Speakers Bureau 2018-2019 topics

Browse by selecting from the drop-down menus to automatically filter your results in the table below, or search for a specific keyword.

‡ Graduate student topic
Topics appropriate for K-12 students: E (K-5), M (6-8), S (9-12)

AreaTopicDescriptionPresenterRoleDepartment
Animals and PlantsGooseneck Barnacles and the Archaeology of Nuu-chah-nulth Shellfish Management ǂ (E M S) NEWGooseneck barnacles are rapidly becoming a popular addition to the menu at high-end restaurants, but they have been part of Northwest Coast diets for thousands of years. The barnacles love the exposed, wave-beaten rocks of the intertidal zone, and are only available for a short window of time at low tide, making them dangerous to harvest. The shell plates of goosenecks don't preserve well and look like pinky fingernails, making them hard to identify, and the ways in which we look for then archaeologically won’t catch all of them. My project combines historical ecology and archaeology to see how frequently gooseneck barnacles and other rare shellfish appear in Barkley Sound archaeological sites to get a better idea of this creature's story on the West Coast of Vancouver Island.Efford, Ms. MeaghanGraduate StudentDepartment of Anthropology
Animals and PlantsShellfish Archaeology in BC ǂ (E M S) NEWThe intertidal zone is an exciting place, with many hardy creatures braving the crashing waves and hot sun to make homes in the rocky intertidal splash zone. It is a dangerous place, but is rich in nutrients and home to many organisms. This is where we find tide pools, the sections of the zone with lots of organisms living together. These organisms are smart and tough: they can protect themselves against predators and hunt for their dinner, all while protecting their homes. Many shellfish make their home in the intertidal zone, from the spiky sea urchins and the fancy snails to the hardy clams and bright purple mussels. Sometimes fish use this zone as a nursery. The food chains in the splash zone are complex and often involve birds and sea otters feasting on the creatures who make their homes there.Efford, Ms. MeaghanGraduate StudentDepartment of Anthropology
Animals and PlantsSeabird Tracking: How Do We Know Where Seabirds Go, and Why is it Important? ǂ (E M S) NEWMy research involves tracking of seabird movement around breeding colonies, using GPS tags (small devices placed directly on the birds that log their location over time). I can speak about general seabird biology (mostly familiar with the British Columbian seabirds), and about tracking of seabirds (technology, history of research methods). I am familiar with field protocols for how seabird research takes place in BC. I also have experience working at a long-term ecological monitoring field station in Haida Gwaii, which involved seabird research, but also other ecological monitoring projects, such as monitoring other types of bird and marine mammals. I am happy to also speak about long-term monitoring in ecology, and about citizen science projects.Pattison, Ms. VivianGraduate StudentDepartment of Geography
Business and EconomicsThe Mystery and History of Money (S) NEWWe use money so frequently that without it life seems almost unimaginable, but how is it possible to exchange some shiny metal objects or brightly coloured pieces of paper for a cup of coffee, or better yet, food? This lecture explains where money came from, what makes it possible, and where money might be going in the future.Rudnyckyj, Dr. Daromir Associate ProfessorDepartment of Anthropology
Business and EconomicsAngels and Venture Capitalists: Financing “High-growth” Start-up Companies Schure, Prof. PaulProfessorDepartment of Economics
Business and EconomicsFinancial Crises and Economic Crises Schure, Prof. PaulProfessorDepartment of Economics
Business and EconomicsThe Euro and Financial Markets in the Eurozone Schure, Prof. PaulProfessorDepartment of Economics
Business and EconomicsEconomic Insecurity in 21st-Century Canada: 30 Years of Retrenchment in Federal Support for the Unemployed NEWIncome inequality has grown in Canada, with the deterioration of our social protection system for the unemployed identified as a key factor. This talk looks at retrenchment in employment insurance and social assistance since the 1990s, the consequences and what might be done to bring redistribution back. Wood, Dr. DonnaAdjunct Assistant ProfessorDepartment of Political Science
Business and EconomicsGoal Setting and Performance ManagementThis lecture/workshop is designed to help organizations integrate goal setting with leadership and management techniques to enhance the motivation and performance of their members.Wikkramatileke, Dr. Rhordon Instructor and Curriculum DeveloperDivision of Continuing Studies
Business and EconomicsProfessional Sales NEWThis lecture/workshop discusses the competencies associated with professional sales in this day and age.Wikkramatileke, Dr. Rhordon Instructor and Curriculum DeveloperDivision of Continuing Studies
Business and EconomicsCollaborative Creativity NEWTwo English grads, a biochemistry alum, and a paleontologist walked into a bar…and created a series of linked novellas. Each author writes alone, but all of the tales have to work together—just like this team.The tactics can work for any creative collaboration: a quilting bee, a potluck party, or a theatre production. In Collaborative Creativity, we talk about the process from brainstorming through assessing risks, from setting deadlines to dealing with fallout if they get missed, and most importantly, how to keep it fun.Goldsworthy, Ms. RachelCoordinator Centre for Social and Sustainable InnovationPeter B. Gustavson School of Business
Business and EconomicsDecision-making in Organizations and Along the Supply Chain (in English, French or Arabic) (M S) NEW Guitouni, Dr. AdelAssociate ProfessorPeter B. Gustavson School of Business
Business and EconomicsManaging a Global Value Chain: Balancing Economy, Sustainability and Social Responsibility (in English, French or Arabic) (M S) NEW Guitouni, Dr. AdelAssociate ProfessorPeter B. Gustavson School of Business
Business and EconomicsDiversity and Inclusion Agenda: Lessons from the Victoria Forum (in English, French or Arabic) (M S) Guitouni, Dr. AdelAssociate ProfessorPeter B. Gustavson School of Business
Business and EconomicsCross-cultural Management: Managing Diversity (in English or Korean) (S)This presentation discusses how to manage cultural diversity: culture clash, cross-cultural communication and negotiation, culture shock and living and working overseas.Nam, Dr. Sang H.Associate ProfessorPeter B. Gustavson School of Business
Business and EconomicsOrganizational Behaviour: How to Manage People (in English or Korean) (S) This presentation discusses how to manage people effectively within an organization: motivation, leadership, teamwork, and conflict management.Nam, Dr. Sang H.Associate ProfessorPeter B. Gustavson School of Business
Business and EconomicsOrganizational Democracy: Innovative Ways of Improving Democracy in Cooperatives, Unions, Non-profits, Corporations and Government Agencies (S) NEWFostering greater democracy has been a focus for employees and leaders alike in organizations including unions, corporations, cooperatives, non-profits and government agencies. The benefits of greater democratization extend well beyond the walls of these organizations. Yet many democratic structures in organizations fail to achieve their goals, ultimately leaving employees apathetic. This presentation discusses democratic innovations such as mini-publics that can help revitalize democracy in organizations.Pek, Dr. SimonAssistant ProfessorPeter B. Gustavson School of Business
Business and EconomicsOrganizational Culture Management: How Organizations Can Create, Maintain, Change and Diagnose their Organizations' Cultures (S) NEWThere is a widespread interest in managing organizational cultures. This presentation introduces participants to the the essential dynamics of organizational culture, discussing how organizational cultures are (and can be) created, maintained, changed and diagnosed. Its aim is to equip leaders to be able to influence these dynamics to drive change within their organizations.Pek, Dr. SimonAssistant ProfessorPeter B. Gustavson School of Business
Business and EconomicsUniversity Athletics, Academics and the Challenge of Congruence (in English or French) (S) Wolfe, Dr. RichardAdjunct Professor Peter B. Gustavson School of Business
Business and EconomicsWest Meets East: Sport as a Lens for Enlightening, Balancing and Transcending (in English or French) (S) Wolfe, Dr. RichardAdjunct Professor Peter B. Gustavson School of Business
Business and EconomicsSport and Economics: Exploring Research Synergy (in English or French) (S) Wolfe, Dr. RichardAdjunct Professor Peter B. Gustavson School of Business
Business and EconomicsUnderstanding Innovation in Organizations: Using Sport as a Lens (in English or French) (S) Wolfe, Dr. RichardAdjunct Professor Peter B. Gustavson School of Business
Business and EconomicsSport Analytics: Limitations and Promise (in English or French) (S) Wolfe, Dr. RichardAdjunct Professor Peter B. Gustavson School of Business
Business and EconomicsIntercultural Competence for Work and Life (in English or Spanish (S) NEW Flores, Dr. RicardoAssistant ProfessorPeter B. Gustavson School of Business
Business and EconomicsManaging Small-to-Medium Ventures (in English or Spanish) (S) NEW Flores, Dr. RicardoAssistant ProfessorPeter B. Gustavson School of Business
Business and EconomicsEthical Leadership: Leading Organizations and People through Tough Times (in English or Spanish) (S) NEW Flores, Dr. RicardoAssistant ProfessorPeter B. Gustavson School of Business
Business and EconomicsInstitutional Leadership: Promoting Your Values and Improving Your Community (in English or Spanish) (S) NEW Flores, Dr. RicardoAssistant ProfessorPeter B. Gustavson School of Business
Business and EconomicsEthical Challenges Across Cultures (in English or Spanish) (S) NEW Flores, Dr. RicardoAssistant ProfessorPeter B. Gustavson School of Business
Business and EconomicsGlobalization and You (in English or Spanish) (S) NEW Flores, Dr. RicardoAssistant ProfessorPeter B. Gustavson School of Business
Business and EconomicsEconomic Development in Rural Communities: Small Businesses and Entrepreneurship Rural entrepreneurship presents both opportunities and challenges to small business owners. They can often leverage the uniqueness of their location to create tourism, hospitality, and culinary business. At the same time, these business face challenges around getting their product to market and accessing typical business infrastructure and qualified staff.Siemens, Dr. LynneAssociate ProfessorSchool of Public Administration
Child and Teen DevelopmentThe UN Convention on the Rights of the Child: Possibilities and Promise (E M S)This session explores the power and potential of the UN Convention on the Rights of the Child for changing schooling.Price, Dr. Jason M.C.Associate ProfessorDepartment of Curriculum and Instruction
Child and Teen DevelopmentChildhood Stress (E M)This talk looks at types and sources of childhood stress and suggests ways that parents and teachers can help reduce this stress.Dyson, Dr. LilyProfessor EmeritaDepartment of Educational Psychology and Leadership Studies
Child and Teen DevelopmentParenting Preschool Children (E M)This presentation talks about the needs of young children and how parents, teachers and child care professionals can help promote their social development.Dyson, Dr. LilyProfessor EmeritaDepartment of Educational Psychology and Leadership Studies
Child and Teen DevelopmentPromoting Healthy Living for Children through Self-regulation and Emotion Regulation (E) “Father pleads for the arrest of uncontrollable son,” “Public pressure grows to try teenager as adult in brutal attack on senior,” “Child threatens father with knife.” These news headlines illustrate the increasing challenges faced by parents and educators in supporting the ability of children to self-regulate their emotions. What do parents and pre-school educators say? This presentation examines how 150 parents and 15 pre-school educators defined self-regulation and emotion regulation, explained how self-regulation and emotion regulation are acquired, and explored their roles as caregivers in this process. They also identified how self-regulation and emotion regulation in the pre-school years can support the transition from pre-school to the primary years. Boyer, Dr. WandaAssociate ProfessorDepartment of Educational Psychology and Leadership Studies
Child and Teen DevelopmentChildren and Nature: What are the Benefits of Outdoor Play? (S) There’s increasing concern about the decline of outdoor play by children, and the potentially negative effect of this decline on their attention and attitudes toward nature. It’s argued that the decline in outdoor play leads to an overall disconnection from nature— termed nature deficit disorder. This talk summarizes empirical research on this issue.Mueller, Dr. UlrichChair and ProfessorDepartment of Psychology
Child and Teen DevelopmentIs Play Important for Development? (S)Play is a universal phenomenon that can be found among children around the world. There are different types of play, ranging from physical, rough-and-tumble play to symbolic play with others. Research has shown that different types of play promote development. This talk reviews the research and discusses ways that play can be used in educational and clinical practice with children.Mueller, Dr. UlrichChair and ProfessorDepartment of Psychology
Child and Teen DevelopmentIndigenous Literature for Young Readers (in English or Spanish) (E M S) This presentation offers examples of resources that can be used with young readers to introduce them to Indigenous worldviews, spirituality, beliefs, and ways of being.Rodriguez de France, Dr. CarmenAssistant ProfessorIndigenous Education
Child and Teen DevelopmentElectronic Media and Young Children: Positive and Negative Effects on Development (S) Electronic media are ubiquitous in children’s lives. This presentation discusses what goes on in children’s minds when they are exposed to electronic media. It explores research on how child comprehension of messages conveyed by electronic media changes with age. And it summarizes what research tells us about the positive and negative effects of traditional media such as TV, as well as new media such as iPads, on a variety of aspects of child functioning, including language development, attention and social skills. Mueller, Dr. UlrichChair and ProfessorDepartment of Psychology
Computers, Engineering and TechnologyHow To Spot and Avoid Phishing Emails (S) NEW Bassi, Mr. NavDirectorAcademic Services and Administrative Services
Computers, Engineering and TechnologyPersonal Cybersecurity Tips: Reducing Your Risks (S) NEW Bassi, Mr. NavDirectorAcademic Services and Administrative Services
Computers, Engineering and TechnologyOwn Your Inbox: Email Management Tips (S) NEW Bassi, Mr. NavDirector Academic Services and Administrative Services
Computers, Engineering and TechnologyWhy Did the Computer Do That? Explaining Software in a Probabilistic World (E M S) NEWI talk about the role software plays in every system that touches our lives. This covers social network software like Facebook, but also software that is making decisions about driving cars, prescribing medicine and recommending hires.Ernst, Prof. NeilAssistant ProfessorDepartment of Computer Science
Computers, Engineering and TechnologyNotebook-based Data Science with Jupyter Notebooks (E M S) NEWThis presentation focuses on using modern lab notebooks to do data science and analysis, specifically using Jupyter notebooks. Ernst, Prof. NeilAssistant ProfessorDepartment of Computer Science
Computers, Engineering and TechnologySpatial Computing and the 3D Sensing Revolution (Jan-April) (in English or Italian) (S) Humans have an excellent understanding of the 3D environment. The imminent advent of virtual and augmented reality relies on computers to achieve a similar level of comprehension of the 3D scene—including what objects can be seen, and their geometry and position in space. All this computation must happen in real-time to ensure highly responsive applications. Spatial computing, a mix of computer graphics and computer vision, addresses these challenges. It does so with the help of machine learning, as well as modern sensing technology—sensors that not only measure colour, but also the 3D geometry of what is being observed.Tagliasacchi, Dr. AndreaAssistant ProfessorDepartment of Computer Science
Computers, Engineering and TechnologyIntroduction to Graphics and Game Development with the Unity Game Engine (Jan-April) (in English or Italian) (S) The core mission of computer graphics is to create images that look photorealistic. In video games, this synthesis must happen efficiently, so that the game remains responsive to user actions. To achieve this high-performance, computer graphics leverages hardware acceleration on the GPU (graphics processing unit). Dealing directly with the GPU is difficult, tedious and error-prone. This is why the industry makes use of “game engines”—software that abstracts away the GPU and leaves the programmer to focus on game development. This presentation uses the Unity3D game engine to briefly introduce fundamental concepts from computer graphics. By the end of this hands-on talk, you’ll know how to build a simple 3D game!Tagliasacchi, Dr. AndreaAssistant ProfessorDepartment of Computer Science
Computers, Engineering and TechnologyIntroduction to Visual Computing (Jan-April) (in English or Italian) (S) Tagliasacchi, Dr. AndreaAssistant ProfessorDepartment of Computer Science
Computers, Engineering and TechnologyAnalyzing Music Using Computers (M S)Humans are remarkably good at extracting information from organized combinations of air pressure waves that we call music. Even toddlers are able to recognize melodies, dance in rhythm with music, and express music preferences. Computers are increasingly being used to perform similar tasks of information extraction from music signals. Accomplishing these seemingly simple tasks requires sophisticated techniques from digital signal processing and machine learning. Such systems enable new ways of interacting with the large amounts of music material available digitally.Tzanetakis, Dr. GeorgeAssociate ProfessorDepartment of Computer Science
Computers, Engineering and TechnologyCreating a Digital Edition Using WordPress ǂ (S) With the growing interdisciplinary study of digital humanities, manipulating and presenting texts online is a growing practice. This graduate student speaker offers two different formats for her topic: as a presentation of the content in her own digital text, or as a tutorial for creating a digital edition on WordPress. A content-based presentation would run similar to a guest-lecture with opportunities for audience interaction. A tutorial-based presentation would run as a workshop where the audience is guided in assembling their own literary editions. This would require Internet access, computer access, and at least two hours of time.Seatter, Ms. LindseyGraduate StudentDepartment of English
Computers, Engineering and TechnologySustainable Construction Materials and Technologies (in English or Hindi) (M)This speaker’s current research is focused on cement-based composites containing sustainable construction materials and fibres. His areas of interest include masonry structures, and structural health monitoring using non-destructive techniques such as drones.Gupta, Dr. RishiAssistant ProfessorDepartment of Mechanical Engineering
Computers, Engineering and TechnologySmartphones and Tablets: Educational Distractions or Homework Tools and Bicycles for the Mind? (M S)Can smartphones and tablets be more than distractions and actually help with homework and be more productive? This session will look at different strategies to reduce social media distractions, and at apps that can help turn smartphones into serious productivity, research, and homework tools. The talk is aimed at non-technical users.McCue, Mr. RichSystems Administrator and Educational TechnologistLibraries, Systems Services
Computers, Engineering and TechnologyShooting Videos for Social Media on Your Phone (S) NEWWondering how to film and edit awesome short videos to use on social media? Learn why short videos work and how to create a hook that captures your viewers’ attention. You’ll also discover tips for lighting and editing your videos.Croft, Ms. HeatherWeb and Communications CoordinatorOffice of the Registrar
Computers, Engineering and TechnologyDigital Citizenship (S) NEWDigital citizenship goes beyond simply using the internet —technology needs to be used to create, share, tag, comment and contribute to the online world in positive ways to leave a digital footprint that you can live with. Learn the elements of digital citizenship and how you can be a good digital citizen. Croft, Ms. HeatherWeb and Communications CoordinatorOffice of the Registrar
Computers, Engineering and TechnologyA Global Perspective on eHealth Platforms—Meeting Citizen and Health System Needs (in English or German)Most people can look forward to long, mostly healthy lives. This is perhaps the most significant achievement of modern civilization. In the wider context of aging societies, medical innovations and recent health and disease trends show health care costs are rising. Around the globe, national health systems are setting new policy priorities— where digital systems play a dominant role. This presentation offers a review of global good eHealth practice and national eHealth platforms on five continents, putting Canadian achievements into perspective and helping us learn for the future. Stroetmann, Dr. Karl A.Adjunct Assistant ProfessorSchool of Health Information Science
Computers, Engineering and TechnologyRobot Butlers: is this the Future of Assistive Technology? NEW Livingston, Dr. NigelProfessorSchool of Public Health and Social Policy
Cultures Around the WorldThe Unlikely Nation: An Introduction to Indonesian Society, History and Diversity ǂ (M S) NEW Foertsch, Mr. ChrisGraduate StudentDepartment of Anthropology
Cultures Around the WorldPeoples and Cultures of Southeast Asia (S) NEWSoutheast Asia is one of the most diverse and dynamic regions in the world today, yet is not well known in North America. This lecture introduces some of the foundational features of the history and culture of this vibrant part of the world.Rudnyckyj, Dr. DaromirAssociate ProfessorDepartment of Anthropology
Cultures Around the WorldSports as Cultural Practice: Taking an Anthropological Approach (in English or French) (S) While sport increasingly participates in the process of globalization, it nonetheless has a history and culturally specific differences which contradict universalizing conceptions of human behaviour such as those of game theory. Anthropology has shown a different way of understanding this behaviour, and sports is an ideal ground to examine such questions.Fromet de Rosnay, Dr. EmileAssistant ProfessorDepartment of French
Cultures Around the WorldIndigenous Latin America (in English, Spanish or German) (E M S) NEWIntroduction to Indigenous Peoples in Latin America (ethnic groups, geography, languages, and current globally relevant issues). Our aim is to encourage dialogue and build bridges as we address topics such as decolonization, education, social justice and the environment. Focus on Bolivia, Guatemala, Mexico, Peru, or other countries, depending on audience.McBee, Dr. GabrielaSessional InstructorDepartment of Hispanic and Italian Studies
Cultures Around the WorldMexico’s Day of the Dead (M S)The fascinating celebration of the “Day of the Dead” is explored in this talk. Includes slides of preparations and the beautiful altars that are created to remember those who have passed away.Stewart, Prof. RosaAssistant Teaching ProfessorDepartment of Hispanic and Italian Studies
Cultures Around the WorldReligion in India (in English or Bengali) (S) Bose, Dr. NeileshAssistant Professor and Canada Research ChairDepartment of History
