Searching for work during COVID-19

Shift into Summer
A lot has changed in the past few months, including what it looks like to search for work and explore your career options. We know this is challenging and we're here to help! Connect with us online and use these resources to take your next steps.

Meet with your personal career educator

Did you know you have a dedicated career educator who specializes in your area of study? We know searching for work is tough right now, and we're here to help.

To book a 30-minute phone or video conference appointment with a career educator:

  1. Log in to the Co-op and Career portal 
  2. Select the "Appointments" tab and choose "Career Services"
  3. Select the staff member you would like to meet with (tutorial: How to book an appointment in the Co-op and Career portal)
Who is your career educator?

Business students - Andrée-Anne Leroy

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Andrée-Anne Leroy is the career educator for students in the Faculty of Business.

Email:

Phone: 250-721-6087

Office: Business and Economics Building, room 107

Office hours: Varies, contact

Engineering and Computer Science students - John Fagan

John Fagan, career educator for the Faculty of Engineering

John Fagan is the career educator for students in the Faculty of Engineering.

Email:

Phone: 250-472-5825

Office: Engineering and Computer Science Building, room 210

Office hours: Varies - contact .

Education students - Joy Andrews

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Joy Andrews is the career educator for students in the Faculty of Education.

Email:

Phone: 250-721-8421

Office: Campus Services Building, room 110

Office hours: Varies - contact careers@uvic.ca

Fine Arts students - Joy Andrews

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Joy Andrews is the career educator for students in the Faculty of Fine Arts.

Email:

Phone: 250-721-8421

Office: Campus Services Building, room 110

Office hours: Varies - contact careers@uvic.ca

Human and Social Development students - Jeremy Pearce

Jeremy Pearce, career educator for the Faculty of Human and Social Development

Jeremy Pearce is the career educator for students in the Faculty of Human and Social Development.

Email:

Phone: 250-721-8421

Office: Campus Services Building, room 110

Office hours: Varies - contact careers@uvic.ca

Humanities students - Joy Andrews

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Joy Andrews is the career educator for students in the Faculty of Humanities.

Email:

Phone: 250-721-8421

Office: Campus Services Building, room 110

Office hours: Varies - contact careers@uvic.ca

Science students - Jeremy Pearce

Jeremy Pearce, career educator for the Faculty of Human and Social Development

Jeremy Pearce is the career educator for students in the Faculty of Science.

Email:

Phone: 250-721-8421

Office: Campus Services Building, room 110

Office hours: Varies - contact careers@uvic.ca

Social Sciences - Richard Myers

Richard Myers, career educator for the Faculty of Social Sciences

Richard Myers is the career educator for students in the Faculty of Social Sciences.

Email:

Phone: 250-721-8421

Office: Campus Services Building, room 110

Office hours: Varies - contact careers@uvic.ca

Access resources and support

These resources can help you maintain momentum in your work search.

Access our online resources on landing a job

Did you know we have more than 100 online resources around searching for and applying for work? Our resources include:

Prepare to interview remotely

Some employers are shifting to remote interviewing rather than in-person interviewing. Interviewing over video conference or phone can feel different than interviewing in person, but the principles are the same. Here are a few tips to make it simple:

  1. Treat webcam interviews as a combination of a telephone and in-person interview. As in a phone interview, you can have some notes in front of you, but should avoid referring to them too often.
  2. Ask permission: When looking to call someone using a webcam tool like Skype, iChat or Facetime, it’s polite to ask for permission before calling. Your contact might be on the telephone, in a public place or otherwise not in a position to take your webcam call. Try instant messaging before making the call - a short text like “Is this still a good time for our call?” will only take a few seconds and will avoid catching your contact off guard. It’s also a good idea to know whether your contact expects to see you on webcam, or whether he or she expects a voice-only call.
  3. Prepare your space: To prepare your space, find a quiet spot with bare walls behind you, set up the webcam/monitor so it is eye-level, and make sure you’re captured well on the screen. Avoid being surrounded by clutter and don’t plan to multitask during the call - your full attention should be on the interview. Log on about 15 minutes early.
  4. Create a professional profile: When you connect via web conferencing program, the interviewer may be able to see certain profile information about you by default. Be aware what your status, location, and other profile details are saying and ensure they are appropriate and accurate when using this type of tool for business.
  5. Test the technology: You may also wish to practice an interview to get the hang of looking and speaking to the lens and microphone instead of to the screen image of the interviewer(s). Test out the quality of your microphone and make sure that your voice is clear for the person on the other end. If possible, invest in an external microphone and headphones. Ensure there won’t be other demands on your internet connection at the same time. If you have access to an Ethernet connection, it is usually better than wireless.

