Capstone Projects

Sasha Mosky's plant pressings from her internship in India
For her capstone project, 2017 intern Sasha Mosky collected plants that people in Rajasthan use for cooking, medicine, and ceremony to "challenge some of the narratives around India being polluted and people not respecting their environment"

CAPI Interns and Scholars complete a self-designed investigation during their field-based experience. Capstone Projects provide an opportunity for students to reflect upon their experiences, share with others, and consider next steps beyond thier research and overseas placements. 

Rachel Barr

Program designation:
QES Intern

Home department at UVic:
Gender Studies

Internship organization:
Society for Participatory Research in Asia, India

Abstract:
My capstone project is a story book, the story is about a girl who learns about body changes and menstruation from her grandmother. After spending a few months in India working with the gender team and working with youth, I decided to make a storybook with the youth that I was working alongside. The book is an attempt to try to dispel some of the stigma about menstruation. I worked with over fifty young women to create the book, I wrote the story and they did the art. Collaborating with the youth in this process taught me so much and I can’t wait to share it with you.  

Read Rachel's story "A Special Journey"

Marlin Beswetherick

Program designation:
QES Intern

Home department at UVic:
Anthropology

Internship organization:
Malaysian Social Research Institute, Malaysia

Abstract:
My Capstone is a project book that is designed to showcase the highlights of my work as an intern at the Malaysian Social Research Institute (MSRI) as well as promote MSRI itself. One of my main tasks as a MSRI and CAPI intern was the development of engaged social media platform; helping MSRI reach out to wider audiences. I was very fortunate to be able to help out in this way as I was given the opportunity to truly understand the organization and the impact it has on so many lives. Using the skills that I learned while in Malaysia, this book is a story of my 6 months with MSRI and CAPI.

View Marlin's "Media Activism" report

Chad Boissy

Program designation:
QES Intern

Home department at UVic:
Civil Engineering

Internship organization:
African Institute of Mathematical Sciences School Enrichment Center (AIMSSEC), South Africa

Abstract:
My capstone project focused on providing a handful of homeless people in the streets of Muizenberg, South Africa, their favourite meal. Using a budget of 100 dollars, I asked a few people I walked by daily what their favourite meal was, and the following day surprised them with the meal they had mentioned. My inspiration for this initiative came from a night out when complete strangers picked up my tab from restaurant in Victoria. Their generosity made my night to say the least, and I was eager to pay it forward ever since.

Read Chad's blog post "Food for Thought"

Will Howling

Program designation:
QES Intern

Home department at UVic:
Gustavson School of Business (Commerce)

Internship organization:
Society for Participatory Research in Asia, India

Abstract:
I faced many different challenges or difficulties during my internship in India. Based on my experiences, my goal for my capstone project is to help equip future interns to face some of these difficulties or challenges during their own placements. What I decided to produce is a workbook that accompanies the experience of being a student intern. The workbook is a tool that encourages active and critical reflection of different parts of the internship experience - whether it's international experiential learning generally, how to share the experience with others, your expectations/assumptions/positionality, or any other part of the experience.

Will's capstone project on his challenges interning in India

Sasha Mosky

Program designation:
QES Intern

Home department at UVic:
Environmental Studies, Geography

Internship organization:
Society for Participatory Research in Asia, India

Abstract:
My capstone project is an ethno-botanical plant press which details how people use plants in everyday life. For this project I collected plants that people use for cooking, medicine, and ceremony, dried them, and displayed them visually. The goal of this project is to challenge some of the narratives around India being polluted and people not respecting their environment by showing how people use and interact with nature in urban settings. 

