Completed projects

BMED lab's past projects

Thanks to our participants and research grant agencies, BMED lab members have conducted a number of research projects.

Promoting physical activity in recently retired and empty nest populations

A study that aims to promote physical activity in recent retirees and empty nesters. Participants will receive a program specific to their demographic that will help motivate them to increase their physical activity pursuits.

Physical activity promotion through wearable monitors

Would you and your partner like to increase your physical activity? We are looking for couples 45-75 years old who are living together to participate in the research study. This exciting study explores monitoring physical activity in tandem with your partner. Couples will receive a Fitbit physical activity tracker to use for 3 months. If you are interested in participating email us at bml@uvic.ca to learn more!

Physical activity among cystic-fibrosis patients

This study is a joint research initiative between the Vancouver Island Health Association and Uvic. This collaboration project will be examining strategies to help increase physical activity among people living with cystic fibrosis. Please contact bml@uvic.ca for more information.

First-time Parent Physical Activity Intervention

This study is exploring different strategies to increase physical activity in new-parents at two months post-partum. This is a six month long study and the first of its kind working with couples and not just targetting new moms. We are currently recruiting for this study! If you are interested in learning more about the study please contact Sandy Courtnall at scourtna@uvic.ca

Family Physical Activity Intervention

This study explored strategies to help families become more active together. Participants were randomized into two separate condition; a planning condition or an information condition, both aimed at increasing family-based physical activity. This study was a six month long trial. We have recently completed data collection and will be moving into the analysis phase. Stay tuned for results!

Workplace Wellness Intervention Study

The office intervention study explored different types of messaging on reducing sedentary behaviour. Recruitment has wrapped up and data analysis will begin shortly.

Parent Preferences Towards Exercise and Sport Survey

This study surveyed over 300 parents asking them about their preferences towards sports and types of exercise. The results are currently being analyzed. Stay tuned for results!

Text to Plan Study

This study examined the effectiveness of text messaging to help people create physical activity plans.

Women 55+ Physical Activity Study

This study compared the impacts of a walking group vs. a dance group on moderate to vigorous physical activity and psychological outcomes in women ages 55 and older. These results are currently being analyzed.  Stay tuned for results!

Exercise games and physical activity

This study investigated an innovative way to increase physical activity in children between the ages of 9 and 12 years old. Famillies were provided with a state-of-the-art exercise bike and video game console to have in their homes. The video games provided a variety of play including racing, puzzle solving, collaborative play, team play and competitive play.

This study is no longer recruiting and is in the data analysis phase.  If you are interested in learning about the results of the study please contact Sandy at bml@uvic.ca or 250-472-5288

Video gamebike study

This study compared a videogame bike to a regular exercise bike placed in the homes of participants. The results of this study are currently being analyzed and written up and will be released shortly! Please contact bml@uvic.ca for more information.

Older adult exercise videogame study

This study explored whether an interactive exercise video game would have greater adherence compared to a regular exercise dvd among older adults. The results of this study are currently being analyzed and written up. Please contact bml@uvic.ca for more information.

Cardiac disease study (EPOCH)

This study explored different environmental and lifestyle correlates of physical activity after cardiac hospitalization. This study has completed data collection and is now being analyzed and written up. Please contact bml@uvic.ca for more information.

Neighbourhood aesthetics study

This was a pilot study exploring different environmental factors of neighbourhoods with physical activity of people living in those areas. Data collection is now complete and the results are being analyzed. Please contact bml@uvic.ca for more information.

Dog walking survey

This survey explored different factors that contribute to dog walking among dog owners. Data collection is now complete and the results are currently being analyzed and written up. Please contact bml@uvic.ca for more information.

Family exergaming survey

This survey investigated what types of exergames families may be interested in using. The results are currently being analyzed. For more information please contact bml@uvic.ca

Parenthood project

(a) Health behaviours of new parents study: A 24-month study

This study sought to investigate whether or not the health behaviours of new parents differed from those of non-parents, and documented how these behaviours changed over time.

Thanks to our participants! Results of this study can be found in:

(b) Health behaviours during early parenthood: Exploring the impact of multiple children

This study sought to investigate whether or not the health behaviours of parents expecting a second child would differ from those of parents with only one child and documented how these behaviours changed over time.

Thanks to our participants! Results of this study are in-press but will be out shortly.

 If you have any questions about this study please contact the lab at 250-472-5488 or email the .

Family physical activity project:

The study featured a randomized controlled trial comparing a planning intervention to a standard promotion intervention with over 100 families in the Greater Victoria area. The study also examined family physical activity motivation compared to personal exercise motivation. Funded by HELP.