Cultures Around the WorldThe Story of an African (Women's) Farm (M S) This highly illustrated talk tells the story of an inspiring farm set up during a food crisis in the early 1990s and its ongoing contributions to women's lives and their community in South Africa.Vibert, Dr. ElizabethAssociate ProfessorDepartment of History
Cultures Around the WorldFood Sovereignty and Sustainability: South African Case Studies (M S)Food Sovereignty and Sustainability discusses these concepts, and then uses two South African collaborative farms as examples of how local, small-scale agriculture can change lives and communities.Vibert, Dr. ElizabethAssociate ProfessorDepartment of History
Cultures Around the WorldMicro-managing: Household Economies in Southern Africa (M S) ‘Micro-managing’ examines how 'the poorest of the poor' carefully manage and amplify scarce resources and diversify activities to support themselves and their families. Households in rural South Africa serve as case studies. Vibert, Dr. ElizabethAssociate ProfessorDepartment of History
Cultures Around the WorldThe Thinking Garden: A Film About an Inspiring South African Women's Farm (M S)The Thinking Garden. The writer-producer presents this award-winning, inspiring documentary about a South African women's cooperative farm, 35 minutes [2017]Vibert, Dr. ElizabethAssociate ProfessorDepartment of History
Cultures Around the WorldWhy is Africa Poor and Food-insecure (and is it)? (M S) This highly illustrated talk looks at historical and contemporary factors shaping the ongoing challenges of sub-Saharan Africa, queries standard narratives, and considers some little-discussed success stories. Vibert, Dr. ElizabethAssociate ProfessorDepartment of History
Cultures Around the WorldCreativity and Creative Spaces in China (S) NEWIntroduction to creative districts in Chinese cities and the relationship between art, artists, creative output and urban change.Marton, Dr. AndrewProfessorDepartment of Pacific and Asian Studies
Cultures Around the WorldWashoku: Japanese Food Culture (in English or Japanese) NEW Poulton, Dr. CodyProfessorDepartment of Pacific and Asian Studies
Earth and OceansHuman Evolution ǂ (M S) NEWThis talk ideally takes place in the UVic Anthropology department to have access to fossil hominin casts. This talk goes through the various species that came before us—what they looked like, where they have been found, what things they were doing and making. This talk can be tailored to specific interests—from early hominins and up to Homo sapiens, or it can focus specifically on the genus Homo. The purpose of this talk is to engage with people interested in learning more about our evolution and to potentially provide some hands-on learning opportunities.Rogers, Ms. LisaGraduate StudentDepartment of Anthropology
Earth and OceansPacific Storm Types and Tracks What are the types of Pacific storms? Where do they form, where do they travel, and why do they move as they do? Why do we have more storms in winter than in summer? How do El Niño/La Niña affect them?Atkinson, Dr. DavidAssistant ProfessorDepartment of Geography
Earth and OceansHow Storms Impact the Coasts How do storms affect the ocean and impact the coast? How does the nature of the coast—water depth, type of beach material, coast shape—affect how a storm can cause impact? How do features like sandbars and rip-currents work? Why there are bigger waves in winter? Atkinson, Dr. DavidAssistant ProfessorDepartment of Geography
Earth and OceansField Research in the Arctic The Canadian high Arctic is a place most people have never seen. In this photo tour, you’ll see what the it looks like—landforms, animals and some of the research taking place there.Atkinson, Dr. DavidAssistant ProfessorDepartment of Geography
Earth and OceansThe Coastal Regions of Alaska and the Arctic This presentation gives an overview of the Alaskan and Arctic coastal regions, including who lives there, what the land/coast is like, how important sea ice is, how climate change is manifesting itself in these areas, and new threats/opportunities from oil/gas development and the Northwest Passage opening. Atkinson, Dr. DavidAssistant ProfessorDepartment of Geography
Earth and OceansWeather Stations in the Icefields of the RockiesThis presentation includes an overview of how 10-metre weather towers were installed on the Columbia Icefield near Jasper and Banff, and an icefield in Nahanni National Park Reserve in the NWT. See examples of data and photos sent back from the stations, and learn about some of the problems with this sort of science.Atkinson, Dr. DavidAssistant ProfessorDepartment of Geography
Earth and OceansHow We Change the Land Surface and the Soils—and Why it Matters ǂ (E M S)Are you aware of how we change the Earth surface? Human activities such as agriculture, overgrazing, deforestation and building of cities, have altered more than half of the land surface worldwide in the past 150 years, causing profound soil degradation. Yet soils play an important role in global water, energy and human food production that supports all living things. By using slices, computer animations and live demonstrations, this talk will help you know more about the environment we depend on and help you better understand our role in environmental processes. The goal is to understand how each individual can make a difference. The talk can be customized according to the time available and the age and educational background of the audiences.Wang, Ms. Pei-LingGraduate StudentDepartment of Geography
Earth and OceansHow We Know a Giant Earthquake is on its Way and What it Will Look Like ǂ (E M S) Victoria residents frequently hear warnings that a big earthquake could hit this region anytime. How do we know we’re due for a big earthquake? How do we know it will be a big one? This talk reviews stories of earthquakes that occurred before the first European settlers arrived. By using photos, computer animations and live demonstrations, you’ll learn where the earthquakes come from, what causes them; what they and associated hazards look like; and how can we respond. The goal is to better understand the hazards so we can have less anxiety about the uncertainties and be better prepared. This talk can be customized according to the time available and the age and educational background of the audiences. Wang, Ms. Pei-LingGraduate StudentDepartment of Geography
Earth and OceansOcean Networks Canada: Operating the World’s Leading Ocean Observatories (M S) Starting with the installation of VENUS in the Salish Sea in 2006, NEPTUNE in the northeast Pacific in 2009, and the Cambridge Bay Observatory in the Arctic in 2012, UVic’s Ocean Networks Canada is the world leader in the design, operations and innovation associated with advanced ocean observatory systems. Observing sensors are installed across a wide range of marine environments, from near the Fraser River out to the Endeavour Hot Vents in the open ocean. The presentation provides a broad overview of the observatories and the pure and applied science they support.Dewey, Dr. RichardAssociate Director, Science ServicesOcean Networks Canada
Earth and OceansHot, Sour and Breathless: Oceans Under Stress (in English or Mandarin) (M S) The global ocean is under stress from warming, acidification and oxygen declines. Why are these changes happening and what impacts can we expect? This talk outlines these three interrelated stressors, examining impacts and actions we can take to counteract them.Owens, Mr. DwightUser Engagement OfficerOcean Networks Canada
Earth and OceansLife Below Water: the UN’s Sustainable Development Goal 14 (in English or Mandarin) (M S) NEWThe world’s oceans—their temperature, chemistry, currents and life—make the Earth habitable for humankind. How we manage this vital resource is essential for humanity as a whole. The UN Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) aim to protect the planet, end poverty and ensure that all people enjoy peace and prosperity. Goal 14, Life Below Water, strives to sustainably manage and protect marine and coastal ecosystems from pollution, as well as address the impacts of ocean acidification. This talk introduces the goal and how we can all help achieve it.Owens, Mr. DwightUser Engagement OfficerOcean Networks Canada
Earth and OceansSea of Plastic: Trash in our Oceans (in English or Mandarin) (M S) From urban shorelines, to isolated atolls, to the deepest recesses of the abyss, discarded plastics and trash can now be found throughout our oceans. This talk outlines the extent of this problem and explores what can be done to clean up our mess.Owens, Mr. DwightUser Engagement OfficerOcean Networks Canada
Earth and OceansEarthquake Early Warning for BC (S)UVic’s Ocean Networks Canada is in a unique position to detect subduction earthquakes through the operation of sensor networks on land and on the seafloor. Learn about the prototype earthquake early warning system already in place, and how it will be expanded and enhanced to provide early warning to the residents of southwestern BC.Crosby, Mr. BobRetireeRetirees Association
Earth and OceansGeologic Time and Stratigraphy ǂ (E M S) NEWRocks are like the pages of a book: they are records of past events that can give us a lot of information if we only learn how to "read" them. Stratigraphy helps us read the rocks on the surface of the Earth and to re-construct the sequence of events which lead to their formation. Different concepts (principles of stratigraphy, unconformities) and techniques (radiometric dating of different isotopes) are the necessary tools to gather the clues recorded in rocks and to use them to understand what happened in the past.Cappello, Ms. MarikoGraduate StudentSchool of Earth and Ocean Sciences
Earth and OceansThe Fukushima Disaster and Radiation in the Pacific Ocean: What Does It Mean for BC? (M S)The mega-thrust earthquake in March 2011 off the coast of Japan and the subsequent tsunami led to globally significant releases of radioactive elements from the Fukushima Dai-ichi Nuclear Power Plant. In this presentation, the radioactive releases, transport from Fukushima and expected maximum concentrations on the west coast of North America are discussed in light of naturally occurring radioactivity and historic releases of radioactive elements from human activities. Ongoing monitoring efforts and likely impacts on environmental and public health are also discussed.Cullen, Dr. JayAssociate ProfessorSchool of Earth and Ocean Sciences
Earth and OceansOcean Acidification Around Vancouver Island, and its Potential Impact on Pteropods ǂ (M S) NEWHuman activity is causing the ocean to become more acidic, and researchers around the world are racing to understand the current and future impacts on marine life. This process, known as ocean acidification (OA), is making it more difficult for marine organisms to build their shells or skeletons out of calcium carbonate. One important shell-building organism is the pteropod, Limacina helicina. Commonly called "sea butterflies", pteropods are a group of marine snails that swim using two "wings". These tiny snails are important for ecosystems because they are a major food source for other organisms, including pink salmon. Studies have indicated that pteropods may be negatively impacted by ocean acidification dissolving their shells. If pteropods disappeared, the effects would be seen throughout the food web. This lecture will distil the chemistry of OA into an easy to understand format, explain how OA is affecting organisms, and describe my current OA research on pteropods around Vancouver Island. It will also highlight the potential solutions, including what you can do to help with this problem.Miller, Mr. Matthew RayGraduate StudentSchool of Earth and Ocean Sciences
Earth and OceansMicroplastics in the Vancouver Island Marine Environment ǂ (M S) NEWMicroplastics have now reached every part of the ocean, from the Arctic to Antarctic waters and sea ice, to deep-sea sediments. These discoveries have led researchers to become increasingly concerned about the impacts of this "structural pollutant" on marine ecosystems. A growing number of studies are showing that impacts on organisms can be variable, but little is known about the potential health effects of microplastics on humans. This lecture will give a broad overview of the issue of micro plastics, including highlighting what is known to date and what people can do to help. It will also explain my previous research on microplastic levels in oysters cultured around Vancouver Island, and put this into context with other types of food stuffs and pathways of human microplastic exposure.Miller, Mr. Matthew RayGraduate StudentSchool of Earth and Ocean Sciences
Earth and OceansMicrofossils ǂ (M S) NEWBiology, identification, and use of different groups of microfossils in geologic time and the modem world. Includes foraminifera, conodonts, dinoflagellates and other main groups. Depth of the presentation can be made into a broad overview/introduction to micropaleontology or made more specific for audiences related to taxonomy, biostratigraphy, paleoclimate and paleo-environmental reconstruction.Over, Ms. Jin-SiGraduate StudentSchool of Earth and Ocean Sciences
Earth and OceansRising Sea Levels: Past, Present and Future ǂ (M S) NEWPresentation on various effects and manifestations of sea-level; how we measure modem sea-level with technology ancient sea-level with proxies, various impacts (can specifically talk about research in Hawaii), and how it varies on the geologic time scale and into the future. Can be made to focus more or less on climatechange aspect.Over, Ms. Jin-SiGraduate StudentSchool of Earth and Ocean Sciences
Earth and OceansVolcanoes: How they Work, How We Study Them ǂ (E M S) NEWVolcanoes are complex geologic features that can be seen from the shores of Vancouver Island. Volcanologists look to understand how, what and why volcanoes erupt. This talk explores the geology of volcanoes, particularly gases and lava that are expelled from volcanoes and how we sample and study volcanoes. Scholtysik, Ms. RebeccaGraduate StudentSchool of Earth and Ocean Sciences
Earth and OceansIcelandic Volcanoes ǂ (E M S) NEWVolcanoes in Iceland erupt regularly and in some cases, have unique features, such as peaks capped with glaciers. This talk focuses on the history of Icelandic volcanoes, impacts on Iceland’s society, current studies of Icelandic geology and beautiful photos of Iceland’s landscapes.Scholtysik, Ms. RebeccaGraduate StudentSchool of Earth and Ocean Sciences
Earth and OceansWhat Does a Volcanologist Do? ǂ (E M S) NEWVolcanologists study Earth’s fascinating and dangerous natural features: volcanoes. This talk will focus on the work and research of volcanologists, with examples of collecting samples at volcanoes and laboratory experiments. It will also cover personal experiences from an early-career, female volcanologist, who is passionate about teaching.Scholtysik, Ms. RebeccaGraduate StudentSchool of Earth and Ocean Sciences
Education in the SchoolsWeb of Performance: How Performance Literacy Empowers 21st-Century Youth (S) NEWPerformance studies offers young people opportunities to develop their performance literacy through the investigation of performance as a form of play, ritual, healing, education, identity, power and everyday life. Based on a recent nationally-funded grant, this talk introduces a new curriculum in performance studies for youth 16-20.Prendergast, Dr. MonicaAssociate ProfessorDepartment of Curriculum and Instruction
Education in the SchoolsStaging the Not-Yet: How Dramatic Ensembles are Enacting Micro-utopian Visions (S) NEWUtopian philosophy offers new ways to think about what can happen in a dramatic ensemble. This can be a creative and collaborative space in which young people and their teachers can experience fleeting glimpses of more hopeful ways of being and doing through collective performance creation.Prendergast, Dr. MonicaAssociate ProfessorDepartment of Curriculum and Instruction
Education in the SchoolsHow to Survive and Thrive in First-year University (S) NEWDesigned for Grade 12 students contemplating the tradition to university, this talk identifies the habits of successful students, ranging from study skills to sleep habits. Learn 10 simple tips for university success! Surridge, Dr. LisaAssociate Dean and ProfessorDepartment of English
Education in the SchoolsTeachers' Research Toolkit for Implementing Critical Learner Reflection This interactive workshop is designed to dispel trepidation among educators who have contemplated engaging in practitioner research that involved critical learner reflection. This session describes what practitioner research is, and discusses how to problem-solve challenges commonly encountered in the practitioner-research process. Bring your practitioner research questions and ideas with you! This workshop guarantees to help you make informed decisions and get you excited about embarking on your own practitioner-research journey.Huang, Dr. Li-ShihAssociate ProfessorDepartment of Linguistics
Education in the SchoolsIndigenous Arts in the Classroom: A Hands-On PresentationThis is a hands-on presentation using diverse art forms.Rodriguez de France, Dr. CarmenAssistant ProfessorIndigenous Education
Education in the SchoolsFlipping the Classroom: A Powerful Teaching Tool, But Not a Panacea (M S) Adopting a flipped classroom approach can free up valuable in-class time by using videos and exercises that students watch and complete as homework, or “pre-work." This allows teachers to more easily differentiate their instruction and lets students learn at their own pace. This talk includes an overview of the flipped learning model, a demonstration of one approach to flipping a classroom, and discussion of where flipped learning does and doesn’t work well—along with equity issues to keep in mind when implementing.McCue, Mr. RichSystems Administrator and Educational TechnologistLibraries, Systems Services
Education in the SchoolsIs Educational Technology Worth the Investment? (M S)Are new educational technologies more effective in helping students achieve learning objectives than the old technologies they replace? This interactive talk explores the intersection of educational technology and teaching methods, looking at the relative effectiveness of educational technology tools such as: MOOC’s, digital textbooks, clickers, flipped classrooms, streaming video lectures, PowerPoint, mobile learning, Google Drive, virtual labs, and learning management systems (LMS). Participants leave with a better understanding of how to assess the value of educational technology and teaching method pairings.McCue, Mr. RichSystems Administrator and Educational TechnologistLibraries, Systems Services
Education in the SchoolsIndigenizing Education is More than a Metaphor (Jan-April) NEWIndigenous perspectives pertaining to how we live, learn and flourish are not new in the context of schooling and education. The past often informs the present, and the present provides an opportunity to highlight the distinct differences that underpin how Indigenous peoples, and as culturally connected peoples, view the world they live in and learn from. This presentation will highlight the important learning distinctions, dynamics and developments to emerge with respect to how learning as Indigenous peoples across the life span in Aotearoa New Zealand has transformed the conventional educational landscape over the past 40 years. This phenomenon has also given rise to a distinct Indigenous approach(es) to research and theory advancement that is fundamentally couched in Te Ao Mâori but inherently inclusive in its approach and delivery.  The following four perspectives, and the interconnection of each, alongside some relevant examples  will be shared: 1. Te Ao Mâori – philosophical perspective 2.       Mâtauranga Mâori – pedagogical perspective 3. Whânau Ora – political and social reform 4. Te Reo me Ngâ Tikanga –  preservation of language and culture.Whitinui, Dr. PaulAssociate ProfessorSchool of Exercise Science, Physical and Health Education
Education—GeneralThe Value of Being a Volunteer (E M S)The benefit of volunteering is a win-win situation. It's not just about giving up some free time, but about growing a person and supporting a group or special interest area. It can be a rewarding experience and opportunity to expand your network.Davie, Ms. MarleneAlumni Engagement OfficerAlumni Relations
Education—GeneralLearning Outside the Classroom: Community-engaged Learning in our Region (in English or Spanish) (M S) NEWOverview of community-engaged learning pedagogy and examples in our region. Showcase of student projects and the role that faculty and community have in creating space for students to learn and contribute to community at the same time. Nagel, Ms. RhiannaCommunity Engaged Learning CoordinatorCommunity-Engaged Learning
Education—GeneralMoving Forward Through the Rearview Mirror: Future, Change and Indigenous Education (E M S)This session explores Aboriginal perspectives on special education practice, including alternatives.Price, Dr. Jason M.C.Associate ProfessorDepartment of Curriculum and Instruction
Education—GeneralEducation for Social Justice and Reconstruction (E M S) Price, Dr. Jason M.C.Associate ProfessorDepartment of Curriculum and Instruction
Education—GeneralBoards of Education: Governance and Vision in BC Education (E M S) Price, Dr. Jason M.C.Associate ProfessorDepartment of Curriculum and Instruction
Education—GeneralDenying Indigenous Education NEWHistorically, some Indigenous communities requested on-reserve day schools in order to keep their children from attending residential schools. Canadian officials repeatedly denied these requests, accusing Aboriginal parents of “indifference” to education when they kept their children at home. This talk focuses on the cases of Campbell River and Cape Mudge. Raptis, Dr. HelenAssociate ProfessorDepartment of Curriculum and Instruction
Education—GeneralDo We Still Need School Boards? NEWNova Scotia has just eliminated their regional school boards (as did New Zealand in 1989). In this talk, I discuss why regional boards were established, what their roles were intended to be, and how these roles have evolved over time. I end by discussing the pros and cons of regional school boards. Raptis, Dr. HelenAssociate ProfessorDepartment of Curriculum and Instruction
Education—GeneralThe Fraser Institute Rankings: Who Loses and Why? NEWFor two decades, the Fraser Institute has been publishing school rankings and generating significant controversy. This talk examines the institute’s methodology and how its ranking process predetermines winning and losing schools. Raptis, Dr. HelenAssociate ProfessorDepartment of Curriculum and Instruction
Education—GeneralInspiring Creativity (S)This session examines how every human has the capacity for creativity, and how learning to harness that capacity is worthwhile. There are easy-to-learn approaches that can help each of us live more creative lives.Wiebe, Dr. MichelleAssistant Teaching ProfessorDepartment of Curriculum and Instruction
Education—GeneralUsing Design Thinking to Solve Community Problems (S) NEWDesign thinking is an approach to problem solving that has become popular in disciplines other than art and design. This talk focuses on what design thinking is, how it can help to solve ‘wicked’ problems and how to use this approach in your own life. Wiebe, Dr. MichelleAssistant Teaching ProfessorDepartment of Curriculum and Instruction
Education—GeneralThe Concept of Experience ​in the Humanities and the Sciences (in English or French) (S)This presentation looks at an alternate way of understanding the difference between the humanities and the other sciences.Fromet de Rosnay, Dr. EmileAssistant ProfessorDepartment of French
Education—GeneralBreaking Down Barriers: Students’ Use of their Own-Language There’s a growing recognition of the role played by learners’ first languages/own-languages in learning an additional language. This session draws on insights from recent literature and the presenter’s own scholarly and professional work on learners’ use of their own languages to give instructors practical suggestions on how to incorporate them into teaching.Huang, Dr. Li-ShihAssociate ProfessorDepartment of Linguistics
