Courses

Use the course search to browse all courses offered in the upcoming summer session. For dates and times check the online timetable or click 'Schedule' under each course.

Course search

ADMN 316 - Written Communications in the Public and Non-Profit Sectors

Units: 1.5

Schedule

Topics include how to: analyze a communication task; identify the topic, purpose and audience; write and edit professionally with a good command of standard written English and principles of plain language; gather, paraphrase, summarize, analyze or interpret complex information from print and electronic sources; describe complex policies and procedures; apply the principles of document structure and design; write proposals; and design and develop the types of documents required in the public and non-profit sectors.

Notes:

Credit will be granted for only one of 316, ENGL 302.

Students should take this course early in their Diploma program.

ADMN 470 - Contemporary Topics in Administration

Units: 1.5-3.0

Schedule

A study of selected topics drawn from the current literature and practices in public administration or related fields.

Notes:

May be taken more than once for credit in different topics.

ADMN 477 - Strategic Planning and Implementation

Units: 1.5

Schedule

Examines strategic planning processes and how strategic goals can be implemented in public sector organizations. Strategic planning topics include stakeholder analysis; developing mission, value and vision statements; environmental scanning; transforming strategic plans into policies and programs; management tactics; and assessing organizational performance. Implementation topics include: deploying resources; quality control; strategic communication; budgeting; team building; problem solving; progress assessment; completion; and evaluation.

Notes:

Credit will be granted for only one of 477, 411, 412, 470 (if taken in the same topic), 577.

ADMN 502B - Data Analysis & Interpretation

Units: 1.5

Schedule

Develops skills in understanding, evaluating and applying techniques of data analysis relevant to policy analysis and management research. Topics include: descriptive and inferential statistics; techniques of estimation in the context of opinion polls and related survey research methods; statistical testing using data collected from survey research, correlational studies, and experimental and quasi-experimental research designs. The computer lab component will allow students to further develop spreadsheet skills using EXCEL.

Prerequisites:

502A or PADR 502A or permission of the department.

ADMN 512 - Resource Accountability and Management in the Public Sector

Units: 1.5

Schedule

Explores the budgeting cycle: budget preparation and execution, internal and external auditing, financial statements, and performance budgeting and reporting. Examines management tools that support resource allocation decisions and accountability. Considers the rationale for alternative goods and services provision arrangements. Reviews evidence-based approaches for efficient resource allocation decisions, benchmarking performance, and incentives to motivate employees and contractors. Explores public sector fiscal challenges.

ADMN 551 - Administrative Justice System in Canada

Units: 1.5
Formerly: 551A and 551B.

Schedule

Examines constitutional and administrative law structures and principles that underlie Canada's administrative justice system. Students develop critical understanding of (1) characteristics of federal and provincial systems, (2) legal principles under which statutory decision-making is done, (3) process and principles applied to development of administrative justice system legislation, (4) breadth and influence of tribunal decisions on activities of Canadians. Examples are drawn from federal and provincial levels; comparisons to US, UK and France as appropriate.

Notes:

Credit will be granted for only one of 551, 551A, 551B.

ADMN 582 - Topics in Program Evaluation, Performance Measurement, Performance Management and Knowledge Management

Units: 1.5

Schedule

Designed to explore contemporary issues and problems in the field of evaluation and performance management. Topics will be selected for each offering of the course; examples of topics to be included are: contribution analysis; gaming of performance measurement; professionalizing evaluation; managing knowledge creation and its uses in complex organizations; understanding and influencing organization cultures to increase and sustain knowledge utilization; audit and evaluation; comparative evaluation; and evaluation in developing countries.

ADMN 596 - Evaluation Project

Units: 4.5

Schedule

The evaluation project is a substantial evaluation of a policy or program designed and conducted for a public sector or non-profit organization. Each evaluation project will have a client and will be supervised by a faculty member in the School of Public Administration. The completed project report will be assessed by a committee consisting of the academic supervisor, a second reader (both members of the School of Public administration), and the client for the project.

Grading: INP, COM, N F.

ADMN 598 - Master's Project

Units: 4.5

Schedule

Requires a substantial analysis of a management, policy or program problem for a client in the nonprofit or public sector. The Master's Project is completed in consultation with the client and an academic supervisor in the School of Public Administration and must be both practical and academically rigorous. A written project report is defended in an oral examination. For more information, please refer to the School of Public Administration website.

Grading: INP, COM, N, F.

ADMN 599 - Master's Thesis

Units: 6.0

Schedule

Requires a substantial contribution to the knowledge in the field of Public Administration. An MPA Thesis will demonstrate a student's mastery of a substantive body of scholarly or practice literature as well as using appropriate and academically defensible methodologies to analyze research questions, test hypotheses or contribute new theoretical knowledge. Individual students will work with an academic supervisor in the School of Public Administration.

Grading: INP, COM, N, F.

ADMN 693 - PhD Candidacy Examination

Units: 3.0

Schedule

Students enrol in ADMN 693 for the duration of their preparation for their candidacy examinations. This begins at the time a student first enrols in the PhD program and continues until candidacy requirements have been completed.

Grading: INP, COM, N, F.

ADMN 699 - Dissertation

Units: 30.0

Schedule

Prerequisites:

693.

Grading: INP, COM, N, F.

AE 200 - Design

Units: 1.5

Schedule

Creative problem solving through art. A studio exploration of the elements and principles of art, media and processes, and the development of ideas in fine and applied art. Consideration is given to the ways in which this theory and practical experience can be applied in a variety of teaching and learning contexts.

AE 201 - Image Development

Units: 1.5

Schedule

A survey of methods and practices of innovative image transformation and development of skills and techniques through studio exploration. Instructional applications in various learning environments are considered.

AE 303A - Ceramics I

Units: 1.5
Formerly: part of 303

Schedule

Fundamental ceramics skills of hand-building, wheel throwing and glazing. The history of clay and study of the principles of form. A projects-based studio course.

Notes:

Credit will be granted for only one of 303A, 303.

AE 305 - Drawing

Units: 1.5

Schedule

Development of skills and teaching methods in drawing through studio exploration. Instructional applications in various learning environments are considered.

Notes:

Credit will be granted for only one of 305, 302.

AE 306 - Painting

Units: 1.5

Schedule

Development of skills and teaching methods in painting through studio exploration. Instructional applications in various learning environments are considered.

Notes:

Credit will be granted for only one of 306, 302.

Supply list available from MacLaurin A430 or at <www.educ.ca/edci>.

AE 307 - Printmaking

Units: 1.5

Schedule

An introduction to printmaking including its history, related concepts, and selected studio techniques. Exploration and experimentation are emphasized as a means of skill development. Instructional applications in various learning environments are considered.

Notes:

Credit will be granted for only one of 307, 300.

AE 308 - Sculpture

Units: 1.5

Schedule

Development of skills and teaching methods in sculpture through studio exploration. Instructional applications in various learning environments are considered.

Notes:

Credit will be granted for only one of 308, 301.

AE 309 - Ceramics: Hand Building

Units: 1.5

Schedule

Studio experience in the methods and techniques of hand-built ceramics and their application to different levels of student development; appropriate curriculum, assessment, and critiquing strategies.

AE 319 - Photography

Units: 1.5

Schedule

Basic approaches to photography as an art medium. An exploration of concepts and methods appropriate to elementary and secondary classrooms and other educational settings from simple technologies such as photograms and pinhole photography to 35 mm cameras and darkroom procedures.

AE 322 - Digital Arts

Units: 1.5

Schedule

An introductory survey of digital media production focusing on graphics, 2D animation, 3D modelling and animation, audio, video, and website construction. Students will learn to generate media ideas, collect resources, construct and edit concepts using industry-standard software packages. Emphasizes the production and teaching of digital media for creative, educational, and commercial environments. No previous computer experience is required.

AGEI 473 - Chronic Disease and Ageing

Units: 1.5

Schedule

Chronic diseases are very prevalent among the elderly, and their management has a major influence on the health, functionality and quality of life of older people. The growing body of evidence and experience in the delivery of high quality, safe, effective care will be examined and the design of systems that encourage and support high quality care will be explored. The role of chronic disease self-management and social support networks will be an important focus.

ANTH 100 - Introduction to Anthropology

Units: 1.5
Formerly: 100A, 100B

Schedule

An introductory survey of the sub-fields of anthropology: biological anthropology, archaeology, cultural and social anthropology, and linguistic anthropology. Topics include the human fossil record, the archaeological record from Paleolithic cultures to urban civilizations, and examination of contemporary human societies, drawn from various levels of complexity.

Notes:

Credit will be granted for only one of 100, 100A, 100B.

ANTH 200 - Cultural and Social Anthropology

Units: 1.5
Formerly: 200A, 200B

Schedule

Introduction to the analysis of sociocultural systems. Major topics include subsistence, production and distribution, social organization, politics, religion, kinship, symbolic systems, and cultural change from an international perspective.

Notes:

Credit will be granted for only one of 200, 200A, 200B.

Prerequisites:

Minimum second-year standing or permission of the department.

ANTH 302 - Globalization, Health, and the Environment

Units: 1.5

Schedule

A comparative framework for understanding the relationship between global processes, the environment and health. Topics include social and economic inequalities, violence, gender, diet, health policies, technologies, pandemics, climate change, and health care industries. Emphasis on how local experiences of health are linked to global processes via the environment.

Prerequisites:

Minimum second-year standing.

ANTH 343 - Archaeological Field Techniques

Units: 1.5

Schedule

Training in the methods and techniques of archaeology through participation in a field project. Complements the regional topics of 344, with which it will normally be combined to form the archaeological field school.

Notes:

Credit will be granted for only one of 343, 390 (if taken in the same topic).

Prerequisites:

240 and permission of the department.

ANTH 344 - Regional Topics in Archaeology

Units: 1.5

Schedule

Intensive study of topics in archaeological method and theory relevant to the interpretation of a single site or region. Complements the applied archaeological research of 343, with which it will normally be combined to form the archaeological field school.

Notes:

Credit will be granted for only one of 344, 390 (if taken in the same topic).

May be taken more than once for credit with permission of the department if regional focus is different.

Prerequisites:

240 and permission of the department.

ANTH 352 - Human Osteology

Units: 1.5
Formerly: 451

Schedule

Theoretical and methodological approaches to the study of human skeletal remains.

Notes:

Credit will be granted for only one of 352, 451.

Prerequisites:

250.

ANTH 391 - Selected Problems in Anthropology: Ethnology

Units: 1.5
Formerly: 390

Schedule

Presentation of selected problems in anthropology.

Notes:

* Contact hours may vary depending on the topic.

Credit will be granted for only one of 391, 390 (if taken in the same topic).

May be repeated under different topics.

Topics and prerequisite information will be provided by the departmental office.

Prerequisites:

Set by department depending upon topic.

For students without a declared Major or Honours in Anthropology, permission of the department.

ANTH 393 - Selected Problems in Anthropology: Cultural Anthropology

Units: 1.5
Formerly: 390

Schedule

Presentation of selected problems in anthropology.

Notes:

* Contact hours may vary depending on the topic.

Credit will be granted for only one of 393, 390, 390A (if taken in the same topic).

May be repeated under different topics.

Topics and prerequisite information will be provided by the departmental office.

Prerequisites:

Set by department depending upon topic.

For students without a declared Major or Honours in Anthropology, permission of the department.

ANTH 395 - Selected Problems in Anthropology: Method and Theory

Units: 1.5
Formerly: 390

Schedule

Presentation of selected problems in anthropology.

Notes:

* Contact hours may vary depending on the topic.

Credit will be granted for only one of 395, 390, 390A, 390B, 390C, 390D (if taken in the same topic).

May be repeated under different topics.

Topics and prerequisite information will be provided by the departmental office.

Prerequisites:

Set by department depending upon topic.

For students without a declared Major or Honours in Anthropology, permission of the department.

ANTH 597 - Thesis Proposal Development

Units: 0.0-3.0

Schedule

Offered every term, for MA students who have completed their first two terms and are preparing their thesis proposals. After the proposal is approved, students enrol in 599.

Grading: INP, COM.

ANTH 598 - Comprehensive Examinations

Units: 0

Schedule

Notes:

Enrolment restricted to non-thesis MAs only.

Grading: INP, COM, N, F.

ANTH 599 - Thesis

Units: 7.5

Schedule

Grading: INP, COM, N, F.

ANTH 693 - Doctoral Candidacy Examinations

Units: 3.0

Schedule

Offered on an ongoing basis. Candidacy must be reached by the end of the third year in the program. Successful completion of 693 is a pre-requisite for registration in 699 (Dissertation).

Grading: INP, COM, N, F.

ANTH 699 - PhD Dissertation

Units: 20

Schedule

Prerequisites:

ANTH 693.

Grading: INP, COM, N, F.

ART 334 - Multi-Media Printmaking

Units: 3.0

Schedule

A studio course placing emphasis on the use of a variety of media in printmaking.

Notes:

Class size is limited. May be taken more than once for credit with permission of the department to a maximum of 6 units.

Prerequisites:

9 units of 200-level Visual Arts courses.

ART 351 - Special Studies

Units: 1.5 or 3.0

Schedule

The study of a specialized topic or area and its relationship to practice.

Notes:

May be taken more than once for credit in different topics.

Normally class size is limited.

Prerequisites:

Minimum of 12 units in 100- and 200-level courses, or permission of the department.

ART 570 - Directed Study

Units: 3.0

Schedule

An independent study course normally taken during the semester between the student's first and second year.

ASTR 102 - Exploring the Cosmos

Units: 1.5
Formerly: part of ASTR 120

Schedule

A general course designed for non-science students. An exploration of how astronomical observations guide and challenge our understanding of the fundamental laws of nature. Cosmology, and the elusive dark matter and dark energy that determine the universe's fate. Stars, galaxies, and relics left over by the Big Bang. Black holes and relativity; supernovae and neutron stars. Practical work includes observations with campus telescopes.

Notes:

Credit will be granted for only one of 102, 120.

BCMB 298 - Research Experience

Units: 0

Schedule

Experimental research under the direction of department members. For second-year students who wish to gain some experience in biochemical or microbiological research. Interested students should contact the course coordinator by the first week of classes.

Prerequisites:

Permission of the department.

Grading: COM, N, F.

BCMB 301A - Lab Techniques &amp; Projects I

Units: 1.5
Formerly: part of BIOC 301, MICR 301

Schedule

Fundamental biochemical, microbiological and molecular biological laboratory techniques are applied to the development of practical and analytical laboratory skills in projects run as multi-week labs. Acquired laboratory techniques may include: bioinformatics; buffers; SDS-PAGE; protein purification; ELISA; Western blot; culturing hybridomas; enzyme kinetics.

Notes:

Credit will be granted for only one of 301A, BIOC 301.

Limited enrolment.

Prerequisites:

MICR 200A and 200B; and

declared BSc Biochemistry or Microbiology, or permission of the department.

Pre or co requisites:

BIOC 300A or 300B.

BCMB 301B - Lab Techniques &amp; Projects II

Units: 1.5
Formerly: part of BIOC 301, MICR 302

Schedule

Building on BCMB 301A, practical and analytical laboratory skills are applied to increasingly complex laboratory projects. Students are expected to develop time management skills, apply knowledge to new problems, and learn to communicate scientific results. Acquired laboratory techniques may include: enzyme inhibition; gel electrophoresis; immunodetection; microbial quantification and characterization; molecular cloning; transposon mutagenesis; and, culturing HeLa cells.

Notes:

Credit will be granted for only one of 301B, BIOC 301.

Prerequisites:

301A.

Pre or co requisites:

BIOC 300A or 300B.

BCMB 398 - Research Experience

Units: 0

Schedule

Experimental research under the direction of department members. For third-year students who wish to gain some experience in biochemical or microbiological research. Interested students should contact the course coordinator by the first week of classes.

Prerequisites:

Permission of the department.

Grading: COM, N, F.

BCMB 498 - Research Experience

Units: 0

Schedule

Experimental research under the direction of department members. For fourth-year students who wish to gain some experience in biochemical or microbiological research. Interested students should contact the course coordinator by the first week of classes.

Prerequisites:

Permission of the department.

Grading: COM, N, F.

BCMB 580 - Research Seminar

Units: 0
Formerly: BIOC and MICR 580

Schedule

Requires attendance and participation at all departmental seminars, and the formal presentation of the research that comprises the major portion of the student's MSc thesis in biochemistry or microbiology, or the major portion of the currently completed and proposed research for students intending to transfer to the PhD program.

Grading: INP, COM, N, F.

BCMB 680 - Advanced Research Seminar

Units: 0
Formerly: BIOC and MICR 680

Schedule

Requires attendance and participation at all departmental seminars, and the formal presentation of the research that comprises the major portion of the student's PhD thesis work in biochemistry or microbiology.

Prerequisites:

580, or BIOC or MICR 580 or permission of the department.

Grading: INP, COM, N, F.

BCMB 693 - PhD Candicacy Examination

Units: 3.0

Schedule

Students enrol in BCMB 693 upon provisional transfer to the BIOC or MICR PhD program and remain enrolled until all candidacy requirements are complete.

Grading: INP, COM, N, F.

BIOC 300A - General Biochemistry I

Units: 1.5
Formerly: part of 300

Schedule

BIOC 300A and 300B are intended to provide detailed coverage of foundation topics for students majoring in biochemistry or microbiology and must be taken sequentially. Protein structure and function, enzymes and enzyme kinetics, carbohydrates, lipids, biological membranes and bioenergetics.

Notes:

Credit will be granted for only one of 300A, 300.

CHEM 213 is recommended prior to taking this course.

A minimum grade of C+ is recommended in all prerequisites.

Prerequisites:

BIOL 225 and CHEM 231; and

CHEM 232 or 235.

BIOC 300B - General Biochemistry II

Units: 1.5
Formerly: part of 300

Schedule

BIOC 300A and 300B are intended to provide detailed coverage of foundation topics for students majoring in biochemistry or microbiology. Metabolic processes and their control, as well as structure and function of DNA, RNA and genes.