See Sasha's plant pressings

Luc Nadeau

Program designation:
QES Intern

Home department at UVic:
Political Science, Philosophy

Internship organization:
Malaysian Social Research Institute, Malaysia

Abstract:
For my capstone project I decided to make a food map of the Ampang Point area. Having spent so much time in this relatively small geographical area, I wanted to create a piece of interactive media that could reflect my experiences and memories of this space. Moreover, as a Victoria native who has spent most of my life in the capital regional district of lower Vancouver Island, I wanted to document my first extensive learned familiarity of a new living space, namely Ampang Point of Kuala Lumpur. Kuala Lumpur is a vibrant and dynamic city in a state of near constant renewal given the rapidity of demographic shifts and infrastructure development. When I return, as I hope to do one day, this map will serve as a compass of sorts, giving me a chance to retrace my past steps while simultaneously reflecting on this evolving cityscape. On another note, this map is meant to be a living document insofar as it will be made available to future interns should they be interested in contributing to its growth. While the focus of the map is eating or "makan" in the Malay language, an aspect of great cultural significance in Malaysia, I have included other points of interest as well, and others are invited to do the same. Makan Makan! 

Visit Luc's Ampang Point Food Map 

Seema Prasad

Program designation:
QES Intern

Home department at UVic:
Anthropology

Internship organization:
Malaysian Social Research Institute, Malaysia

Abstract:
My Capstone project is a document outlining the importance of community engagement during an intern’s six-month placement overseas. Engaging with the community further than within an intern’s work placement can be extremely rewarding in terms of making friends, gaining knowledge, and creating a memorable experience. This document is part of the CAPI Intern Handbook that is reviewed in depth during the pre-departure training process. It outlines how past interns have engaged with their community and lists some resources that future interns might find useful.

View Seema's "Community Engagement" report

Loreen Regnander

Program designation:
QES Intern

Home department at UVic:
Geography, Environmental Studies

Internship organization:
Society for Participatory Research in Asia, India

Abstract:
During my 6 months in India, I worked with and alongside rural villages in the state of Chhattisgarh assessing the various social and environmental impacts that a recent government initiative, the Swachh Bharat Mission, has had on these communities. I lived and worked in Raipur, Chhattisgarh where I was able to meet with and engage with various communities, government officials and NGO’s to discuss the future of this initiative. However, when conducting this research, I found there were still many barriers and boundaries that were difficult to overcome in such short periods of time; especially being a woman and wanting to interview women. These challenges inspired me to think of new ways of engagement and resulted in a pretty powerful realization which not only helped me to overcome these barriers, but also inspired change at the organization I was working with.

Watch Loreen's documentary short "Dust" about silicosis among mine workers in Delhi

Duncan Chalmers

Program designation:
President's beyond borders fund intern

Home department at UVic:
Anthropology

Internship organization:
Karenni Social Development Centre, Thailand

Abstract:

My capstone is a project about sound, place, identity, and community among Karenni refugees in Ban Nai Soi, Thailand. It is, by nature, a soundscape project, and attempts to bring to light the central role that sound plays in the processes of placemaking. The collection of sounds you will find here are taken from my time as an intern at the Karenni Social Development Center, a community-based education organization for young Karenni refugees along the Thai-Burma border. ​ 

Community is important. These are the sounds of community. Have a listen on Duncan's "sonic geogrpahies of KSDC" website

Su Yen Chong

Program designation:
QES Incoming Scholar

Country of origin:
Malaysia

Program of study at UVic:
Art History and Visual Studies (MA program)

Abstract:
My Capstone project focuses on garments and its ability to convey visual messages to the wearer and also people around the wearer. Through interviews, I asked three questions revolving around this theme. The purpose of this project is to apply fashion theories through the questions asked and examine the range of answers for commonality and variation. As I am compiling the video interviews, it struck me that individual preference plays a large role in choosing attires but the encoded message within an article of clothing or style as a whole, whether by conscious or unconscious decision, is present in every instance. This project has honed my perception on visual communications in my everyday life, making seemingly inconsequential details apparent.

Watch Su Yen's "Garments: Objects of comfort and communication" on Vimeo

Ngozi Nwoko

Program designation:
QES Incoming Scholar

Country of origin:
Nigeria

Program of study at UVic:
Law

Abstract:
My capstone project uses video clips of some hip-hop musicians in Nigeria, relevant pictures, and descriptive texts to show how Afro-hip-hop music is being used as an agency for socio-economic and political activism, sensitization, and mobilization. Specifically, it conveys the idea of the potency of music as a tool of resistance to the oppression, marginalization, and environmental destruction of the oil producing communities in Nigeria. It uses the video and pictures to show the contents of the amnesty offer by the Nigerian federal government to the Niger Delta militants, the disposition and narrative of the government and how music is being used to re-historicize the Niger Delta question.