Education—GeneralLet’s Break the Cycle of Non-transformative Reflection: Field-tested Tips on Implementing Critical Learner Reflection NEWAt one point or another in our learning journeys, we have probably all been asked to reflect on our learning experiences. As a teaching professional, you may also have asked your students to engage in reflection. Although educators across disciplines have long recognized its importance and applicability across a wide variety of educational settings, reflection remains a challenging concept for educators across disciplines to firmly grasp in practice. In this talk, the presenter will help you foster critical reflection by exploring with you (a) what learner reflection entails, (b) why learner reflection is critically important, according to up-to-date theory and research, and (c) how to implement reflection in ways that will help learners reap its benefits and become autonomous learners.Huang, Dr. Li-ShihAssociate ProfessorDepartment of Linguistics
Education—GeneralIndigenous Ways of Being Through Photography (in English or Spanish) (E M S) This session offers hands-on “discovery” of Indigenous ways of being through the lens of a camera, paying attention to immediate surroundings such as land, imagery, cultural representations, language, etc.Rodriguez de France, Dr. CarmenAssistant ProfessorIndigenous Education
Education—GeneralIndigenous Education: What Have We Learned in 50 Years? (in English or Spanish) (E M S) Explore the history of Indigenous education in BC through policy and curriculum.Rodriguez de France, Dr. CarmenAssistant ProfessorIndigenous Education
Education—GeneralOnce Upon a Time: Indigenous Ways of Knowing and Being through Story (in English or Spanish) (E M S) Rodriguez de France, Dr. CarmenAssistant ProfessorIndigenous Education
Education—GeneralWomen’s History Month for K-12 Teachers NEW Aragon, Dr. JanniDirector Office of Technology Integrated Learning
Education—GeneralLeaders as Indigenous Allies: Working for Positive Change in Schools (S) Allyship is a critical leadership tool that non-Aboriginal leaders can use in their work with Indigenous communities to support the creation of inclusive learning spaces. The Aboriginal Enhancement Schools Network (AESN) was founded five years ago and has built a network of teachers and teacher-leaders who put Aboriginal student success at the centre of their work. This presentation draws from a recently completed study of this network, showcasing key strategies for successful inclusion that make a difference for all learners.McGregor, Dr. CatherineAssociate DeanFaculty of Education
Education—GeneralEmotional Intelligence (EQ) and Academic Success (S)This presentation is designed for students (high school/university) to gain a greater understanding of EQ and how it impacts their social and academic lives. Leacock, Prof. BrianAssociate Director, International ProgramsPeter B. Gustavson School of Business
Environment and SustainabilityThe Future of Water Law and PolicyThis presentation explores the elements and attributes of modern water law and focuses on the emerging model for watershed governance in BC. It also addresses the successful conditions for watershed governance, and explores how a watershed governance regime can build resilience in dealing with an increasingly uncertain world and the priority of water sustainability. Brandes/Simms, Mr./Ms. Oliver/RosieCo-Director/Researcher and Coordinator Centre for Global Studies, POLIS Water Sustainability Project
Environment and SustainabilityPutting the "Sustainable" in BC's New Water Law With elements of BC’s new Water Sustainability Act in force since February 2016, the province has a once-in-a-lifetime opportunity to become a leader in freshwater protection. This presentation highlights the critical legal components needed to put the "sustainable" in the Water Sustainability Act, including protection of groundwater and flows for nature, and improved planning and governance.Brandes/Simms, Mr./Ms. Oliver/RosieCo-Director/Researcher and Coordinator Centre for Global Studies, POLIS Water Sustainability Project
Environment and SustainabilityCollaborative Consent: Moving Toward Co-governance for BC’s Water Collaborative consent is a concept that has emerged from the Northwest Territories to describe the decision-making process used to develop Mackenzie River water management agreements. This presentation introduces the concept of collaborative consent as a pathway to building respectful shared-decision making processes between Indigenous and non-Indigenous governments, highlighting the opportunity to adopt collaborative consent in freshwater decision-making in BC.Brandes/Simms, Mr./Ms. Oliver/RosieCo Director/Researcher and Coordinator Centre for Global Studies, POLIS Water Sustainability Project
Environment and SustainabilitySolar Cells and Alternative Energy Technologies: Challenges and Prospects (E M S) This talk covers the history of the science behind photovoltaics (solar cells, inorganic and organic), trends in new types of solar cells, energy requirements, political and economic considerations, and comparison to other alternative energy technologies.Frank, Dr. NatiaAssociate ProfessorDepartment of Chemistry
Environment and SustainabilityGreen Chemistry as a Path to Safer, Healthier Communities (S) NEWGreen engineering and chemistry can be design and policy tools to develop safer products and communities. This talk focuses on case studies from my work on roofing in India and antimicrobials in personal care.Buckley, Dr. HeatherAssistant ProfessorDepartment of Civil Engineering
Environment and SustainabilityClimatology and Climate Change: Long Term Climate Trends (in English or Dutch) (M S) NEWLong Term Climate Trends (millions of years to future projections)Feddema, Dr. Johannes Chair and ProfessorDepartment of Geography
Environment and SustainabilityClimate Modelling (in English or Dutch) (M S) NEW Feddema, Dr. JohannesChair and ProfessorDepartment of Geography
Environment and SustainabilityLand-cover Change Impacts on Climate— including Urban Climates (in English or Dutch) (M S) NEWThere are many ways that humanity’s actions effect climate. This speaker’s current research combines remote sensing, GIS and modelling to develop datasets to models simulate human impacts on the Earth’s surface in the National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR) Community Climate System Model (CCSM) in the US. Feddema, Dr. JohannesChair and ProfessorDepartment of Geography
Environment and SustainabilityHow Does Corporate Power Obstruct Solutions to the Climate Crisis? NEWThis presentation presents findings from the corporate mapping project, a seven-year university-community partnership that focuses on the power of the fossil-fuel sector in Canada and beyond, and its influence on culture and public policy. Alternatives to business-as-usual, which might steer us clear of climate catastrophe, are discussed.Carroll, Prof. BillProfessorDepartment of Sociology
Environment and SustainabilityConserving Energy One Cubicle (or Home) at a Time (M S)Do you know how much electricity you use in your personal office, cubicle or home? Do you know how much energy your desktop computer or laptop uses? Will you save more electricity by turning off your computer at night or shortening your daily shower by five minutes? Discover some counter-intuitive facts about saving energy, money and the environment.McCue, Mr. RichSystems Administrator and Educational TechnologistLibraries, Systems Services
Environment and SustainabilityClimate Action: UN Sustainable Development Goal 13 (in English or Mandarin) (M S) NEWThere is no country in the world that is not experiencing first-hand the drastic effects of climate change. Global warming is causing long-lasting changes to our climate system, which threaten irreversible consequences. The UN Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) work in the spirit of partnership and pragmatism to make the right choices now to improve life, in a sustainable way, for future generations. They provide clear guidelines for all countries to adopt. If we work together, it is still possible to avert catastrophic climate change and strengthen our resilience to climate-related disasters. This requires urgent collective action.Owens, Mr. DwightUser Engagement OfficerOcean Networks Canada
Environment and SustainabilityFrom Trees to Bluebirds: The Communication of Conservation on Vancouver Island (M S)This presentation looks at how we talk about science and conservation, and what the barriers are to uptake and engagement among target audiences.Fisher, Mrs. AlinaResearch ManagerSchool of Environmental Studies
Environment and SustainabilityMicroplastics in the Marine Environment: Context and Prevention ǂ (E M S) This talk focuses on marine microplastic pollution in BC and ingestion by cultured and wild shellfish. It also includes information on global microplastic research and what each of us can do to reduce plastic use and microplastic release into the ocean in everyday life—such as avoiding single use plastic, recycling, and avoiding synthetic clothing and other products.Covernton, Mr. GarthGraduate StudentDepartment of Biology
Ethics and PhilosophyThe Philosophy of Giorgio Agamben (in English or French) (S) This talk focuses on this important philosopher, known for his approach to theories of biopolitics/biopower and potentiality.Fromet de Rosnay, Dr. EmileAssistant ProfessorDepartment of French
Ethics and PhilosophyExistential Philosophy (S) This talk explores some fundamentals of Existentialist philosophy through some of its iconic literary narratives: Dostoevsky, Sartre and Camus.Belmonte, Dr. NinaAssistant Teaching ProfessorDepartment of Philosophy
Ethics and PhilosophyImagining Perfection: The Importance of Utopian Ideals (S) This talk offers a brief history of the utopian imagination, its fundamental claims and its continuing importance in shaping our communities.Belmonte, Dr. NinaAssistant Teaching ProfessorDepartment of Philosophy
Ethics and PhilosophyEthics by Example? The Hero in Contemporary Cinema (S) How can we think about the moral affect popular cinema has on our culture? This talk suggests how action films, through their portrayal of heroes and heroic behaviour, provide us with an ethical landscape for the narratives of our lives.Belmonte, Dr. NinaAssistant Teaching ProfessorDepartment of Philosophy
Ethics and PhilosophyDe-Mystifying Mindfulness: What Does it Mean to Live a Mindful Life? (S) NEW'Mindfulness' is everywhere today, but the term has become so pervasive that it seems to have lost all meaning. What actually is it, how can it be cultivated, and why might you want to live more mindfully anyway?Goto-Jones, Dr. ChrisDeanDepartment of Philosophy
Ethics and PhilosophyMagical Thinking: What Counts as Magic Today and Can it Make Life Better? (S) NEWA consideration of the changing meaning of magic (including conjuring and stage magic) and its impact on everyday life. How does the experience of magic transform our experience of the world around us?Goto-Jones, Dr. ChrisDean Department of Philosophy
Ethics and PhilosophyThe Virtual Ninja Manifesto: Can Video Games Make You Into a Better Person? (S)The media is full of concerns about whether videogames produce anti-social effects on gamers, but is there a way to approach videogames as vehicles for self-cultivation and moral growth?Goto-Jones, Dr. ChrisDean of HumanitiesDepartment of Philosophy
Ethics and PhilosophyAbortion (in English or German) (S) NEWAbortion is defined by the Canadian Medical Association as the active termination of a pregnancy before fetal viability. This presentation considers the ethics of abortion. It begins with a brief historical look at abortion, includes the position of major Christian figures on the status of the human fetus, and deals with the so-called Doctrine of Double Effect.Kluge, Dr. EikeProfessorDepartment of Philosophy
Ethics and PhilosophyMedical Assistance in Dying (in English or German) (S) After over twenty years of administrative, legal, religious and ethical debate, the Medical Assistance in Dying (MAiD) Act came into force in 2016, and it is now legal in Canada for physicians and nurse practitioners to provide an incurably ill competent patient suffering from an irremediable condition whose death is reasonably foreseeable in a short period of time with assisted death. This presentations considers the ethics of MAiD as it concerns health care professionals and patients.Kluge, Dr. EikeProfessorDepartment of Philosophy
Ethics and PhilosophyEthical Issues in Reproductive Technologies (in English or German) (S)Reproductive technologies are rapidly advancing in sophistication. It will soon be possible to go from in vitro fertilization to gestating a human baby in an artificial uterus. This presentation deals with the ethical issues that surround the development and use of these technologies.Kluge, Dr. EikeProfessorDepartment of Philosophy
Ethics and PhilosophyEthical issues in Police Conduct (in English or German) (S)Police officers are social servants with special rights and duties. This presentation examines the ethical issues that surround the conduct of police officers in the exercise of their duties. The presentation is based on the experience of the presenter as ethics consultant to the Office of the BC Police Complaint Commissioner.Kluge, Dr. EikeProfessorDepartment of Philosophy
Ethics and PhilosophyThe History and Ethics of a Deliberate Death (in English or German) (S) NEWIt has sometimes been argued that deliberate death—euthanasia, assisted suicide and providing assistance in dying—violates fundamental ethical principles. This presentation examines the historical and ethical validity of that claim.Kluge, Dr. EikeProfessorDepartment of Philosophy
Ethics and PhilosophyPatenting Genes (in English or German) (S) Patents in human genes are very valuable, worth hundreds of millions of dollars. This presentation deals with the ethics of patenting human genes—a practice that is permitted by international and Canadian law—and the question of who really owns human genes.Kluge, Dr. EikeProfessorDepartment of Philosophy
Ethics and PhilosophyPhilosophy and the Personal (S) Philosophy is often viewed as a dispassionate, objective search for truth on the deepest and broadest questions we’re capable of posing, such as: why is there anything at all? This description, while accurate, masks the fact that philosophers who pursue these grand questions frequently, and of necessity, also perceive themselves to have "skin in the game.” This talk takes a historical look at this side of the discipline.Scott, Dr. DavidAssociate ProfessorDepartment of Philosophy
Ethics and PhilosophyPolitical Correctness, Inclusivity and Freedom of Speech (M S) This talk explores research and debates on the origins of “political correctness.” The focus is on PC as a description of measures to reform language and practices to reduce social injustice, notably discrimination by race, gender, sexual orientation, disability etc.; and as an ideological tool used by those who oppose such measures.Warburton, Dr. RennieProfessor EmeritusDepartment of Sociology
Fitness, Athletics and Healthy LifestylesA Critical Evaluation of Probiotics as Health Supplements NEWClaims that live bacterial cultures, known as probiotics, are beneficial to human health date back over 100 years. The health claims associated with these products have ranged from improved digestive function to bolstered immune systems, and the scientific validity for these claims will be critically examined. This presentation will focus mainly on how recent research findings could lead to the development of more effective probiotics.Ishiguro, Dr. Edward E.Professor EmeritusDepartment of Biochemistry and Microbiology
Fitness, Athletics and Healthy LifestylesThe Traditional Mediterranean Diet: What We Have Learned (in English or Cantonese) (M S) NEW Lam, Dr. ChristopherAssociate Affiliate ProfessorIsland Medical Program
Fitness, Athletics and Healthy LifestylesWhy Am I So Bloated? (S) NEW Sullivan, Dr. StephenAffiliate Associate ProfessorIsland Medical Program
Fitness, Athletics and Healthy LifestylesGut Grief from Running (S) NEW Sullivan, Dr. StephenAffiliate Associate ProfessorIsland Medical Program
Fitness, Athletics and Healthy LifestylesThe Heart-moment Path to Joy and Meaning in Life (S) NEWMoments of true heart are stepping stones on the path of joy and meaning in life. We will learn how to work with heart moments in a group context and use them as personal guides to a good life. Sacamano, Dr. JamesRetireeRetirees Association
Fitness, Athletics and Healthy LifestylesPhysical Literacy: Staying Physically Active for Your Life ǂ (M S)Individuals who are “physically literate” move with competence and confidence in a wide variety of physical activities in multiple environments. This talk review processes to help people prioritize movement and physical activity as part of their lifestyle.Buxcey, Mr. JohnGraduate StudentSchool of Exercise Science, Physical and Health Education
Fitness, Athletics and Healthy LifestylesExercise is Medicine (E M S)Physical inactivity is among the top four modifiable risk factors related to non-communicable disease. This talk discusses how exercise and physical activity is effective across all ages (children to seniors) in enhancing health and treating, managing and preventing a large number of chronic diseases.Gaul, Dr. KathyProfessorSchool of Exercise Science, Physical and Health Education
Fitness, Athletics and Healthy LifestylesUsing Physical Activity to Reduce Your Health Risks (E M S)Physical inactivity is among the top four modifiable risk factors related to non-communicable disease. This talk discusses how exercise and physical activity is effective across all ages (children to seniors) in enhancing health and treating, managing and preventing a large number of chronic diseases.Gaul, Dr. KathyProfessorSchool of Exercise Science, Physical and Health Education
Fitness, Athletics and Healthy LifestylesExercise for People with Chronic Disease (E M S)Physical inactivity is among the top four modifiable risk factors related to non-communicable disease. This talk discusses how exercise and physical activity is effective across all ages (children to seniors) in enhancing health and treating, managing and preventing a large number of chronic diseases.Gaul, Dr. KathyProfessorSchool of Exercise Science, Physical and Health Education
Fitness, Athletics and Healthy LifestylesIs Your Leisure Portfolio Ready for Retirement? Many of us focus on our financial portfolio to prepare to retire but how many of us consider our leisure portfolio? Retirement brings opportunities to learn new things, build grow our networks and help our communities. Learn how to be ready to grow your leisure portfolio!Meldrum, Dr. JohnDirector and Assistant ProfessorSchool of Exercise Science, Physical and Health Education
Fitness, Athletics and Healthy LifestylesDancing: an Activity that Stimulates the Whole Brain, Increases Mood and Makes People Happy (in English or Greek) (S) NEWDance is a creative way to challenge sedentary habits of older people, as well as a promising therapeutic activity assisting them to express themselves and better communicate with others. Experiences of dancers over 55 years of age may promote a new image of older persons contributing to health, social cohesion and community participation.Mallidou, Dr. AnastasiaAssistant ProfessorSchool of Nursing
Fitness, Athletics and Healthy LifestylesPhysical Activities for the Aging Population (in English or Greek) (S) NEW Mallidou, Dr. AnastasiaAssistant ProfessorSchool of Nursing
Fitness, Athletics and Healthy LifestylesLa Dolce Vita: Live a Healthier, Slimmer and Happier Life with the Mediterranean Diet NEWThe Mediterranean Diet is often touted as the world’s healthiest diet—but it’s not really a diet. It’s a lifestyle. And it's a pleasurable way of eating that’s been shown to improve health, weight and longevity. In this presentation, I'll present the history, research, and practical tips for adopting a Mediterranean Diet.Foster, Dr. KimPhysicianUniversity Health Services
Fitness, Athletics and Healthy LifestylesHealth and Staying Physically Active as We Grow OlderThis presentation addresses the importance of staying active as we grow older, dealing with some important health issues in a lighthearted way. The presentation covers the many aspects of health that are improved through a commitment to regular physical activity, including some of the recent research showing the value to cognitive functioning. Simple suggestions for staying active and improving strength are included with time to address specific questions.Docherty, Dr. DavidProfessor EmeritusSchool of Exercise Science, Physical and Health Education
Fitness, Athletics and Healthy LifestylesFun, Fitness and FatnessThis presentation asks the question—are you eating right and getting enough physical activity to have health benefits? —and discusses the merits of different types of physical activity. The presentation examines some serious health issues in a lighthearted way (no pun intended!).Docherty, Dr. DavidProfessor EmeritusSchool of Exercise Science, Physical and Health Education
Fitness, Athletics and Healthy LifestylesWeight Reduction Using Diet and ExerciseThis presentation examines why diets work for the short term but not for the long term and the importance of including exercise in any effort to lose weight. It also addresses some of the challenges that face people trying to lose weight using diets and exercise. Docherty, Dr. DavidProfessor EmeritusSchool of Exercise Science, Physical and Health Education
Fitness, Athletics and Healthy LifestylesBack Health for Sport and Daily LivingDeveloping the “core” has become very popular for athletes, but also those people who suffer from low back pain or are just interested in having a healthy back. This presentation starts with a quick look at the structure of the back and why it tends to cause problems with one out of every two people. Approaches to exercise are presented that show simple ways to improve stability of the back or spine and how these approaches should be integrated into our daily lives. Docherty, Dr. DavidProfessor EmeritusSchool of Exercise Science, Physical and Health Education
Fitness, Athletics and Healthy LifestylesStepping into Fitness This presentation looks at the many benefits of walking and the use of the pedometer in reaching and maintaining goals for physical activity. The use of Nordic poles to assist or complement walking is included, as well as a demonstration on how to use them. It also looks at the relationship between stepping and caloric intake and expenditure. Docherty, Dr. DavidProfessor EmeritusSchool of Exercise Science, Physical and Health Education
Fitness, Athletics and Healthy LifestylesBoosting or Maintaining Brain Power as You Grow Older This presentation looks at ways to maintain or boost brain power through lifestyle choices, especially the role of physical activity which is the number one way to preserve memory and other cognitive functions. Docherty, Dr. DavidProfessor EmeritusSchool of Exercise Science, Physical and Health Education
Fitness, Athletics and Healthy LifestylesYour Amazing Brain: A Look at How It Works and What It Does (E M)This is an interactive session with lots of Q and A’s and some hands- on learning for younger children.Docherty, Dr. DavidProfessor EmeritusSchool of Exercise Science, Physical and Health Education
Fitness, Athletics and Healthy LifestylesGetting Stronger: You’re Never Too Old Strength training is important for all age groups, including the elderly. This presentation looks at the many benefits of a strength-training program and provides sample programs using theraband exercises designed for older groups, as well as simple exercises to help balance.Docherty, Dr. DavidProfessor EmeritusSchool of Exercise Science, Physical and Health Education