Notes:

Credit will be granted for only one of 300B, 300.

CHEM 213 is recommended prior to taking this course.

A minimum grade of C+ is recommended in all prerequisites.

Prerequisites:

All of 300A, BIOL 225, CHEM 231; and

CHEM 232 or 235.

Grading:

BIOC 599 - MSc Thesis: Biochemistry

Units: to be determined

Schedule

Grading: INP, COM, N, F.

BIOC 699 - PhD Dissertation: Biochemistry

Units: to be determined

Schedule

Corequisites:

BCMB 693.

Grading: INP, COM, N, F.

BIOL 150B - Modern Biology

Units: 1.5

Schedule

An introduction to biological science, emphasizing cellular and physiological processes. Topics include principles of genetics, cell biology, plant physiology and animal physiology.

Notes:

Not open to students with credit in any of 150, 184, 186, 190A, 190B.

150A and 150B may be taken in any order.

150B cannot be taken concurrently with any of 184, 186. Major and Honours students, see "Notes on Course Requirements".

BIOL 184 - Evolution and Biodiversity

Units: 1.5
Formerly: part of 190B

Schedule

An introductory course in the biological sciences. Evolutionary theory, Mendelian genetics, mitosis and the cell cycle, meiosis and sexual life cycles, and diversity of prokaryotes, protists, plants, fungi, invertebrates and craniates.

Notes:

Credit will be granted for only one of 184, 190B.

184 and 186 may be taken in any order.

Prerequisites:

One of Biology 11, Biology 12, BIOL150A, 150B, 186, passing a placement exam.

BIOL 186 - Physiology and Cell Biology

Units: 1.5
Formerly: part of 190A

Schedule

An introductory course in the biological sciences. Biological chemistry, cellular diversity, membrane structure and function, energy transduction, DNA replication. Structure, growth, nutrition, and development of plants; principles of animal physiology including homeostatic mechanisms, circulation, gas exchange, osmoregulation, thermoregulation, defense systems, chemical signalling, reproduction and development.

Notes:

Credit will be granted for only one of 186, 190A.

A high school or university chemistry course is recommended prior to taking this course.

184 and 186 may be taken in any order.

Prerequisites:

One of Biology 11, Biology 12, BIOL150A, 150B, 186, passing a placement exam.

BIOL 225 - Principles of Cell Biology

Units: 1.5

Schedule

An introduction to cellular, subcellular, and molecular structure/function relationships in eukaryotic cells. Membrane structure and dynamics, membrane transport, protein sorting, vesicular transport, endocytic pathways, extracellular matrices, interactions with the cellular and acellular environments, endomembrane system, cytoskeleton and motility, cellular reproduction, mechanisms of cell signalling, techniques in cell biology.

Notes:

Credit will be granted for only one of 225, 200.

Prerequisites:

One of 186, 190A, permission of the department.

Pre or co requisites:

One of 184, 190B, MICR 200A, permission of the department.

BIOL 329 - Biology of the Vertebrates of British Columbia

Units: 1.5

Schedule

Factors that influence the organization, distribution, and diversity of vertebrates in BC. Topics include: natural history, systematics, sample design, biodiversity, and conservation initiatives. Course goals are to appreciate the diversity of vertebrates and understand life histories and species-at-risk issues. The lab will focus on identification of over 400 species of vertebrates by using calls, digital images, and study skins. Optional field trips. Attendance at the Annual Vertebrate Symposium is mandatory.

Prerequisites:

215 and minimum third-year standing.

BIOL 360 - Cell Biology

Units: 1.5

Schedule

Structure and function of animal and plant cells and tissues, membrane structure, transport, cellular compartments, cytoskeleton, cell growth and division, cell adhesion, extracellular matrix, tissue organization and renewal.

Prerequisites:

230; and

one of BIOC 299, 300A, 300B (300A or 300B may be taken as corequisites).

BIOL 361 - Molecular Genetics and Genomics

Units: 1.5

Schedule

Naturally occurring and induced genetic mutations leading to phenotypic variation within and among species in a diversity of eukaryotic taxa. Regulation of transcription and translation (including small regulatory RNAs), protein-protein interactions, molecular mechanisms of tumor formation, genome structure and mobile genetic elements, and functional genomics.

Prerequisites:

230; and

one of BIOC 299, 300A, 300B (300A or 300B may be taken as corequisites).

BIOL 400 - History of Biology

Units: 1.5

Schedule

The historical development of the major techniques and ideas of biology, including the significance of the important historical contributors to biology.

Notes:

Only one of 400 and 489 may be counted as an upper-level credit toward degree programs in Biology.

Prerequisites:

Minimum third-year standing.

BIOL 499A - Honours Thesis I

Units: 1.5
Formerly: part of 499

Schedule

The first stage of a research project conducted under the direction of a faculty member. Open to Honours students only.

Notes:

Credit will be granted for only one of 499A and 499B, 499.

499A and 499B are “tied” courses and must be taken in consecutive terms except with permission of the department.

Credit for 499A will be assigned only upon successful completion of 499B.

Prerequisites:

Permission of the department.

Grading: INP, standard grade (assigned upon completion of 499B; if 499B is not completed, a grade equivalent to N will be assigned to 499A).

BIOL 499B - Honours Thesis II

Units: 1.5
Formerly: part of 499

Schedule

Continuation of a research project conducted under the direction of a faculty member. Open to Honours students only.

Notes:

Credit will be granted for only one of 499A and 499B, 499.

499A and 499B are “tied” courses and must be taken in consecutive terms except with permission of the department.

Credit for 499A will be assigned only upon successful completion of both courses.

Prerequisites:

499A.

BIOL 560 - Annual Biology Graduate Symposium

Units: 1.0

Schedule

Required of all graduate students every year of their degree program except by permission of the department. Shall be treated, in its grading, as the thesis or the dissertation and shall be given one unit of credit upon completion.

Grading: INP, COM, N, F.

BIOL 599 - Thesis

Units: 12.0

Schedule

Grading: INP, COM, N, F.

BIOL 693 - PhD Candicacy Examination

Units: 3.0

Schedule

Students enrol in BIOL 693 upon registering in the PhD program (or upon switching to the PhD program from the MSc program) and remain enrolled until all candidacy requirements are complete.

The candidacy examination must be held within 21 months of a student entering the PhD program. Students transferring from the MSc to the PhD program must complete the exam within 18 months from their entry into the PhD.

Grading: INP, COM, N, F.

BIOL 699 - PhD Dissertation

Units: ranges from 24 to 39

Schedule

Corequisites:

693.

Grading: INP, COM, N, F.

BME 200 - Molecular and Cellular Physiology for Engineers

Units: 1.5

Schedule

Examines the basic structures and processes that make up cells and tissues, including protein synthesis, cellular tissues, and control of cellular processes, using principles from engineering kinetics and transport processes.

Prerequisites:

CHEM 101 or 150; and

one of PHYS 111, 112, 125, 130.

BME 201 - Quantitative Human Physiology

Units: 1.5

Schedule

Introduction to human physiology at the level necessary for advanced work in biomedical engineering, including properties of organ systems such as the nervous, endocrine, muscular, cardiovascular and respiratory systems.

Prerequisites:

CHEM 101 or 150; and

one of PHYS 111, 112, 125, 130.

BME 403 - Medical Image Processing

Units: 1.5
Also: ELEC 435

Schedule

Image processing and understanding techniques applied in medical imaging technologies such as CT, MRI, ultrasound, X-ray. Design of computer aided diagnosis systems. Topics include algorithms for filtering, edge detection, segmentation, registration and 3D visualization of medical data.

Notes:

Credit will be granted for only one of 403, ELEC 435.

Prerequisites:

ELEC 310.

BME 499 - Design Project

Units: 1.5

Schedule

A significant technical design project in Biomedical Engineering completed under the supervision of a faculty member. This design experience is based on the knowledge and skills acquired in earlier course work. Projects may originate from faculty members, students, or external sources. They may have a diverse nature and serve diverse needs. Multi-disciplinary projects are encouraged.

Prerequisites:

350 or MECH 350; and

ENGR 002 and minimum fourth-year standing in the BME Degree Program.

BUS 693 - Doctoral Candidacy Exam

Units: 3.0

Schedule

PhD students write a Candidacy Exam made up of three components including two written content exams on core subject material and a critical review of an empirical research manuscript. These written responses will be combined with an oral examination to assess whether the student has reached a sufficient level of expertise to allow him or her to proceed to the next stage of the program.

Grading: INP, COM, N, F

BUS 694 - Thesis Proposal Defence

Units: 0

Schedule

Grading: INP, COM, N, F

BUS 695 - Special Topics in Business Administration

Units: 0.5-4.5

Schedule

The content, credit value and method of evaluation must be approved by the PhD Program Director.

Notes:

May be taken more than once for credit in different topics up to a maximum of 20 units.

Grading: INP, COM, N, F

BUSI 699 -

Units:

Schedule

CD 501 - Anchoring a Change Agenda: Foundations

Units: 1.5

Schedule

Grounds students in a solid understanding of the multiple historical, theoretical and conceptual frameworks of the role of civil society and the social economy in advancing progressive economic, political and social change, including the economics of social justice. The powerful intersection of theory and practice will be examined and critically assessed in the context of the capacity of co-operatives, non-profits and community development organizations to respond to key contemporary societal issues, global trends, and to consider implications for the future.

Prerequisites:

Admission to the MACD Degree Program or with permission of the Graduate Adviser.

CD 510 - Leadership, Management and Governance within Organizations

Units: 1.5

Schedule

Develops the competencies required to effectively lead and manage organizations from the 'inside', focusing on leadership capacities, human resources (staff, boards and volunteers), governance, internal and external stakeholder relations. Through a blend of theory, practice and experiential simulations, students will integrate their learning as well as appreciate the unique dimensions of co-operatives, social enterprises and non-profit organizations.

Prerequisites:

Admission to the MACD Degree Program or with permission of the Graduate Adviser.

CD 524 - Leadership and Organizational Development for Communities

Units: 1.5

Schedule

Explores leadership beliefs, values, and attitudes, and analyzes perspectives in shaping leadership in civil society, community development and the social economy. Introduces management, assessment, concepts and tools for developing strategic priorities and planning frameworks for organizations and communities. Includes scenario based exercises set in a variety of practice contexts relevant to students' experience and systems.

Notes:

Credit will be granted for only one of 524, 502, 503.

Prerequisites:

Admission to the MACD Degree Program or with permission of the Graduate Adviser.

CD 525 - Managing Organizations, Systems and Community Transformations

Units: 1.5

Schedule

Develops key competencies for personal, group, organizational and community leadership in: teamwork, facilitation, presentation skills, negotiation, conflict resolution, group dynamics and collaboration. Examines systemic factors that encourage and challenge innovation. Analysis of cases that demonstrate successful scaling, practices or particular innovations.

Notes:

Credit will be granted for only one 525, 511, 513.

Prerequisites:

Admission to the MACD Degree Program or with permission of the Graduate Adviser.

CD 526 - Agenda for Social Change: Moving Forward

Units: 1.5

Schedule

Surveys the key leverage points for exercising strategic leadership for addressing key trends at the local and regional level. Exemplary practice and understanding of key policy innovations are drawn from local and international sources. Provides an opportunity for students to engage in generative dialogue to explore learning that strategically advances civil society, social economy and strengthens communities. Understanding local and international key policy innovations are linked with the formulation of recommendations for action for moving forward.

Notes:

Credit will be granted for only of 526, 517, 520.

Prerequisites:

Admission to the MACD Degree Program or with permission of the Graduate Adviser.

CD 598 - Master's Project

Units: 4.5

Schedule

Expected to be a substantial analysis of a management, policy or program problem for a client in the community development sector. This major project is prepared in consultation with the client and an academic supervisor drawn from regular university faculty and qualified practitioners and must be both practical and academically rigorous. The Master's Project is defended in an oral examination.

Grading: INP, COM, N, F

CENG 241 - Digital Design

Units: 1.5
Formerly: 290

Schedule

Boolean algebra, canonical expressions, logic gates and their physical realization. Fan-in and fan-out, timing, rise and fall times, delay. Combinational circuits minimization (Karnaugh map, Quine-McCluskey, Tools-Expresso, others). Standard circuits - adders, multiplexers, demultiplexers, etc. Memory elements, flip-flops. State transition diagrams, Mealy-Moore finite state machines. State assignment and machine realization, counters. Introduction to hardware design languages and their use to design combinational and sequential circuits. Hardware design with FPGAs.

Notes:

Credit will be granted for only one of 241, 290.

Prerequisites:

Minimum second-year standing.

CENG 242 - Discrete Structures in Engineering

Units: 1.5

Schedule

Introduction to the use of recurrence relations and generating functions in engineering problems. Engineering modeling with graphs. Graph representation and traversal techniques, and their computational complexity. Use of branch-and-bound, divide-and-conquer, greedy, network flow, dynamic programming, approximation, and heuristic algorithms in Electrical and Computer Engineering applications.

Notes:

May not be counted for credit towards a Computer Science degree program.

Prerequisites:

MATH 101 and 110.

CENG 299 - Introduction to Electrical and Computer Engineering Design

Units: 1.5

Schedule

Computer Aided Design (CAD) tools used in electrical and computer engineering design: drafting, printed-circuit board layout, scientific and system simulation. Instrumentation devices used in control and measurement. Case studies illustrating electrical and computer engineering design process. Time and project management. Technical communications and presentations.

Notes:

Credit will be granted for only one of 299, CIVE 200, ELEC 200, 299, ENGR 150, MECH 200.

Pre or co requisites:

ENGR 120 or 121; and

MATH 110 or 211.

CENG 441 - Design of Digital and VLSI Systems

Units: 1.5

Schedule

Advanced combinational and sequential logic design. Optimization of finite state machines; timing methodologies and synchronization issues. Hardware description languages (HDL): structural and behavioural descriptions, simulation and testbenches, coding styles, design with HDL and FPGA implementation. Design for test: testing concepts, scan-based design and built-in self-test (BIST). Design for high speed: timing analysis, pipelining and retiming. Design for low power: sources of power dissipation, design transformations.

Notes:

Credit will be granted for only one of 441, 440, 465.

Prerequisites:

241 or 290.

CENG 499 - Design Project II

Units: 1.5
Formerly: 499A and 499B

Schedule

A significant technical design project in Computer Engineering completed under the supervision of a faculty member. This design experience is based on the knowledge and skills acquired in earlier course work. Projects may originate from faculty members, students, or external sources. They may have a diverse nature and serve diverse needs. Multi-disciplinary projects are encouraged.

Notes:

Credit will be granted for only one of 499, 499A, 499B, ELEC 499, 499A, 499B, SENG 499, 499A, 499B.

Prerequisites:

One of 399, BME 350, ELEC 399, MECH 350; and

ENGR 002; and

minimum fourth-year standing in the Computer Engineering Program.

CHEM 091 - Introduction to Chemistry

Units: 0

Schedule

Special tutorial course for students who do not have Chemistry 12, which is designed to provide background for students who intend to enrol, either simultaneously or subsequently, in a university-level introductory general chemistry course. This course will be delivered via the Internet. There are no set class times; a unit should be completed roughly every two weeks during the term. Students will be assessed by timed on-line quizzes after the completion of each unit.

Notes:

0.5 fee unit.

Prerequisites:

Chemistry 11; and

Principles of Mathematics 12 or Pre-Calculus 12; or

other advanced mathematics course equivalent to Principles of Math 12 or Pre-Calculus 12 with permission from the Department.

Grading: COM, N, F.

CHEM 101 - Fundamentals of Chemistry I

Units: 1.5

Schedule

Introduction to the modern theory of atomic structure and its relation to chemical bonding. Introduction to organic chemistry and modern materials, including polymer chemistry. Laboratory emphasizes skills typically needed in a scientific environment including observing, recording and discussing experimental data. Basic chemical techniques are introduced using a variety of different types of experiments.

Notes:

Credit will be granted for only one of 101, 100, 124, 140, 150.

Students without Chemistry 12 must also enrol in 091 if they wish to take CHEM 102.

Prerequisites:

Chemistry 11; and

Principles of Mathematics 12 or Pre-Calculus 12; or

other advanced mathematics course equivalent to Principles of Math 12 or Pre-Calculus 12 with permission from the Department.

CHEM 222 - Introduction to Inorganic Chemistry

Units: 1.5

Schedule

Fundamental concepts of inorganic chemistry, with emphasis on periodicity, structure, bonding and reactivity; principles will be illustrated using the chemistry of selected groups of elements.

Prerequisites:

102.

CHEM 232 - Organic Chemistry with Biological Applications

Units: 1.5

Schedule

A continuation of CHEM 231, incorporating further functional group surveys and organic chemistry of biologically relevant molecules; aldehydes and ketones; dienes and aromatic compounds; electrophilic aromatic substitution; carboxylic acids and derivatives; beta-dicarbonyl compounds; introduction to organic synthesis; amines and phenols; carbohydrates and lipids.

Notes:

Credit will be granted for only one of 232, 235.

Prerequisites:

231.

CHEM 298 - Research Experience

Units: 0

Schedule

Experimental research under the direction of department members. For second-year students who wish to gain some experience in chemical research. Interested students should contact the course coordinator by the first week of classes.

Prerequisites:

Permission of the department.

Grading: COM, N, F.

CHEM 364 - Physical Chemistry Laboratory

Units: 0.75

Schedule

This laboratory course builds on expertise acquired in CHEM 245 and presents a variety of physical chemistry experiments at an intermediate level.

Notes:

A total of 1.5 units of credit will be granted for only one of 364, 346, 347 (if taken prior to September 2001).

Offered in fall, spring and summer terms.

To count toward any Chemistry program, this course must be taken twice, over two terms in which the course content differs, for a total of 1.5 units.

Prerequisites:

245.

CHEM 398 - Research Experience

Units: 0

Schedule

Experimental research under the direction of department members. For third-year students who wish to gain some experience in chemical research. Interested students should contact the course coordinator by the first week of classes.