Alexandra Lloyd

Program designation:
QES Outgoing Scholar

Home department at UVic:
Anthropology (MA program)

Destination country:
Australia

Abstract:
From April to July of 2017, I was in Melbourne, Australia conducting fieldwork for my Master's thesis in Anthropology. My research explores the relationship between gender, sexuality, and migration. Specifically, my research investigates sexuality as it is lived and experienced by unmarried, female Indonesian international students living and studying in Melbourne. My research looks at issues surrounding society and the surveillance of female sexuality, gender inequality, and women's agency in the transnational context. For my Capstone, Alexandra has created a website as a platform for showcasing her research findings and the experiences of her respondents. It is my hope that this website will breathe life into her research and highlight the uniquely human experiences of gender and sexuality. Further, it is my hope that this website, and my research more broadly, will serve as a resource and an avenue for advocating for women's autonomy and rights (gender equality) in a global context.

Link to current draft version: https://transnationalismandsexuality.wordpress.com/

Christina Service

Program designation:
QES Outgoing Scholar

Home department at UVic:
Geography (PhD program)

Destination country:
New Zealand

Abstract:
For my capstone project I will present my research results from my time at the University of Otago in New Zealand to the Kitasoo/ Xai’xais First Nation in community of Klemtu. During my presentation I will be able to share my analysis results from data collected in collaboration with the Kitasoo/Xai'xais (2012-2017), which have immediate management implications for Spirit bear conservation. Additionally, I will also tie in my broader observations of the indigenous conservation context of New Zealand compared to coastal British Columbia.

Taiwo Afolabi – Canada

Incoming Crossing Borders Scholar

University of Victoria, Applied Theatre

Abstract:

Storytelling Theatre: an educational workshop

Theatre is culture driven, and people-oriented. It is an effective tool for achieving different purposes in the society, hence applied theatre. As an art form, it focuses on building community, and strengthening relationships through storytelling for social transformation. Thus, this workshop introduced the youth group at Victoria Immigration, and Refugee Centre Society (VIRCS) to theatre interactive techniques, and games to tell stories, and facilitate participation, and build community. Furthermore, the workshop kicked off a creative/ theatre awareness project, and built an atmosphere needed for creativity, and dramatic experience for refugee community theatre project that we will be presented on the 20th June 2017 at Antechamber room/Council Victoria in celebrating  World Refugee Day. The workshop fostered cultural cohesion, and integration among the newly arrived Syrian refugee youths and other immigrants from other countries in Victoria. The workshop was held on the 5th October 2016 at the Pearkes Arena (behind Tillicum Mall) - 3100 Tillicum Rd - in the Flipside Lounge.

Jesse Baltutis - South Africa

Outgoing Crossing Borders Scholar

South Africa

Abstract: 

Jesse conducted an activity on water with 18 youth ranging in age from 7 to 14 attending the FUN Society summer camp during their themed 'water week.’ In this activity, Jesse lead a group of kids in exploring global water issues, contextualizing it within the South African and Canadian context. Jesse and the students discussed their favourite memories of water was, what role water plays in their lives and its importance. Water was then discussed in a more global context informed by Jesse’s time in South Africa. This included how different parts of the world have different amounts of water, different access opportunities, and how water is critical to a healthy life, both for humans and animals. Jesse then did an activity to illustrate how scarce fresh water is on earth. The visuals helped them to see how finite fresh water is, how important it is to protect water, and students discussed what we could do in our every day lives to save water. After the discussion, they played a version of capture the flag, called 'capture the water' to build more positive memories centred around water.

http://www.funsociety.ca/camps/victoria

Zachary Brabazon - Bangladesh

Crossing Borders Intern

Refugee and Migratory Movements Research Unit, Bangladesh

Abstract: Zach created and coloured a picture-book that seeks to do two things. First, Zach channels the educational experience of working with RMMRU by including a statistical/factual overview of the role of labour migration in Bangladesh's economy. Second, Zach explores their own experiences of Bengal by interspersing portraits and landscapes among the figures.