Explore funding and financial support

Many students are experiencing unexpected financial hardship because of COVID-19. Here are a few resources that may be helpful:

Canada Emergency Student Benefit (CESB)

The Government of Canada has launched the Canada Emergency Student Benefit (CESB) to provide supoprt to students and new graduates who are not eligible for the Canada Emergency Response Benefit or Employment Insurance.

This benefit will provide between $1,250 and $1,750 per month depending on whether students or graduates have dependents. This benefit will be available from May to August 2020.

See details here.

Canada Student Service Grant (CSSG)

The Government of Canada's Canada Student Service Grant (CCSG) will help students and new graduates gain valuable work experience and skills while they help their communities during COVID-19.

Post-secondary students and recent graduates may be eligible for between $1,000 and $5,000 to be used towards post-secondary education costs through the Canada Student Service Grant, if they volunteer with registered charities, non-profits and non-governmental organizations.

Apply for this funding.

Canada Emergency Response Benefit (CERB)

The Canada Emergency Response Benefit (CERB) provides a taxable benefit of $2,000 every 4 weeks for up to 16 weeks for eligible workers who have lost their income due to COVID-19. See details & ongoing updates here.

Support for Indigenous students

The Government of Canada is providing financial support to First Nations, Inuit and Métis Nation post-secondary students. See details & ongoing updates here.

Additional support from the Government of Canada

See tips for working remotely

Many organizations are shifting to remote work arrangements in response to COVID-19, including setting up student employees to work from home.

We recognize that working remotely is new for many students and that you might not know what to expect. We've put together some tips to support you (you can see more here). Employers can see tips for supporting students working remotely.

1) Make sure you have the necessary tools to do your job from home

Check with your employer to make sure you have the proper technology to do your daily work. This will include:

  • appropriate computer hardware
  • appropriate software
  • VPN access to the appropriate shared servers - and how to set this up
  • Setting up and testing teleconference and videoconference tools that your organization is using to stay in touch

In addition, make sure that you have:

  • strong, reliable WiFi – connect with your employer about your WiFi to ensure it will allow your to connect with your team
  • access to appropriate policy or training documents
  • an understanding of your organization's security protocols around accessing/sharing files

Resources to support this:

2) Be clear about your organization's work-from-home expectations

Working from home presents unique challenges. You are likely to be sharing the space with friends or family members and may not have a private office space. Remote work can impact work flow and productivity so be clear about what's expected, including:

  • your regular work hours with your supervisor
  • if and how you should track your hours
  • how your supervisor will communicate with you, including what tools to use (email, teleconference or videoconference tools, phone, etc.) and the expected response rate
  • how productivity may be affected
  • your work goals and deadlines
  • expectations around availability
  • how review and approval process may have been adjusted during this time
  • how you should report on your progress and share information with the team

Resources to support this:

3) Re-prioritize projects based on what can be done remotely

If you're shifting suddenly to a remote work setup, connect with your supervisor to review your current task list and identify what projects can be done remotely.

Adjust projects that can't be done remotely. This could be an opportunity to tackle a research project, to compile training documents, to take advantage of online training opportunities, or to tackle other projects that have been lower on the priority list.

This might also mean re-evaluating your organization's expectations about what can been done in a certain period - deadlines might need to shift with this new work setup.

4) Shift into a work-from-home routine

Working out of your home can be challenging, especially if you’re working alongside friends or family members. Here are some tips to help you work from home effectively:

  • set up a space in your home where you can shift into ‘work mode’, and then close it down at the end of the day
  • remove distractions, where possible
  • get changed out of your pyjamas and into work clothes to mentally get ready to be at work
  • organize a desk space, even if you’re working at your kitchen table
  • take scheduled coffee and lunch breaks – get some fresh air, connect with friends remotely and make time for yourself
  • connect with your co-workers regularly by email and other means
  • resist the temptation to work beyond set business hours so that you have boundaries between your work day and personal time
  • use project management skills to keep on top of your tasks
  • break big projects into smaller, achievable goals
  • at the end of the day, create a to-do list for the next day of work

Resources to support this:

5) Communicate clearly and regularly with your supervisor

As organizations continue to adapt in response to COVID-19, it's important to keep in touch with your team. Ask your supervisor to share information about:

  • changing protocols, processes and guidelines
  • relevant updates from your organization
  • what is expected of you during this time
  • who you should contact if you have questions or need support

Resources to support this:

6) Stay connected

Working remotely during COVID-19 can be isolating, especially if you live alone. Here are a few ways to stay connected:

  • Ask your supervisor to schedule short daily video conference check-ins. These check-ins can be both social and productive and are a great way to boost morale.
  • Set up daily check-ins with other co-op students working at your organization through video conference or chat
  • Create a Slack channel with fellow students
  • Follow along on updates from other UVic students on the MyUVicLife blog
  • Access online resources

Resources to support this:

Explore job posting sites

We've compiled a list of popular job posting sites to help you get started. Explore these sites to find a wide range of work opportunities.