Prerequisites:

Permission of the department.

Grading: COM, N, F.

CHEM 399 - Research Experience

Units: 1.5
Formerly: 498

Schedule

Experimental research under the direction of department members. For students who wish to gain some experience in chemical research. Students are advised to make arrangements for 399 projects as early as possible. Ideally, projects should be discussed with potential supervisors before the semester in which the research will be undertaken. Interested students should contact the course coordinator by the first week of classes.

Notes:

Credit will be granted for only one of 399, 498.

Cannot be taken simultaneously with 499A or 499B.

Prerequisites:

Permission of the department.

CHEM 499A - Honours Thesis I

Units: 1.5
Formerly: part of 499

Schedule

The first stage of a research project conducted under the direction of a faculty member. Normally open to Honours students only. Students are advised to make arrangements for 499 projects as early as possible. Ideally, projects should be discussed with potential supervisors before the semester in which the research will be undertaken. Interested students should contact the course coordinator by the first week of classes.

Notes:

Credit will be granted for only one of 499A and 499B, 499.

499A and 499B are "tied" courses and must be taken in consecutive terms except with permission of the department. Credit for 499A will be assigned only upon successful completion of 499B. Both 499A and 499B are offered in all three terms.

Chemistry Majors may take 499A and 499B as electives.

Prerequisites:

Permission of the department.

Grading: INP; standard grade (assigned upon completion of 499B; if 499B is not completed a grade equivalent to N will be assigned to 499A).

CHEM 499B - Honours Thesis II

Units: 1.5
Formerly: part of 499

Schedule

Continuation of a research project conducted under the direction of a faculty member. Normally open to Honours students only.

Notes:

Credit will be granted for only one of 499A and 499B, 499.

499A and 499B are "tied" courses and must be taken in consecutive terms except with permission of the department. Credit for 499A will be assigned only upon successful completion of both courses. Both 499A and 499B are offered in all three terms.

Chemistry Majors may take 499A and 499B as electives.

Prerequisites:

499A.

CHEM 599 - MSc Thesis

Units: 12.0

Schedule

Grading: INP, COM, N, F.

CHEM 693 - PhD Candidacy Examination

Units: 3.0

Schedule

Students enrol in 693 concurrently with 699 until 693 is passed. If the candidacy examination cannot be completed until the following semester, an INP (in progress) grade will be entered.

Grading: INP, COM, N, F.

CHEM 699 - PhD Dissertation

Units: 33.0 - 36.0

Schedule

Pre or co requisites:

693.

Grading: INP, COM, N, F.

CIVE 210 - Sustainable Development in Civil Engineering

Units: 1.5

Schedule

Principles of sustainable design in engineering systems, manufacturing, infrastructure, transportation, communications, and community development; design for the environment and sustainability metrics; introduction to life cycle assessment framework, methods, and tools using mathematical modelling software. Evaluation of sustainable technologies from technical, economic, environmental and social perspectives using life cycle analysis. Environmental impact assessments, environmental audit protocols and plans, pre-assessment planning and preliminary assessment of contaminated sites, site investigation, remedial planning and design. Green design case studies.

Prerequisites:

CHEM 101 or 150; and

CSC 111 and MATH 100; and

PHYS 110 and 111, or 112, or 122 and 125.

CIVE 285 - Civil Engineering Materials

Units: 1.5

Schedule

Influence of constituent materials on the properties of fresh and hardened concrete. Concrete mix design. Impact of loads and environment on behaviour of concrete. Properties of asphalt cement and properties and design of asphalt concrete. Stresses in flexible and rigid pavements. Pavement failures. Material lifecycles. Use of innovative materials including polymer composites, advantages and limitations.

Notes:

Prerequisites:

MATH 100; and

CHEM 101 or 150; and

PHYS 110 and 111, or 112, or 122 and 125.

COM 220 - Organizational Behaviour

Units: 1.5
Formerly: 120

Schedule

Introduction to behavioural concepts and tools that will assist the manager in both understanding behaviour in organizations and improving organizational effectiveness. Topics include individual motivation, perception and communication, managerial roles, schools of management theories, group processes and team work, leadership, supervision, and introduction to organizational structure, processes and culture.

Notes:

Credit will be granted for only one of 220, 120, PSYC 334, PSYC 334A, SOCI 323, SOCI 324. Not available for supplemental.

Not open to BCom students; not intended for students seeking entry to Bachelor of Commerce program. Credit will not be granted toward the Bachelor of Commerce program.

Prerequisites:

Minimum second-year standing.

COM 240 - Management Finance

Units: 1.5

Schedule

An introduction to corporate financial management. Provides a framework, concepts, and tools for analyzing financial decisions. Main topics include discounted cash flow techniques, financial statement analysis, capital budgeting, valuation of stocks and bonds, tax environments, risk and return tradeoffs, diversification, capital market efficiency, and an introduction to international finance issues.

Notes:

Not open to BCom students; not intended for students seeking entry to Bachelor of Commerce program. Credit will not be granted toward the Bachelor of Commerce program. Not available for supplemental.

Pre or co requisites:

One of 202, 253, 270; and

minimum second-year standing.

COM 250 - Fundamentals of Marketing

Units: 1.5

Schedule

Product design and management, distribution channels, and marketing communications are examined as key elements of the marketing mix. Consumer buyer behaviour, sales force management, and marketing research are other topics to be reviewed.

Notes:

Not open to BCom students; not intended for students seeking entry to Bachelor of Commerce program. Credit will not be granted toward the Bachelor of Commerce program. Not available for supplemental.

Prerequisites:

Minimum second-year standing.

COM 270 - Financial and Management Accounting For Specialists

Units: 1.5

Schedule

Introduction to the construction and interpretation of financial statements and the development and use of accounting information for management planning and control, including the development of cost information.

Notes:

Credit will be granted for only one of 270 or 210. Not open to BCom students; not intended for students seeking entry to Bachelor of Commerce program. Credit will not be granted toward the Bachelor of Commerce program. Not available for supplemental.

Prerequisites:

Minimum second-year standing.

COM 400 - Strategic Management

Units: 1.5

Schedule

A series of integrative management case studies that illustrate the application and integration of management functions. Focuses on organizational strategy and strategic management including the process of choosing and defining goals, formulating and implementing strategies, and monitoring strategic performance. Normally students are required to take this course in their final academic term.

Prerequisites:

Third-year Commerce core.

COM 402 - Legal Issues in Management

Units: 1.5

Schedule

An examination of several aspects of commercial law that are particularly relevant to those who own, manage, or are employed by a business enterprise. Subjects that will be addressed include common law doctrines (such as contract and negligence), legislation (such as the Business Corporations Act) and other legal principles that affect business decision making in a global environment.

Notes:

Credit will be granted for only one of 402, 302.

Prerequisites:

Third-year Commerce core or permission of the Program Director.

COM 405 - Career Preparation Across Borders

Units: 0

Schedule

Designed to ensure that all Commerce students develop career preparation skills, including portfolio presentation, career planning and preparation skills. Intended to complement each student's career goals as identified in COM 205. Content will vary and may include: skills training, portfolio development, career assessment, networking events. This is a non-credit but mandatory course for all Bachelor of Commerce students.

Notes:

Must normally register in three consecutive terms beginning with Fall Term, Winter Session. 0.5 fee units per term (including Summer Session).

Prerequisites:

205 and minimum fourth-year standing.

Grading: INP, COM, N, F

COM 410 - Leadership Strategies

Units: 1.5
Also: MBA 521

Schedule

An examination of leadership in a variety of environments: corporate, the military, and the public sector. Identifies the characteristics of a leader and instills an interest in and awareness of this vital organizational skill. Includes a review of leadership research from a historical perspective as well as current theory on transformational leadership. Experiential exercises, case studies and role playing techniques are employed to demonstrate leadership skills.

Notes:

Credit will be granted for only one of 410, MBA 521.

Prerequisites:

220 or 321; and

minimum fourth-year standing; or

permission of the Program Director.

COM 425 - Taxation for Managers

Units: 1.5
Also: MBA 531

Schedule

Reviews the fundamentals of the income tax system for all taxpayers. It then examines tax planning techniques that maximize cash flow and return on investment. While the course emphasizes business decisions, it also includes personal financial planning issues.

Notes:

Credit will be granted for only one of 425, MBA 531.

Prerequisites:

270 or 315 with a minimum grade of B-; and

minimum fourth-year standing; or

permission of the Program Director.

COM 426 - Management Accounting II

Units: 1.5

Schedule

Focuses on the key tools that management accounting brings to decision making. It covers both the quantitative and qualitative aspects in an effective management control system including such topics as cost behaviour, cost allocation, activity based costing, flexible budgeting and variance analysis. In addition, the balanced scorecard, variable and absorption costing models, and alternative inventory management systems are examined.

Notes:

Credit will be granted for only one of 426, 450 (if taken in the same topic).

Prerequisites:

270 or 316 with a minimum grade of B-; and

minimum fourth-year standing; or

permission of the Program Director.

COM 435 - Corporate Relations and Responsibilities

Units: 1.5

Schedule

Examines the relations of a corporation to its stakeholders - customers, stockholders, government, unions and society at large. Especially important are a firm's code of ethics and conduct, written and unwritten, which governs its relationships and spells out its responsibilities to its various publics. Students will study and discuss a number of cases which illustrate how a variety of organizations have responded to this challenge.

Notes:

Credit will be granted for only one of 435, 450 (if taken in the same topic).

Prerequisites:

220 or 321; and

minimum fourth-year standing; or

permission of the Program Director.

COM 445 - Corporate Finance

Units: 1.5
Also: MBA 524

Schedule

Serves as a continuation of the introductory finance course to more advanced applications of the techniques, concepts, and tools of corporate finance. Main topics include short- and long-term financial management, cost of capital, capital structure, financial leverage, dividends policy, working capital management, leasing, mergers and acquisitions, and the use of derivatives for risk management.

Notes:

Credit will be granted for only one of 445, MBA 524.

Prerequisites:

240 or 371 with a minimum grade of B-; and

minimum fourth-year standing; or

permission of the Program Director.

COM 446 - Investments

Units: 1.5

Schedule

Covers the fundamental principles that are crucial to understanding the securities traded in international financial markets. The main topics include market structure, information efficiency, asset pricing models, valuation and trading of stocks, bonds, options and futures.

Notes:

Credit will be granted for only one of 446, ECON 435, MBA 525, COM 450 (if taken in the same topic).

Prerequisites:

240 or 371; and

minimum fourth-year standing; or

permission of the Program Director.

COM 450 - Selected Topics in Management

Units: 1.5

Schedule

The course content will reflect the interests of the faculty members and current issues in business and industry. Topics may include non-traditional forms of work organizations, leadership, organizational development, and development of managerial skills.

Notes:

May be taken more than once to a maximum of 6 units with permission of the Gustavson School of Business.

Prerequisites:

Minimum fourth-year standing or permission of the Program Director.

COM 495 - Marketing Communications

Units: 1.5

Schedule

Focuses on effectively communicating ideas, goods, or services to internal and external audiences by developing an integrated marketing communications plan. A hands-on project brings the theory to life. Covers the development of a strategic campaign using both online and offline tools and advertising, sales promotion, direct marketing and public relations tactics. Useful for careers in marketing, advertising, social media, service management and entrepreneurship.

Prerequisites:

250 or 351; and

minimum fourth-year standing; or

permission of the Program Director.

CS 101 - Introduction to Canadian Culture

Units: 1.5
Formerly: CS 100A

Schedule

An introduction to the multidisciplinary study of cultural structures and expressions in Canada, including such forms as literature, the fine arts, mass media and communications.

Notes:

Credit will be granted for only one of 101, 100A.

A required course for the Diploma/Certificate programs in Canadian Studies.

CSC 106 - The Practice of Computer Science

Units: 1.5
Formerly: 212

Schedule

A survey of aspects of the application of Computer Science. Topics include: algorithms; complexity and decidability; programming; hardware; software engineering; selected interdisciplinary topics; ethical and societal considerations. Optional topics include: cryptography; security; databases; human computer interaction; graphics.

Notes:

Credit will be granted for only one of 106, 112, 212.

Not open to third- or fourth-year students in a Computer Science program.

CSC 110 - Fundamentals of Programming I

Units: 1.5

Schedule

Introduction to designing, implementing, and understanding computer programs using an object-oriented programming language. Topics include an introduction to computing and problem solving, selection and iteration, arrays and collections, objects and classes, top-down design and incremental development.

Notes:

Credit will be granted for only one of 110, 111.

Prerequisites:

One of Foundations of Math 12, Mathematics 12, Precalculus 12,

MATH 100, 120.

CSC 115 - Fundamentals of Programming II

Units: 1.5

Schedule

Techniques, methods, and tools for systematic development and maintenance of software systems and documentation; basic algorithms and data structures; and fundamental concepts of object-oriented programming. Topics include control and data abstraction, modularization, abstract data types, layers of abstraction, information hiding, separation of concerns, type checking, program design, separate compilation, software libraries, techniques for the development of high-quality software components, program understanding.

Notes:

Credit will be granted for only one of 115, 116, 160.

Prerequisites:

110 or 111.

CSC 225 - Algorithms and Data Structures I

Units: 1.5

Schedule

Basic techniques for design, analysis, implementation of algorithms and data structures. Foundations: Random access machine model, time and space complexity, worst-case analysis, upper and lower bounds. Proof techniques for algorithm correctness. Basic data structures: stacks, queues, linked lists. Sorting: elementary sorting algorithms, mergesort, quicksort, priority queues. Searching: Binary search trees, balanced search trees, hash tables. Graphs: undirected and directed graphs, graph traversals and applications, topological sort. Algorithm design techniques: greedy, backtracking, divide and conquer.

Prerequisites:

115 or 116; and

MATH 122.

CSC 230 - Introduction to Computer Architecture

Units: 1.5

Schedule

The architecture of computer systems including concepts such as CPU, memory, buses, I/O, cache, instruction sets, interrupt processing, pipelining, performance. Families of processors, CISC, RISC. Memory organization and management (including virtual memory, protection, segmentation and paging). Computer arithmetic. The use of assemblers, linkers and loaders. Assembly language programming and its interface with a high-level language (C).

Notes:

Credit will be granted for only one of 230, CENG 255.

Prerequisites:

115 or 116.

CSC 320 - Foundations of Computer Science

Units: 1.5

Schedule

A survey of formal models and results that form the theoretical foundations of computer science; typical topics include finite automata, Turing machines, undecidable problems, context free languages and computational complexity.

Prerequisites:

226.

CSC 360 - Operating Systems

Units: 1.5

Schedule

The major concepts of operating systems and study of the interrelationships between the operating system and the architecture of computer systems. Topics discussed include operating system structures, concurrent programming techniques, cpu scheduling, deadlocks, memory management, file systems and protection.

Prerequisites:

226 and SENG 265; and

CSC 230 or CENG 255.

CSC 370 - Database Systems

Units: 1.5
Formerly: 470

Schedule

The use and operating principles of database management systems. Topics include: data entities and relationships; data modelling using Entity-Relation Diagrams: hierarchical, network and relational models of databases; query languages; physical representation of data in secondary storage; relational algebra and calculus as applied to the design of databases; security and integrity in the context of concurrent use; and basic ethical issues associated with database design and use.

Notes:

Credit will be granted for only one of 370, 470, HINF 200, 300.

Prerequisites:

226 and SENG 265.

CSC 426 - Computational Geometry

Units: 1.5

Schedule

Algorithms and data structures that are used to solve geometrical problems. Topics include geometric searching, convex polygons and hulls, Voronoi diagrams, plane sweep algorithms, proximity and intersections. Application areas which are discussed include: computer graphics, VLSI design, and graph theory.

Prerequisites:

226; and

minimum third-year standing.

CSC 429 - Cryptography

Units: 1.5

Schedule

Fundamentals of modern cryptography. Topics include: review of classical and information-theoretic cryptography; block ciphers, DES, cryptanalysis of DES, modes of operation, AES; cryptographic hash functions and message authentication codes; public key cryptography, RSA, EIGamal and other public key systems, signature schemes; introduction to security protocols.

Notes:

Prerequisites:

CSC 320, or MATH 222, or MATH 110 and STAT 254; and

minimum third-year standing.

CSC 466 - Overlay and Peer-to-Peer Networking

Units: 1.5

Schedule

Focuses on Layer 3 and above and the control plane of the Internet. Topics will include: overlay network architectures, peer-to-peer application models, end-to-end control mechanisms, inter- and intra-domain routing protocols, service provisioning, network measurement, and related best current practices on the Internet.

Prerequisites:

One of 361, 450, CENG 460.

CSC 485A - Topics in Systems

Units: 1.5
Formerly: 485

Schedule

Entrance will be restricted to third- and fourth-year students who meet the prerequisite specified for the topic to be offered.

Notes:

Credit will be granted for only one of 485, 485A, 485B, 485C, 485D, 485E, 485F, 485G, 485H (if taken in the same topic).

May be taken more than once for credit in different topics with permission of the department.

* Lab hours may vary depending on the topic.

CSC 526 - Computational Geometry

Units: 1.5

Schedule

An introduction to algorithms and data structures which are used to solve geometrical problems. Topics include geometric searching, convex polygons and hulls, Voronoi diagrams, plane sweep algorithms, proximity and intersections. Application areas discussed include computer graphics, VLSI design and graph theory.

CSC 529 - Cryptography

Units: 1.5

Schedule

Paradigms and principles of modern cryptography. Topics include: review of classical and information-theoretic cryptography; block ciphers; DES, Cryptanalysis of DES, modes of operation, AES; Cryptographic hash functions and message authentication codes; public key cryptography, RSA, EIGamal and other public key systems, signature schemes; introduction to security protocols; secret sharing schemes and zero knowledge techniques.

