsen Akbari and his team have created a "smart bandage" that detects infection using a smartphone app. Antibiotics can be administered directly through the bandage without having to remove it.

UVic astronomer Sara Ellison and a student with a telescope

A team involving UVic astronomer Sara Ellison has discovered an inspired method of finding the elusive pairing of supermassive black holes that mark merging galaxies— a discovery that may provide clues to the future of Earth's own galaxy.

UVic graduate student Dao Xiang working with a computer chip in a lab

Reuven Gordon, Canada Research Chair in Nanoplasmonics, and his research team have created an artificial material that can switch from the conductive qualities of gold to the insulating qualities of glass, potentially ending stagnant computer speeds.

Thinking big—and small

Some of the most profound questions in science are about the nature of matter. What is it made of? What holds it together? Can we alter it to create new types of matter and materials?

The answers lie in the depths of inner and outer space. Whether they’re probing the behaviour of subatomic particles, scanning the universe for distant stars and galaxies, using mathematics to explain our complex world, or creating new molecules and materials, UVic scientists and engineers are world leaders in the quest for answers.

Nanotechnology, spintronics, photonics, supramolecular design, advanced crystal growth, and advanced microscopy—these are among the technologies used by our researchers to develop new materials for applications as diverse as health care, electronics, manufacturing, and environmental monitoring and remediation.

Our edge in materials science

World-renowned researcher Ian Manners joins UVic as a Canada 150 Research Chair in 2018. Specializing in synthetic self-assembled materials, Manners joins a team of UVic scientists leading the way in nanotechnology, advanced imaging technologies, biomedical devices, and materials for energy applications. Discover UVic's edge in materials science.

Learn more about physical sciences and engineering, mathematics and computer science research at UVic

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