Fitness, Athletics and Healthy LifestylesTaking Risks and Embracing Change (S)Life is a balancing act between forces for and against change. This session outlines steps on how you can respond to change you initiate or change you have little control over. It can assist you to evaluate your ability to take risks and “embrace change.”Lauzon, Dr. LaraAssociate ProfessorSchool of Exercise Science, Physical and Health Education
Fitness, Athletics and Healthy LifestylesFor the WELLth of It (S)Are you making healthy lifestyle choices? This session focuses on a number of wellness models that incorporate physical, social, intellectual, spiritual, emotional, occupational and environmental wellness dimensions. This session is valuable for anyone who finds themselves better at taking care of others than taking care of themselves.Lauzon, Dr. LaraAssociate ProfessorSchool of Exercise Science, Physical and Health Education
Health Care and MedicineWhat We’ve Learned from the Human Genome (E M S)The decoding of the human genome, completed over a decade ago, heralded the beginning of a new era in biomedical research. This presentation explores what our genome has since taught us about ourselves and our place in the biological world. How genomics has contributed to our understanding of the genetic basis of human disease is discussed, using cancer as an example. The prospect of applying genome information for administering personalized or tailor-made medical diagnoses and treatments has received much hype, and the status of this practice is summarized.Ishiguro, Dr. EdwardProfessor EmeritusDepartment of Biochemistry and Microbiology
Health Care and MedicineAllergies: Dysfunction in the Immune System (E M S)How allergies arise, the role of the immune system in this process, and the basis for treatment strategies is described. Allergies are not only common, their prevalence has continued to increase over the past 50 years, especially in industrialized countries. Current theories for this are considered. Ishiguro, Dr. Edward E.Professor EmeritusDepartment of Biochemistry and Microbiology
Health Care and MedicineNew Emerging Human Infectious Diseases in a Changing WorldNew human infectious diseases previously unknown to science—such as SARS, MERS, and Ebola—have appeared at an unprecedented rate in recent years. Over 40 new infectious diseases have been recognized since 1970. This talk focuses on the impact such diseases have had on global health, with an emphasis on how and why they are apparently evolving. Ishiguro, Dr. Edward E.Professor EmeritusDepartment of Biochemistry and Microbiology
Health Care and MedicineWhat Everyone Should Know about Listeria, Salmonella, Norovirus and Other Food-borne Pathogens (E M S)An estimated 1.6 million Canadians are affected by food-borne infections every year. These illnesses result in at least 4,000 hospitalizations and 105 deaths. The most common causes of food-borne illnesses are pathogens that have emerged only within the last 50 years, such as norovirus, Listeria, Salmonella, and E. coli. This presentation focuses on the epidemiological basis for the recent rise of food infections as a public health problem and the challenges in preventing them.Ishiguro, Dr. Edward E.Professor EmeritusDepartment of Biochemistry and Microbiology
Health Care and MedicineThe Biology of AgingThis presentation summarizes recent advances in our understanding of aging, and how this information has led to new strategies for slowing down the process. The speaker will critically evaluate some of the major strategies, e.g., anti-aging drugs, diets and dietary supplements.Ishiguro, Dr. Edward E.Professor EmeritusDepartment of Biochemistry and Microbiology
Health Care and MedicineThe Rise of Superbugs: The Alarming Spread of Bacterial Drug Resistance, its Underlying Causes and the Quest for Solutions (E M S)Superbugs are bacteria that have developed resistance to multiple antibiotics. They’re currently a global problem, representing the most serious challenge to the treatment of infectious diseases. Experts warn that immediate action is required to reduce the impact of superbug infections. This presentation focuses on the underlying causes of bacterial drug resistance and the current state in the quest for solutions.Ishiguro, Dr. Edward E.Professor EmeritusDepartment of Biochemistry and Microbiology
Health Care and MedicineThe Next-generation Vaccines: More than Just a Poke in the Arm The traditional vaccines that have been in use for over a century are designed to prevent infectious diseases. In this presentation, they’re compared to new innovations that will soon lead to what have been termed the next-generation vaccines. The future prospects for novel uses of vaccines, for example, in curbing drug addictions, is also described. Vaccinations have been credited with saving countless lives from infectious diseases for over 200 years. Yet controversy regarding vaccine safety still exists, and this issue is examined.Ishiguro, Dr. Edward E.Professor EmeritusDepartment of Biochemistry and Microbiology
Health Care and MedicineWhat’s Wrong (and What’s Right) About the Flu Vaccine? (E M S) This presentation explains the composition of the flu vaccine, how it’s supposed to work, why it’s never fully effective, and why you should get vaccinated anyway. The speaker will also explain why you need to be vaccinated annually, and discuss recent strategies for creating a more effective vaccine that will provide a longer lasting immunity to influenza.   Ishiguro, Dr. Edward E.Professor EmeritusDepartment of Biochemistry and Microbiology
Health Care and MedicineNot as Advertised But Perfectly Legal: Some Health Products to be Aware OfThis presentation focuses on common merchandise with health-related applications that come with unproven claims. Examples to be discussed include personal care products, “health foods” and supplements, including various types of probiotics, non-prescription medications like cold remedies (including some that actually claim to prevent illnesses), and weight-loss products. Learn what the law says regarding claims made on labels for such products and some hints on the types of claims to watch out for.Ishiguro, Dr. Edward E.Professor EmeritusDepartment of Biochemistry and Microbiology
Health Care and MedicineA Look into the Eye: How the Retina Works and Advances in Treating Retinal Disease (M S)This talk is an introduction to the anatomy of the eye and the retina, explaining how the retina works, and the diseases that affect it. The role of basic research, and what kinds of therapies are being developed to treat retinal diseases, are also addressed.Chow, Dr. BobAssistant ProfessorDepartment of Biology
Health Care and MedicinePrivacy and Confidentiality of Electronic Patient Records (in English or German) (S) NEWThis presentation deals with the ownership of and access to patient health records, with particular emphasis on electronic health records which are becoming increasingly important in modern health care delivery and telehealth and telemedicine. National and international standards are considered from an ethical perspective.Kluge, Dr. EikeProfessorDepartment of Philosophy
Health Care and MedicineHealth Care—Commodity or Right? (in English or German) (S) NEWThis presentation deals with the question whether, ethically speaking, health care should be considered a commodity that is for sale like other services and commodities, or whether it should be considered a right and society should provide it to its citizens. The USA and Canada are considered as representative examples. Attention is paid to the current case of Cambie Surgeries Corp. v. Medical Services Commission of British Columbia, which has the potential of fundamentally changing the Canadian system of health care.Kluge, Dr. EikeProfessorDepartment of Philosophy
Health Care and MedicinePhysicians and the Pharmaceutical Industry (in English or German) (S) NEWThe pharmaceutical industry is frequently accused of being guilty of unethical practices by advertising to patients, charging high prices for their products, and engaging in related practices. This presentations considers the ethical validity of such claims in light of the fact that pharmaceutical companies are businesses and not social services, that physicians are the gatekeepers to prescription medications, and that “It takes two to tango.”Kluge, Dr. EikeProfessorDepartment of Philosophy
Health Care and MedicineUsing Smart Nanomaterials to Improve Current Cancer Treatment Options (S) NEWCancer nanotechnology is an evolving field. We can use materials of nano-size scale to increase the radiation dose given in a radiotherapy treatment. In addition, these nano-size particles can be used to deliver chemotherapeutic drugs in controllable fashion, reducing the side effects. I will highlight the advance we have made in the use of these nano-materials for improving existing cancer therapeutics.Chithrani, Dr. DevikaAssistant ProfessorDepartment of Physics and Astronomy
Health Care and MedicineMachine Learning and Cancer: Improving Radiation Therapy (M S)About half of all cancer patients receive radiation as a form of treatment. A challenge of radiation therapy is that the tumour can move during radiation treatment. This talk describes powerful computer algorithms can be used to predict how much a tumour moves, helping to reduce the side-effects from this treatment.Basran, Dr. Parminder S.Adjunct Associate ProfessorDepartment of Physics and Astronomy/Medical Physics
Health Care and MedicineHitting the Target: Big Data, Medical Physics, and What You had for Dinner in Precision Radiation Therapy (M S)When using radiation for cancer therapy, the precision of treatments needs to be very high—typically millimetres or smaller! This talk describes how we deliver high-precision radiation and how simple things— like what you had for dinner last night—can affect the targeting of cancer.Basran, Dr. Parminder S.Adjunct Associate ProfessorDepartment of Physics and Astronomy/Medical Physics
Health Care and MedicineAging and Alzheimer's Disease: Psychological Factors Involved in Aging (E M S) Gawryluk, Dr. JodieAssistant ProfessorDepartment of Psychology
Health Care and MedicineDetecting Dementia Early: What Do We Know? ǂ (M S) This talk summarizes the current research on non-invasive early detection methods for dementia.Knight, Ms. JamieGraduate StudentDepartment of Psychology
Health Care and MedicineAn Introduction to Brain Imaging ǂ (E M S) This lecture will summarize basic brain structure and function, along with imaging techniques (e.g., structural and functional magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)). Research and clinical applications will also be discussed.Mayo, Ms. ChantelGraduate StudentDepartment of Psychology
Health Care and MedicineBrain Trauma and Disease ǂ (E M S)This lecture summarizes how brain trauma and disease affects the brain. The content of this lecture can be tailored to the interest of the group. Possible topics include: multiple sclerosis, mild traumatic brain injury, or Alzheimer's disease.Mayo, Ms. ChantelGraduate StudentDepartment of Psychology
Health Care and MedicineThe Aging Brain ǂ (E M S) This talk highlights the effects of aging on our brain and behaviours. In addition, it discusses the differences between Alzheimer's disease and related dementias, as compared to healthy aging.Mayo , Ms. ChantelGraduate StudentDepartment of Psychology
Health Care and MedicineAging and Alzheimer's Disease: Psychological Factors Involved in Aging ǂ (E M S) This graduate student in clinical neuropsychology studies how brain imaging technology is used to identify early biomarkers of disease progression in neurodegenerative disorders. She can speak on topics such as Alzheimer's disease, as well as the neurobiological and psychological changes associated with aging more generally. She can also talk about the basics of functional neuroimaging (specifically fMRl), brain anatomy, and brain-behavior relationships, geared towards younger or community audiences.Scarapicchia, Ms. VanessaGraduate StudentDepartment of Psychology
Health Care and MedicinePersonal and Professional Perspectives on Dementia Care (S) Cloutier, Dr. DeniseAssociate ProfessorInstitute on Aging and Lifelong Health
Health Care and MedicineUsing an Assets-based Approach in the Care of Older Adults (S) Cloutier, Dr. DeniseAssociate ProfessorInstitute on Aging and Lifelong Health
Health Care and MedicineDepressed About Depression (in English or Spanish) NEWWhat is depression? This talk addresses the burden and significance of depression, current approaches to therapeutics, and our research at UVic.Caruncho, Prof. HectorProfessorIsland Medical Program
Health Care and MedicineConcussions and Mild Traumatic Brain Injury (E M S) This talk presents some of the issues around diagnosis of concussions and discuss new research on the topic. The speaker can also talk about potential new therapies for speeding up recovery from concussion. Christie, Dr. BrianProfessorIsland Medical Program
Health Care and MedicineThe Benefits of Exercise for Your Brain (E M S) This talk discusses the benefits of exercise and how it impacts the structure and function of the brain. Learn about recent research findings in a way that will engage audiences of all ages and backgrounds. Christie, Dr. BrianProfessorIsland Medical Program
Health Care and MedicineIntegrating Chinese Medicine and Acupuncture into Western Medical Practice (in English or Cantonese) (M S) NEWI have been practicing integrative medicine—Western family medicine and Chinese medical acupuncture—since 1980, and have given lectures to UBC medical students as well as acting as preceptor to students in my clinic practice. I have also given continuing medical education lectures on complementary medicine and Chinese medicine. My articles on these topics and the Mediterranean diet have been published in medical journals and books.Lam, Dr. ChristopherAssociate Affiliate ProfessorIsland Medical Program
Health Care and MedicinePrinciples of Chinese Medicine and Acupuncture (in English or Cantonese) (M S) NEW Lam, Dr. ChristopherAssociate Affiliate ProfessorIsland Medical Program
Health Care and MedicineGrowing and Guiding New Neurons in the Healthy and Injured Brain (M S) This presentation provides participants with a basic understanding of the brain and nervous system, as well as a brief insight into the speaker’s research program, which seeks to understand the development of brain cells.Swayne, Dr. Leigh AnneAssistant ProfessorIsland Medical Program
Health Care and MedicineThe History of Hepatitis C: Cause to Cure in 30 Years (S) NEWWinding down a 50-year career in medicine with experiences in Canada, the UK, Australia, New Zealand, Saudi Arabia, the Emirates, Oman and the tiny tropical Pacific island of Saipan. Sullivan, Dr. StephenAffiliate Associate ProfessorIsland Medical Program
Health Care and MedicineHow to Talk With Your Doctor About Your Pain(S) NEW Sullivan, Dr. StephenAffiliate Associate ProfessorIsland Medical Program
Health Care and MedicineHealth IT, Systems Biology, and the Future of Personalized, Integrated Medicine (in English or German) If biological science is to deliver on its promise to improve human health care, an integrationist perspective of systems biology is needed. If the future of integrated medicine is to become reality, we need digital health service innovations and we must look for the business case for all key players involved.Stroetmann, Dr. Karl A.Adjunct Assistant ProfessorSchool of Health Information Science
Health Care and MedicineBig Data Analytics in Health Care: Toward Predictive, Personalized, Integrated Medicine (in English or German) (S)In 1979, Douglas Adam published The Hitchhiker's Guide to the Galaxy where Earth is a supercomputer to calculate the answer to what “life, the universe and everything” are about. But in the last minute, psychiatrists have Earth destroyed, fearing for the loss of their careers when the meaning of life became known. Today, medicine promises predictive, personalized health care for all and big data allows for integrating health data as foundation for a learning health systems.Stroetmann, Dr. Karl A.Adjunct Assistant ProfessorSchool of Health Information Science
Health Care and MedicineBringing Research into Practice: Improving Outcomes for People and the Health Care System (S) Participants will learn about the collaborative knowledge translation activities that are increasing the preproduction and use of evidence in decision-making and policy-setting at Island Health.Young, Dr. WendyAdjunct Professor School of Nursing
Health Care and MedicineDementia and Alzheimer’s: Current Research ǂ (M S) Dementia is not a natural part of aging. It is an umbrella term that encompasses over one hundred neurodegenerative diseases that affect memory, judgment, and cognitive skills severely enough to interfere with daily life. Alzheimer’s disease is the most common form of dementia and comprises nearly seventy percent of cases. To date there is no cure and there are no disease-modifying treatments available. Find out about current research regarding this topic and what researchers are doing to solve the issue of dementia.Knight, Ms. JamieGraduate StudentDepartment of Psychology
History—GeneralWomen Travellers Throughout the Ages This session presents the lives and experiences of nine exceptional, interesting and enthusiastic women travellers from the 4th to the 21st century who wrote about adventure. Reading list included. Mayfield, Dr. MargieProfessor EmeritaDepartment of Curriculum and Instruction
History—GeneralAngry Young Men: Teenagers in Postwar Britain (E M S) NEWAngry Young Men begins with the immediate post-WWII moment in Britain and traces the evolution of teenage youth cultures from Teddy Boys through Mods, Rockers, Skinheads, Glam Rockers, Hippies, Punks, New Romantics, Rude Boys, Rastafarians, Ravers, Heroin Chic and finally Hipsters. Ross, Dr. StephenProfessorDepartment of English
History—GeneralParis: A Walk through the Ages—Medieval Marvels (Sept-Dec) (in English or French) (S)What is a city? How does it change through the ages and keep its own distinct identity? This virtual visit to Paris highlights the permanence—through changes, revolutions, and destructions—of places, symbols, monuments and neighbourhoods that have endured, sometimes unexpectedly, in the passing of centuries. This is a series of three talks (which can be enjoyed independently) on medieval Paris, modern Paris (19th century) and Paris as inspiration in songs (1920-1970).Cazes, Dr. HélèneProfessorDepartment of French
History—GeneralParis: A Walk through the Ages—The Inspiration of Paris in Songs (Sept-Dec) (in English or French) (S)What is a city? How does it change through the ages and keep its own distinct identity? This visit of Paris highlights the permanence—through changes, revolutions, and destructions—of places, symbols, monuments and neighbourhoods that have endured, sometimes unexpectedly, in the passing of centuries. This is a series of three talks (which can be enjoyed independently) on Medieval Paris, Modern Paris (19th Century) and Paris as inspiration in songs (1920-1970)Cazes, Dr. HélèneProfessorDepartment of French
History—GeneralParis: A Walk through the Ages—The Museum of Modernity (Sept-Dec) (in English or French) (S)What is a city? How does it change through the ages and keep its own distinct identity? This visit of Paris highlights the permanence—through changes, revolutions, and destructions—of places, symbols, monuments and neighbourhoods that have endured, sometimes unexpectedly, in the passing of centuries. This is a series of three talks (which can be enjoyed independently) on Medieval Paris, Modern Paris (19th Century) and Paris as inspiration in songs (1920-1970)Cazes, Dr. HélèneProfessorDepartment of French
History—GeneralEuropean Thought and Culture Since 1700 (in English or French) (S) This talk examines European thought and culture since 1700: on topics related to enlightenment, romanticism, modernism and postmodernism.Fromet de Rosnay, Dr. EmileAssistant ProfessorDepartment of French
History—GeneralHolocaust Memorialization in Central Europe Today (in English or German) (S) This talk describes the I-witness Holocaust field school and highlights, through a variety of visuals, the different ways the Holocaust is being memorialized in Germany, Austria and Poland.Thorson, Dr. HelgaAssociate ProfessorDepartment of Germanic and Slavic Studies
History—GeneralGrowing Up in Athens and Sparta (M) (Jan-April)This talk discusses what life was like for young men and women growing up in classical Athens and Sparta. Bowman, Dr. LaurelAssistant ProfessorDepartment of Greek and Roman Studies
History—GeneralCleopatra, Hellenistic Queen (M) (Jan-April)This talk discusses how Cleopatra tried and failed to protect her throne and Egypt.Bowman, Dr. LaurelAssistant ProfessorDepartment of Greek and Roman Studies
History—GeneralThe 18th-century Spanish Exploration of the Pacific Northwest (in English or Spanish) (S) This talk gives an overview of the 18th-century Spanish exploration of the Pacific Northwest, focusing on the diaries of specific voyages, yet to be chosen. Restrepo-Gautier, Dr. PabloAssociate ProfessorDepartment of Hispanic and Italian Studies
History—GeneralSir Edward Grey and the Balkan Wars, 1912-1914 (M S) Asking for new description not in GermanMcKercher, Prof. BrianProfessorDepartment of History
History—GeneralThe Limitations of the Politician-Historian: Winston Churchill and Appeasement (M S) Asking for new descriptionMcKercher, Prof. BrianProfessorDepartment of History
History—GeneralIssues Relating to the Origins of War in the Modern Period (M S) Learn about the origins of wars in the modern period since 1815— they’re complex, involving a mixture of nationalism, imperialism, national security, and a quest to protect or expand a country's national interests abroad. The notion underlining this complexity is the view that the international system is an “anarchy” of competing national interests.McKercher, Prof. BrianProfessorDepartment of History
History—GeneralNations and Their Strategies Since 1945 (M S) During and since the Cold War period, understanding differing national strategies is important for explaining how and why international relations evolved. This presentation explores how the Cold War saw the advent of a bipolar world dominated by the US and Soviet Russia. There were neutral powers—chiefly in the Third World—but Soviet-American rivalry affected all international politics. Since the end of the Cold War, a multi-polar world has emerged, making international politics more like pre-1939.McKercher, Prof. BrianProfessorDepartment of History
History—GeneralThe Origins and Course of the First World War (M S) This talk explores the complex origins of the First World War, which involved a mixture of nationalism, imperialism, national security, and the quest by great powers to protect or expand their national interests abroad. The war itself was devastating, seeing the collapse of four great powers—Germany, Austria-Hungary, Russia and Turkey—and the problems of fighting an unexpected war of attrition.McKercher, Prof. BrianProfessorDepartment of History
History—GeneralThe Origins and Course of the Second World War (M S) The origins of the Second World War are less complex than other modern wars. At this presentation find out how WWII stemmed from the aggrandising and racial policies of Adolf Hitler, and how there were ultimately five wars fought within the rubric of the Second World War: an Anglo-French war against Germany (1939-1940); Britain fighting alone against the Axis (1940-1941); a Soviet-German war (1941-1942); an Anglo-American war against the Axis (1941-1945); and an American war against the Japanese (1941-1945).McKercher, Prof. BrianProfessorDepartment of History
History—GeneralThe Cold War: Cause and Course (M S) The Cold War was a unique period in international history. While the superpowers never fought “hot” wars against one another, they supported proxies to do their fighting or fought themselves against smaller powers. In this presentation, find out how this era was defined as much by an intense diplomatic struggle between two power-blocs of propaganda, and building armed forces to deter one another. Whether neutral or not, all countries of the world were affected.McKercher, Prof. BrianProfessorDepartment of History