CSC 579 - Overlay and Peer-to-Peer Networking

Units: 1.5

Schedule

Focuses on the recent developments and advanced research topics in Layer 3 and above and the control plane of the Internet. Topics include: overlay network architectures, peer-to-peer application models, end-to-end control mechanisms, inter- and intra-domain routing protocols, service provisioning, network measurement, and related best current practices on the Internet.

CSC 586A - Topics in Computer Systems and Software

Units: 1.5
Formerly: 586

Schedule

Notes:

Credit will be granted for only one of 586, 586A, 586B, 586C, 586D, 586E, 586F (if taken in the same topic).

May be taken more than once for credit in different topics with permission of the department.

CSC 597 - Industrial Master's Project

Units: 1.5

Schedule

Grading: INP, COM, N, F.

CSC 598 - Master's Project

Units: 3.0

Schedule

Grading: INP, COM, N, F

CSC 599 - Master's Thesis

Units: 6.0

Schedule

Grading: INP, COM, N, F

CSC 693 - PhD Candidacy

Units: 3.0

Schedule

Grading: INP, COM, N, F

CSC 699 - PhD Dissertation

Units: 33.0-34.5

Schedule

Prerequisites:

693.

Grading: INP, COM, N, F.

CYC 166A - Lifespan Development (Conception to Late Childhood)

Units: 1.5
Formerly: 366A.

Schedule

Introduces students to concepts and models of how human behaviour is acquired, maintained and modified. Focuses on human development from conception to late childhood as a knowledge base for practice with children, youth and families.

Notes:

Credit will be granted for only one of 166A, 366, 366A.

CYC 210 - Supervised Practicum I

Units: 1.5

Schedule

An opportunity to practice evolving CYC skills in an applied setting. Students work directly with children/youth in a supervised practice situation in order to promote professional skill acquisition and integrate the knowledge obtained through coursework. Students are required to complete 120 hours.

Notes:

210 must be completed before 310.

Prerequisites:

All of 100A, 100B, 152, 166A, 166B, 171; or

Permission of the department

Restricted to Child and Youth Care students.

CYC 310 - Supervised Practicum II

Units: 4.5

Schedule

Students work directly with children/youth in a supervised practice situation in order to promote professional skill acquisition and integration. Emphasis is placed on observation and recording skills, understanding the structure and functioning of a service agency, and fostering the student's awareness of his or her functioning in relation to children, youth and agency workers. Attention is also given to developing beginning level case planning, intervention, and case presentation skills with both a one-to-one and a group focus. Students are required to complete 286 hours.

Notes:

Credit will be granted for only one of 310, 310A.

Prerequisites:

All of 166A, 166B, 210, minimum third-year standing.

Restricted to Child and Youth Care students.

Corequisites:

205 and 338.

CYC 310A - Child and Youth Care Practicum by Prior Learning Assessment (PLA)

Units: 4.5

Schedule

Students with significant work or volunteer experience in Child and Youth Care may complete the first CYC practicum by Prior Learning Assessment. Students will present evidence of their prior learning and practice experience in the form of a portfolio which specifically demonstrates the learning objectives and outcomes required in 310.

Notes:

Credit will be granted for only one of 310A, 310.

Restricted to Child and Youth Care students.

5 years of paid CYC experience is strongly recommended.

Prerequisites:

Permission of the department.

CYC 370 - Applying Assessment and Case Planning in Child and Youth Care Practice

Units: 1.5
Formerly: 474.

Schedule

Focuses on the skills necessary to working professionally with individuals, groups and families: intake interviewing, needs and risk assessment, intervention planning and implementation, case management and reporting. Knowledge and skill in issues of abuse and neglect will be developed. Students will be required to apply change theory in a laboratory learning setting and produce professional documentation of their work. Feedback on skill application is provided in class and through video recordings.

Notes:

Credit will be granted for only one of 370, 474.

Prerequisites:

Either 210 and 205, or 351.

Restricted to Child and Youth Care students.

CYC 410A - Advanced Supervised Block Practicum

Units: 4.5

Schedule

A condensed 4 month practicum within which students are required to complete 286 hours. Some practicums are block practicums only, such as Child Life and Child Protection. Check with a practicum coordinator for more information.

Notes:

More hours may be required for Specializations.

Restricted to Child and Youth Care students in their fourth-year of study.

Prerequisites:

All required 300- and 400-level courses with the exception of 475.

Corequisites:

475.

CYC 423 - Research Methods in Child and Youth Care

Units: 1.5

Schedule

The design of research and evaluation in child and youth care. Within an applied research practitioner context, students will be introduced to the knowledge and skills necessary to locate, understand, and use research about child and youth care. Students will examine research/evaluation designs and methodologies for improving child and youth care practice.

Prerequisites:

Minimum third-year standing.

CYC 424 - Qualitative and Quantitative Analysis in Child and Youth Care

Units: 1.5

Schedule

Provides students with a grounding in the techniques commonly used in the analysis of both quantitative and qualitative data in child and youth care as well as the logic of interpreting evaluation data. Students will explore how to interpret, analyze, code, and write about qualitative data. They will analyze quantitative, descriptive data to interpret relationships between variables and be introduced to inferential statistics.

Notes:

Credit will be granted for only one of 424, HSD 425.

Prerequisites:

Minimum third-year standing.

CYC 461 - Child Life Practice in Hospitals and Community Settings

Units: 1.5

Schedule

A foundation to child life practice in hospitals and community health care settings. Emphasis is placed on examining professional issues concerning child life specialists, the application of various conceptual frameworks, and theoretical perspectives to clinical practice within a multidisciplinary model in both hospital and community contexts.

Notes:

On-line delivery with mandatory on campus seminars.

Prerequisites:

Minimum fourth-year standing.

CYC 475 - Advanced Child and Youth Care Practice with Families and Groups

Units: 3.0

Schedule

This advanced course focuses on the development of skills required for child and youth care practice with families and groups. In a supervised teaching setting, students will assess the needs of role-playing individuals, families and groups, and by applying appropriate intervention strategies, assist clients to achieve needs-related, desired outcomes.

Notes:

Credit will be granted for only one of 475, 476.

Prerequisites:

Year 3 required CYC courses.

Restricted to Child and Youth Care students.

CYC 546 - Human Change Processes: From Theory to Practice

Units: 1.5

Schedule

A practice based course that requires students to work with individuals and families in simulated role play scenarios. It begins with the micro contexts of families and moves outward to understand how change occurs in communities and organizations. Human change theory and processes form the foundation of the course in order to explore traditional and contemporary theories of change that highlight gendered and cultural differences and similarities.

CYC 552 - Ethics in Practice

Units: 1.5

Schedule

The primary purpose of this course is to enable students to expand their thinking by critically reflecting on professional and applied ethics from multiple perspectives and traditions. Developing a familiarity with various conceptual resources and ethical decision-making frameworks, discerning the morally relevant features of various ethical dilemmas, appreciating the complexity, plurality and uncertainty of everyday CYC practice, and critically appraising the adequacy of decision-making tools for responding to ethical concerns and challenges are key course objectives.

CYC 553 - Practicum in Child and Youth Care

Units: 1.5 or 3.0

Schedule

The supervised field placement is designed to provide CYC students with an opportunity to apply their skills working with children, youth, families and communities in a supervised setting. Placements which involve individual, family and/or group counseling, can only be undertaken with qualified (i.e. Master's level) supervisors, and require a minimum commitment of 300 hours (3.0 units). Those students who have not completed a practicum as part of their undergraduate degree will also be required to enrol in the 3.0 unit course. Regular contact with the course instructor and consultations between the student, placement supervisor and instructor will be required.

Students registered in the 1.5 unit course will be required to complete a minimum of 165 hours. Students registered in the 3.0 course will be required to complete a minimum of 300 hours.

Notes:

Students are normally required to complete 13.5 units of coursework before registering in 553.

Grading: INP, COM, N, F.

CYC 562 - Special Topics in Child and Youth Care Intervention

Units: 1.5 or 3

Schedule

Students will study models of intervention in child and youth care which are specific to their area of specialization.

Notes:

Topics will vary. May be taken more than once for credit in different topics.

CYC 563 - Specialized Practicum in Child and Youth Care

Units: 1.5

Schedule

In consultation with a faculty adviser, students will select a special setting for advanced work and training. In some settings, this may take the form of a clinical internship. Students will work under supervision and will consult regularly with both the practicum supervisor and faculty course instructor. Students may be required to complete a specialized theory or intervention course in their area of focus prior to undertaking the specialized practicum.

Students are required to complete a minimum of 165 hours.

Prerequisites:

553.

Grading: INP, COM, N, F.

CYC 598 - Applied Research Project

Units: 6.0

Schedule

The student will undertake an applied research project which could, for example, include: (1) program development, (2) program needs assessment, (3) development of an assessment tool/protocol for clients, (4) evaluation of an existing program, (5) cost/benefit analysis of program models, or (6) secondary analysis of existing agency data. The research project should be developed in consultation with the student's supervisory committee.

Grading: INP, COM, N, F.

CYC 599 - Thesis

Units: 6.0

Schedule

Specialized research on a topic chosen in consultation with the student's supervisory committee. The thesis should be an original piece of research that would be suitable for publication in a professional journal or presentation at a professional meeting.

Grading: INP, COM, N, F.

CYC 682A - Internship in Child and Youth Care Research

Units: 1.5
Formerly: CYC 682.

Schedule

Learners may be involved in an ongoing research project in CYC or a closely related field in which they will play an active role in some aspect(s) of conducting the research. Learners will be expected to spend a minimum of 10 hours per week in the practicum and to meet with a faculty supervisor on a regular basis for a minimum of 150 hours.

Notes:

Learners may not be paid for work on this research project during the time that they are undertaking the practicum course for university credit.

Grading: INP, COM, N, F.

CYC 682B - Practice Internship in Child and Youth Care

Units: 1.5
Formerly: CYC 682.

Schedule

A practice Internship provides opportunities for the student to be actively involved and supervised in a practice setting. Practice settings may include teaching environments, face to face counselling settings, international contexts, or work in policy development with a specific Ministry. Normally students will work for 10 hours per week for a maximum of 150 hours. In addition, students will meet with the practicum co-ordinator throughout the term.

Notes:

Learners may not be paid for work on this research project during the time that they are undertaking the practicum course for university credit.

Grading: INP, COM, N, F.

CYC 693 - Candidacy Exams

Units: 3.0

Schedule

Students will be expected to complete two candidacy papers (one focused on the substantive area of interest including related theories, and the other on methodology related to their area and topic of interest) and an oral examination before qualifying to undertake PhD research and a dissertation. Within thirty-six months of registration as a provisional doctoral student and at least six months before the final oral examination, a student must pass a candidacy examination.

Grading: INP, COM, N, F.

CYC 699 - PhD Dissertation

Units: 16.5

Schedule

Prerequisites:

693.

Grading: INP, COM, N, F.

DR 506 - Mediation Processes and Skills

Units: 1.5

Schedule

This course couples mediation processes with practice in communication skills needed for effective third party facilitative intervention. Using the paradigm of Attitude, Process and Skills, students learn and practice mediation as a dispute resolution tool, integrated with prior learning in conflict analysis and diagnosis. Through lectures, clinical exercises, demonstrations, coached role play, reflective listening skills practice, and group discussions, students connect skills with theoretical and philosophical foundations of mediation required to satisfactorily conclude mediated agreements.

Notes:

Credit will be granted for only one of 506 and 510 (if taken in the same topic).

Prerequisites:

501 or PADR 501.

DR 509 - Dispute Resolution System Design and Public Interest Disputes

Units: 1.5

Schedule

Introduction to designing, assembling and implementing systems to prevent, manage and/or resolve a series or stream of disputes arising out of a single organization and/or relationships. Examines models of conflict intervention and the design process. Introduces the theory and practice of negotiating public-interest issues and managing stakeholder conflicts.

DR 598 - Master's Project

Units: 4.5

Schedule

The non-thesis option requires students to complete a major project in consultation with the student's supervisor and the Graduate Adviser. The project is expected to be a substantial analysis of a conflict situation or process, policy issue, or other relevant topic approved by the Graduate Adviser. It will have a practical application and is generally prepared in consultation with a client, as well as the supervisor. A written project report will be prepared and submitted to an oral examination committee.

Grading: INP, COM, N, F

DR 599 - Master's Thesis

Units: 6.0

Schedule

The thesis option requires original research on a topic chosen in consultation with the student's supervisor and the Graduate Adviser.

Grading: INP, COM, N, F.

DSST 441 - Enabling Technologies

Units: 1.5

Schedule

Focuses on innovations that enhance quality of life by enabling people with disabilities to participate in everyday life. Students will be encouraged to think through challenges relating to function to support innovations that enable people to be more independent.

ECON 103 - Principles of Microeconomics

Units: 1.5

Schedule

The principles of microeconomic analysis with special reference to the theory of demand, the theory of the firm and the theory of distribution.

Notes:

Credit will be granted for only one of 103, 103C, 180, 201, ADMN 310, ENGR 280 taken before May 2012.

103 cannot be taken concurrently with 100.

One of Principles of Math 12, Pre-Calculus 12, MATH 120 is recommended prior to taking this course.

ECON 104 - Principles of Macroeconomics

Units: 1.5

Schedule

The principles of macroeconomic analysis with special reference to fluctuations in income and prices, monetary and fiscal policies for economic stabilization.

Notes:

Credit will be granted for only one of 104, 202.

104 cannot be taken concurrently with 100.

Principles of Math 12, Pre-Calculus 12 or MATH 120 is recommended prior to taking this course.

ECON 180 - Introduction to Principles of Microeconomics and Financial Project Evaluation

Units: 1.5
Formerly: 103C

Schedule

A concentrated introduction to principles of microeconomics and financial project evaluation for Engineering students. Microeconomic topics include theories of demand, the firm, and the distribution of income. Financial project evaluation topics include time value of money, interest rates and loans, and financial decision-making considering depreciation, taxes and risk. Assumes competency in calculus, algebra and familiarity with computer spreadsheet software.

Notes:

Credit will be granted for only one of 180, 103C, 103.

Prerequisites:

Admission to the BEng or BSEng program; and

MATH 101.

ECON 203 - Intermediate Microeconomics I

Units: 1.5

Schedule

An examination of the theories of consumer demand; production and cost; the firm and market under conditions of perfect competition, monopoly, monopolistic competition and oligopoly; factor markets and distribution; and welfare economics.

Notes:

Credit will be granted for only one of 203, 300, 302, 304A.

203 cannot be taken concurrently with 205.

Prerequisites:

One of 103, 103C, 180; and

MATH 100 or 102.

ECON 204 - Intermediate Macroeconomics

Units: 1.5

Schedule

Theories of aggregate economic behaviour; the determination of national income and employment, consumption, investment, inflation, growth and fluctuations, economic policy.

Notes:

Credit will be granted for only one of 204, 301, 303, 304B.

Prerequisites:

One of 103, 103C, 180; and

104; and

MATH 100 or 102.

ECON 225 - Writing for Economists

Units: 1.5

Schedule

Extensive practice in written technical and non-technical composition. Basic grammar will be reviewed, including sentence syntax, punctuation, and paragraph construction. Students will be exposed to the correct style for the various documents they are likely to encounter.

Notes:

A comprehension and writing test will be given in the first seven calendar days of the course. Students who fail the test will be required to see the Economics 225 TA during the term to upgrade their writing skills.

Students satisfy the ECON 225 course requirement if they have: i) received a minimum grade of B+ in ENGL 135, 146 or 147; or ii) passed ENGR 240.

Prerequisites:

One of 103, 103C, 180; and

104; and

Academic Writing Requirement satisfied.

ECON 245 - Descriptive Statistics and Probability

Units: 1.5

Schedule

Populations, samples, measures of central location and dispersion. Deterministic time series analysis: trends, moving averages, seasonal adjustment, index numbers. Probability laws. Discrete and continuous random variables. Joint, marginal, and conditional distributions. Mathematical expectation and variance. Functions of random variables; laws of expectation. Covariance and correlation. Binomial, Poisson, and normal distributions.

Notes:

See "Credit Limit - Beginning Level Statistics Courses".

Credit will be granted for only one of 245, 240.

Prerequisites:

MATH 100 or 102.

Pre or co requisites:

One of 103, 103C, 180; and

104.

ECON 246 - Statistical Inference

Units: 1.5

Schedule

Estimation, confidence intervals and hypotheses tests. Simple regression and correlation. Multiple regression; t and F tests.

Notes:

Credit will be granted for only one of 246, 340, STAT 251, STAT 261, STAT 256 (if taken prior to September 2004).

STAT 252 cannot be used to satisfy the prerequisites.

Prerequisites:

245 or STAT 260; and

MATH 100 or 102.

ECON 306 - International Economics

Units: 1.5

Schedule

An introduction to international trade and finance. Topics include determinants of trade, balance of payments, and policy issues of current interest. The latter may include the political economy of tariffs, bilateral and multilateral trade negotiations, trade and development.

Notes:

Credit will not be granted for 306 if 405A has already been completed.

Prerequisites:

One of 103, 103C, 180; and

104; and

either 225, or one of ENGL 135, 146, 147 with a minimum grade of B+, or ENGR 240.

ECON 320 - Economic Development

Units: 1.5

Schedule

An introduction to issues and policy problems faced by developing countries. Covers key principles, concepts and measurement issues, empirical facts, and analytical perspectives associated with economic development. Topics will include human development, inequality and poverty, population growth, education, health, and agriculture and rural development. Topics may also include urbanization and migration, role of credit markets, globalization, environment, and other current issues in development.

Prerequisites:

One of 103, 103C, 180; and

104; and

either 225, or one of ENGL 135, 146, 147 with a minimum grade of B+, or ENGR 240.

ECON 321 - The Economic History of Canada

Units: 1.5

Schedule

The story of long-run economic growth and welfare in the Canadian economy, with the aid of economic analysis, quantitative data and other historical materials. Emphasis on the development of the Canadian economy from a resource-based economy to a developed industrial economy within an international setting.

Prerequisites:

One of 103, 103C, 180; and

104; and

either 225, or one of ENGL 135, 146, 147 with a minimum grade of B+, or ENGR 240.

