Victoria adults who use substance in social settings

CISUR has conducted twice-annual surveys of Victoria adults age 19+ who use substances in social settings (clubs, raves, parties, etc) since 2008. Due to the nature of recruitment methods, the majority of participants in this survey are post-secondary students. In order to provide a current snapshot based on a suitable sample size, this section of the website will show information based on data between 2010 and 2015, unless otherwise noted.

For further information on the surveys, including the survey instrument used, please see the high-risk populations section of the AOD Monitoring Project site.

The information presented here is just a fraction of the data we collect. You can find more data in our data tables, or contact us directly.

demographics of social-setting adults in victoria

The average age of survey respondents (2010-2015) was 23 years old, with most identifying as straight and white. There were slightly more males (56%) than females (43%) in the sample.

Download our poster: Alcohol and drug use among adults using substances in social settings

Note: Respondents had to be actively using substances at least once per month over the past six months to be eligible for the survey. These statistics are not necessarily representative of the average street-involved youth, street-involved adult, post-secondary or general populations. For more information on our high-risk surveys, please see the High Risk section of the AOD Monitoring Project.

the most commonly used substance among adults using drugs in social settings

Alcohol, marijuana and tobacco were the top three substances adults who use substances in social settings reported using in the past 30 days (2010-2015). At 97%, this group had the highest rates of alcohol consumption among the three high-risk surveys conducted—and that rate has been increasing.

substance use trends over time for adults using drugs in social settings in in Victoria

Looking at trends over time, adults using substances in social settings have seen a statistically significant increase in 6/8 top substances they had reported using in the past 30 days: alcohol (p<.001), marijuana (p<.001), ecstasy (p<.01), magic mushrooms (p<.001), LSD (p<.001) and prescription amphetamines such as Dexedrine or Adderall (p<.001). Prescription amphetamines in particular have seen a large increase in reported use since 2010, going from 5% in 2010 to a high of 38% in 2015, albeit with some ebb and flow over the years.

most common settings adults using drugs in social settings do certain drugs

Looking at where adults using substances in social settings usually did certain drugs, psychedelics such as LSD and mushrooms were usually consumed outdoors, while nightclubs or bars were the place they reported usually using ecstasy. Ketamine and GHB were usually consumed in their own homes.

Download our poster: Alcohol and drug use among adults using substances in social settings

Note: Respondents had to be actively using substances at least once per month over the past six months to be eligible for the survey. These statistics are not necessarily representative of the average street-involved youth, street-involved adult, post-secondary or general populations. For more information on our high-risk surveys, please see the High Risk section of the AOD Monitoring Project.

Overdose rates among adults who use drugs in social settings

The majority of adults using substances in social settings surveyed reported experiencing at least one type of alcohol-related (77%) and one type of other drug-related (78%) harm in the past 12 months (2010-2015). More than half (57%) had reported experiencing an overdose in their lifetime, with an average of five overdoses having been experienced in their lives. Alcohol was the main substance reported in nearly 3/4 of overdoses. For more details on specific types of harms experienced, see the harms related to substance use section.

Download our poster: Alcohol and drug use among adults using substances in social settings

Note: Respondents had to be actively using substances at least once per month over the past six months to be eligible for the survey. These statistics are not necessarily representative of the average street-involved youth, street-involved adult, post-secondary or general populations. For more information on our high-risk surveys, please see the High Risk section of the AOD Monitoring Project.