Crayon Renderings

Kenda Chang-Swanson - India

Crossing Borders Intern

Society for Participatory Research in Asia, India

Abstract: 

Kenda’s capstone project emerges out of a relationship with their friend and co-worker at PRIA. They are working together to share their voices and thoughts through a collaborative book. This includes short written pieces/reflections as well as visuals/photos to pull apart some issues, particularly examining gender, gender-based violence, and women’s experiences of public space and other experiences and issues. Pulling together their voices with their own respective experiences as a Canadian and an Indian woman, this book acts as a personal reflective opportunity to also dive into some of the current issues we see existing in the world today.

Place, Belonging and Home(s)

Kimberly Copeland - Malaysia

Crossing Borders Intern

Malaysian Social Research, Malaysia

Abstract: Kimberly prepared a joint capstone project with Danae Zachari

For our UVic CAPI capstone project, we digitized fourteen Malaysian Social Research Institute publications in order to make them available online to students, scholars and the wider public. Currently, thirteen of these publications are available at the McPherson library for UVIC students, faculty and staff, as well as for the wider community.  Our objective is to bridge MSRI, UVIC CAPI, and the UVIC McPherson library in the form of an open and collaborative research database approach framework. We wanted to organize, categorize and create an online library and research database using MSRI research, articles, and publications. Until our capstone efforts, these materials (some over 40 years old) were never available online. 

The Malaysian Social Research Institute Online

 There are dozens of MSRI publications - research, journals, art galleries, and personal narratives - that MSRI has physical copies of; however, the majority of these articles are out of print and unavailable to the public. We started our library bridge project because we realized that there is a keen interest in South East Asian politics; migration and refugee movement; and the Middle East amongst Uvic students and course subjects. We wish to open up and share these amazing works with MSRI staff, clients, and the school as well as the UVic McPherson Library.

MSRI Publications available online at the McPherson library:
Bosnia: Testament to War Crimes
Chinese New Villages in Malaya – A Community Study  
In the Time of Mishmish
Islam Embedded Volume 1
Islam Embedded Volume 2
Islamic Law
Nine Saints of Java
On Becoming Alijah
On the Way to Exile
Palestinians Speak – I Painted the Snow Black… because we’re afraid of the days
The Propagation of Islam
The Real Cry of Syed Shaykh al-Hady

MSRI Publications now available in-print at the McPherson Library:
Chinese New Villages

Janice Dowson - South Africa

Outgoing Crossing Borders Scholar

South Africa

Abstract: 

Janice’s Capstone project is a booklet that tells the stories of four women they met who are all working to overcome the gender inequality in South Africa. It is the story of their lives, interspersed with information about the South African Women’s movement pre-and-post-apartheid, the Commission for Gender Equality and the ongoing struggle for gender equality. The role of women in the struggle for liberation is often overlooked, as is their place in fighting for gender equality during the years of the negotiated settlement. Further, despite making gains for gender equality protections in the negotiated settlement, gender inequality and gender based violence remains high. Janice aims to show with their Capstone how everyday instances of women’s resistance do remain, even though many argue that the women’s movement collapsed in favour of institutionalized approaches to achieving gender equality.  

Women in South Africa: Strength, Resistance, and Resolve

Bhiamie Eckford-Williamson – Canada

Incoming Crossing Borders Scholar

University of Victoria, Canada

Abstract: 