ECON 325 - Public Economics

Units: 1.5

Schedule

Introduction to the role of government in the economy. Topics include: examination of public goods, externalities, and information asymmetries; market failures resulting from these conditions and policies to address those market failures; taxes, expenditures, and collective decision-making under majority voting. Policy applications include welfare, education, health care spending, and tax policies such as income taxes, consumption taxes, and taxes on carbon emissions.

Prerequisites:

One of 103, 103C, 180.

ECON 345 - Applied Econometrics

Units: 1.5

Schedule

An intuitive development of the basic concepts and techniques in econometrics. The emphasis is on the application of econometric concepts and techniques in analyzing economic phenomena.

Notes:

Credit will not be granted for 345 if credit has already been received for either one of 365, 445. Cannot be taken concurrently with 365 or 366.

Students wishing to proceed to graduate studies in Economics are advised to include 365 and 366 in their undergraduate program instead of 345.

203 and 204 are recommended prior to taking this course.

Prerequisites:

One of 103, 103C, 180; and

104; and

245 or STAT 260 with a minimum grade of C+ in either; and

ECON 246 or STAT 261; and

either ECON 225, or one of ENGL 135, 146, 147 with a minimum grade of B+, or ENGR 240; and

MATH 100 or 102.

ECON 350 - Mathematical Economics I: An Introduction to Static Methods

Units: 1.5
Formerly: 250

Schedule

An introduction to the application of calculus and linear algebra to selected problems in microeconomic and macroeconomic theory.

Notes:

Credit will be granted for only one of 350, 250.

Prerequisites:

Either MATH 208 with a minimum grade of C, or MATH 101, 200 and 211 or 110.

Pre or co requisites:

203.

ECON 422 - Issues in European Economic Integration

Units: 1.5

Schedule

Various aspects of the economics of European integration are covered in this course, including agricultural, forestry and environmental issues; the development of macroeconomic institutions; competition and industrial policy; tax policy and social choice. The course will be team taught.

Prerequisites:

203 and 204; and

either 225, or one of ENGL 135, 146, 147 with a minimum grade of B+, or - ENGR 240.

ECON 548 - Applied Econometric Modelling

Units: 1.5

Schedule

Explores a range of practical estimation and testing issues in the context of different types of econometric models. Topics may include: panel models; nonparametrics and semiparametrics; latent variable models; simultaneous equations models; resampling methods, and the methodology-practice gap.

ECON 598 - Extended Essay

Units: 3.0

Schedule

Grading: INP, COM, N, F.

ECON 599 - Thesis

Units: 4.5

Schedule

Grading: INP, COM, N, F.

ECON 693 - PhD Candidacy Examinations

Units: 3.0

Schedule

Students enrol in ECON 693 for the duration of their preparation for candicacy examinations. This begins at the time a student first enrols in the PhD program and continues until candidacy requirements have been completed.

Grading: INP, COM, N, F.

ECON 699 - Dissertation

Units: 21.0 - 33.0

Schedule

Prerequisites:

693.

Grading: INP, COM, N, F.

EDCI 208 - Studio Piano Class I

Units: 1.5
Formerly: ME 208

Schedule

Development of piano keyboard skills: technique, simple harmonic analysis, sight reading, transposition and accompaniment patterns. For those with little or no piano background. Students with basic piano skills should register in EDCI 308.

Notes:

Credit will be granted for only one of 208, ME 208.

EDCI 303 - Historical and Philosophical Foundations of Canadian Education

Units: 1.5
Formerly: EDUC 303

Schedule

Focuses on historical events and philosophical ideas that have impacted learners and teachers in Canadian schools.

Notes:

Credit will be granted for only one of 303, EDUC 303, ED-B 420, ED-B 423.

Prerequisites:

Acceptance in a Teacher Education Program.

EDCI 308 - Studio Piano Class II

Units: 1.5
Formerly: ME 308

Schedule

Continuation of development of piano keyboard skills: technique, harmonic analysis, sight reading, transposition, accompaniments, composition and improvisation.

Notes:

Credit will be granted for only one of 308, ME 308.

For those with some piano background (e.g., 208 or equivalent).

EDCI 311 - Studio Guitar Class: I

Units: 1.5
Formerly: ME 303A

Schedule

Acquisition of basic skills in guitar playing and song accompaniment. Appropriate for students with little or no background in music theory.

Notes:

Credit will be granted for only one of 311, ME 303A.

EDCI 312 - Studio Guitar Class: II

Units: 1.5
Formerly: ME 303E

Schedule

Acquisition of intermediate guitar skills such as chord transformation, key transposition, and barre chords. Understanding of theoretical concepts through guitar performance and basic accompaniment. Students are expected to have acquired the fundamentals of the guitar and have an understanding of the basics of music theory as applied to the guitar.

Notes:

Credit will be granted for only one of 312, ME 303E.

EDCI 335 - Learning Design

Units: 1.5

Schedule

An introduction to the practice of learning design and its application to interactive learning environments. Students will explore the principles of learning design; examine how they can maximize the effectiveness, efficiency and appeal of learning experiences for learners; and teach for understanding. Students will have the opportunity to plan, design, and develop an interactive learning environment using the latest technology tools specifically for teaching and learning.

EDCI 337 - Interactive &amp; Multimedia Learning

Units: 1.5
Formerly: ED-B 360

Schedule

An introduction to the theory and application of multimedia learning in interactive learning environments. Students will explore the latest research and discover some best practices for creating rich educational experiences. Students will have the opportunity to design and develop interactive learning experiences using such technologies as touch input devices, tablets, interactive white boards, virtual worlds and augmented reality.

Notes:

Credit will be granted for only one of 337, ED-B 360.

EDCI 339 - Distributed and Open Learning

Units: 1.5
Formerly: ED-B 363

Schedule

This course provides learners with an opportunity to gain direct experience with current technologies that enable various forms of online and mobile learning, including social media tools, live capture and streaming. This course will also look critically at access to learning in the 21st century and introduce students to the concept of open learning and the development of personalized learning networks.

Notes:

Credit will be granted for only one of 339, ED-B 363.

EDCI 404 - Curriculum and Instruction in Elementary or Middle School Social Studies

Units: 1.5
Formerly: EDUC 404

Schedule

A study of the curriculum organization and techniques of instruction in elementary or middle school social studies. Examples are drawn from a variety of content areas: history, geography, anthropology, sociology, political science, and/or economics, with emphasis on participatory citizenship, culture and traditions in a pluralistic society.

Notes:

Credit will be granted for only one of 404, EDUC 404, ED-E 746.

Prerequisites:

Acceptance in a Teacher Education Program.

EDCI 410 - Literacy in the Digital Age

Units: 1.5

Schedule

An exploration of how new digital technologies have changed reading and writing for adolescents, and how these changing practices influence language and literacy teaching and learning.

EDCI 452 - Cultural Studies in Education

Units: 1.5
Formerly: EDUC 432

Schedule

Focuses on the school both as a community of learners and as a part of a larger community in a changing world. Topics of study will include different conceptions of community as they relate to education and learning, relations of power in school and community settings, gender roles, ethnicity, spirituality, traditions of conflict resolution, human rights, and the effects of global systems on local communities.

Notes:

Credit will be granted for only one of 452, EDUC 432.

EDCI 463 - Visual Thinking

Units: 1.5
Formerly: EDUC 443

Schedule

Visual artists use a variety of strategies to develop original imagery, find creative solutions to problems, and express ideas that cannot be conveyed in any other medium. Students will explore the methods artists use to create and communicate. Though they arise from art, the methods can be applied to many other areas of learning. Developmentally appropriate classroom activities and teaching methods are recommended as ways of engaging elementary students in visual thinking.

Notes:

Credit will be granted for only one of 463, EDUC 443.

EDCI 476 - Organization and Instruction in French Immersion

Units: 1.5

Schedule

An examination of current models for the organization and instruction of French Immersion students at the elementary and secondary level. Participants will define and articulate those critical factors that ensure lessons and units of study will enable students to learn language as well as concepts/skills. This course is taught in French.

EDCI 487 - Special Topics in Education

Units: 1.5 or 3.0
Formerly: ED-A 487, ED-B 487, ED-E 487

Schedule

Topics of current interest or concern to groups of students.

Notes:

May be taken more than once for credit in different topics; however students in an education degree program require permission of the Teacher Education Advising Office to apply the credit towards their degree program.

EDCI 499 - Professional Development - Curriculum and Instruction

Units: 0.5-3.0
Formerly: ED-A, ED-B, ED-E 499

Schedule

A variable content course directed at improving specific teacher and/or administrator competencies. Normally offered off campus.

Notes:

Not more than 3 units of credit for any 499 courses may be approved as electives in an education degree program. Approval must be obtained from the Teacher Education Advising Office.

Grading: COM, N, F

EDCI 510 - Research Issues and Studio Development in Art

Units: 3.0
Formerly: ED-A 570

Schedule

Review of contemporary art education research issues; development of a teaching creed and proposal; studio exploration linked to current instructional practice.

Notes:

Credit will be granted for only one of 510, ED-A 570.

EDCI 512B - Digital Presentation

Units: 1.5
Formerly: half of 512

Schedule

An extensive exploration of the tools and processes used in presenting studio media in digital formats. Students will learn how to organize existing studio materials, processes, ideas, and resources into dynamic presentation structures using still/motion visuals, text and audio. A strong focus will be given to the production formats required for final graduate presentations.

Notes:

Credit will be granted for only one of 512 and 512B.

EDCI 517 - Reading Processes in the School Curriculum: Research and Processes

Units: 1.5
Formerly: 542A, 542, half of ED-B 542

Schedule

Examines and analyzes research and models of reading, and the processes of reading and reading development.

Notes:

Credit will be granted for only one of 517, 542A, 542, ED-B 542.

EDCI 531 - Critical Discourses in Curriculum Studies

Units: 1.5
Formerly: 531A and 531B

Schedule

An exploration of the implications of modern thought and social trends on current concepts and practices of curriculum in formal and informal educational settings. Invites students to reflect on their own educational concepts and practices and to imagine new possibilities.

Notes:

Credit will be granted for only one of 531, 531A, 531B, ED-B 555A, 555B.

EDCI 556 - Language Processes in the School Curriculum: Writing and Representing

Units: 1.5
Formerly: 543B, 543, half of ED-B 543

Schedule

An examination of processes through which skills and competence in composition are developed. Includes analysis and evaluation of research, methods and materials relevant to instruction in composition.

Notes:

Credit will be granted for only one of 556, 543B, 543, ED-B 543.

EDCI 570 - Research in Curriculum and Instruction in the Elementary Grades

Units: 1.5
Formerly: ED-E 540

Schedule

Review of the critical issues; analysis of significant research on curriculum development at the elementary school level.

Notes:

Credit will be granted for only one of 570A-D, ED-E 540.

EDCI 580 - Qualitative Research Methods

Units: 1.5
Formerly: ED-B 580

Schedule

Provides a survey of a variety of qualitative methods, and opportunities for learners to develop competencies in research practices common to qualitative inquiry.

Notes:

Credit will be granted for only one of 580, ED-B 580.

EDCI 591 - Selected Topics in Curriculum and Instruction

Units: 1.5 or 3.0
Formerly: ED-A, ED-B and ED-E 591

Schedule

A variable content course. Normally restricted to course offerings and not individual study.

Notes:

May be taken more than once for credit in different topics.

EDCI 597 - Comprehensive Examination

Units: 1.5
Formerly: ED-A, ED-B and ED-E 597

Schedule

A written and/or oral comprehensive examination, which must be passed as required for individual Master of Education programs.

Notes:

Credit will be granted for only one of 597, ED-A 597, ED-B 597, ED-E 597.

Grading: INP, COM, N, F

EDCI 598A - Project Proposal and Literature Review

Units: 1.5

Schedule

Encourages discussion of alternate approaches to project topics as well as examine the components of a project proposal, especially the features of an effective literature review. The proposal and literature review for the MEd project must be accepted by the 598A course instructor and the student’s program supervisor.

Notes:

Students who do not complete the course requirements may register a second time for the course. Incomplete course requirements in the second term will result in withdrawal from the program. There are appeal procedures for extenuating circumstances.

Prerequisites:

Open only to students admitted into selected Community-based Master's of Education Programs.

Grading: COM, INP, N, F.

EDCI 598B - Project

Units: 1.5

Schedule

The project proposal approved in 598A is to be completed and will include the approved literature review, an analytic and professional reflection on the contributions of the project. A project may be presented in any appropriate form – prose, performance, multimedia, or exhibition for example – but must include a written submission of moderate length. The successful completion of the project requires the approval of the course instructor and the student’s program supervisor.

Notes:

Students who do not complete the course requirements may register a second time for the course. Incomplete course requirements in the second term will result in withdrawal from the program. There are appeal procedures for extenuating circumstances.

Prerequisites:

598A or suitable equivalent. Open only to students admitted into selected Community-based Master's of Education Programs.

Grading: COM, INP.

EDCI 599 - Thesis - Curriculum and Instruction

Units: 7.5
Formerly: ED-A, ED-B and ED-E 599

Schedule

Grading: INP, COM, N, F

EDCI 693 - Candidacy Examination - Curriculum and Instruction

Units: 3.0

Schedule

Candidacy Examinations which must be passed as required for individual Doctor of Philosophy Programs within the Faculty of Education. Exams will be reviewed and graded by all members of the individual's Doctoral Committee.

Grading: INP, COM, N, F

EDCI 699 - PhD Dissertation - Curriculum and Instruction

Units: 30.0
Formerly: ED-B 699

Schedule

Prerequisites:

EDCI 693.

Grading: INP, COM, N, F.

EDCI 787 - Cross-curricular Inquiry Strategies

Units: 1.5

Schedule

Inquiry-focused, project-based learning strategies applicable across a range of subject areas, and adaptable to learners' needs, interests, and competencies, will be presented, experienced and critically examined. Grouping structures that facilitate collaborative investigations and interactions, and multi-format presentations, will be featured.

Prerequisites:

ED-D 408 - Promoting Prosocial Behaviour: Strategies and Management

Units: 1.5
Formerly: EDUC 408

Schedule

Designed to provide beginning teachers with insights and concrete strategies that will assist them in preventing and/or effectively intervening in situations involving discipline, conflict, aggression and bullying. Peacemaking programs and peer conflict management initiatives will be discussed.

Notes:

Credit will be granted for only one of 408, EDUC 408.

Prerequisites:

Registration in a Faculty of Education Teacher Education Program.

ED-D 414 - Group Processes

Units: 1.5

Schedule

Analysis, theory, and research related to group processes, decision-making, and leadership in a variety of settings. Awareness and understanding of self in group contexts. Includes skills practice and development related to group membership and facilitation.

Notes:

414 is a prerequisite course for the Master’s program in Counselling Psychology and must be completed within seven years of the date of application.

ED-D 415 - Learning Difficulties: Assessment and Intervention

Units: 3.0

Schedule

A consideration of assessment strategies and instructional methods and materials appropriate for the identification and intervention of learning difficulties. Topics include: the application of knowledge and ethics in the assessment of students with special needs; the administration, scoring, and interpretation of norm-referenced, criterion-referenced, and curriculum-based assessment to Level B; task analysis, observation, portfolio, and environmental assessments; the synthesis and interpretation of assessment findings for individualized education program (IEP) planning and evaluation.

Notes:

Restricted to students registered in the Professional Specialization Certificate in Special Education.

Prerequisites:

405 and 402.

ED-D 417 - Skills for Effective Interpersonal Communication

Units: 1.5

Schedule

Basic interpersonal communication skills for active listening, empathic understanding and communication of empathy. Includes analysis of effective interpersonal skills and skill building laboratory experience. The content and skills are transferable to a variety of settings, including counselling, education, human development, management, healthcare, psychology and recreation.

Notes:

417 is a prerequisite course for the Master’s program in Counselling Psychology and must be completed within seven years of the date of application.

ED-D 418 - Introduction to Theories of Counselling

Units: 1.5
Formerly: part of ED-D 417

Schedule

Major theoretical approaches to counselling. Includes philosophical assumptions, key concepts, the process of change and interventions. Designed for those interested in counselling, psychotherapy, and helping relationships.

Notes:

418 is a prerequisite course for the Master's program in Counselling Psychology and must be completed within seven years of the date of application.

ED-D 420 - Learning Support: Context and Key Issues

Units: 1.5
Formerly: EDUC 420

Schedule

An introductory overview of key issues in learning support. Topics will include the organization, administration and management of classrooms in which students with special educational needs are found; the referral process; teacher responsibilities for students with special educational needs in the context of regular classrooms; and the utility and limitations of various assessment techniques.

Notes:

Credit will be granted for only one of 420, EDUC 420.

ED-D 424 - Teaching Students with Developmental Disabilities

Units: 1.5

Schedule

An introduction to designing, implementing, and monitoring programs within inclusive settings for children and adolescents with developmental disabilities such as intellectual disabilities, autism, cerebral palsy, and fetal alcohol spectrum disorder.

ED-D 425 - Assistive Technology in the Inclusive Classroom

Units: 1.5

Schedule

The application of a range of assistive technologies and instructional strategies to support active student participation in inclusive classrooms. Study and application of functional assessment processes, team principles, and a range of technologies and resources.

ED-D 503 - Program Development and Evaluation

Units: 1.5

Schedule

An examination of the issues, practices, and methods of program evaluation at the institutional, organizational, and classroom levels.

ED-D 514 - Assessment in Counselling

Units: 1.5

Schedule

The use of testing, diagnosis, and other aspects of assessment within a counselling perspective for adults, adolescents and children. Topics addressed include: basic concepts in assessment, the relationship between counselling and assessment, ethical issues, diversity, reliability and validity, test selection and administration, test evaluation, a variety of assessments and assessment reports.

Notes:

Credit will be granted for only one of 514, 591 if taken in the same topic.

Restricted to students who have been admitted to the MA or MEd degree program in Counselling Psychology, or by permission of the department.