Opportunities may be impacted by COVID 19 and may change or be removed as the situation develops.  Co-op and Career is not vetting individual posting sites or opportunities. We encourage you to connect with organizations directly to keep in the loop.

Employers across all sectors have been impacted by COVID-19, and this has changed the range of opportunities that are being posted.

Some sectors are actively hiring. Here are some curated lists that may be helpful if you're looking for positions in Victoria and Vancouver. We'll add other lists as we gather them. Remember that you can always connect with your career educator to chat about the experience and skills you can gain from these opportunities, and how they fit into your overall career goals.

NOTE: Opportunities may be impacted by COVID 19 and may change or be removed as the situation develops. Co-op and Career is not vetting individual posting sites or opportunities. We encourage you to connect with organizations directly to keep in the loop.

Know what area you want to work in? See the industry-specific job postings tab for tons more employer ideas, including more employers for tourism, parks and recreation.

Opportunities may be impacted by COVID 19 and may change or be removed as the situation develops. Co-op and Career is not vetting individual posting sites or opportunities. We encourage you to connect with organizations directly to keep in the loop.

Summer-specific job postings

General postings - Co-op and Career staff picks

General postings - BC

General postings - across Canada

Explore the following job posting sites for industry-specific job opportunities. Opportunities may be impacted by COVID 19 and may change or be removed as the situation develops.

Co-op and Career is not vetting individual posting sites or opportunities. We encourage you to connect with organizations directly to keep in the loop.

Accounting and auditing

Agriculture, forestry and fisheries

Arts and culture

Business and administration

Communications, public relations and marketing directories

Community and social services

Diversity

Education (K-12)

Education (post-secondary)

Engineering and information technology

Environmental and life sciences

Finance, banking and insurance

Banks and credit unions

Insurance Companies

Government

  • Govjobs.ca (links to federal, provincial and municipal job posting sites across Canada)

Municipal/regional

Provincial/Territorial

Federal

International

Health

Hospitality and tourism

Manufacturing, fashion and construction

Mining, oil and gas

Recreation centres and facilities

Sales and service

Transportation

Utilities

Check out our volunteer resources page for tons of information and volunteer opportunities, or check out posting sites below. Opportunities may be impacted by COVID 19 and may change or be removed as the situation develops.

Co-op and Career is not vetting individual posting sites or opportunities. We encourage you to connect with organizations directly to keep in the loop.

Opportunities at UVic

There are tons of opportunities to volunteer right here on campus. Here are some popular options:

Opportunities posted on Learning in Motion

Many organizations post volunteer opportunities on LearninginMotionl. To log in to the portal and see these postings, simply sign up for a free student or alumni account using your Netlink ID.

Opportunities in Canada

Check out these external directories to make a connection that’s right for you.

  • Volunteer Victoria: The primary recruitment and referral centre for the Greater Victoria Region. It can connect you with over 600 volunteer opportunities through its online database. Plus it provides individualized placement support to young people aged 15 to 29.
  • Canadian Volunteer Directory: Managed by Canadian-Universities.net, this resource is organized by category, city, town, county and province. The volunteer database is made up of over 4,000 categorized non-profit organizations and agencies from over 500 locations across Canada.
  • GoVolunteer: Lists volunteer opportunities with over 1,500 organizations in BC and Alberta.
  • Charity Village: A centralized site where the Canadian non-profit sector posts volunteer opportunities, resources and more.

International opportunities

Please see UVic's COVID-19 website for information about how COVID is impacting international travel.

Here is a short selection of volunteer service organizations - check out our volunteer page for questions to ask yourself when seeking international volunteer experience.

  • Volunteer BaseCamp: BaseCamps Volunteer Abroad Program is one of the longest running and most affordable international volunteer programs in the world. Since 1998, the program has coordinated international volunteers working on projects with small community groups, non-governmental organizations and institutions seeking volunteer assistance. This program places volunteers all over the world and includes extensive in-country orientation and training.
  • Latitude Global Volunteering: Latitude has operated in the field of international volunteering for over 40 years.  It places and supports student volunteers around the world.
  • GoAbroad: This US-based site provides a comprehensive international education and volunteering database.
  • International Volunteer Directory: Created by the staff of Experiential Learning International (ELI), this US not-for-profit organization specializes in international volunteer programs. The site provides excellent advice and information about volunteering abroad and provides a listing of ELI opportunities. 
  • CrossContinental Solutions: Offers flexible intern and volunteer abroad programs in Africa, Asia and Latin America with meals, accommodation, on-site support hotline and more.
  • Cross-Cultural Solutions: A not-for-profit organization that operates international volunteer programs in twelve countries in Africa, Asia and Latin America. 
  • uVolunteer: An international volunteer abroad program that works with NGOs, governments, grassroots organizations and private partners to offer volunteer projects.