The results can be found in:

Modes of physical activity project:

The study examined whether motivation was different for endurance, strength, and flexibility activities in a college sample. Specific beliefs for each mode were also elicited.

The results can be found in:

  • Rhodes, R.E. & Conner, M. (2010). Comparison of behavioral belief structures in the physical activity domain. Journal of Applied Social Psychology.
  • Rhodes, R.E., Blanchard, C.M., & Matheson, D.H. (2007). Motivational antecedent beliefs of endurance, strength, and flexibility activities. Psychology, Health and Medicine, 12, 148-162. Link to abstract.

Walking project

Healthy steps walking study

This study was conducted to examine the effectiveness of promotional materials on leisure-time walking. Thanks to our participants, we are now at the data analysis stage of this research.

Sedentary behaviour correlates project:

The study featured surveys of the Greater Victoria region and college students to evaluate the interplay between sedentary behaviour and physical activity.

The results can be found in:

  • Rhodes, R.E. & Dean, R. N. (2009). Understanding physical inactivity: Prediction of four leisure-time sedentary behaviors. Leisure Sciences, 31, 124-135. Link to abstract.
  • Rhodes, R.E., Blanchard, C.M. & Bellows, K.H. (2008). Exploring cues to sedentary behavior as processes of physical activity action control. Psychology of Sport & Exercise, 9, 211-224. Link to abstract.
  • Rhodes, R.E. & Blanchard, C.M. (2008). Do sedentary motives adversely affect physical activity? Adding cross-behavioural cognitions to the theory of planned behaviour. Psychology and Health, 23, 789-805. Link to abstract.

Correlates of leisure-time walking project:

The study evaluated the environmental and motivational correlates of walking among adults in British Columbia. Funded by SSHRC.

Results can be found in:

  • Rhodes, R.E., Blanchard, C.M., Courneya, K.S. & Plotnikoff, R.C. (2009). Identifying belief-based targets for the promotion of leisure-time walking. Health Education and Behavior, 36, 381-393. Link to abstract.
  • Rhodes, R.E., Courneya, K.S., Blanchard, C.M. & Plotnikoff, R.C. (2007). Prediction of leisuretime walking: An integration of social cognitive, perceived environmental, and personality factors. International Journal of Behavioral Nutrition and Physical Activity, 4, 51. Link to abstract

Interactive gamebike project:

This study examined the effect of an interactive video game bike on motivation, adherence, and fitness when compared to a stationary bike. Funded by MSFHR.

Results can be found in:

  • Rhodes, R.E., Warburton, D.E.R. & Bredin, S.S.D. (2009). Predicting the effect of interactivevideo bikes on exercise adherence: An efficacy trial. Psychology, Health, and Medicine, 14(6), 631-641. Link to abstract.
  • Warburton, D.E.R., Sarkany, D., Johnson, M., Rhodes, R.E., Whitford, W., Esch, B.T.A., Scott, J.M., Wong, S., Shannon S. D. & Bredin, S.S.D. (2009). Metabolic requirements of interactive video game cycling. Medicine and Science in Sports and Exercise, 41, 920-926. Link to abstract.
  • Warburton, D.E.R., Bredin, S.S.D., Horita, L.T.L., Zbogar, D., Scott, J.M., Esch, B.T.A. & Rhodes R.E. (2007). The health benefits of interactive video game exercise. Applied Physiology, Nutrition and Metabolism, 32, 655-663. Link to abstract.

Dog walking project:

This study examined the physical activity of dog owners and those without dogs, in Greater Victoria. The environment was also assessed. Funded by SSHRC.

Results can be found in:

  • Brown, S.G., & Rhodes, R.E. (2006). Relationships among dog ownership and leisure time walking in Western Canadian adults. American Journal of Preventive Medicine, 30, 131-136. Link to abstract.
  • Rhodes, R.E., Brown, S.G., & McIntyre, C.A. (2006). Integrating the perceived neighbourhood environment and the theory of planned behaviour when predicting walking. American Journal of Health Promotion, 21, 110-118. Link to abstract.
  • Blacklock, R.E., Rhodes, R.E. & Brown, S.G. (2007). Relationship between regular walking,physical activity and health-related quality of life. Journal of Physical Activity and Health, 4, 138-152. Link to abstract.

EA SPORTS Active 2 project:

This pilot study examined if the EA Sports Active 2 Mountain Gravity workout would meet exercise intensity, recommended by the American College of Sports Medicine (ACSM) and Canadian Society of Exercise Physiologists (CSEP). The results confirmed the workout met the guidelines. To learn more, please see the abstract.

If you have any questions about our past projects, please .