Prerequisites:

518 and 522 or students who have counselling or related background.

ED-D 516 - Advanced Intervention in Special Education

Units: 1.5

Schedule

An intensive course specializing in academic interventions for students with special needs. Intervention design, implementation, and monitoring will be involved within the context of special education service delivery.

Prerequisites:

515 or permission of the department.

ED-D 518 - Advanced Seminar in Theories of Counselling Psychology

Units: 1.5

Schedule

Contemporary theories and approaches to counselling and psychotherapy for individuals, couples, and families across the lifespan.

Notes:

This course is open only to students who have been admitted to the MA or MEd degree program in Counselling Psychology, or by permission of the department.

ED-D 519A -

Units:

Schedule

ED-D 519C -

Units:

Schedule

ED-D 519D -

Units:

Schedule

ED-D 519H -

Units:

Schedule

ED-D 519L -

Units:

Schedule

ED-D 519P -

Units:

Schedule

ED-D 519S -

Units:

Schedule

ED-D 521 - Theory and Practice in Family Counselling

Units: 1.5

Schedule

Theoretical approaches and intervention strategies related to family counselling with diverse clientele. Through discussion, experiential activities, and role playing, students will become familiar with current concepts and techniques.

Notes:

This course is open only to students who have been admitted to the MA or MEd degree program in Counselling Psychology, or by permission of the department.

Prerequisites:

522 or permission of the department.

ED-D 522 - Skills and Practice for Counselling

Units: Variable

Schedule

Provides basic counselling interventions with an emphasis on the therapeutic relationship. Extensive opportunity to role play and to self-reflect on role as counsellor and issues related to boundaries and power. Sequenced skill training, with extensive counselling simulation and supervision of practice in a field setting. Includes direct client contact under the supervision of a qualified professional with diverse client populations.

Notes:

Can be taken more than once until practicum hourly requirements are met.

This course is open only to students who have been admitted to the MA or MEd degree program in Counselling Psychology, or by permission of the department.

Corequisites:

518 and 519N or 519C and 519L.

Grading: INP, COM, N, F.

ED-D 523 - Internship in Counselling

Units: Variable

Schedule

Provides intensive practice in advanced counselling techniques and approaches under the supervision of a professional counsellor in community settings. Lectures focus on case presentations, models of consultation, supervisor-supervisee relationship, roles and responsibilities of health professionals, counsellor identity, professional organizations, record keeping. Two term course.

Notes:

Can be taken more than once until practicum hourly requirements are met. Enrolment is limited due to availability of placements. Normally limited to a maximum of 3 units of credit.

This course is open only to students who have been admitted to the MA or MEd degree program in Counselling Psychology, or by permission of the department.

Prerequisites:

522.

Grading: INP, COM, N, F

ED-D 531 - Concepts and Theory of Organization

Units: 1.5 or 3.0
Formerly: ED-B 531

Schedule

Critical examination of the classical, modern, and emerging literature of administrative studies in the organizational context, with emphasis on philosophy of leadership, decision making processes, power and authority, leadership studies, and contemporary issues and perspectives.

Notes:

Credit will be granted for only one of 531, ED-B 531.

ED-D 533A -

Units:

Schedule

ED-D 533D -

Units:

Schedule

ED-D 535 - Global Comparative Perspectives on Leadership and Education

Units: 1.5
Formerly: 535A and 535B

Schedule

Explorations of diverse leadership and education theories and practices in school, institutions, workplaces, and/or community across Canada and around the world.

Notes:

Credit will be granted for only one of 535, 535A and 535B.

ED-D 540 - Women, Learning and Leadership

Units: 1.5

Schedule

Explores women's leadership in diverse contexts such as the women's movement(s), the voluntary sector, community organizations and government.

Notes:

Credit will be granted for only one of 540, 591 (if taken in the same topic).

ED-D 541 - Leadership in Rural Education

Units: 1.5

Schedule

An examination of the historical contexts, unique issues, and recent developments surrounding leadership in rural and remote education, globally, nationally, and provincially, including First Nations. Focus is on issues of equitable educational opportunities, recruitment and retention of educators, multi-grade classes, professional isolation, and demands of community-based lifestyle and the benefits of technology. The dearth of rural education research is explored.

Notes:

Credit will be granted for only one of 541, 591 (if taken in the same topic).

ED-D 561A - Methods in Educational Research

Units: 1.5
Formerly: 561

Schedule

An introduction to quantitative and qualitative research designs, the research process, the selection and design of data collection instruments and methods, writing and reporting findings, and systematically evaluating and critiquing the quality of research studies. Useful for students preparing to conduct thesis research as well as students who wish to become better readers and consumers of research.

Notes:

Credit will be granted for only one of 561A, 561.

ED-D 561B - Research Methods in Leadership

Units: 1.5

Schedule

Designed to prepare students in Leadership Studies to undertake independent, scholarly research so that they might fulfill the research requirements for the MEd degree in Leadership Studies. Students will become familiar with different lines of inquiry, appropriate methodologies, proposal preparation and the ethics involved in doing research.

Other graduate level research methods courses may be substituted with permission from the Graduate Adviser.

Notes:

Students must complete their 598 project within the two-term 3.0 unit allotment.

Prerequisites:

Students must complete 7.5 units before registering in 561B.

Corequisites:

Students must take 561B and 598 concurrently.

ED-D 570 - Instruction and Technologies to Promote Self-Regulated Learning and Strategy Use

Units: 1.5

Schedule

An introduction to contemporary theory and research about self-regulated learning and learning strategies. Emphasis is placed on the application of theory and research to the design of computer based instructional tools and environments.

Notes:

Students who complete this course may be eligible to apply for a lab instructor position for ED-D 101 (Learning Strategies for University Success).

Credit will be granted for only one of 570, 591 (if taken in the same topic).

ED-D 591D -

Units:

Schedule

ED-D 591E -

Units:

Schedule

ED-D 597 - Comprehensive Examination - Educational Psychology and Leadership Studies

Units: 1.5

Schedule

A required element of all MEd programs. Typically held within one month of completion of all course work. Examination format may be either written or oral, as decided upon by the program supervisor in consultation with the candidate. Areas of examination and examiners are established by each program area (counselling, educational psychology, special education, leadership studies).

Grading: INP, COM, N, F

ED-D 598 - Project - Educational Psychology and Leadership Studies

Units: to be determined

Schedule

Evidence of independent research work in the form of a project, extended paper(s), work report, etc., as determined within the department. Planned and carried out with a project supervisor.

Grading: INP, COM, N, F

ED-D 599 - Thesis - Educational Psychology and Leadership Studies

Units: 6.0

Schedule

Grading: INP, COM, N, F

ED-D 693 - Doctoral Candidacy Exam in Educational Psychology

Units: 3.0

Schedule

PhD students write candidacy examinations in research methodology and in their area of focus within educational psychology. The format will consist of two written papers followed by an oral examination. In the oral examination, the candidate will be examined in both research methodology and his/her area of focus.

Normally, within thirty six months of registration as a provisional doctoral student and at least six months before the final oral examination, a student must pass the candidacy examination.

Grading: INP, COM, N, F.

ED-D 699 - PhD Dissertation

Units: to be determined

Schedule

Prerequisites:

693

Grading: INP, COM, N, F.

ED-P 490 - Transformative Inquiry

Units: 1.5

Schedule

Focus on dialogic learning, teacher as researcher, and other ways of knowing to identify and explore personally meaningful topics within teaching practice. Individual reflection, collaborative processes, and mentoring sessions with instructor culminate in student facilitated inquiry conversations where the intricacies and overlapping issues of transformative pedagogy are considered and assimilated.

Prerequisites:

Enrolment in a teacher education program.

Grading: INP, COM, N, F

ELEC 216 - Electricity and Magnetism

Units: 1.5

Schedule

Electric charge, Coulomb's Law, electrostatic forces, electric field, Gauss's Law, electric potential, stored energy. Electric current, conduction in a vacuum and in material media, displacement current, magnetic field of a current, force on a current carrying wire, magnetic induction, electromotive force, energy stored in a magnetic field. Magnetism and magnetic circuits. Time varying fields. Capacitance, resistance, inductance, and their characterization.

Notes:

Credit will be granted for only one of 216, PHYS 216.

Prerequisites:

Either PHYS 112, or one of 110, 120, 122 and one of 111, 125, 130.

Pre or co requisites:

MATH 200.

ELEC 220 - Electrical Properties of Materials

Units: 1.5

Schedule

Materials for engineering, atomic bondings, crystalline structures, properties of metals, glasses, semiconductors, insulators and magnetic materials. Electronic conduction in solids and simple devices. Materials in engineering design and environmental effects.

Prerequisites:

One of PHYS 111, 112, 125; and

MATH 200.

Pre or co requisites:

216 or PHYS 216.

ELEC 250 - Linear Circuits I

Units: 1.5

Schedule

Circuit analysis and design techniques. Resistors, sources, Kirchoff's voltage and current laws. Theorems: linearity, superposition, Thevenin, Norton. Node and loop analysis. Capacitors and inductors, series and parallel connections, stored energies. Analysis of first- and second-order circuits. Forced and natural responses. Phasors, impedance and admittance. Network theorems using phasors. Series and parallel resonance. RMS quantities, complex power. Maximum power transfer. Three-phase circuits, Y- and Delta-loads.

Pre or co requisites:

MATH 201.

ELEC 260 - Continuous-Time Signals and Systems

Units: 1.5

Schedule

Continuous-time signals and systems. Functions of a complex variable. Analytic functions. Signal properties and basic signal transformations. Elementary functions including the Dirac delta function. System properties. Linear time-invariant systems and convolution. The Fourier series in the analysis of periodic signals. The Fourier transform and spectral analysis. The Laplace transform and its use in system analysis. The relationship between the Fourier and Laplace transforms. Solving differential equations with the Laplace transform. Partial fraction expansions. Using computer simulation of dynamic systems.

Prerequisites:

MATH 101; and

110 or 211 (211 may be taken as a corequisite).

ELEC 299 - Introduction to Electrical and Computer Engineering Design

Units: 1.5

Schedule

Computer Aided Design (CAD) tools used in electrical and computer engineering design: drafting, printed-circuit board layout, scientific and system simulation. Instrumentation devices used in control and measurement. Case studies illustrating electrical and computer engineering design process. Time and project management. Technical communications and presentations.

Notes:

Credit will be granted for only one of 299, 200, CENG 299, CIVE 200, ENGR 150, MECH 200.

Pre or co requisites:

ENGR 120 or 121; and

MATH 110 or 211.

ELEC 310 - Digital Signal Processing I

Units: 1.5

Schedule

Generation of discrete-time signals through the sampling process and their spectral representation. Mathematical representation and properties of digital signal processing (DSP) systems. Typical DSP systems, e.g., digital filters and applications. The z transform and its relation to the Laurent series. Evaluation of the inverse z transform using complex series and contour integrals. Application of the z transform for representation and analysis of DSP systems. The processing of continuous time signals using DSP systems. The discrete-Fourier transform and the use of fast Fourier transforms for its evaluation. Introduction to the design of DSP systems.

Prerequisites:

260.

ELEC 403 - Engineering Design by Optimization

Units: 1.5

Schedule

The steepest descent and Newton methods for unconstrained optimization. Golden section, quadratic, cubic and inexact line searches. Conjugate and quasi-Newton methods. The Fletcher-Reeves algorithm. Application to the design of circuits, control systems, filters, and mechanical systems using optimization techniques. Introduction to constrained optimization. Includes laboratory sessions to program various optimization algorithms and to apply them to several modelling and engineering design problems.

Prerequisites:

310 or CSC 349A.

ELEC 404 - Microwaves and Fiber Optics

Units: 1.5

Schedule

Transmission line theory, Smith chart and design examples, transmission lines and waveguides, network analysis, design of impedance matching and tuning networks, aspects of coupled lines, radiation and amplification, optical fibers, numerical aperture, single mode and multimode fibers, chromatic dispersion, fiber optic components.

Prerequisites:

300 and 340.

ELEC 410 - Power Electronics

Units: 1.5

Schedule

Electronics in energy conversion and control. Circuits with switches and diodes. Electrical and thermal characteristics of power semiconductor devices: diodes and thyristors; bipolar, field effect and insulated gate transistors. Phase controlled converters: ac-to-ac and ac-to-dc. Dc-to-dc converters including switching regulators. Voltage source inverters. Pulse-width modulation and harmonic elimination techniques. Emphasis on device limitations, computer aided analysis and system control. Application examples including solar power conversion and battery chargers.

Prerequisites:

370 and 380.

ELEC 435 - Medical Image Processing

Units: 1.5
Also: BME 403

Schedule

Image processing and understanding techniques applied in medical imaging technologies such as CT, MRI, ultrasound, X-ray. Design of computer aided diagnosis systems. Topics include algorithms for filtering, edge detection, segmentation, registration and 3D visualization of medical data.

Notes:

Credit will be granted for only one of 435, BME 403.

Prerequisites:

310.

ELEC 450 - Communications Theory and Systems II

Units: 1.5

Schedule

Transmission and filtering of random signals, analysis of modulation systems, in particular pulse code modulation, phase shift keying, frequency shift keying, etc., design of modems and of CODECs, introduction to noise analysis, information theory and coding.

Prerequisites:

350.

ELEC 452 - Optical Communication Technology

Units: 1.5

Schedule

Modern photonic devices, principles and applications. Topics include optical waveguides and fibers, attenuation, chromatic and polarization mode dispersion, light emitting diodes, laser diodes, laser noises and reduction techniques, photo detectors, noises, passive optical polarizers, couplers, isolators and circulators, Mach-Zehnder interferometer, fiber Bragg grating, optical filters, optical multiplexer and demultiplexer, arrayed waveguide gratings and Echelle gratings, optical amplifiers, optical microcavities and plasmonic devices. Nonlinear effects and devices.

Prerequisites:

320 and 340.

ELEC 456 - Wireless and Mobile Communications

Units: 1.5

Schedule

Path loss, fading and shadowing models; digital transmission over fading channels; diversity transmission/reception; adaptive modulation; multicarrier transmission/OFDM; spread spectrum and multiple access (FDMA/TDMA/CDMA) for mobile communications; capacity estimation and coverage analysis, with applications to WiFi and beyond 3G cellular systems.

Prerequisites:

350.

ELEC 466 - System-on-Chip Engineering for Signal Processing

Units: 1.5

Schedule

Design and System-on-Chip (SOC) implementation for signal processing applications. SOC design and testing methodologies, Platform-based design, Intellectual Property (IP) reuse, and built-in self-test. Controlling power consumption in SOC implementations. SOC multi-technology integration of analog and digital electronics, sensors and MEMS.

Prerequisites:

One of CENG 355, CSC 355, MECH 405, 458; and

either ELEC 310, or MECH 435 and 455.

ELEC 484 - Audio Signal Processing

Units: 1.5

Schedule

Introduction to digital audio effects and applications. Parametric filters, shelving filters, time-varying filters. Delay structures, delay-based audio effects. Dynamics processing, non-linear processing. Spatial effects, 3D audio, reverberation. Time segment processing, pitch shifting, time stretching. Time-frequency processing, phase vocoder.

Prerequisites:

310.

ELEC 486 - Multiresolution Signal and Geometry Processing with Software Applications

Units: 1.5

Schedule

Multirate signal processing, upsampling, downsampling, sampling rate conversion, polyphase techniques, multirate filter banks, multiresolution signal representations, wavelets, digital geometry processing, polygon meshes, subdivision surfaces/wavelets, efficient multiresolution signal processing. Applications in data compression, computer graphics/animation, geometric modeling, communications, and signal processing. C++ programming language, libraries such as OpenGL and CGAL.*

Prerequisites:

310.

ELEC 499 - Design Project II

Units: 1.5
Formerly: ELEC 499A and 499B

Schedule

A significant technical design project in Electrical Engineering completed under the supervision of a faculty member. This design experience is based on the knowledge and skills acquired in earlier course work. Projects may originate from faculty members, students, or external sources. They may have a diverse nature and serve diverse needs. Multi-disciplinary projects are encouraged.

Notes:

Credit will be granted for only one of 499, 499A, 499B, CENG 499, 499A, 499B, SENG 499, 499A, 499B.

Prerequisites:

One of 399, BME 350, CENG 399, MECH 350; and

ENGR 002; and

minimum fourth-year standing in the Electrical Engineering Program.

ELEC 503 - Engineering Design by Optimization I

Units: 1.5

Schedule

The steepest descent and Newton methods for unconstrained optimization. Golden section, quadratic, cubic and inexact line searches. Conjugate and Quasi-Newton methods. The Fletcher-Reeves algorithm. Application to the design of circuits, control systems, filters, and mechanical systems using optimization techniques. Introduction to constrained optimization. Students are required to complete one project that applies some of the optimization techniques to be studied in the course to an engineering analysis or design problem.

Notes:

Credit will be granted for only one of 503, 403.

Prerequisites:

ELEC 509 - Seminar

Units: 1.0

Schedule

Expose Master's students to different areas of research through seminar participation and provide a forum for the presentation of graduate student research. Required for all Master's students every year of their program as an addition to the normal program except by departmental permission. One unit of credit shall be given upon completion.

Grading: INP, COM, N

ELEC 512 - Digital Communications

Units: 1.5

Schedule

Source and channel descriptions. Source digitization, entropy and the rate distortion tradeoff, lossless source codes (Huffman and run length codes), optimal and adaptive quantization. Digital modulation techniques, optimal coherent receivers, performance evaluation, the incoherent case. Special topics - case studies, fiber optics, satellite systems, mobile radio systems.

Notes:

Credit will be granted for only one of 512, 450.

ELEC 543 - Design of Digital and VLSI Systems

Units: 1.5

Schedule

Advanced combinational and sequential logic design. Optimization of finite state machines; timing methodologies and synchronization issues. Hardware description languages (HDL): structural and behavioural descriptions, simulations and testbenches, coding styles, design with HDL and FPGA implementation. Design for test: testing concepts, scan-based design and built-in self-test (BIST). Design for high speed: timing analysis, pipelining and retiming. Design for low power: sources of power dissipation, design transformations. Students will be required to complete a project.