Bhiamie facilitated a ‘Sharing Circle’ activity with students from Yunesit’in ?Esgul to hear the perspectives and ideas from children in the Yunesit’in community about how they connect with their land and language. This Sharing Circle is designed to engage students on the topics of land and language. It will seek students’ ideas and perspectives on their relationship to their homelands and how they feel about learning their Native language (Tsilhqot’in).  This project is designed as a ‘two-way’ learning exercise between Bhiamie and the students. This project fulfils a vital component of the research; incorporating Yunesit’in children’s perspectives in the research. It is also a key component for the ongoing reflection and project design for the researcher. As a University research project designed using Indigenous research methodologies, Reciprocal Appropriation is a fundamental requirement. Reciprocal Appropriation in this context means the equal sharing and benefit of a project to be shared between the researcher and community partners. As part of this project Bhiamie will be providing art and craft supplies, which will be given to the school (an identified need) following the activity. This project also supports the identified goals of the language program already in place at Yunesit’in ?Esgul. This project consists of two parts:

  1. Sharing Circle discussing how students feel about learning their Native Language
  2. Creative art project where students will draw a facet of the land (animals / hunting / fishing / rivers / mountains etc.) and connect this with their language

This project was completed on Thursday November 24 at Yunesit’in ?Esgul. This project has been designed in collaboration with Chief Russell Myers-Ross and JoAnne Moiese, Principal Yunesit’in ?Esgul. Permission slips have been drafted and approved by all parties involved.

Claire Horwood - Malaysia

Crossing Borders Intern

Malaysian Social Research, Malaysia 

Abstract: 

Claire developed a curriculum for MSRI’s “Everyday English” class to improve access to practical English language classes for the adult refugee population and to create a user-friendly pre-packaged lesson plan for inexperienced teachers and volunteers. At the time this project idea was developed, there was a high demand among MSRI’s refugee populations for practical English language courses directed towards basic/beginner learners using a variety of educational tools and multimedia. Many refugees need to be able to communicate in basic English to meet their daily needs, given potential relocation to English speaking countries and the fact that English is a common language spoken in Malaysia. Others want to learn English because it is often a requirement to find work. Claire sought to design a solution for this existing problem (the need for more practical English language training that could benefit a larger number of refugees) within the organization, by applying the principles of experiential and project-based learning. The PDF here shows a few examples from some of Claire’s lesson plans.

Grocery Store Bingo

Elena Lopez -Malaysia

Outgoing Crossing Borders Scholar

Malaysia

Abstract: 

Elena’s Capstone project is an interactive online game, created in an attempt to share her fieldwork experiences with migrant construction workers in Malaysia. Using textual strategies, Elena tried to blur the distinction between the periphery (Global South) and the center (the West). Through gamification, Elena attempted to subvert the typical representation of migrant workers as victims; you play as a migrant worker, with autonomy and control over decision-making. At the same time, the game is meant to give some sense of the confines of the exploitative system that migrant workers must work within. All of the in-game events are based on reports from migrant construction workers and interviews with union employees, and the game is purposefully monotonous punctuated with agitation to reflect Elena’s fieldwork observations.

Construct Your Life Abroad

Charli Mohammed - Singapore

Outgoing Crossing Borders Scholar

Singapore

Abstract: 

In 2016, Charlene went to Singapore to conduct her fieldwork for her Master’s thesis in Anthropology. Charlene’s research explored the food security and living experiences of Indonesian domestic workers who live and work in Singapore. For her Capstone project, Charlene created a website to showcase some of her results, and to describe both her participants’ and her own experiences during her fieldwork. This website brings the participants’ stories to life to the reader, and acts as an avenue to advocate for the fair treatment of foreign domestic workers.

Food Access and Self Expression

Sidney Moss - India

Crossing Borders Intern

Society for Participatory Research in Asia, India

Abstract: Sidney collected recipes throughout their time in India so that they could put together a cookbook/photo journal as their final project. Sidney became fascinated with the role that food plays in connecting people. They also enjoyed the photography aspect of it, and the challenges that come with accurately representing culture, food, people, and moments through still images. 

A Taste of India

Jeanique Tucker - Canada

Incoming Borders Scolar

University of Victoria, Canada

Abstract: 

Jeanique has put together a film series that seeks to unpack political violence and the varied way communities, and specifically artists respond.  This is aligned with their Ideafest presentation where Jeanique looked at how visual artist responded to a specific incidence of violence in Jamaica.  This film series, instead, takes a broader look at political violence in the global south (with a focus on the themes/thinkers grounding my own research).