History—GeneralCanadian Society and War Since 1867 (M S) Canada has been divided over issues of war and peace since its creation in 1867. From the Nile expedition of 1885 to modern peace-keeping under UN or NATO leadership today, the use of military power and the place of the Canadian armed forces as an expression of national strength has been the subject of great debate. In this presentation, learn how it’s not just the division between English Canada and Quebec that’s important—so too are the beliefs of pro-military Canadians and others than can be broadly categorized as pacifists. McKercher, Prof. BrianProfessorDepartment of History
History—GeneralThe Anglo-American Special Relationship Since 1941 (M S) McKercher, Prof. BrianProfessorDepartment of History
History—GeneralWinston Churchill’s Criticism of Appeasement in the 1930s (M S) NEW McKercher, Prof. BrianProfessorDepartment of History
History—GeneralHow “Race” is Made Historically (S) This illustrated talk explores the contested concept of ‘race’ and its use across the British empire and into the present day, particularly in North American contexts. Vibert, Dr. ElizabethAssociate ProfessorDepartment of History
History—GeneralFranz Boas: the Founding Father of American Anthropology and the Construction of Indigeneity in the Pacific Northwest (S) NEW Wickwire, Dr. WendyProfessor Emerita/Adjunct ProfessorDepartment of History
History—GeneralHow WWI Ended (S)This talk looks at how the years 1917 to 1923 saw a revolutionary transformation of the world, ending empires, creating new countries, setting new ideologies in motion, giving unprecedented opportunities to previously ignored sections of the population such as women. Hannant, Dr. Larry D.Adjunct Associate ProfessorDepartment of History
History—GeneralCanadians and the Spanish Civil War (S) The Spanish Civil War (1936-39) galvanized a volatile world, pitting democracy against fascism in a struggle that was joined by 40,000 volunteers from 70 different places. This talk tells how Canadians distinguished themselves in the effort to defeat the advance of fascism to another country, with men and women joining the battle.Hannant, Dr. Larry D.Adjunct Associate ProfessorDepartment of History
History—GeneralNorman Bethune: A Troubled Hero (S) Renowned in China and Spain but ignored in his homeland of Canada, Dr. Norman Bethune has been described as “arrogant in the service of humanity.” Few other Canadians have painted such a vibrant mark on history in such a short time. Bethune introduced medical innovations into two of the great anti-fascist struggles of the 1930s. Hannant, Dr. Larry D.Adjunct Associate ProfessorDepartment of History
History—GeneralThe Cold War in Canada (S)Canada is usually seen as having avoided the eruption of paranoia and persecution that preoccupied the United States in the second half of the 20th century. In fact, Canada and Canadians fell into what Prime Minister Lester Pearson called the "dark madness" of the Cold War in a profound way, and many Canadians suffered in it, including prominent people on Vancouver Island and in Victoria.Hannant, Dr. Larry D.Adjunct Associate ProfessorDepartment of History
History—GeneralThe Monk and the King: How Monasteries Under Charlemagne Were Crucial to the Future of Europe (M S) Charlemagne (742-814) is known as the founding figure of Europe. His support of monasteries was a key element in his statecraft, and had both positive and negative ramifications. This talk describes how monasteries were the seed beds of literacy, science and universities and how they also generated an early form of colonialism.Lines, Mr. MichaelLearning and Research LibrarianLibraries, William C. Mearns Centre for Learning
History—GeneralFlattened Earth and the Civic Sphere (M S) NEWThis presentation narrates a cultural history of the Flat Earth Society of Canada, founded in 1970. My research spans social and literary aspects of this society, unpacking its playful artistry and counter-cultural messages.Eso, Mr. DavidSessional LecturerDepartment of English
History—GeneralA History of the Palestinian-Israeli Conflict (S) The conflict between Palestine and Israel is one of the most highly publicized and bitter struggles of modern times. This talk examines not only the historical basis of the conflict, but also looks at how and why a resolution to the conflict has been so difficult. Bunton, Dr. MartinAssociate ProfessorDepartment of History
History—GeneralThe British Monarchy: Why Does the Royal Family Travel So Much? (M S)Royal tours – in Britain and throughout the world – are perhaps the most striking feature of the modern British monarchy. This talk locates the origins of this practice in the mobile royal courts of the Middle Ages, discusses its near-disappearance in the 1600s and 1700s, and explains its revival in the modern era in the context of modern technological and cultural developmentsDevereaux, Dr. SimonAssociate ProfessorDepartment of History
History—GeneralThe War of the Windsors: Charles and Diana, 1981-1997 (M S)The marriage of Charles Prince of Wales to Lady Diana Spencer in July 1981 was a global media event. Within a decade, however, their marriage ended in a mutual acrimony that was relentlessly detailed in that same media which once had celebrated this fairy-tale romance. This talk reviews the story from start to finish and considers how it nearly inspired the British entirely to abandon one of their most cherished national institutions.Devereaux, Dr. SimonAssociate ProfessorDepartment of History
History—GeneralMurder and the Media in Victorian England (M S)The newspapers of the Victorian age were obsessed with murder. This talk reveals the origins of this fascination in the rise of the modern newspaper press and a growing fascination with the cultural divide between towns and the countryside.Devereaux, Dr. SimonAssociate ProfessorDepartment of History
History—GeneralThe Road Hill Murder of 1860: A Great Victorian Mystery (M S) In June 1860 a four-year-old boy was savagely murdered in a comfortable upper middle-class home Wiltshire. The career of a famed police detective was shattered when he attempted to charge the boy’s 16-year-old half-sister, Constance Kent, with the crime – only for her to confess her guilt five years later. This talk revisits this case, one of the most sensational of the age.Devereaux, Dr. SimonAssociate ProfessorDepartment of History
History—GeneralJack the Ripper and the Royal Family: Murder and Myth (M S) This talk reviews the many different theories which, since 1970, have suggested that Jack the Ripper – the most famous killer in history – was either a member of the royal family or someone acting on its behalf.Devereaux, Dr. SimonAssociate ProfessorDepartment of History
History—GeneralBad Kings: Edward VIII and the Abdication Crisis (1936) (M S)More than eighty years after, King Edward VIII’s abdication of the British throne still haunts the royal family. This talk locates the Abdication Crisis in the king’s own character and reviews some of the controversies which surround the Crisis and its outcome to this day. Devereaux, Dr. SimonAssociate ProfessorDepartment of History
History—GeneralBad Kings: George IV and William IV of England, 1820-1837 (M S) NEWMost people believe that widespread contempt for the monarchy is only a recent development. In fact, as this talk reveals, the reigns of two of George III’s sons—men of extraordinary personal and fiscal dissolution—brought the institution to a historical low-point in the years just before the accession of their niece Victoria would restore its lustre.Devereaux, Dr. SimonAssociate ProfessorDepartment of History
History—GeneralMurder, Bodysnatching and Anatomization in England, 1752-1832 (M S) NEWThis talk reveals the relationship between public execution, anatomical education and grave robbing in late Georgian England.Devereaux, Dr. SimonAssociate ProfessorDepartment of History
History—GeneralDr. Crippen: Sex, Murder and Science in Early 20th-Century England (S) NEWIn 1910 a seemingly meek London doctor murdered his wife and fled England with his young mistress. Through a combination of “cutting-edge” forensics and determined detective work, Dr. Crippen was pursued, arrested and brought to the gallows. This talk revisits this particularly famous criminal justice sensation.Devereaux, Dr. SimonAssociate ProfessorDepartment of History
History—GeneralMurder and “the New Woman” in England Between the Wars (S) NEWThis talk revisits three sensational “domestic” homicide cases of the interwar era—Edith Thompson, Madame Fahmy and Dr Buck Ruxton—and shows how they exposed deep-set social anxieties of the era.Devereaux, Dr. SimonAssociate ProfessorDepartment of History
History—GeneralWhy was Public Execution Abolished in Victorian England? (M S) NEWPublic executions are a staple of many movie and television images of Victorian England. This talk explains why public execution was abolished in 1868.Devereaux, Dr. SimonAssociate ProfessorDepartment of History
History—GeneralWhy was Capital Punishment Abolished in Postwar Britain? (M S) NEWIn 1945 the abolition of execution for murder seemed unimaginable to most English people. 20 years later it took place. This talk briefly reviews the issues and cases which led to this most striking of criminal justice reforms.Devereaux, Dr. SimonAssociate ProfessorDepartment of History
History—GeneralExecution, Transportation and the Founding of Australia, 1775-1789 (M S) NEWIn the popular imagination, all forms of punishment in pre-modern England were brutal. This talk shows how transportation was an indispensable alternative to hanging large numbers of people and explores how the absence of that alternative during the 1780s led to executions on an almost unprecedented scale.Devereaux, Dr. SimonAssociate ProfessorDepartment of History
History—GeneralBad Kings: The Madness of George III, 1760-1820 (M S) NEWMost people believe that widespread contempt for the monarchy is only a recent development. In fact, as this talk reveals, the reigns of two of George III’s sons—men of extraordinary personal and fiscal dissolution—brought the institution to a historical low-point in the years just before the accession of their niece Victoria would restore its lustre.Devereaux, Dr. SimonAssociate ProfessorDepartment of History
History—GeneralThe Prosecutorial Passions: Spouse Murder in England, 1660-1800 (in English or French) NEWMy research focuses mainly on crime, trial, execution, print culture, religion and popular and high politics, as well as gender (including masculinity) in 17th- and 18th-century England. I have published extensively on execution, the last dying speeches of criminals and traitors, and trials (most recently, spouse murder and "petty treason" or husband-murder). McKenzie, Dr. AndreaAssociate ProfessorDepartment of History
History—GeneralThe Bloody Code: Criminal Trial in 17th and 18th Century England (in English or French) McKenzie, Dr. AndreaAssociate ProfessorDepartment of History
History—GeneralThe Great Fire of London 1666 (in English or French) McKenzie, Dr. AndreaAssociate ProfessorDepartment of History
History—GeneralRoyal Martyr or Man of Blood? The Execution of Charles I in 1649 (in English or French) McKenzie, Dr. AndreaAssociate ProfessorDepartment of History
History—GeneralGunpowder, Treason and Plots: Anti-Catholicism and Conspiracy Theories in 17th-Century England (in English or French) NEWMy current research project is on the "Popish Plot”, a supposed Catholic conspiracy in the 1670s and 1680s which precipitated a larger constitutional and political crisis: “Exclusion” (an attempt to bar Charles II’s heir, his openly Catholic brother James, the Duke of York, from the throne). The trials associated with the Popish Plot collectively constitute the worst miscarriage of justice in British history, and would ultimately result in the reform of the English criminal law, and contribute to the rise of defence counsel. They also reflect both the prevalence of anti-Catholic prejudices and the way in which, in the context of a rapidly expanding public sphere, such beliefs served as a political tool in the hands of an emerging opposition party. Thus the Popish Plot led not only to the Exclusion Crisis, the formation of modern political parties (“Whigs” and “Tories”) and, indirectly, the “Glorious Revolution” which toppled James II in 1688-9, but also the rise of a partisan press and “fake news”. McKenzie, Dr. AndreaAssociate ProfessorDepartment of History
History—GeneralWho Killed Sir Edmond Berry Godfrey? Revisiting the Most Famous Murder Mystery of the 17th Century (in English or French) NEW McKenzie, Dr. AndreaAssociate ProfessorDepartment of History
History—GeneralGood Food, Bad Sex: Sinful Appetites Through the Ages (S) NEW“Good Food, Bad Sex" explores the history of Anglo-American ideas linking illicit sexuality and gourmet food, from the 17th century to the present. The talk touches on the history of prostitution and the history of same-sex sexuality, as well as dirty cookbooks and the foodie revolution.Cleves, Dr. Rachel HopeProfessorDepartment of History
History—GeneralThe First Treaties: The Roots of Indigenous-Settler Relations in Canada (in English or French) (M S)This talk explores the 500-year history of alliances and treaties involving the Indigenous peoples of what is now Canada and settlers who arrived from Europe and elsewhere after 1500. Its focus is on the lesser-known treaties negotiated before Confederation in 1867, from the Atlantic coast to the Great Lakes. Cook, Dr. PeterAssociate ProfessorDepartment of History
History—Victoria and BCBishop’s Beautiful Books: The Seghers Collection at UVic (Sept-Dec) (in English or French) (S)This presentation showcases some of the treasures in a collection of ancient books initiated by the second bishop of Victoria, Charles Seghers (1839-1886) and now on permanent loan at UVic. Some 3,500 titles attest to the Catholic culture of the first decades of Victoria Western settlement.Cazes, Dr. HélèneProfessorDepartment of French
History—Victoria and BCLocal Stories and Experiences of the Holocaust(in English or German) (S)This talk discusses the UVic Holocaust archival project and ways in which Holocaust survivors in our community have decided to tell their stories. These include the mediums of art, music, video and text. Thorson, Dr. HelgaAssociate ProfessorDepartment of Germanic and Slavic Studies
History—Victoria and BCBC's Ambiguous Relations with the Rest of Canada (S)From the time they first considered joining Canada, British Columbians have had an ambiguous relationship with the rest of the country. They’re proud of their province and of being Canadian but they’ve frequently felt that the rest of the country doesn’t appreciate them and exploits them. This talk is illustrated with editorial cartoons.Roy, Dr. PatriciaProfessor EmeritusDepartment of History
History—Victoria and BCBoundless Optimism: Richard McBride's British Columbia (S)Learn about Richard McBride, who was premier of British Columbia from 1903 to 1915, a period of unprecedented growth. A native of the province, he became premier at age 32; brought some order to provincial politics, promoted the development of railways, encouraged British investment and immigration, and played a role on the national and imperial stage. He even had the province purchase two submarines on the eve of the First World War.Roy, Dr. PatriciaProfessor EmeritusDepartment of History
History—Victoria and BCCartoonists at Sea: Some Views of BC Ferries and Their Predecessors (S)Transportation between Vancouver Island and the mainland of British Columbia has often been a source of amusement for local cartoonists. With cartoons going back to the early years of the 20th century and carrying through almost to today, this presentation examines not only the political issues around ferries but describes imaginative suggestions for travel—and perennial complaints about the service.Roy, Dr. PatriciaProfessor EmeritusDepartment of History
History—Victoria and BCA Humorous History of Highways in BC (S)With the help of several generations of editorial cartoonists, this presentation traces the development of the road system of the province and its political manifestations from 1858 to the present day. Roy , Dr. PatriciaProfessor EmeritusDepartment of History
History—Victoria and BCThe Role of BC's Indigenous Peoples in the Establishment of New York's American Museum of Natural History (S) NEW Wickwire, Dr. WendyProfessor Emerita/Adjunct ProfessorDepartment of History
History—Victoria and BCFrom Shetland to British Columbia: James A. Teit and the Indigenous Fight for Rights, 1908-1922 (S) NEW Wickwire, Dr. WendyProfessor Emerita/Adjunct ProfessorDepartment of History
Languages and LinguisticsThe Evolution of Human Language (M S) NEWLanguage makes us human. Why did it evolve in our species but not others? Adaptation or mutation? From genomics to fossil remains, explore the linguistics of this most human mystery.Archibald, Dr. JohnProfessorDepartment of Linguistics
Languages and LinguisticsTeaching Pronunciation in the Context of Indigenous Language Revitalization (in English or French) This talk addresses normal variation in the way people pronounce things; how pronunciation can differ between generations and between speakers with different fluency levels; how pronunciation might be affected by learning through literacy (rather than strictly orally); and what teachers and learners of a second language can expect in terms pronunciation challenges.Bird, Dr. SonyaAssociate ProfessorDepartment of Linguistics
Languages and LinguisticsTeaching Pronunciation Through Visual Feedback Techniques (in English or French) (M S) This talk addresses pronunciation challenges that are faced by people with specific speech impediments, or who are learning an additional language. Starting with speech sounds that are typically difficult to pronounce, different techniques for incorporating visual feedback into pronunciation learning and teaching are explored—for example, ultrasound imaging of the tongue as it articulates speech sounds. This talk is best given to small groups in an interactive setting.Bird, Dr. SonyaAssociate ProfessorDepartment of Linguistics
Languages and LinguisticsLaryngeal Function in Voice Production (S) Esling, Dr. John H.Professor EmeritusDepartment of Linguistics
Languages and LinguisticsAccents, Dialects and Voice Qualities (S) Esling, Dr. John H.Professor EmeritusDepartment of Linguistics
Languages and LinguisticsSounds of the World's Languages (S) Esling, Dr. John H.Professor EmeritusDepartment of Linguistics
Languages and LinguisticsHow Babies Acquire the Capacity to Speak (S) Esling, Dr. John H.Professor EmeritusDepartment of Linguistics
Languages and LinguisticsThe International Phonetic Alphabet (S) Esling, Dr. John H.Professor EmeritusDepartment of Linguistics
Languages and LinguisticsAll About Learning a Second Language Pronunciation (in English or Chinese) Lin, Dr. HuaAssociate ProfessorDepartment of Linguistics
Languages and LinguisticsAbout the Chinese Language (in English or Chinese) Lin, Dr. HuaAssociate ProfessorDepartment of Linguistics
Languages and LinguisticsThe Edge of Innovation: "Kids these Days" and Language Change (S) NEWLiving languages are in a constant state of change. This talk reviews common myths on the language of youth and discusses the critical role they play in the ongoing evolution of individual languages, focusing in particular on English.D’Arcy, Dr. AlexandraProfessorDepartment of Linguistics
Law and Justice IssuesWhy it’s Legal to Eat Your Pet Pig for Dinner, and Other Ways the Law Fails Animals (E M S) NEWThis case discusses the recent notorious BC case where a family adopted a pig and then ended up eating the pig. Counterintuitively, such conduct is legal. The case is used as a case study to comment on the gross inadequacies in the legal system when it comes to guarding against animal abuse and suffering.Deckha, Prof. ManeeshaProfessor and Lansdowne ChairFaculty of Law
Law and Justice IssuesAnimals, Culture and the Law (E M S) NEWThis presentation explains how strongly our cultural views about animals shapes their legal status. The presentation explains why law is presently an ineffective tool to protect animals and what law-reform concerned groups are trying to achieve.Deckha, Prof. ManeeshaProfessor and Lansdowne ChairFaculty of Law
Law and Justice IssuesThe Toronto Pig Save Trial: Farmed Animal Suffering and the Law (E M S) NEWThis presentation discusses the world-famous Toronto Pig Save Trial, involving an activist who was criminally charged for giving water to a thirsty pig on a sweltering day. It uses the case to study the law's dismal protection of animals.Deckha, Prof. ManeeshaProfessor and Lansdowne ChairFaculty of Law
Law and Justice IssuesGlobal Corruption: An Issue We Should No Longer Ignore (S) NEWThis talk identifies the extent of global corruption and the devastating impact that it has on poverty, gender inequality, economic development, and political and legal stability. The talk also identifies steps that must be taken to combat corruption and bribery.Ferguson, Prof. GerryDistinguished ProfessorFaculty of Law
Law and Justice IssuesHow and Why Do Wrongful Convictions in Canada's Criminal Justice System Occur? (S) NEWThis talk examines the extent of and the common causes for wrongful criminal convictions in Canada. It also identifies reforms that are needed to reduce as much as possible wrongful convictions in the future. Ferguson, Prof. GerryDistinguished ProfessorFaculty of Law
Law and Justice IssuesReconciliation Syllabus: An Introduction to the Truth and Reconciliation Commission's 94 Calls to Action (E M S) This presentation (which can be geared for any age from elementary to adult, from expert to generalist) gives an accessible introduction to the legal history of residential schools, legal activism leading to the TRC, and the resulting 94 calls to action. It involves exercises to facilitate meaningful engagement with the calls, as well as ideas about innovative and concrete action.Johnson, Dr. RebeccaProfessorFaculty of Law
Law and Justice IssuesCan You Patent a Frog? Patents, Trademarks and Copyright (S) Sirk, Dr. AislinnIndustrial Liaison OfficerResearch Partnerships and Knowledge Mobilization
Law and Justice IssuesHarassment and Human Rights: Problem, Response and Remedy For the last 25 years the speaker has worked nationally and internationally on campuses and communities, with organizations, groups and individuals to address the complicated issue of sexual harassment and to develop workable responses in policy and practice. There are many shades of grey in this work and it’s important that the policy responses that organizations develop don't also become part of the problem. Whittington, Dr. BarbaraProfessor EmeritaSchool of Social Work
Law and Justice IssuesOpium Wars and China's Approach to Contemporary International Law (S) NEWExamines the Doctrine of the Unequal Treaties arising from the Opium Wars in relation to China's approach to modern international law.Marton, Dr. AndrewProfessorDepartment of Pacific and Asian Studies
Law and Justice IssuesRestorative Justice in the Community: Accountability to Victims Works for AllAs part of a community group, Peninsula Crossroads Community Justice, we work with situations that would normally or previously have been ignored or would have wound their way through a lengthy court process. The police and the schools refer youth and adult cases to our community group. Restorative justice brings the victim(s), those harmed, and the harm-doers together whenever possible to determine what happened and how amends can be made. The process is both powerful and productive. This presentation gives examples of situations from the police or schools that have been dealt with in this potentially transformational way, followed by a discussion. Whittington, Dr. BarbaraProfessor EmeritusSchool of Social Work
LiteratureAmerican Literature and the Christian Right (S) This talk discusses the surprising re-emergence of conservative Christianity as a powerful political and social force since the 1960s, and the consequences of that emergence for mainstream American literature. For more information: http://religiondispatches.org/who-are-we-and-how-should-we-live-american-literature-and-the-god-gap/. Douglas, Dr. ChristopherProfessorDepartment of English