Notes:

Credit will be granted for only one of 543, CENG 441.

Prerequisites:

ELEC 568 - System-on-Chip Engineering for Signal Processing

Units: 1.5

Schedule

Design and System-on-Chip (SOC) implementation for signal processing applications. SOC design and testing methodologies, Platform-based design, Intellectual Property (IP) reuse, and built-in self-test. Controlling power consumption in SOC implementations. SOC multi-technology integration of analog and digital electronics, sensors and MEMS. Students are required to complete a project.

Notes:

Credit will be granted for only one of 568, 466.

ELEC 569A - Selected Topics in Computer Engineering

Units: 1.5
Formerly: 669

Schedule

Notes:

Variable content course. May be taken more than once for credit in different topics to a maximum of 3 units.

ELEC 581 - Power Electronics

Units: 1.5

Schedule

Characteristics of power semiconductor switching devices, e.g., silicon controlled rectifiers, bipolar and MOS power transistors, insulated gate bipolar transistors, gate-turn-off thyristors. Basic principles of phase controlled converters, dc to dc choppers, dc to ac inverters (square wave and pulse width modulated), switching power supplies, resonant converters. Applications to communication and computer power supplies, electric drives, induction heating, etc.

ELEC 586 - Multiresolution Signal and Geometry Processing with Software Applications

Units: 1.5

Schedule

Multirate signal processing, upsampling, downsampling, sampling rate conversion, polyphase techniques, multirate filter banks, multiresolution signal representations, wavelets, digital geometry processing, polygon meshes, subdivision surfaces/wavelets, efficient multiresolution signal processing. Applications in data compression, computer graphics/animation, geometric modeling, communications, and signal processing. C++ programming language, libraries such as OpenGL and CGAL. Students are required to complete a project.

Notes:

Credit will be granted for only one of 586, 486.

Prerequisites:

ELEC 598 - MEng Project

Units: 2.0

Schedule

Grading: INP, COM, N, F

ELEC 599 - MASc Thesis

Units: 12.0

Schedule

Grading: INP, COM, N, F

ELEC 609 - Seminar

Units: 1.0

Schedule

Expose PhD students to different areas of research through seminar participation and provide a forum for the presentation of graduate student research. Required for all Doctoral students every year of their program as an addition to the normal program except by departmental permission. One unit of credit shall be given upon completion.

Grading: INP, COM, N, F.

ELEC 693 - PhD Candidacy Examination

Units: 3.0

Schedule

The PhD Candidacy Examination consists of an oral examination. This examination should be taken and passed not later than three years from initial PhD registration. Required of all PhD students every term of their program until the oral examination is passed.

Notes:

693 is a corequisite: all registrations in 699 must be accompanied by registration in 693 until 693 is passed.

Grading: INP, COM, N, F.

ELEC 699 - PhD Dissertation

Units: 30.0-36.0

Schedule

Corequisites:

693

Grading: INP, COM, N, F.

ENGL 135 - Academic Reading and Writing

Units: 1.5

Schedule

Practice of skills needed for successful academic writing in a variety of subject areas. Analysis of rhetorical, stylistic, research and documentation techniques; development of these techniques through practical writing assignments. Balance of lectures and discussion.

Notes:

Credit will be granted for only one of 135, ENGR 110.

This course satisfies the Academic Writing Requirement.

ENGL 146 - The Literature of Our Era

Units: 1.5

Schedule

Comparative study of literary works from the 20th and 21st centuries. Special attention to how writers have adapted styles and techniques to represent our own experiences and the challenges of our age. Lectures, discussions, and essay writing workshops combine to develop students' abilities to write and speak about literature, and to make academic arguments in any discipline.

Notes:

Credit will be granted for only one of 146, 116, 121, 122, 125.

This course satisfies the Academic Writing Requirement.

ENGL 200A - English Literature to 1660

Units: 1.5
Formerly: part of 200

Schedule

Surveys major works from the Middle Ages and Renaissance. May include Old and Middle English texts in translation: Beowulf or Sir Gawain and the Green Knight, alongside works by major authors including Chaucer, Shakespeare, Marlowe, Sidney, Spenser, Donne and Milton.

Notes:

Credit will be granted for only one of 200A, 150, 200.

ENGL 366C - Shakespeare: Comedies, Problem Plays, and Romances

Units: 1.5
Formerly: part of 366 and 366A

Schedule

Study of such plays as A Midsummer Night's Dream, As You Like It, Twelfth Night, The Merchant of Venice, Measure for Measure, Troilus and Cressida, The Winter's Tale, and The Tempest.

Notes:

Credit will be granted for only one of 366C, 366, 366A, 366E.

ENGL 437B - Modern Drama Since World War II

Units: 1.5
Formerly: part of 437

Schedule

An examination of styles, techniques, themes and moods in drama from the Second World War to the present; theories and techniques of performance, production, and reception, particularly as these affect both the writing and the reading of the play as text. Emphasis on British and American theatre, but with consideration of influential European playwrights and movements, and of post-colonial developments.

Notes:

Credit will be granted for only one of 437B, 437.

ENGL 503 - Special Studies I

Units: 1.5

Schedule

ENGL 598 - Master's Essay

Units: 3.0-4.5

Schedule

Students are required to complete a Master's Essay and a final oral examination based on that essay. In most cases, this essay will be a revised version of a paper written for one of the student's seminars. Students who intend to complete the 598 essay in a given term must sign up for a proseminar in which a faculty member will lead them through a series of meetings designed to set clear expectations concerning the methodological and theoretical expectations as well as the amount of contextual research required for the Master's Essay.

Notes:

Students entering the program effective September 2009, and students doing a concentration in Literatures of the West Coast, will complete a Master's Essay (not to exceed 10,000 words) worth 4.5 units. All other students who entered the program prior to September 2009 will complete a Master's Essay (not to exceed 6,500 words) worth 3 units.

Grading: INP, COM, N, F.

ENGL 599 - MA Traditional or Alternative Thesis

Units: 7.5

Schedule

Grading: INP, COM, N, F.

ENGL 693 - Candidacy Examination

Units: 6.0
Formerly: 698

Schedule

Notes:

Credit will be granted for only one of 693, 698.

Students are required to pass two exams (Major Field and Focused Field) within 24 months of registration as a doctoral candidate, and before registering in the Dissertation (ENGL 699).

Grading: INP, COM, N, F.

ENGL 699 - PhD Dissertation

Units: 18.0-33.0

Schedule

Prerequisites:

693

Grading: INP, COM, N, F.

ENGR 297 - Technology and Society

Units: 1.5

Schedule

Introduction to the effects of technology on society including the ethical, environmental, cultural, social, economic and political issues raised by technological change. The concepts of sustainability, civil society, engineering law (negligence and product liability torts, contract law and consumer protection statutes) and environmental stewardship are addressed in the context of systems engineering design.

Pre or co requisites:

One of 120, 240, ENGL 225.

ENGR 446 - Technical Report

Units: 1.0

Schedule

A major technical report demonstrating written communication and analytical skills. The report topic must be approved by the Engineering and Computer Science/Math Co-op Program Manager at least two months prior to submission. Work Term Report Guidelines in effect at the time of registration govern report style and format.

Prerequisites:

002 and credit for 6 units of 400-level courses taken within the Faculty of Engineering.

Corequisites:

003.

ENT 402 - Entrepreneurship and Small Business for the Non-Specialist

Units: 1.5
Formerly: 302

Schedule

The impact of entrepreneurship and the function of the entrepreneur in new venture creation. A framework is developed which incorporates marketing feasibility studies and financial analysis into a comprehensive business plan. The business venture is examined with respect to financial planning, marketing, management, and tax decisions at the various stages of the business life cycle.

Notes:

Credit will be granted for only one of 402, 302, MECH 462. Enrolment limited to students outside the Entrepreneurship area of specialization.

Prerequisites:

Either COM 220 and 250, or 321 and 351; and

minimum fourth-year standing; or

permission of the Program Director.

ENT 410 - Venture Marketing Expertise (Promise Skills)

Units: 1.5

Schedule

As part of the integrated Entrepreneurship Core Semester, this course material is designed to help students to develop the conceptual tools and techniques needed for market scanning, opportunity recognition, product development, market acceptance, and the establishment and maintenance of venture stakeholder relationships. This element of the Entrepreneurship area of specialization will help students to develop skills in identifying and building the market relationships upon which successful entrepreneurship is based.

Prerequisites:

Third-year Commerce core or permission of the Program Director.

Corequisites:

411, 412, 413 and registration in the special entrepreneurship section of COM 400.

ENT 411 - Venture Planning/Finance Expertise (Planning Skills)

Units: 1.5

Schedule

As part of the integrated Entrepreneurship Core Semester, this course material is designed to help students develop the conceptual tools and techniques necessary to identify critical venture attributes and processes, and the consequent financial outcomes of venture creation decisions. This element of the Entrepreneurship area of specialization will help students to develop skills in recognizing the decision points and enacting the choice patterns that lead to relevant venture outcomes.

Prerequisites:

Third-year Commerce core or permission of the Program Director.

Corequisites:

410, 412, 413 and registration in the special entrepreneurship section of COM 400.

ENT 412 - Acquiring Expert Venture Cognitions

Units: 1.5

Schedule

As part of the integrated Entrepreneurship Core Semester, this course is designed to provide an overarching conceptual framework within which to integrate the other course materials that students encounter within the Entrepreneurship specialization. Students examine the process and content (sequence and norms) of New Venture Expert Scripts, creating their own master and sub-scripts that enable them to become independent economic actors. Students create individual verbal and written searching, screening, planning, financing, start-up and harvesting scripts.

Prerequisites:

Third-year Commerce core or permission of the Program Director.

Corequisites:

410, 411, 413 and registration in the special entrepreneurship section of COM 400.

ENT 413 - Portfolio Practicum

Units: 1.5

Schedule

As part of the integrated Entrepreneurship Core Semester, this course helps students to further integrate into practice the concepts experienced within the Entrepreneurship specialization. Students participate in industry tours, networking sessions, start-up experiences, visits from guest speakers, case studies and industry immersions. From these experiences, students create a portfolio that demonstrates to instructors, investors and other stakeholders their mastery of new venture skills and abilities, and the practical integration of knowledge sets acquired in the Entrepreneurship Specialization.

Prerequisites:

Third-year Commerce core or permission of the Program Director.

Corequisites:

410, 411, 412 and registration in the special entrepreneurship section of COM 400.

EOS 300 - Earth Science Field School

Units: 1.5

Schedule

An up to two-week field course in and around southern Vancouver Island during which the students will be introduced to geological fieldwork (mapping, traversing, drawing sedimentary logs, sampling, recording field notes) and the regional geology and tectonics of Vancouver Island. Normally held in late April - early May after examinations for Year 2.

Notes:

If the course is oversubscribed, registration priority will be given to those students declared in a program requiring EOS 300.

Prerequisites:

All of 201, 202, 205; and

declared program requiring EOS 300; or

permission of the department.

EOS 400 - Advanced Field Geology

Units: 1.5

Schedule

A field trip of up to two week's duration consisting of a transect of a major geological belt (usually the Canadian Cordillera). The focus varies with location, with the Cordilleran trip focusing on the tectonic interpretation of rock packages; the processes responsible for orogenesis; the role of orogens in the construction, growth, and evolution of continents; and how orogens affect and are affected by climate and the Earth system. Normally held in late August to early September, immediately prior to the commencement of the fall term.

Notes:

330 is strongly recommended prior to taking this course.

If the course is oversubscribed, registration priority will be given to those students declared in a program requiring EOS 400.

Prerequisites:

300; and

either 316, or 310 and 320; and

declared program requiring EOS 400; or

permission of the department.

EOS 499A - Honours Thesis I

Units: 1.5
Formerly: part of 499

Schedule

The first stage of a research project conducted under the direction of a faculty member. Open to Honours students only.

Notes:

Credit will be granted for only one of 499A and 499B, 499.

499A and 499B are “tied” courses and must be taken in consecutive terms except with permission of the department.

Credit for 499A will be assigned only upon successful completion of 499B.

Prerequisites:

Permission of the department.

Grading: INP, standard grade (assigned upon completion of 499B; if 499B is not completed, a grade equivalent to N will be assigned to 499A).

EOS 499B - Honours Thesis II

Units: 1.5
Formerly: part of 499

Schedule

Continuation of a research project conducted under the direction of a faculty member. Open to Honours students only.

Notes:

Credit will be granted for only one of 499A and 499B, 499.

499A and 499B are “tied” courses and must be taken in consecutive terms except with permission of the department.

Credit for 499A will be assigned only upon successful completion of both courses.

Prerequisites:

499A.

EOS 599 - MSc Thesis

Units: to be determined*

Schedule

The thesis or dissertation requirement for advanced degrees applies to all students in the School. Students must enrol in 599 in their first semester and remain enrolled until their thesis requirements have been completed.

Notes:

* Normally 9 units.

Grading: INP, COM, N, F.

EOS 693 - PhD Candidacy Examination

Units: 3.0

Schedule

Students must enrol in EOS 693 in their first semester and remain enrolled until their candidacy requirements have been completed, normally within the first two years of a PhD program. A pre-candidacy committee meeting must precede the formal candidacy exam.

Corequisites:

699

Grading: INP, COM, N, F.

EOS 699 - PhD Dissertation

Units: to be determined

Schedule

The thesis or dissertation requirement for advanced degrees applies to all students in the School. Students must enrol in 699 in their first semester and remain enrolled until their dissertation requirements have been completed.

Corequisites:

693

Grading: INP, COM, N, F.

EPHE 134 - Yoga

Units: 0.5
Formerly: PE 134

Schedule

Intended for students pursuing degrees in the Faculty of Education. Designed to develop each participant's level of performance, ability to analyze skills, and understanding of concepts within the activity of yoga.

Notes:

Credit will be granted for only one of 134, PE 134.

EPHE 142 - Personal Health, Wellness and Potential

Units: 1.5
Formerly: PE 142

Schedule

An examination of lifestyle behaviours, which have the power to enhance or diminish personal potential. Current wellness models and motivational theories will be reviewed and applied to wellness planning as related to personal and professional performance. Topics will include physical activity and health; nutrition; stress management; substance use/abuse; environmental awareness; goal setting; and the process of decision-making.

Notes:

Credit will be granted for only one of 142, PE 142.

EPHE 155 - Introduction to Nutrition: Concepts and Controversies

Units: 1.5
Formerly: PE 155

Schedule

The basics of diet planning, dietary guidelines and weight management will be covered through the application and demonstration of nutritional principles and their relationship to physical activity and health. Controversial topics such as ergogenic aids, vitamin and mineral supplementation, alcohol, diets and organic foods will be discussed using a balanced view of scientific evidence.

Notes:

Credit will be granted for only one of 155, PE 155.

EPHE 346 - Motor Development and Physical Maturation

Units: 1.5
Formerly: PE 346

Schedule

An overview of motor development and maturation from the neonate to adulthood and old age. Special attention will be given to the growth and motor development characteristics of children and adolescents.

Notes:

Credit will be granted for only one of 346, PE 346.

No prerequisite required but a background in anatomy is recommended.

EPHE 356 - Principles of Facility Administration

Units: 1.5
Formerly: PE 356

Schedule

Study of the concepts and processes of management as they apply to leisure service, recreation, fitness and health facilities. Emphasis on problem-solving techniques used by administrators and managers in the planning, designing, controlling, financing, renovating and maintaining of such facilities.

Notes:

Credit will be granted for only one of 356, PE 356.

EPHE 359 - Fiscal and Legal Management in Recreation and Health

Units: 1.5
Formerly: EPHE 354B

Schedule

A detailed look at the budgeting process, financial control, goal setting, risk management and legal liability in recreation and health related service agencies. Although 358 is not a prerequisite, 359 is best taken in conjunction with 358.

Notes:

Credit will be granted for only one of 358, 354B, PE 354B.

Prerequisites:

One of COOP 001, RHED 001, KINE 001.

EPHE 572 - Physiology in Physical Education and Sport

Units: 1.5
Formerly: PE 572

Schedule

The study of physiological basis for sport performance and fitness. The assessment of physiological status and the rationale for the prescription of exercise programs.

Notes:

Credit will be granted for only one of 572, PE 572.

EPHE 575 - Applied Sport Psychology

Units: 1.5
Formerly: PE 575

Schedule

Provides students with a further understanding of concepts and principles underlying the field of sport psychology. Provides a basis for the use of mental training techniques such as imagery, self-talk, feedback, and focusing to improve sport performance and experiences.

Notes:

Credit will be granted for only one of 575, PE 575.

EPHE 576 - Teaching and Coaching Effectiveness in Physical Education and Sport

Units: 1.5
Formerly: PE 576

Schedule

A review of current models of effective teaching and coaching; observation and coaching systems; analysis of teaching and coaching behaviours; a review of current research.

Notes:

Credit will be granted for only one of 576, PE 576.

EPHE 577 - Research Methods and Techniques in Coaching Studies

Units: 1.5
Formerly: PE 577A or PE 577

Schedule

The development of research skills required to interpret the literature related to coaching and sport performance and develop a project proposal as part of the requirements for the degree.

Notes:

Credit will be granted for only one of 577, PE 577, 577A.

Taught in summer only.

Prerequisites:

Enrolment in the MEd Coaching Studies Program.

EPHE 579 - Current Issues in Coaching Studies

Units: 1.5
Formerly: PE 577B or PE 579

Schedule

Identification and selection of issues in coaching and sport for presentation, discussion and resolution. As leaders in sport, students will consider issues from both a content perspective and in the context of beliefs and values.

Notes:

Credit will be granted for only one of 579, PE 577B, 579.