The films are:

Amandla! A Revolution in Four Part Harmony (2002) - South Africa (film on music as resistance)
Trench Town: The Forgotten Land (2007) - Jamaica (film on music as resistance)
Favela Rising (2005) - Brazil (film on music as resistance)
The Battle of Algiers (1966) - Algeria/France (theoretical starting point for my research)

Joel Toorenburgh - Bangladesh

Crossing Borders Intern

Refugee and Migratory Movements Research Unit, Bangladesh

Abstract: 

Joel’s Capstone project is focused on the Bangla language. Due to its history, Bangladesh now derives a significant part of its identity from the Bangla language - much like other regions of the world that had to fight to protect their right to speak and live in their mother language (think of Québec, Catalonia and many other regions). In fact, the UN dedicated International Mother Language Day to a day in Dhaka when students protested in defense of the Bangla language, but were violently attacked taking the lives of two among them. Joel’s experience in Dhaka taught him the value of knowing the local language. It was a basic, but vital tool used to connect with locals. For this reason, Joel has compiled some of the most basic Bangla words and phrases. It helps to summarize and solidify what Joel learnt, and could help prepare someone who is about to set off into Bangladesh.

Decoding Bangla

Danae Zachari - Malaysia

Crossing Borders Intern

Malaysian Social Research Institute, Malaysia

Abstract: Danae prepared a joint capstone project with Kimberley Copeland

For our UVic CAPI capstone project, we digitized fourteen Malaysian Social Research Institute publications in order to make them available online to students, scholars and the wider public. Currently, thirteen of these publications are available at the McPherson library for UVIC students, faculty and staff, as well as for the wider community.  Our objective is to bridge MSRI, UVIC CAPI, and the UVIC McPherson library in the form of an open and collaborative research database approach framework. We wanted to organize, categorize and create an online library and research database using MSRI research, articles, and publications. Until our capstone efforts, these materials (some over 40 years old) were never available online. 

The Malaysian Social Research Institute Online

 There are dozens of MSRI publications - research, journals, art galleries, and personal narratives - that MSRI has physical copies of; however, the majority of these articles are out of print and unavailable to the public. We started our library bridge project because we realized that there is a keen interest in South East Asian politics; migration and refugee movement; and the Middle East amongst Uvic students and course subjects. We wish to open up and share these amazing works with MSRI staff, clients, and the school as well as the UVic McPherson Library.

MSRI Publications available online at the McPherson library:
Bosnia: Testament to War Crimes
Chinese New Villages in Malaya – A Community Study  
In the Time of Mishmish
Islam Embedded Volume 1
Islam Embedded Volume 2
Islamic Law
Nine Saints of Java
On Becoming Alijah
On the Way to Exile
Palestinians Speak – I Painted the Snow Black… because we’re afraid of the days
The Propagation of Islam
The Real Cry of Syed Shaykh al-Hady

MSRI Publications now available in-print at the McPherson Library:
Chinese New Villages

Taiwo Afolabi – Canada

Incoming Crossing Borders Scholar

University of Victoria, Applied Theatre

Abstract:  Understanding the complexities of global refugee and migrant movements can be overwhelming—especially when we don’t have a clearly defined way to actively engage with the issues and individual experiences. Following a short performance, interactive Applied Theatre and Theatre for Development techniques supported meaningful dialogue that engaged the community in deeper understanding and moves us toward action on 8 March 2016.

Tabitha Black-Lock – Bangladesh

Crossing Borders Intern

Refugee and Migratory Movements Research Unit, Bangladesh

Abstract: This website shares information collected while the author participated in a 6 month internship based in Dhaka, Bangladesh.  This information includes  a culmination of personal experience, observations and general research which touches on issues of health and environment in Bangladesh.  

Health and Environment in Bangladesh

Siobhan Davis – Malaysia

Crossing Borders Intern

Malaysian Social Research, Malaysia

Abstract: Newcomers often face challenges adapting to their new environments - this Capstone project aims to illustrate how food and social gatherings can support refugee resettlement and integration processes by fostering friendships and community building.