LiteratureFundamentalism and Literature (S) This talk is an introduction to the theology and politics of Christian fundamentalist fiction. Includes famous novels such as Left Behind, The Shack, and This Present Darkness.Douglas, Dr. ChristopherProfessorDepartment of English
LiteratureMonotheism and Polytheism in the Hebrew Bible (S) NEWAn introduction to some of the historical-critical Bible scholarship that examines the development of monotheism out of an earlier polytheistic cultural matrix. Includes a discussion of the lingering traces of polytheism in the Hebrew Bible or Old Testament.Douglas, Dr. ChristopherProfessorDepartment of English
LiteratureVictorian Writers and the Bible as Literature ǂ (S) NEWThis presentation outlines the major changes in biblical interpretation in the Victorian era (1837-1901) and considers the broader cultural significance of these changes. As a result of the advent ofwhat we would now call modem biblical scholarship, traditional understandings of the Bible as unified divine revelation were challenged by critical approaches that saw the Bible as a composite,historical, and literary document. While many Christians resisted this criticism, others embraced this opening of the canon as an opportunity for creative participation in a dynamic Word that is not set in stone but in formation. By considering responses to biblical criticism from a range of writers whose work engages with the Christian religion (including Samuel Taylor Coleridge, GeorgeMacDonald, Matthew Arnold, and George Eliot), my talk focuses on what Victorian writers show us about the transformative potential of reading the Bible not as dogma but as literature.Dyck, Ms. DenaeGraduate StudentDepartment of English
LiteratureWhere Shall Wisdom Be Found? Illustrations from Victorian Stories ǂ (S) NEWThis presentation takes up the age-old and enduring question "where shall wisdom be found?" in relation to Victorian stories that adapt the traditions of biblical wisdom literature. In particular, my talk focuses on how the biblical form of the parable offers as an effective means for exploring wisdom literature's abiding concerns with the search for meaning and the exercise of practical virtue. Unlike many other kinds of didactic literature, the parable is an invitational form that requires the reader's participation in the work of interpretation and application. As the storytelling of writers such as George Eliot, Elizabeth Gaskell, John Ruskin, and George MacDonald demonstrates, Victorian parables pursue wisdom not by providing answers but by provoking further questions.Dyck, Ms. DenaeGraduate StudentDepartment of English
LiteratureFaith, Doubt and Spiritual Searching in Victorian Poetry ǂ (S) NEWThis presentation uses examples from Victorian poetry to reconsider the familiar narrative of the Victorian "crisis of faith." Although this narrative reflects some of the major cultural shifts that defined the Victorian era—such as the rise of evolutionary theory, the growth of agnosticism, and the dismantling of previously held ideas about the Bible—it obscures the more complex process of religious questioning evident in much of this period's literature. Victorian poetry, in particular, offers a framework for understanding faith and doubt not as opposites but as mutually constitutive. Through reading and discussing select poetry by writers including Alfred Tennyson, the Brownings, Christina Rossetti and Gerard Manley Hopkins (depending on the interests of the group), this presentation explores how the spiritual searching of Victorian poetry still resonates today.Dyck, Ms. DenaeGraduate StudentDepartment of English
LiteratureShakespeare, Milton and Canadian Confederation: Thomas D'Arcy McGee as Literary Critic (S) NEWThomas D'Arcy McGee is now widely known as a "prophet of Canadian Confederation." What is less well-known is how the work of William Shakespeare and John Milton helped McGee think through questions about minority rights, executive power and sectarian conflict in ways that continue to resonate today. Kuchar, Dr. GaryAssociate ProfessorDepartment of English
LiteratureGardens in Victorian Literature ǂ (E M S) NEWThis talk explores the role that gardens play in 19th-century literature. The Victorians had an eclectic taste in garden designs, wanting to show off exotic plants and newly built greenhouseswhile also incorporating aspects of the Picturesque style and formal Italian gardens. In 19th-century literature, though, gardens tend to serve the same purpose over and over—they encourage characters to ignore social norms and misbehave in some way. This talk can be adapted for any age group and can incorporate a variety of texts, such as novels by Jane Austen, the Brontes, Wilkie Collins, and George Eliot, and children's stories by Lewis Carroll, Oscar Wilde, Beatrix Potter, Rudyard Kipling, and Frances Hodgson Burnett.Niemann, Ms. JaniceGraduate StudentDepartment of English
LiteratureHow Ghost Stories Work—and Why (E M S) How Ghost Stories Work uses several examples of very short ghost stories to illustrate the rhetorical tricks authors use to draw readers in, make them shudder, and provoke feelings of terror and awe. Audiences will be invited to create their own stories as part of the presentation. Ross, Dr. StephenProfessorDepartment of English
LiteratureA History of the English Ghost Story (E M S) NEWA History of the English Ghost Story begins with the Gothic in late-18th century England, and follows the evolution of the English ghost story through Charles Dickens' popularization of it as a Christmas tradition through the late-19th century mania for seances and spiritualism, into the 20th century's increasingly psychological forms. Ross, Dr. StephenProfessorDepartment of English
LiteratureNarrative Style in Austen’s Fiction ǂ (S)This presentation explores Jane Austen’s unique narrative style, which relies on blending the narrator’s voice with the voice of a given character in the text. This sophisticated narrative voice dominates Austen’s fiction and is one of the many defining factors of her works. Speaking on this topic works best as a collaborative reading, where the audience is engaged with the text and is prepared to focus on the minute details to gain a new understanding of the power of Austen’s narrative style.Seatter, Ms. LindseyGraduate StudentDepartment of English
LiteratureJane Austen: Past and Present ǂ (S)This general presentation looks at Jane Austen's life, her works of literature, and her impact on culture—both past and present. Formulated as an introduction to Austen, or as a delightful reintroduction for long-time lovers of her works, this presentation blends an informative lecture format with short readings from many of Austen's beloved texts.Seatter, Ms. LindseyGraduate StudentDepartment of English
LiteratureChristine of Pizan: A Life of Her Own (Sept-Dec) (in English or French) (S)Christine de Pizan (1364–c. 1430) became one of the most important French authors when (and because) she was widowed. An exceptional writer and fighter for women's rights, she wrote poetry and prose on the burning topics of her time and of her life: love, equality of men and women, royal justice, good government, and Joan of Arc, among other subjects. She was forgotten for a long time before the relatively recent rediscovery of her works.Cazes, Dr. HélèneProfessorDepartment of French
LiteratureThe Revolution of Anatomy: the Renaissance Discovery of the Human Body (Sept-Dec) (in English or French) (S)In 1543, young physician, Andreas Vesalius published what has been called "the most beautiful book" ever made: a splendid album of anatomy where the text is matched by engravings of a new style. The publication of this book is said to have changed the history of medicine. Has it? How? This presentation comprises many photographs of this masterpiece; UVic owns a copy of this treatise.Cazes, Dr. HélèneProfessorDepartment of French
Literature19th-Century French Literature and Culture (in English or French) (S)This talk discusses 19th-century French literature and culture: the role of science, industry and politics in literary production.Fromet de Rosnay, Dr. EmileAssistant ProfessorDepartment of French
LiteratureFrench Literature Since 1800 (in English or French) (S) NEWThis presentation can discuss any topic in literature from the Enlightenment onward, from Voltaire to the present. It can also include topics such as the Enlightenment novel, romantic and modernist poetry, and postmodern culture.Fromet de Rosnay, Dr. EmileAssistant ProfessorDepartment of French
LiteratureInto the Woods with German Myths and Fairy Tales This presentation is about the enduring relevance of fairy tales and addresses the following questions: Why do we need fairy tales? What is a hero? What is a quest? Why do fairy tales often take place in a forest environment? What is the cultural significance of wolves and ogres?Pnevmonidou, Dr. ElenaAssistant ProfessorDepartment of Germanic and Slavic Studies
LiteratureModern Latin American Literature (in English or Spanish) (S) Russek, Dr. DanAssociate ProfessorDepartment of Hispanic and Italian Studies
LiteratureModern Latin American Literature and Visual Arts (in English or Spanish) (S) Russek, Dr. DanAssociate ProfessorDepartment of Hispanic and Italian Studies
LiteratureModern Latin American Culture (in English or Spanish) (S) Russek, Dr. DanAssociate ProfessorDepartment of Hispanic and Italian Studies
LiteratureThe Golden Age of the English Detective Novel(M S) NEWThe years between the First and Second World Wars are universally seen as the “golden age” of English detective fiction. This talk suggests why this was the case through the examples of Agatha Christie, Dorothy Sayers and G.K. Chesterton—and, of course, their forebear Sir Arthur Conan Doyle.Devereaux, Dr. SimonAssociate ProfessorDepartment of History
LiteratureThe Tale of Genji: The World's Oldest Novel (in English or Japanese) NEW Poulton, Dr. CodyProfessorDepartment of Pacific and Asian Studies
LiteratureJapan's Iliad: The Tale of the Heike (in English or Japanese) NEW Poulton, Dr. CodyProfessorDepartment of Pacific and Asian Studies
Music, Art, Film and TheatreIntroduction to Paleolithic Art ǂ (M S) NEWThis speaking engagement is based off of lectures I gave to 7th grade classes in the fall of 2017 and a workshop I ran with the UVic Experimental Archaeology Club. Depending on the time available, I would ideally speak to the group for about 20 minutes on the art of the European Upper Paleolithic—rock art, figurines, ornaments, etc. For the remaining time I would provide the group with pictures of some rock art and figurines and allow them to recreate the art—or make their own—using charcoal and clay. The purpose of this activity is to introduce people to Paleolithic art and give them a chance to do some hands-on, creative learning.Rogers, Ms. LisaGraduate StudentDepartment of Anthropology
Music, Art, Film and TheatreA History of Music Technology from Antiquity to Today (M S) The way music is produced, distributed and consumed has always been influenced by technology. This overview highlights some interesting moments in time when particular technologies had a dramatic impact on music. Starting from the hydraulis, the first organ and keyboard instrument, to the availability of thousands of songs in portable music players today, we travel through history, making interesting stops along the way. This presentation focuses on moments when technology drastically changed how music was produced, distributed and consumed—and speculates about where this trend will take us in the future.Tzanetakis, Dr. GeorgeAssociate ProfessorDepartment of Computer Science
Music, Art, Film and TheatreMusic Instruments as Harbingers of New Forms of Human/Computer Interaction (M S) The playing of musical instruments is one of the most complex possible interactions between a human and a sophisticated tool. This talk traces how the use of computers has transformed music-making and how research in new instruments for music expression provides a glimpse to the future of human-computer interaction.Tzanetakis, Dr. GeorgeAssociate ProfessorDepartment of Computer Science
Music, Art, Film and TheatreTheatre Audience Education: How to Better See a Play (S) NEWThis talk is based on the speaker’s graduate studies in theatre audience education. Based on her experience in developing a secondary level audience education program at the Belfry Theatre in Victoria, this talk lays out some of the key concepts in effectively experiencing a theatre performance.Prendergast, Dr. MonicaAssociate ProfessorDepartment of Curriculum and Instruction
Music, Art, Film and TheatreContemporary Israeli Cinema (M S) NEWHow do movies reflect the realities of life in Israel? This talk will screen clips from films made in the past four years that deal with the Israeli-Palestinian conflict, relations between Ashkenazi and Sephardi Jews, and socioeconomic shifts inside the country. The recent Israeli “Cinema of Anomie,” or wandering and uncertainty, will be the major topic of discussion in this lecture. Shlensky, Dr. Lincoln Z.Associate ProfessorDepartment of English
Music, Art, Film and TheatreEdith Piaf, the Parisian “Sparrow” (Sept-Dec) (in English or French) (S) Spend half an hour with the music, the lyrics and the life of an iconic singer of the 20th century. This talk includes slides and songs, giving context to the phenomenal success met by a street singer, now a symbol for French culture across the world. Cazes, Dr. HélèneProfessorDepartment of French
Music, Art, Film and TheatreFrench Cinema (in English or French) (S) This talk examines 19th-century French literature and culture: the role of science, industry and politics in literary production.Fromet de Rosnay, Dr. EmileAssistant ProfessorDepartment of French
Music, Art, Film and TheatreHercules: Greek Myth or Disney? (M S) (Jan-April)This talk compares the Greek myths about Hercules to the Disney version of the story.Bowman, Dr. Laurel Assistant ProfessorDepartment of Greek and Roman Studies
Music, Art, Film and TheatreO Brother Where Art Thou and The Odyssey (M S) (Jan-April)This talk discusses how the Coen brothers' film O Brother Where Art Thou? uses Homer's Odyssey.Bowman, Dr. LaurelAssistant ProfessorDepartment of Greek and Roman Studies
Music, Art, Film and TheatreLatin American Film (in English or Spanish) (S) Russek, Dr. DanAssociate ProfessorDepartment of Hispanic and Italian Studies
Music, Art, Film and TheatrePuppets and Robots in Japanese Theatre (in English or Japanese) Poulton, Prof. CodyProfessorDepartment of Pacific and Asian Studies
Music, Art, Film and TheatreNew Play Development in Canada Richmond, Dr. Brian FrederickProfessorDepartment of Theatre
Music, Art, Film and TheatreTheatre in War and (Post) Conflict Zones: The Importance of Laughter, Time and Place (in English or Dutch) (S) These presentations offer an exploration of theatre in (post)-conflict zones and development contexts supported by an analysis of the value of applied theatre practitioners working in these settings. By describing the ethics and techniques on cultural awareness and by showing selected examples of theatre companies globally, these presentations offer a firm foundation in the basic theories, contexts and vocabularies used in the field. Sadeghi Yekta, Dr. KirstenAssistant ProfessorDepartment of Theatre
Music, Art, Film and TheatreTheatre and Human Rights: What Kind of Theatre Takes Place in an Unwanted Space? (in English or Dutch) (S) These presentations offer an exploration of theatre in (post)-conflict zones and development contexts supported by an analysis of the value of applied theatre practitioners working in these settings. By describing the ethics and techniques on cultural awareness and by showing selected examples of theatre companies globally, these presentations offer a firm foundation in the basic theories, contexts and vocabularies used in the field. Sadeghi Yekta, Dr. KirstenAssistant ProfessorDepartment of Theatre
Music, Art, Film and TheatrePopular Culture and Society (M S) NEWThis is a customizable presentation that can be catered to your needs/interests. Potential topics of focus could include: gender and sexuality in popular music, including case studies on artists such as Beyoncé; artificial intelligence and its affects on popular music and society; contemporary media fandom; social media and identity; posthumanism and futurisms in popular culture.Avdeeff, Dr. MelissaLimited Term Assistant Teaching ProfessorSchool of Music
Music, Art, Film and TheatreConducting Gestures (in English, German, Hungarian or Romanian) (S) NEWSimilarly to gestures and body language accompanying our speech, an orchestra conductors movements have also many and rich ties to our cultural history. The talk offers an introduction into "how to read a conductor." Csaba, Prof. AjtonyAssistant ProfessorSchool of Music
Music, Art, Film and TheatreHow Do Orchestra Conductors Prepare for a Concert? (in English, German, Hungarian or Romanian) (S) NEWWhat are the tasks of a conductor, how do they prepare for a concert individually and with a group?Csaba, Prof. AjtonyAssistant ProfessorSchool of Music
Music, Art, Film and TheatreHas New Music Always Been Awkward? (in English, German, Hungarian or Romanian) (S) NEWThe expression "contemporary music" may sound uncanny at times. Few know, however, that until the early 1800s no other music existed but a contemporary one, and in the early 1900s membership in a New Music society was a recognized principle for organizing ones social life. Csaba, Prof. AjtonyAssistant ProfessorSchool of Music
Music, Art, Film and TheatreCuriosity and Music (in English, German, Hungarian or Romanian) (S) NEWMusic is in a way a language and science at the same time. Each new composition has to bring hundreds of intuitively developed innovations to engage with the listener in a meaningful way. Similarly, performers frequently need to find ways to make the ideas of the composers work. Even if one does not pursue the path of a musician, engagement with music means spending time with the most curious and innovative people. Csaba, Prof. AjtonyAssistant ProfessorSchool of Music
Music, Art, Film and TheatreThe History of Orchestra Conducting (in English, German, Hungarian or Romanian) (S) NEWA brief excursion with movies through the history of orchestra conducting—from the beginnings, when violinists used their bow, to modern conductors without baton—conducting for the movie cameras. Csaba, Prof. AjtonyAssistant ProfessorSchool of Music
Music, Art, Film and TheatreGender and Cross-dressing in Japanese Theatre (in English or Japanese) NEW Poulton, Dr. CodyProfessorDepartment of Pacific and Asian Studies
Music, Art, Film and TheatreProducing Non-profit Theatre in Canada A multi-award winning director, this speaker has created nearly 200 professional productions for many of the major theatres across Canada, as well as in the US, Europe and Mexico, and has worked with many of his generation’s leading playwrights in developing their work. He’s also former chair of the Department of Theatre at UVic, and a professor who offers courses in the areas of producing, directing and acting.Richmond, Dr. Brian FrederickProfessorDepartment of Theatre
Music, Art, Film and TheatreDirecting the Classics Richmond, Dr. Brian FrederickProfessorDepartment of Theatre
Personal InterestsGo with the Flow: Keys to Mastering your Attitude (S) NEWEver have one of “those” days? You will have the opportunity to review your influence and explore strategies to improve your experiences. This interactive and reflective workshop will help you with your interactions, deadlines and expectations. At the end, we expect you will be motivated and inspired. Oakes, Ms. JenniferAcademic AdvisorAcademic Advising for Humanities, Science and Social Sciences
Personal InterestsWise Whys: An Extraordinary Goal-setting Workshop (S) NEWWhen you ride a bike it is best to look where you want to go, not focus on where you are. Where you choose to focus your attention influences the outcome. This interactive workshop will give participants specific and practical take-away skills for accomplishing desired goals. Oakes, Ms. JenniferAcademic AdvisorAcademic Advising for Humanities, Science and Social Sciences
Personal InterestsFind Your Joy (S) NEWStuck. Discontent. Apathetic. Unfulfilled. So many women are just going through the motions in their lives. Each of us has a warrior inside looking to break free. I can help you find your joy, your passions, and take concrete steps towards playing bigger in your life. Kerr, Ms. TeriAlumni and Annual Giving OfficerAthletics and Recreational Services
Personal InterestsTaming your Inner Critic (S) NEWThe inner critic can be a debilitating force. Identifying our limiting beliefs and learning to turn down the volume of the voice inside that is holding us back can help us to grow and stretch both personally and professionally.Kerr, Ms. TeriAlumni and Annual Giving OfficerAthletics and Recreational Services
Personal InterestsDifficult Conversations (S) NEWWhat to say (and do) when a co-worker gets sick. As a breast cancer survivor, I have learned firsthand how people are innately ill-equipped to deal with the grief, uncertainty and awkwardness that a cancer diagnosis brings. Engaging and raw, Teri Kerr will share her story and help you navigate the fear without sticking your foot in your mouth.Kerr, Ms. TeriAlumni and Annual Giving OfficerAthletics and Recreational Services
Personal InterestsFrom Survive to Thrive: Finding Joy after Cancer (S) NEWFrom Survive to Thrive Finding Joy after Cancer. Life is short! Eat the cookie! Cancer survivor Teri Kerr will share her story and provide guidance on discovering what makes your heart sing, breaking through limiting beliefs and finding joy after living through trauma. Kerr, Ms. TeriAlumni and Annual Giving OfficerAthletics and Recreational Services
Personal InterestsYoga Psychology (E M S) This talk discusses how yoga psychology harnesses the powers of awareness, attunement and embodied learning to foster an inquiry into the foundation of self-awareness, health and wellness.Hosalli, Ms. ShubhaElectronic TechnicianDepartment of Chemistry
Personal InterestsYogic Living (E M S) Many people practice yoga—but yoga is not only a soothing workout. It is also a lifestyle, helping people embrace states of well-being. In this session, learn more about yogic living.Hosalli, Ms. ShubhaElectronic TechnicianDepartment of Chemistry
Personal InterestsTravelling Lightly and Safely: Tips for Women TravellersThis session gives ideas and tips for women travellers to make travel easier and safer while maximizing the travel experience, including what to take and how to pack. Handouts with suggestions are included.Mayfield, Dr. MargieProfessor EmeritaDepartment of Curriculum and Instruction
Personal InterestsTouring the Yukon and Alaska (S)This presentation uses a Powerpoint slide show to take you on an unforgettable tour of these northern frontiers.Cameron, Dr. IanAdjunct ProfessorDepartment of Educational Psychology and Leadership Studies
Personal InterestsTouring the Midi Canal in Southern France (S)This presentation uses a Powerpoint slide show to take you on an unforgettable tour of this region.Cameron, Dr. IanAdjunct ProfessorDepartment of Educational Psychology and Leadership Studies
Personal InterestsThe Baja Bash: Mazatlan to San Diego by Boat (S)This presentation uses a Powerpoint slide show to take you on an unforgettable tour of this region.Cameron, Dr. IanAdjunct ProfessorDepartment of Educational Psychology and Leadership Studies
Personal InterestsA Band Trip to Cuba (S)This presentation uses a Powerpoint slide show to take you on an unforgettable tour of this island nation.Cameron, Dr. IanAdjunct ProfessorDepartment of Educational Psychology and Leadership Studies
Personal InterestsSavvy Self-Management for Caregivers (E) This presentation encourages us to explore the topic of care- giving with dignity and self-respect. We need to ask ourselves: what tools do we need to deal with the demands placed on us?Boyer, Dr. WandaAssociate ProfessorDepartment of Educational Psychology and Leadership Studies
Personal InterestsFive Facts You Should know About "Global Warming" (but probably don't): A Skeptic's View of Climate "Catastrophe"(M S)There is plenty of scientific evidence that fears of catastrophic climate change are not warranted, but the public rarely gets to hear these facts. This talk presents five key facts most people don't know that cast doubt on claims of dangerous global warming in the future. First among these facts: the planet has not warmed significantly since at least 1998.MacRae, Mr. PaulSessional Lecturer Department of English
Personal InterestsThe Magic of Bill Watterson's Calvin and Hobbes (Sept-Dec) (in English or French) (S)The comic series Calvin and Hobbes provides an escape, “out of the box" to its readers. This presentation takes a close look at some strips and the devices used by the author to poetically invite the reader to a magic world. Is this "low art"? The presentation ends with the audience sharing their favorite Calvin and Hobbes stories.Cazes, Dr. HélèneProfessorDepartment of French
Personal InterestsThe Tour de France (in English or French) (S)Learn about the Tour de France from its many aspects as a dynamic sporting event, and as a historical, cultural, political and economic phenomenon.Fromet de Rosnay, Dr. EmileAssistant ProfessorDepartment of French
Personal InterestsCrossing Cuba from Havana to Santiago (M S)On this adventure we began in Havana and travelled by bus across bumpy roads stopping at the famous "Bay of Pigs", Cienfuegos, Trinidad, Camaguey, Santiago and several other places before returning to Havana again.Stewart, Prof. RosaAssistant Teaching ProfessorDepartment of Hispanic and Italian Studies
Personal InterestsTravels in Spain and Portugal (M S) NEWIn this tour we travel from Madrid north to Santiago de Compostela and then head south to visit Porto, Lisbon and several other spots in Portugal. Back in southern Spain, we visit Seville and Granada, home to the wonderful La Alhambra. Stewart, Prof. RosaAssistant Teaching ProfessorDepartment of Hispanic and Italian Studies
Personal InterestsA Canal Boat in England and a Cruise in the Baltic (M S) Through the images of this presentation you will take a four day canal trip near Bath. Then you will upgrade to a cruise ship that takes you through the beautiful Baltic with stops in Denmark, Estonia, St. Petersburg in Russia, Finland and Norway.Stewart, Prof. RosaAssistant Teaching ProfessorDepartment of Hispanic and Italian Studies
Personal InterestsNorthern Spain from Barcelona to Santiago de Compostela (M S) We begin this trip with a few days in Barcelona then travel west, following the Pilgrim's Route fairly closely from there to Santiago de Compostela. After the visit in Santiago we travel south to end the trip in Madrid.Stewart, Prof. RosaAssistant Teaching ProfessorDepartment of Hispanic and Italian Studies
Personal InterestsExploring the Northwest Coast and Haida Gwaii (M S) NEWIn this tour we explored our wonderful province. The tour began with a trip on Vancouver Island to Port Hardy where we travelled the inside passage by ferry to Prince Rupert. There were visits to Terrace, Hazelton and Nisga'a Valley. Another ferry trip took up to beautiful Haida Gwaii. This was an adventure filled with good food and fabulous indigenous art. Stewart, Prof. RosaAssistant Teaching ProfessorDepartment of Hispanic and Italian Studies
Personal InterestsA Canadian Visits Chile and Argentina (M S) NEWOur travels begin in Santiago, the capital of Chile. We visit Valparaiso and Viña del Mar on the coast before heading to Mendoza, Argentina where we have a day trip into the Andes. From Mendoza we fly to Buenos Aires, the capital of Argentina. Our experience include a tango performance and a day tour to the famous Pampas. No visit to this part of the world is complete without fantastic food and fabulous wines. Stewart, Prof. RosaAssistant Teaching ProfessorDepartment of Hispanic and Italian Studies
Personal InterestsCentral and Southern Spain (M S)This slide show takes you on a tour of some of the outstanding cities in central and southern Spain, starting in Madrid, visiting Avila, Salamanca, Merida, Sevilla, Cordoba, Granada and moving up the Mediterranean coast to Barcelona.Stewart, Prof. RosaAssistant Teaching ProfessorDepartment of Hispanic and Italian Studies
Personal InterestsTouring through England, Scotland and Ireland (M S) This slide show features a bus tour of this beautiful region starting with several days in London and then Edinburgh, the shores of Loch Ness, the Isle of Skye, Manchester, Dublin, Killarney, Bath, Stonehenge and several other places.Stewart, Prof. RosaAssistant Teaching ProfessorDepartment of Hispanic and Italian Studies
Personal InterestsThe Mystery of the Lost Norse Colony of Greenland (in English or French) McKenzie, Dr. AndreaAssociate ProfessorDepartment of History
Personal InterestsWilderness Adventures with Small Children (in English or French) This talk explores the challenges and rewards of taking small children into the wild. In her spare time, the speaker goes on extended wilderness canoe paddles with her husband and two young children.Bird, Dr. SonyaAssociate ProfessorDepartment of Linguistics
Personal InterestsBeekeeping (S) Esling, Dr. John H.Professor EmeritusDepartment of Linguistics
Personal InterestsHiking in Japan: The Old Roads of Kumano (in English or Japanese) Poulton, Dr. CodyProfessorDepartment of Pacific and Asian Studies
Personal InterestsWhy Bother with Philosophy? (S) Scott, Dr. DavidAssociate ProfessorDepartment of Philosophy
Personal InterestsSocial Media in the Medical Sciences (M S) Social media is a powerful tool. And it’s highly addictive and often distracting. Can social media be used for "useful" purposes in health care? This talk explores some ways patients, researchers and educators have used social media within the health care environment. Basran, Dr. Parminder S.Adjunct Associate ProfessorDepartment of Physics and Astronomy/Medical Physics
Personal InterestsMarie Curie: Legacy of the Worlds' First Medical Physicist (M S) Anyone with a scientific background will likely know of Marie Curie—the only woman to have won two Nobel prizes, and in different subjects! But do you know how she transformed health care?Basran, Dr. Parminder S.Adjunct Associate ProfessorDepartment of Physics and Astronomy/Medical Physics
Personal InterestsDIY Videos as Public Sociology: A Personal/Political Journey NEWSince 2004, I have written, performed and produced a series of music-videos concerning social injustice, ecological crisis, and the possibilities for remaking our troubled world. In this lecture I present some of the music-videos and reflect on the power of art in conveying critical social analysis. Carroll, Prof. BillProfessorDepartment of Sociology
Personal InterestsLiving Well with a Mental Health Diagnosis (E M S) When you or someone you care about realizes you’re experiencing mental health difficulties or receive a diagnosis of mental illness, it can feel catastrophic. In spite of improvement in recent years, mental illness is still stigmatized. That stigma can have a greater negative effect on a person than the symptoms of mental illness. This presentation/workshop will assist you in identifying and working against stigma and developing strategies for living well.Player, Ms. CindyFormer Director Equity and Human Rights Office
Personal InterestsConversations about Mental Health (E M S) NEWFear and stigma make it difficult for all of us to have open-minded conversations about mental health and mental illness. At the same time, these conversations where sharing of experiences and support take place are necessary to break down and eliminate stigma. Participants in this session will identify the kind of opportunities or situations in their lives for conversations about mental health and have the opportunity to practise in a supportive environment.Player, Ms. CindyFormer DirectorEquity and Human Rights Office
Personal InterestsMental Health as a Human Rights Issue (E M S) NEW This talk explores mental health and mental illness through a Human Rights lens. The UN Convention on the Rights of People with Disabilities will be used as a tool to examine ways Canada does and doesn't uphold the rights of people living with mental illness.Player, Ms. CindyFormer Director Equity and Human Rights Office
Personal InterestsMystical, Magical México (in English or Spanish) (E M S) This presentation takes you on a tour of the bounty of natural resources found only in México, from flora and fauna, to pyramids and other forms of cultural representations.Rodriguez de France, Dr. CarmenAssistant ProfessorIndigenous Education
Personal InterestsThe Mexican Revolution: History and Songs (in English or Spanish) (E M S) Learn about the period of Mexican history between 1900-1930 through story and song Rodriguez de France, Dr. CarmenAssistant ProfessorIndigenous Education
Personal InterestsSe Habla Español! (in English or Spanish) (E M S)Have some fun in an interactive session learning simple greetings, songs and poems in Spanish.Rodriguez de France, Dr. CarmenAssistant ProfessorIndigenous Education
Personal InterestsWomen of the Mexican Revolution: Hidden Stories (in English or Spanish) (E M S) Rodriguez de France, Dr. CarmenAssistant ProfessorIndigenous Education
Personal InterestsNutritional Medicine and Dietetics (in English or Cantonese) (M S) NEW Lam, Dr. ChristopherAssociate Affiliate ProfessorIsland Medical Program
Personal InterestsBookbinding for Kids and Teens (E M S) This hands-on workshop enables each student to make either a mini-book charm or a small notebook.Lines, Mr. MichaelLearning and Research LibrarianLibraries, William C. Mearns Centre for Learning
Personal InterestsA First-World-War Canadian Sapper Talks about the Trenches (S)Captain (Retired) Don Lovell, CD, PPCLI reads selections from his grandfather's first-hand accounts from WWI as an engineer sapper at Passchendaele, Vimy Ridge and other bloodied fields.Lovell, Mr. DonRetireeRetirees Association
Personal InterestsPowerlifting for Young Athletes (S)In this presentation, a national champion and record-holder provides tips for high-school-age athletes. A gym facility with Olympic weights for demonstration is the preferred setting. Basic lifts, squat, bench and deadlift, "classic" and "equipped lifting," training, diet, lifestyle (drug-free), goal setting, competitions are outlined.Lovell, Mr. DonRetireeRetirees Association
Personal InterestsVictoria’s Earliest Architects: The People Who Designed the City Before Rattenbury and Maclure (Sept-Dec)Enjoy an irreverent, illustrated history of the language. Russell, Dr. NickRetireeRetirees Association
Personal InterestsA Bird's-eye View of Victoria and the Mystery of Annie Ross (Sept-Dec)This is a richly illustrated talk describing the history and appeal of bird's-eye views, which were hugely popular across North America in the late 19th century, plus a close-up look at an amazing six-foot-wide watercolour bird's-eye view painted of Victoria by a totally unknown local artist. The talk includes many "before-and-after" pictures, showing how scenes in the old pictures look today.Russell, Dr. NickRetireeRetirees Association
Personal InterestsGlorious Victorians: A Celebration of Victoria's Residential Heritage (Sept-Dec)This is a new and richly illustrated talk on what makes Victoria such a wonderful place to live.Russell, Dr. NickRetireeRetirees Association
Personal InterestsRoss Bay Villa: From Bulldozer Bait to Showplace (Sept-Dec)Find out how the Land Conservancy rescued and restored one of Victoria’s oldest houses and discovered one of Victoria’s most interesting pioneers. Russell, Dr. NickRetireeRetirees Association
Personal InterestsWhat Does It Take to Be Canada’s Next Astronaut? The 2016 Astronaut Recruitment Campaign (M S) In June 2016, the Canadian Space Agency issued the fourth call in its history to recruit two new astronauts. There have been only 12 astronauts in the history of the agency, eight of whom have flown in space. Canadian astronauts must be resourceful, experienced in a technical profession and display integrity and the best judgment. The selection process is difficult, both physically and mentally, and competition is fierce to earn one of the spots. This presentation chronicles the speaker’s own journey and experiences in the competition, from one of almost 4,000 applicants to the shortlist of 72 candidates and beyond.Cullen, Dr. JayAssociate ProfessorSchool of Earth and Ocean Sciences
Personal InterestsMy Journeys on the Camino de Santiago NEW Krigolson, Dr. Olav E.Associate ProfessorSchool of Exercise Science, Physical and Health Education
Personal InterestsSri Lanka: Contrasts and Complexities—a Short TourThis presentation provides a brief history and tour of this beautiful island, which has survived both natural and man-made disasters.Livingston, Dr. NigelProfessorSchool of Public Health and Social Policy
Personal InterestsCo-housing: What Is It and Is It For You?Co-housing began in Denmark and the idea has migrated to Canada with 13 cohousing communities completed, most of those in BC. This presentation looks at the phenomenon, in which a community is designed and maintained collectively using consensus decision-making with all households participating. Each household is owned privately (strata-titled) yet has the best of a village life. Some are senior-focused, while others are multigenerational, but all share a commitment to living lightly on the planet. Those who have experienced co-housing speak of its affordability and warmth. There are communities in the formation stage on the Saanich Peninsula and in Sooke, with completed cohousing villages in Sooke, Nanaimo and the Comox Valley. Whittington, Dr. BarbaraProfessor EmertitusSchool of Social Work
PoliticsFeeling Hot, Hot, Hot: Three Dimensions of Transformation in the Circumpolar Arctic (M S) NEWThe Arctic region is undergoing unprecedented ecological, political, and social transformation, compounding already dramatic changes that occurred during the 20th century. Three principal causes or drivers of change have affected the region and remain ongoing: climate change, post-Cold War political changes in Arctic politics, including greater regional cooperation and fears of a resurgent Russia, and substantial decolonization of Arctic politics to better represent the interests of Indigenous peoples.Greaves, Mr. WilfridAssistant ProfessorDepartment of Political Science
PoliticsArctic In/Security and Indigenous Peoples: Comparing Inuit in Canada and Sami in Norway (M S) NEWThis presentation examines the meaning of 'security' in the Arctic from the perspective of two of the region's Indigenous peoples: Inuit in Canada and Sami in Norway. It presents original research to show how these peoples understand the changing nature of security in a rapidly changing Arctic, and how this contrasts with the official Arctic security policies of their respective states.Greaves, Mr. WilfridAssistant ProfessorDepartment of Political Science
PoliticsThe Politics of Anger: Neoliberalism, Populism, and Colonialism ǂ (S)Neoliberalism is a term widely used to describe policy frameworks that cut taxes and social services, reduce state involvement in labour issues and increase a focus on global trade systems. This talk covers Canadian politics, with a particular emphasis on political culture, social justice and issues surrounding colonialism. Henderson, Mr. PhilGraduate StudentDepartment of Political Science
PoliticsColonialism and Settler Responsibilities ǂ (S)This presentation looks at Canadian politics, with an emphasis on political culture, social justice and issues surrounding colonialism. Settler colonialism describes a political formation in which the occupation of Indigenous peoples’ territories by non-Indigenous peoples continues despite an official narrative of the settler colony as a democratic or liberal political community.Henderson, Mr. PhilGraduate StudentDepartment of Political Science
PoliticsComparative Federalism, Multicultural Federalism How to design a constitution in a pluralistic society with the goals of combining single citizenship with collective rights in response to identity based demands.Tremblay, Dr. ReetaProfessorDepartment of Political Science
PoliticsPolitics and Social Media Today (M S) This talk covers current events in US politics, paying special attention to social media. Aragon, Dr. JanniDirector Office of Technology Integrated Learning
PoliticsProtect Your Digital Footprint (M S) Aragon, Dr. JanniDirector Office of Technology Integrated Learning
PoliticsUnderstanding #MeToo (S) NEW Aragon, Dr. JanniDirector Office of Technology Integrated Learning
PoliticsRandom Selection in Politics: Improving Democracy Through the Use of Random Selection (S) NEWThere is a growing frustration with the practice of democracy in society today, as citizens become increasingly apathetic and pessimistic about its prospects. Yet, recent research and practice on democracy suggests that many of these issues may stem from the way we structure our democratic structures: an over-reliance on elections can result in problems including corruption, unrepresentative governments, and reduced citizen participation. This presentation explores how random selection of representatives can serve as a promising alternative or complement to the use of elections and help overcome the problems facing democracy in contemporary society.Pek, Dr. SimonAssistant ProfessorPeter B. Gustavson School of Business
PoliticsFederal Politics Prince, Dr. Michael J.Lansdowne Professor of Social PolicyStudies in Policy and Practice
PoliticsProvincial Politics Prince, Dr. Michael J.Lansdowne Professor of Social PolicyStudies in Policy and Practice
PoliticsMunicipal Politics Prince, Dr. Michael J.Lansdowne Professor of Social PolicyStudies in Policy and Practice
PoliticsSocial Policy Issues in Canada Prince, Dr. Michael J.Lansdowne Professor of Social PolicyStudies in Policy and Practice
PoliticsFighting over Fossil Fuels: Understanding Contentious Pipeline Politics in Canada (M S) NEWThis presentation examines the state of pipeline politics in Canada. It outlines the recent projects and proposals that have ignited acrimonious national and regional debates over economic development, climate change and decarbonization, environmental safety and emergency response, Indigenous rights and title, and the scope of provincial and municipal regulatory powers. I argue that pipelines are at the centre of contemporary Canadian politics, and that the outcomes of these struggles will substantially shape the future of the Canadian state, economy and contributions towards global climate change.Greaves, Mr. WilfridAssistant ProfessorDepartment of Political Science
PsychologyLiving in the Moment (S)Time is an illusion; time stands still and yet time flies. Often people live in the past remembering or regretting, and people plan for the future or are afraid of what the future will bring. This talk discusses how being in the “now” moment enables us to create a memorable past and a hopeful future.Lum, Ms. WendyRegistered Clinical CounsellorCounselling Services
PsychologyRecognizing Visual Persuasion (S)Visuals are a powerful persuasive tool harnessed by the media to convince us to undertake specific courses of action. Learning to recognize the subtle tools of visual persuasion can help us be more aware of the messages that impact our lives.Wiebe, Dr. MichelleAssistant Teaching ProfessorDepartment of Curriculum and Instruction
PsychologyThe Experience and Effects of Homicide on Siblings of Victims Tasker, Dr. SusanAssociate ProfessorDepartment of Educational Psychology and Leadership Studies
PsychologyBrain and Behaviour: A Beginners Guide to Functional Neuroanatomy (E M S) Gawryluk, Dr. JodieAssistant ProfessorDepartment of Psychology
PsychologyNeuroimaging: Translating Advances in Neuroimaging into Clinical Applications (E M S) Gawryluk, Dr. JodieAssistant ProfessorDepartment of Psychology
PsychologyConcussion: What is a Mild Traumatic Brain Injury and How Does It Impact Behaviour? (E M S) Gawryluk, Dr. JodieAssistant ProfessorDepartment of Psychology
PsychologyMultiple Sclerosis: Changes in the Brain and Cognition Function (E M S) Gawryluk, Dr. JodieAssistant ProfessorDepartment of Psychology
PsychologyThe Dragons of Inaction: Why We Don't Do What We ShouldWe all have intentions to improve ourselves and the world, but we don't always act on those intentions. Why not? This talk gathers together the many "dragons of inaction" that hold us back, and suggests some ways to "slay" them. The focus is on climate change and sustainability actions, but the dragons might also apply to diet, exercise and other good works.Gifford, Dr. RobertProfessorDepartment of Psychology
Environment and SustainabilityThe Dragons of Inaction: Why We Don't Do What We ShouldWe all have intentions to improve ourselves and the world, but we don't always act on those intentions. Why not? This talk gathers together the many "dragons of inaction" that hold us back, and suggests some ways to "slay" them. The focus is on climate change and sustainability actions, but the dragons might also apply to diet, exercise and other good works.Gifford, Dr. RobertProfessorDepartment of Psychology
PsychologyModern Views of Personality Gifford , Dr. RobertProfessorDepartment of Psychology
PsychologyThe Psychology of Eyewitness Identification Evidence (S)Hundreds of North Americans who had served lengthy prison sentences have been exonerated based on DNA evidence. In most cases, faulty eyewitness identification evidence played a role in the miscarriage of justice. This talk reports on research aimed at developing better ways of collecting and assessing identification evidence.Lindsay, Dr. SteveProfessorDepartment of Psychology
PsychologyFalse Memories and Distorted Beliefs (S)For the past 30 years the speaker has been studying basic mechanisms of memory that usually serve us well but sometimes lead us to remember events that never happened or to believe things that aren’t true. This talk summarizes some of that research.Lindsay, Dr. SteveProfessorDepartment of Psychology
PsychologyAn Introduction to the Brain and Behaviour ǂ (E M S)This lecture will summarize basic brain structure, function, and the relationship between our brain and our behaviours. Interactive activities will be integrated, where possible.Mayo, Ms. ChantelGraduate StudentDepartment of Psychology
PsychologyUnderstanding Schizophrenia (in English or Spanish) NEWWhat is schizophrenia? We look at psychosis and other symptoms, current therapeutic approaches, and our research at UVic.Caruncho, Prof. HectorProfessorIsland Medical Program
PsychologyThe Development of Memory ǂ (M S) This presentation covers how memory works and develops through life, from birth to what happens to memory as we age. Basic information such as anatomy of memory are covered, theories surrounding memory development, as well as memory loss and decline in late life.Knight, Ms. JamieGraduate StudentDepartment of Psychology
ScienceScience and the Superhero in You (E M S) Batman, Iron Man, Batgirl and Captain America are examples of superheroes who are pitched as just human beings grounded in hard work and achievement. This talk explores the kinesiology, neuroscience and biomedical underpinnings of these classic comic book superheroes and relates them back to us regular folks while answering the question, "Is there a superhero in you?”Zehr, Dr. E. PaulProfessor and DirectorCentre for Biomedical Research
ScienceGenetically Modified Organisms: Frankenfood or Cornucopia? (E M S)The introduction of genetically modified organisms (GMOs) has resulted in an unprecedented level of controversy and debate. GMOs, on one hand, come with promises of improvements in characteristics that are unattainable by traditional plant or animal breeding. On the other hand, GMOs bring spectres of new human health problems, environmental disasters, and economic issues. This unbiased presentation focuses on positive and negative issues surrounding GMOs with illustrations and scientific data. Ishiguro, Dr. Edward E.Professor EmeritusDepartment of Biochemistry and Microbiology