Community Dinners

Yasmine El-Hamamsy – Malaysia

Crossing Borders Intern

Malaysian Social Research, Malaysia

Abstract: The importance of teamwork, sport, activity and fun can often go forgotten in discussions of migration and asylum-seeking. Over the past month, I've had the pleasure and privileged of coaching the first girls football team for the Sahabat Support Centre School. Through some photos and words from the players, my capstone focuses on these students and the creation of a team regardless of legal status, governmental policies, or language.

Soccer Stories

Can Giannotti – Bangladesh

Crossing Borders Intern

BRAC Migration Program, Bangladesh

Abstract: For my Capstone Project I created an informal magazine or a 'zine' containing various articles reflecting upon experiences I had while in Bangladesh and India. These articles ranged from the commodification of yoga, the influence of online dating applications on Indian arranged marriages, and the urban landscape of Mumbai. It was through the creation of this publication, I was able to present my South Asian experiences in a creative and informative manner.

Kip Jorgensen – Bangladesh

Crossing Borders Intern

BRAC Migration Program, Bangladesh

Abstract: The Differing Nature of Dhaka - This capstone project explores the unique and complex urban political ecology of Bangladesh's capital city, Dhaka. With an emphasis on primary research and multimedia, each chapter considers different sites of socio-ecological interaction, examining the role of power in a megacity and amid accelerating environmental change.

The Differing Nature of Dhaka:The urban political ecology of Bangladesh's megacity

Michelle Maillet – Nepal

Crossing Borders Intern

Migrant Centre, Nepal

Abstract: My capstone project is an exploration of local perspectives on migration for foreign employment in Nepal in a post disaster context. I chose the Sindhupalchowk district which has an increasing trend of migration and is arguably the most affected region by the earthquake, to conduct interviews with local people to understand how they think the earthquake will or has effected migration for foreign employment in their community. Over a period of one week, I engaged in seven interviews which took place in four different villages in close proximity to Chautara, the district capital. Five of the interviews were with individuals and two of them became group discussions, one of which had up to nine participants. Throughout the week I witnessed two dominant trends of migration stemming from three different kinds of communities with different levels of engagement in foreign employment migration. The most prevalent of the 2 dominant trends, as described by the Sindhupalchowk residents, was an increase in migration for foreign employment as a result of increased need and vulnerability without a means to locally rectify such needs. Please visit my website to learn more!

Foreign employment and migration in a post-disaster context

Roxanne Power – India

Crossing Borders Intern

Society for Participatory Research in Asia, India

Abstract: My capstone project is intended to showcase voices, perspectives, and learnings under the issue of violence against women from my internship in India, via UVic's Centre for Asia-Pacific Initiatives, and the Society for Participatory Research in Asia (PRIA). By using a dynamic platform, I hope further expressions surrounding the broader theme of inclusive safety, spaces, and access can be shared in an engaging way. Hopefully, such sharing will allow the conversation to build, and the stigma against speaking about violence against women to lessen, bit by bit.

Speak now. For inclusive safety and space for women's rights

Perry Watson – India

Crossing Borders Intern

Society for Participatory Research in Asia, India

Abstract: The purpose of my Capstone project is to evaluate what participation really means based on my own field exposure. There is no single definition that defines what participation looks like. If anything, after my internship abroad, I am even more confused by how we ought to quantify participation. There are many open-ended questions that come to mind when broaching the subject. I will be providing photos and insights from my time in India in order to, hopefully, add some context and nuance to my own thoughts and ideas about participation as I witnessed it during my placement abroad.

What is participation?

Bridget Woods – Malaysia

Crossing Borders Intern

Asia-Pacific Resource and Research Centre for Women, Malaysia 

Abstract: Women’s rights are often discussed in relation to religious or cultural contexts. When discussed as a global phenomenon, critics often speak of a westernization of feminism and the women’s movement. I set out to explore questions of women’s rights with women from five countries across the Asia-Pacific region (Fiji, Pakistan, Nepal, India, Malaysia) to record perspectives and see whether areas of commonality could be discerned.

Women's rights - multiple perspectives