ScienceGut-Brain Communication: the Possibility of Mind-controlling Bacteria Recent research findings demonstrate that bacteria in the digestive tract regulate the production of neurotransmitters like serotonin. This presentation describes evidence suggesting that this phenomenon may be related to conditions ranging from depression to autism spectrum disorder. The possibility of new strategies for treatment or intervention of these disorders is also discussed.Ishiguro, Dr. Edward E.Professor EmeritusDepartment of Biochemistry and Microbiology
ScienceInflamm-aging: A New Area of Aging Research NEWLow-grade chronic inflammation was recently recognized as a hallmark of the aging process. This phenomenon, called inflamm-aging, is believed to be intimately involved in overall functional decline and an increased risk to age-related chronic disease. This presentation discusses our current understanding of the mechanisms of inflamm-aging and possible therapeutic strategies.Ishiguro, Dr. Edward E.Professor EmeritusDepartment of Biochemistry and Microbiology
ScienceHuman Diet and Nutrition: The Influence of Gut Bacteria (E M S) Most of us know something about basic human nutrition. This presentation focuses on an aspect not as well known: the role of our gut bacteria in the digestive process. The presentation includes new research approaches to determine the impact of nutrition on cultivating a healthy gut bacterial population, and what we’re learning about the contributions made by these bacteria on our overall health. Ishiguro, Dr. Edward E.Professor EmeritusDepartment of Biochemistry and Microbiology
ScienceHow the Immune System Works (E M S) This is a general introduction to how our immune system protects us from harmful substances in our environment, such as infectious agents. The level of detail can be adjusted to suit the audience, i.e., any level ranging from novice to proficient.Ishiguro, Dr. Edward E.Professor EmeritusDepartment of Biochemistry and Microbiology
ScienceThe Gut Immune System Over the LifespanNote that this presentation is at least 45 minutes long. Our digestive tract is one of the most vulnerable sites in our body to infection and, not surprisingly, and contains the largest and most active tissue in our immune system. The development and function of gut immunity over the lifespan will be described with a particular focus on the role of the gut bacteria in these processes. Ishiguro, Dr. Edward E.Professor EmeritusDepartment of Biochemistry and Microbiology
ScienceRett Syndrome and the MeCP2 gene (in English or Spanish) NEWDiscussion of the role of the MeCP2 gene (and its resultant proteins) in humans—and the development of Rett Syndrome. Current research includes studies on histone-histone interactions, and on histone-DNA interactions at the nucleosome level and at the higher order structure of chromatin in prostate cancer and Rett’s Syndrome. Special attention is being paid to the influence on these interactions of biologically significant chemical modifications, both at the histone and at the DNA level (acetylation, phosphorylation, methylation) and their epigenetic contribution. Ausió, Dr. JuanProfessorDepartment of Biochemistry and Microbiology
ScienceMagnetism: Its History and Implications in Technology and Health (E M S) This talk looks at the origin of the magnetic fields in planetary dynamics, the Earth's magnetic field and its reversals over history, the role of magnetic fields in the migratory behaviour of hundreds of species, and the role of magnetism in medicine and data storage technologies.Frank, Dr. NatiaAssociate Professor Department of Chemistry
ScienceToward Nature’s Heart of Darkness: New Technologies for Precision Astrophysics and Cosmology (M S) Albert, Dr. JustinAssociate ProfessorDepartment of Physics and Astronomy
ScienceALTAIR: Precision Astrophysics and Cosmology (M S) Albert, Dr. JustinAssociate ProfessorDepartment of Physics and Astronomy
ScienceHow Understanding Fundamental Particle Interactions Helps Us Understand the Universe (M S) Albert, Dr. JustinAssociate ProfessorDepartment of Physics and Astronomy
ScienceUVic's Contributions to the Discovery of the Higgs Boson at the ATLAS Experiment (M S) Albert, Dr. JustinAssociate ProfessorDepartment of Physics and Astronomy
ScienceIn Search of Dark Matter (M S) NEWAn overview of the evidence for dark matter in our universe, and the many ways scientists are trying to figure out what it is. Morrissey, Dr. DavidAdjunct Associate ProfessorDepartment of Physics and Astronomy
ScienceThe Discovery of the Higgs Boson (M S) NEWDiscovery of the Higgs Boson: an explanation of what elementary particles are and how they get their masses from the Higgs boson.Morrissey, Dr. DavidAdjunct Associate ProfessorDepartment of Physics and Astronomy
ScienceTour of the Astronomical Observatory at UVic ǂ (E M S) This tour is intended for groups of up to 24. Approximately 20 minutes are spent in the astronomy lab answering questions, 20 minutes observing the sun, and 20 minutes in the dome observing Venus.Thanjavur, Dr. KarunSenior Lab InstructorDepartment of Physics and Astronomy
ScienceNew Technologies for Exploring the Universe NEWCanada is a leading country in technological developments that are used in astronomical instrumentation at International Observatories. This talk will review some of the most impressive and current instruments and their impact on science. It will also highlight important collaborations between Canadian academics, industry, and government labs in reaching these goals.Venn, Prof. KimProfessorDepartment of Physics and Astronomy
ScienceHabitable Planets Around Other Stars NEWNever before have we had so many techniques for discovering planets around other stars. Many of these planets are in the habitable zone, where their orbital distances are far enough for liquid water to exist on the surface—but does that mean they host life? This talk will review types of stars and planets, and discuss the requirements and likelihood for life.Venn, Prof. KimProfessorDepartment of Physics and Astronomy
ScienceThe Chemical Evolution of the Galaxy NEWShortly after the Big Bang, the Universe contained only a few elements, like hydrogen, helium, and lithium. Other elements were formed primarily in stars and distributed through the Galaxy by supernova explosions. In 2017 though, we discovered binary blackholes and binary neutron stars that send out gravitational waves as they spiral inwards, and also they make heavy elements as they merge together. This talk will review recent developments in our understanding of the origins of the elements.Venn, Prof. KimProfessorDepartment of Physics and Astronomy
ScienceThe Search for Life in the Universe (M S) Do aliens exist? Where might we find them? How will we recognize them? This talk presents the science of astrobiology—the scientific search for alien life. Take an astrobiological tour of our solar system and the newly discovered planets of our Milky Way galaxy in the quest for contact. Willis, Dr. JonAssociate ProfessorDepartment of Physics and Astronomy
ScienceEverything You’ve Ever Wanted to Know About the Big Bang but Were Afraid to Ask (M S) How big is the universe? How old is it? What happened before the Big Bang? What exactly are we expanding into? The universe we live in is as big as anything gets, with big questions to match. That doesn't mean the answers have to be complicated though. Get straightforward answers to all of the above—plus bring some of your own!Willis, Dr. JonAssociate ProfessorDepartment of Physics and Astronomy
ScienceExploring the Oceans, on Earth and Across our Solar System (M S) NEW What is it like to be an ocean explorer? Can you imagine exploring oceans on worlds beyond Earth? We will learn about the exploration of Earth's oceans and the discovery of habitats and life forms so weird that they seem almost alien. Our story will take us from undersea volcanoes off the coast of Vancouver Island to the icy wastes of Antarctica. We will talk about the ships and submersibles used to explore Earth's oceans and we will touch rocks recovered from the abyss. Beyond this, we will journey aboard robotic space probes to the moons of the giant planets Jupiter and Saturn and share in the startling discovery that some host oceans that dwarf our own. What technology might we use to one day explore within these oceans and what might we expect to find?Willis, Dr. JonAssociate ProfessorDepartment of Physics and Astronomy
ScienceNanotechnology and Materials Science (S) NEWMany side effects due to chemotherapy can be reduced by controlled delivery of anticancer drugs using smart nanomaterials. The director of nanoscience and technology development laboratory at UVic can discuss the use of nanotechnology to create innovations that advance the care of cancer patients. For instance, she is using gold nanoparticles as a radiation dose enhancer in cancer therapy. She has also developed three-dimensional tumor models to optimize bio-nano interface in cancer therapy. Chithrani, Dr. DevikaAssistant ProfessorDepartment of Physics and Astronomy
ScienceThe "Replication Crisis" in Psychology and Other Sciences (S) Psychology, biology, medicine, and even physics have been shaken by recent evidence that discoveries published in prestigious journals often fail to be reproduced when other researchers attempt to replicate the original experiments. This talk explains flaws in widely used research procedures that contribute to high rates of non-replicability.Lindsay, Dr. SteveProfessorDepartment of Psychology
ScienceFlatulence and the Human Microbiome (S) NEW Sullivan, Dr. StephenAffiliate Associate ProfessorIsland Medical Program
ScienceLearning about Conspiracy Theories: Why Do People Choose to Reject Science? (M S)The triple disaster of the earthquake, tsunami and nuclear reactor meltdowns that struck Japan in March 2011 led to the release of massive amounts of radioactive isotopes into the environment. Despite the high local levels in Japan, and global reach of contamination from Fukushima, the international scientific community has determined that the short and long-term impacts on environmental and human health will be difficult to detect. While most public response to the speaker’s work on the Fukushima disaster has been positive, he has faced attacks on his professional and personal integrity. This lecture explores how and why individuals choose to reject science and expertise, and what the consequences of such a mindset are for public policy on complicated and/or controversial matters.Cullen, Dr. JayAssociate ProfessorSchool of Earth and Ocean Sciences
ScienceDestination Mars: Using Neuroscience to Facilitate Long-duration Space Travel NEWDr. Krigolson is starting a new collaborative project with the NASA Mars mission. In this talk he will talk about this research and the viability and concerns related to long-duration space missions.Krigolson, Dr. Olav E.Associate ProfessorSchool of Exercise Science, Physical and Health Education
ScienceHuman Smell and Its Relationship to Disease and Dementia ǂ (M S)Humans can smell better than you think. In fact, the idea that humans can’t smell as well as other mammals is a myth. In this talk find out how your sense of smell (olfaction) works and how it’s involved in diagnosing several diseases such as Alzheimer’s and Parkinson’s disease. Knight, Ms. JamieGraduate StudentDepartment of Psychology
Work and EmploymentTake the Leap: Preparing Your Conference Proposal (S) NEWWe often delete conference calls for proposals—yet we have so much to offer our colleagues. Not only will this engaging workshop address common barriers and strategize ways to get past them, you will develop a custom proposal that you can submit to the next “call for proposal”.Oakes, Ms. JenniferAcademic AdvisorAcademic Advising for Humanities, Science and Social Sciences
Work and EmploymentTake the Leap: Presentation Mastery (S) NEWBuild your confidence, learn new strategies and create an extraordinary presentation for your next conference, classroom presentation or public speaking event. Oakes, Ms. JenniferAcademic AdvisorAcademic Advising for Humanities, Science and Social Sciences
Work and EmploymentInfluence: Sources of Individual Power and How to Lead Without a Title (S) NEW Bassi, Mr. NavDirector Academic Services and Administrative Services
Work and EmploymentBeyond Diversity and Human Rights: How to Create Inclusive Spaces for Social Change (in English or French) (M S) Magassa, Mr. MoussaHuman Rights Advisor - Education Equity and Human Rights Office
Work and EmploymentIntercultural Conflict Resolution (in English or French) (M S) Magassa, Mr. MoussaHuman Rights Advisor - Education Equity and Human Rights Office
Work and EmploymentCrafting Your Elevator Pitch (S) NEWTake a step-by-step approach to building your own elevator pitch that you can use to introduce yourself in a professional setting. Learn how to describe who you are, what you can do, why you are doing it and what your goals are.Croft, Ms. HeatherWeb and Communications CoordinatorOffice of the Registrar
Work and EmploymentThe Non-linear Career Path (S) NEWWhile Heather started out in the sciences, she made a series of career hops to land in the online communications field. Follow along her career journey to learn how she figured out how to get paid to do something she loves.Croft, Ms. HeatherWeb and Communications CoordinatorOffice of the Registrar
Work and EmploymentBusiness and Sustainability: Integrating Sustainability into an Organization's Culture and Employees' Day-to-day Actions (S) NEWOrganizations are increasingly interested in tackling pressing social and environmental problems. A key way in which they can do this is by integrating sustainability into their organizational culture and every employee's daily work. Yet this process can be fraught with challenges. This presentation helps equip organizations and the change agents within them to effectively overcome these challenges.Pek, Dr. SimonAssistant ProfessorPeter B. Gustavson School of Business
Work and EmploymentInteracting Effectively With People Who are Different than You (in English or Spanish) (S) NEW Flores, Dr. RicardoAssistant ProfessorPeter B. Gustavson School of Business
Work and EmploymentLeadership Inside and Outside Organizations (in English or Spanish) (S) NEW Flores, Dr. RicardoAssistant ProfessorPeter B. Gustavson School of Business
Work and EmploymentLeading Others—and Yourself (in English or Spanish) (S) NEW Flores, Dr. RicardoAssistant ProfessorPeter B. Gustavson School of Business
Work and EmploymentEmotional Intelligence and Cultural Diversity (S)This presentation is designed for organizations (profit/non-profit) to enhance their understanding of EQ (within leadership and management) and how to embrace cultural diversity using emotional intelligence. Leacock, Prof. BrianAssociate Director, International ProgramsPeter B. Gustavson School of Business
Work and EmploymentNew to the Workforce: Managing Employees Through Engagement, Feedback and Professional Development NEWLearn strategies for supervising and working with recent graduate or individuals new to the workforce. This might include hiring practices, onboarding techniques, supporting professional development, and goal setting. Common challenges and pitfalls, and the opportunities that come with new employees will also be discussed.Thors, Ms. KalenneTraining and Assessment SpecialistResidence Services
Work and EmploymentMeaningful and Engaging Training: Make the Most of Staff and Volunteer Training Time NEWTraining and onboarding can be key to an employee or volunteers success with your organization. What to consider and ways to set up training for groups to ensure a smooth transition experience will be covered. What information to transmit and why, and how to ensure learning is occurring will be discussed.Thors, Ms. KalenneTraining and Assessment SpecialistResidence Services
Work and EmploymentFacilitation Tactics and Techniques for Engaging Meeting, Workshops or Presentations NEWA hands-on introduction and a chance to learn and practice a variety of facilitation techniques to keep groups engaged in meetings and workshops will be covered. Participatory pieces can be easily introduced into many contexts, get some ideas of how to start and why it is important for engagement.Thors, Ms. KalenneTraining and Assessment SpecialistResidence Services
Work and EmploymentCareer Management and Your Work Search (M S) NEWStrategies to effectively conduct a work search, including how to align with career interests and methods to access the hidden job market. Stevens, Ms. BeverlyRetireeRetirees Association
Work and EmploymentResume and Cover Letter Preparation (M S) NEWResume and Cover Letter Preparation covers content and presentation employers are looking for in cover letters and resumes and techniques to increase the probability of being asked for an interview. Stevens, Ms. BeverlyRetireeRetirees Association
Work and EmploymentInterview Skills (M S) NEWStrategies to ensure a successful interview and increase the chances of receiving a job offer. Stevens, Ms. BeverlyRetireeRetirees Association
Work and EmploymentStrategic Planning This lecture/workshop is designed to help organizations evaluate and and enhance their strategic planning efforts.Wikkramatileke, Dr. Rhordon Instructor and Curriculum DeveloperDivision of Continuing Studies
Work and EmploymentUnderstanding Passion in Organizations: Using Sport as a Lens (in English or French) (S) Wolfe, Dr. RichardAdjunct Professor Peter B. Gustavson School of Business
Work and EmploymentUnderstanding Unconscious Bias in Cultural Contexts (S) NEWWorkshop session designed to help individuals identify their unconscious biases and to provide practical strategies for using that understanding to improve performance when working across cultures. Leacock, Prof. BrianAssociate Director, International ProgramsPeter B. Gustavson School of Business
Work and EmploymentReframing Your Organization: Are You Working Well? (S)Multi-frame thinking and decision-making can help managers and leaders develop a strategic planning process when an organization is ready for change. This workshop is of value for anyone who has a vision or plan for renewal within their organization—a plan to help their organization, department or section to “work well.”Lauzon, Dr. LaraAssociate ProfessorSchool of Exercise Science, Physical and Health Education
World AffairsRussian Foreign PolicyThis presentation looks at how US President Trump is considering accepting a Russian zone of influence in Eastern Europe to reach reconciliation with Russia. The president is unlikely to achieve his goal. What Russia is seeking is more than a zone of influence—it wants to be recognized as a great power equal in status with the US.Fraser, Dr. DerekAdjunct Professor, Associate FellowCentre for Global Studies
World AffairsUnderstanding Ukraine This presentation looks at how Ukraine has been hampered in achieving a stable democracy. Ukraine had no previous experience as an independent state, it lacked much of the apparatus of a state, had never experienced democracy, had no knowledge of a market economy, and did not receive an offer of EU membership. Russia has sought to block Ukraine’s move toward democracy and the West.Fraser, Dr. DerekAdjunct Professor, Associate FellowCentre for Global Studies
World AffairsUkrainian-Russian RelationsThis presentation looks at how Russia has long sought to bring the Ukraine back under its control. The invasion in the Donbas region of Ukraine is part of that effort.Fraser, Dr. DerekAdjunct Professor, Associate FellowCentre for Global Studies
World AffairsThe Roots of Russian Western Policy Since Tsarist times, Russian foreign and defence policy has sought to have a buffer zone between Russia and Western Europe.Fraser, Dr. DerekAdjunct Professor, Associate FellowCentre for Global Studies
World AffairsRural-to-Urban Migration in Indonesian Education: Ethnic Minority Students in Java ǂ (M S) NEWThe modern Republic of Indonesia includes hundreds of ethnic groups and over 16,000 islands to form what some scholars call "the unlikely nation." Indonesia has the world's fourth-largest population and is the most populous Muslim-majority nation, spread across the world's largest archipelago. My current research relates to Indonesia's cultural diversity, and the "educational migration" of ethnic and religious minority students from rural Eastern regions who come to universities in cities on the main island of Java. In Java, these minorities face challenges and discrimination as they seek to improve themselves through higher education. Foertsch, Mr. ChrisGraduate StudentDepartment of Anthropology
World AffairsSpice Dreams in Indonesia: Travel Among Mega-cities, Islands and Volcanoes of the World's Largest Archipelago ǂ (M S) NEW Foertsch, Mr. ChrisGraduate StudentDepartment of Anthropology
World AffairsBeyond Debt: Islamic Experiments in Global Finance (S) NEWThis lecture is an introduction to Islamic finance, which seeks to enable commercial activity without using interest-bearing debt. It describes efforts to create an Islamic alternative to the global financial system based in New York, London and Hong Kong.Rudnyckyj, Dr. DaromirAssociate ProfessorDepartment of Anthropology
World AffairsThe Palestinian-Israeli Conflict (M S) The complexities of the Israeli-Palestinian conflict and possible solutions, as well as the differing narratives of Israeli Jews and Palestinian Arabs, are the topics of this talk and discussion. A longer historic framework for considering each side’s claims will be one focus of this talk. Another concern is how Canadians can constructively involve themselves in activism on this topic.Shlensky, Dr. Lincoln Z.Associate ProfessorDepartment of English
World AffairsSouth Asian Migrations (in English or Bengali) (S) Bose, Dr. NeileshAssistant Professor and Canada Research ChairDepartment of History
World AffairsRural Landscapes of Change in China (S) NEWOverview of the dramatic transformation in the countryside of contemporary China focusing on agriculture, rural industry and social change.Marton, Dr. AndrewProfessorDepartment of Pacific and Asian Studies
World AffairsIndia, Pakistan, Afghanistan and KashmirLooking at the enduring rivalry between two nuclear powers, and a seven decade old mass-based nationalist movement and political insurgency in Kashmir.Tremblay, Dr. ReetaProfessorDepartment of Political Science
World AffairsMulticulturalism in South Asia—a Comparative PerspectiveDesign of a political, constitutional framework in a religiously, linguistically divided society and the rise of Hindu fundamentalism.Tremblay, Dr. ReetaProfessorDepartment of Political Science
World AffairsRegional Security and Peace in South Asia Enduring rivalry between India and Pakistan and the prospects of peace in Afghanistan - Pakistan and the Taliban.Tremblay, Dr. ReetaProfessorDepartment of Political Science
World AffairsThe Changing Context of India’s Foreign Policy NEW Tremblay, Dr. ReetaProfessorDepartment of Political Science
World AffairsBREXIT: Why BREXIT Happened, and how it will Impact the UK, the European Union and Canada (in English or French) (S) NEW Brunet-Jailly, Dr. EmmanuelProfessor and Jean Monnet ChairSchool of Public Administration
World AffairsImmigration and Borders (in English or French) (S) NEWThe 2015 immigration crisis is not just a European, but world wide crisis that is also affecting North America, including Canada. What should we know about immigration, and how border policies mitigate such phenomenon?Brunet-Jailly, Dr. EmmanuelProfessor and Jean Monnet ChairSchool of Public Administration
World AffairsEthiopia: UVic Partnerships in Human Rights and Social Work Education In the last 10 years UVic and Addis Ababa University have forged many creative and useful links. Educators from Ethiopia have traveled to Victoria and interned with various professors and human rights educators. UVic faculty have traveled to Ethiopia and had the opportunity to learn and teach there. Dealing with conflict in the context of culture, the development of teaching capacity and exchanging knowledge and life experience have enriched educators here and hopefully in Ethiopia.Whittington, Dr. BarbaraProfessor EmertitusSchool of Social Work