EPHE 585 - Qualitative Research Genres Applied to Education, Health and Society

Units: 1.5
Formerly: PE 585

Schedule

Examines issues surrounding the development of research representations that inform issues in education, health and society. A core component of the course will be to develop, gather data and report on a community based inquiry project. Qualitative genres based on different modes of inquiry will be explored and applied in a student developed inquiry project.

Notes:

Credit will be granted for only one of 585, PE 585.

EPHE 591 - Selected Topics in Exercise Science, Physical and Health Education

Units: 1.5 or 3.0
Formerly: PE 591

Schedule

A variable content course.

Notes:

May be taken more than once for credit in different topics. Pro Forma may be required for registration.

EPHE 597 - Comprehensive Examination - Exercise Science, Physical and Health Education

Units: 1.5
Formerly: PE 597

Schedule

Comprehensive examination which must be passed as required for individual Master of Education programs within the Faculty of Education.

Notes:

Credit will be granted for only one of 597, PE 597.

Grading: INP, COM, N, F

EPHE 598 - Project - Exercise Science, Physical and Health Education

Units: 3.0 - 4.5
Formerly: PE 598

Schedule

Notes:

Not open to students with credit in PE 598.

Grading: INP, COM, N, F

EPHE 599 - Thesis - Exercise Science, Physical and Health Education

Units: to be determined
Formerly: PE 599

Schedule

Notes:

Not open to students with credit in PE 599.

Grading: INP, COM, N, F

EPHE 693 - Candidacy Exam - Kinesiology

Units: 3.0

Schedule

Grading: INP, COM, N, F

EPHE 699 - PhD Dissertation - Kinesiology

Units: 18.0

Schedule

Prerequisites:

693

Grading: INP, COM, N, F.

ER 312A - Field Study in Ecological Restoration I

Units: 1.5

Schedule

Introduces basic field methodologies for assessment and restoration of local sites; includes individual and group field research, and involves field surveys, observation and background study on specific ecosystem types.

Notes:

Open only to students in the Restoration of Natural Systems Program or with permission of the Program's Academic Administrator.

ER 329 - Mining Restoration

Units: 1.5

Schedule

Impact of mines and mining practices on natural systems and landscapes; physical and chemical characteristics of mine sites and debris; restoration vs. reclamation; pre- and post-disturbance restoration strategies; engineering issues; revegetation and remediation of soil at mine sites; long term problems such as slope stability and acid mine drainage; legislation, policies and regulations.

Notes:

Open only to students in the Restoration of Natural Systems Program or with permission of the Program's Academic Administrator.

Background in physical geography such as GEOG 213 or equivalent strongly recommended.

ER 390 - Environmental Restoration Project

Units: 1.5

Schedule

In consultation with the Academic Administrator, students select a restoration project in an area of intended specialization. May involve a field research component. Final report required. Normally taken in the second or subsequent years of study.

Notes:

Open only to students in the Restoration of Natural Systems Program or with permission of the Program's Academic Administrator.

Grading: INP; standard grade.

ER 400 - Seminar in Environmental Restoration

Units: 0

Schedule

Seminar and portfolio presentation in the final year, normally in the field of intended specialization. Seminar is on 390 project, portfolio is of major projects from 311, 312A and 312B plus one elective.

Prerequisites:

390.

Grading: INC, COM.

ER 411 - Advanced Principles and Concepts of Ecological Restoration

Units: 1.5
Also: ES 441

Schedule

An advanced investigation into the meaning, limits, and significance of ecological restoration, including: how restoration is defined and why clear definitions are important; the role of historical knowledge in restoration; the changing character of restoration in a technological culture; ethical issues in restoration practice; participation and political process; cultural inclusion and the significance of restoration as a cultural mode; the international scope of restoration; and the paradox of design.

Notes:

Credit will be granted for only one of 411, ES 441, ES 482 (if taken in the same topic).

Open only to students in the Restoration of Natural Systems Program or with permission of the Program's Academic Administrator.

Prerequisites:

311.

If taken as ES 411, ES 341 or permission of the program.

ES 200 - Introduction to Environmental Studies

Units: 1.5
Formerly: 300A

Schedule

Introduction to the symptoms and sources of environmental problems and approaches to resolving them. Students will apply their understanding through a distinctive interdisciplinary exploration of three main themes: ecological restoration (the process of assisting the recovery of an ecosystem that has been degraded, damaged or destroyed), political ecology (the theory and practice behind sustainability) and ethnoecology (the study of the relationship between people and their habitats).

Notes:

Credit will be granted for only one of 200, 300A.

ES 301 - Political Ecology

Units: 1.5

Schedule

An introduction to the various socio-political and philosophical issues associated with the concept of a sustainable society. Emphasis is placed on the analysis of the complex relationships between social and biophysical systems. Examines how communities and environments are being impacted by the globalization of economies and cultures, technologies and ideologies, as well as responses from a variety of local, non-governmental and international agencies.

Prerequisites:

200 and minimum second-year standing.

ES 370 - Intermediate Field Study

Units: 1.5

Schedule

Further field-based study of environmental problems and solutions, such as integrating watershed scale analysis and enhancements. Typically offered in a compressed format. Additional fees may be necessary to support field expenses.

Pre or co requisites:

200 and 270.

ES 380 - Environmental Topics: Topics in Political Ecology

Units: 1.5
Formerly: 300B

Schedule

An in-depth systematic examination of specific environmental areas through seminars and projects; the development of appropriate responses to questions and problems within the selected areas; modes of interaction and communication with professional and community groups; application of theory to practice; qualitative vs. quantitative research methods. This course will be conducted as a seminar and may include a field trip for which a fee will be charged.

Notes:

* Contact hours may vary depending on the topic.

Credit will be granted for only one of 380, 300B unless approved by the Director.

May be taken more than once for credit in different topics to a maximum of 3 units.

Prerequisites:

200.

ES 382 - Environmental Topics: Topics in Ecological Restoration

Units: 1.5
Formerly: 300B

Schedule

An in-depth systematic examination of specific environmental areas through seminars and projects; the development of appropriate responses to questions and problems within the selected areas; modes of interaction and communication with professional and community groups; application of theory to practice; qualitative vs. quantitative research methods. This course will be conducted as a seminar and may include a field trip for which a fee will be charged.

Notes:

* Contact hours may vary depending on the topic.

Credit will be granted for only one of 382, 300B unless approved by the Director.

May be taken more than once for credit in different topics to a maximum of 3 units.

Prerequisites:

200.

ES 402 - Global Issues in Sustainability

Units: 1.5
Formerly: 420

Schedule

Concepts of sustainability, development and security and their global dimensions; global environmental threats and their sociopolitical implications. Sustainability and development strategies in a north-south context; the role of international agencies in development; global issues of population, energy and resources; international regimes for environmental conservation; war and environment.

Notes:

Credit will be granted for only one of 402, 420, 400A (if taken in 1989-94).

Prerequisites:

200 and 301.

ES 403 - Field Course in Environmental Law and Sustainability

Units: 1.5
Also: LAW 384

Schedule

Analyzes the structure of law, policy, and sustainability in a particular geographic region. Review of overlapping jurisdictional and governance systems that shape a region.

Notes:

Credit will be granted for only one of 403, LAW 384, LAW 343 if taken in the same topic.

ES 415 - Integral Systems Theory: Philosophy and Practice

Units: 1.5

Schedule

The history and philosophy of integral systems theory and its application at the individual and community level. Recent trends in light of panarchy theory and integral ecology.

Prerequisites:

200 and 301; and

384 or 414.

ES 441 - Advanced Principles and Concepts in Ecological Restoration

Units: 1.5
Also: ER 411

Schedule

An advanced investigation into the meaning, limits, and significance of ecological restoration, including: how restoration is defined and why clear definitions are important; the role of historical knowledge in restoration; the changing character of restoration in a technological culture; ethical issues in restoration practice; participation and political process; cultural inclusion and the significance of restoration as a cultural mode; the international scope of restoration; and the paradox of design.

Notes:

Credit will be granted for only one of 441, 482 (if taken in the same topic), ER 411.

Prerequisites:

Either 341 and ER 311, or permission of the school.

ES 593 - Thesis Proposal Preparation

Units: 1.5

Schedule

Students will work individually with their supervisor (or co-supervisors) and supervisory committee to develop a thesis proposal. An oral defense of the proposal shall take place no later than September 30th of the student’s second year of full-time study or third year of part-time study. An annual research showcase will provide an opportunity for students to present their work in a formal setting. Credit shall be granted upon acceptance of the proposal with revisions (as necessary).

Notes:

Required core course.

Grading: INP, COM, N, F.

ES 599 - MA, MSc Thesis

Units: 7.5

Schedule

Grading: INP, COM, N, F.

ES 693 - PhD Candidacy Examination

Units: 3.0

Schedule

PhD students will prepare a comprehensive reading list, a dissertation proposal, and two major papers (on topics relevant to the PhD research field), and will sit for an oral examination related to the reading list.

Grading: INP, COM, N, F.

ES 699 - PhD Dissertation

Units: 21.0

Schedule

Grading: INP, COM, N, F.

FORB 560 - Forest Biology Seminar

Units: 1.5

Schedule

Student and guest seminars on selected topics in forest biology and forest biotechnology and regeneration. Required of all graduate students in forest biology every year of their degree program (except by departmental permission) but will not count as part of their minimum graduate course requirement.

Grading: INP, COM, N, F

FRAN 100 - Intensive French I

Units: 3.0
Formerly: FREN 100

Schedule

Intensive spoken and written French.

Notes:

Credit will be granted for only one of 100, FREN 100, 102, 103, 105.

Intended for beginners. Next course in sequence: 120.

Not open to students with French 11 or equivalent in the last three years. Not open to students with French 12.

FRAN 250 - Experiential Learning

Units: 1.5

Schedule

The student will present a portfolio, in a form approved in advance, based on the experience of living in a francophone environment for a period of approximately six months.

Notes:

Open only to students who are completing the experience requirement for a degree in French.

Prerequisites:

Permission of the department.

Grading: COM, N, F

FRAN 275 - Writing in French I

Units: 1.5
Formerly: part of FREN 292, 295

Schedule

Practice of writing and reading in a variety of forms and the study of relevant models.

Notes:

Credit will be granted for only one of 275, FREN 292, 295.

Prerequisites:

180.

FRAN 325 - Studies in the Cultures of the French-speaking World (in English)

Units: 1.5

Schedule

Study of cultures in the French-speaking world using a variety of sources.

Notes:

May be taken more than once for credit in different topics with permission of the department to a maximum of 3 units.

FRAN 475 - Modern French

Units: 1.5

Schedule

Detailed study of contemporary French, with particular attention to aspects of the language useful to immersion teachers.

Notes:

Restricted to students in the TFI program.

Prerequisites:

Admission to the TFI program.

Grading: COM, N, F

FRAN 598 - Reading List/Oral

Units: 3.0
Formerly: FREN 598

Schedule

A reading list compiled in consultation with advisers, a short critical paper, and an oral exam.

Notes:

Credit will be granted for only one of 598, FREN 598.

Grading: INP, COM, N, F

FRAN 599 - Thesis/Oral

Units: 6.0
Formerly: FREN 599

Schedule

Thesis (topic to be selected in consultation with Graduate Committee as the development of course work) and oral examination.

Notes:

Thesis option is by invitation of the Graduate Committee only. Credit will be granted for only one of 599, FREN 599.

Grading: INP, COM, N, F

GEOG 103 - Introduction to Physical Geography

Units: 1.5
Formerly: Part of 110, 120, EOS 110, 120

Schedule

Introduces the science of Physical Geography using an earth-systems approach. Course themes include global climates and climate change, hydrology and water resources, geomorphology and natural hazards, and biogeography; with focus on how geographic sciences are applied to address real world issues.

Notes:

Not open to students with credit in any of 110 (EOS 110), 120 (EOS 120) if taken prior to May-Aug 2011.

GEOG 222 - Introduction to Maps and GIS

Units: 1.5

Schedule

Introduces techniques and fundamentals of spatial data and analysis. Topics include: scale, map interpretation, GPS and Geographic Information Systems.

Prerequisites:

Minimum second-year standing.

GEOG 306 - Geography of Canada

Units: 1.5

Schedule

An examination of the physical, economic, and cultural landscapes that distinguish the geographical character of major regions in Canada. Issues surrounding Canada’s identity and expressions of regionalism are considered.

GEOG 314 - Global Environment Change and Human Response

Units: 1.5
Formerly: 214

Schedule

Based on four components: global environmental change; sustainable development; biodiversity; and population impoverishment and environmental degradation. Lectures and discussion emphasize the causes of global change, the present and expected impacts on natural and social systems, and response strategies that have been proposed or enacted.

Notes:

Credit will be granted for only one of 314, 214 (if taken prior to 2006).

Prerequisites:

Minimum second-year standing.

GEOG 325 - Field Surveying

Units: 1.5

Schedule

An introduction to fundamental concepts of surveying and field work. This is an instrument-based course covering differential leveling, traversing, tachometry, GPS, and their applications to field work.

Notes:

1.5 units of 100-level MATH recommended prior to taking this course.

Prerequisites:

222 and 226.

GEOG 391 - Topics in Geography

Units: 1.5

Schedule

Examination of a specific topic or area in Geography. Topic(s) will be provided in advance of registration.

Notes:

* Contact hours may vary depending on the topic.

May be taken more than once for credit in different topics.

Prerequisites:

Minimum second-year standing.

Set by department depending on topic.

GEOG 424 - Field Studies in Coastal Geomorphology

Units: 1.5

Schedule

An advanced, field-based exploration of coastal geomorphic processes and landforms. Involves a week-long field trip to local coastal sites where students apply geomorphic concepts and methods towards a series of independent research assignments and/or group projects. Areas of investigation will span nearshore to backshore environments and wave, tidal, fluvial/estuarine, and aeolian processes. A field trip fee may be applied.

Notes:

252 is recommended prior to taking this course.

Prerequisites:

376 and permission of the department by 15 March of previous Winter Session.

GEOG 456 - Wildlife Conservation

Units: 1.5
Formerly: 356

Schedule

An examination of the history of the conservation movement and wildlife management, human dimensions and the value of wildlife, and consequences of over-harvesting, habitat fragmentation, and invasive species for present-day wildlife conservation and, ways forward.

Notes:

Credit will be granted for only one of 456, 356.

Prerequisites:

One of 358, ES 320, BIOL 370.`

GEOG 457 - Marine Protected Areas

Units: 1.5
Formerly: 455; 459A and 459B

Schedule

An in-depth look at the challenges facing designation and management of marine protected areas in Canada and internationally. Includes topics such as network design, governance, zoning, conflicts, ecotourism and fisheries. Students should be prepared to undertake one or more field trips; a fee for each field trip may be applied.

Notes:

Credit will be granted for only one of 457, 455, 459A, 459B.

252 and 304 are recommended prior to taking this course.

Prerequisites:

357.

GEOG 474 - Field Studies in Biogeography

Units: 1.5
Formerly: 471A

Schedule

A field-research course in biogeography based on a combination of reading, discussion, and data analysis. Involves a week-long field trip; a field trip fee may be applied.

Notes:

Credit will be granted for only one of 474, 471A.

252 and 303 are recommended prior to taking this course.

Prerequisites:

274 and permission of the instructor by 15 March of previous Winter Session.

GEOG 499A - Honours Thesis

Units: 1.5
Formerly: part of 499

Schedule

Students will prepare the first part of an honours thesis under the direction of a faculty member from the department.

Notes:

Credit will be granted for only one of 499A and B, 499.

499A and B are "tied" courses and must be taken in consecutive terms except with permission of the department. Credit for 499B will be assigned only upon completion of both courses.

Prerequisites:

Minimum fourth-year standing and declared Honours in Geography.

Grading: INP, standard grade (assigned upon completion of 499B; if 499B is not completed, a grade equivalent to N will be assigned to 499A)

GEOG 499B - Honours Thesis

Units: 1.5
Formerly: part of 499

Schedule

Students will complete their honours thesis under the direction of a faculty member from the department. After acceptance of the thesis by the supervising faculty member, an oral presentation and defence will be scheduled during the exam period.

Notes:

Credit will be granted for only one of 499A and B, 499.

499A and B are "tied" courses and must be taken in consecutive terms except with permission of the department. Credit for 499B will be assigned only upon completion of both courses.

Prerequisites:

499A.

GEOG 599 - MA, MSc Thesis

Units: to be determined

Schedule

Notes:

Credit to be determined.

Grading: INP, COM, N, F

GEOG 693 - Candidacy Examination

Units: 3.0

Schedule

By eighteen months of registration as a provisional doctoral student, a student must register for and eventually pass a candidacy examination.

The candidacy exam format includes two take home essays (max. 30 pages each) and an oral exam (max. 2 hours). Essay 1 will focus on the development of thought in the candidate's area of Geography (e.g., Physical, Human, Geomatics, or Resources) with an emphasis on linkages to the broader discipline. Essay 2 will focus on the candidate's research area. An oral examination will follow within 2 to 3 weeks after the completion of Essay 2.

Grading: INP, COM, N, F.

GEOG 699 - PhD Dissertation

Units: to be determined

Schedule

Prerequisites:

693

Grading: INP, COM, N, F

GMST 410 - Special Topics

Units: 1.5
Formerly: GERS 438A

Schedule

Notes:

Credit will be granted for only one of 410, GERS 438A, 438B (if taken in the same topic).

May be taken more than once for credit in different topics with permission of the department.

GMST 599 - Thesis

Units: 6.0-9.0
Formerly: GER 599

Schedule

Notes:

Credit will be granted for only one of 599, GER 599.

Grading: INP, COM, N, F.

GRS 495 - Practicum in Archaeology

Units: 3.0

Schedule

Introduction to the methods and techniques of archaeology in the Mediterranean through participation in an excavation. Engagement in university-level research and learning foundational principles of excavation and survey.

Notes:

Credit will be granted for only one of 495, CLAS 495 (if taken in the same topic).

May be taken more than once for credit in different topics with permission of the department.

Interested students should contact the department during the Fall Term.

361 and 371 are recommended prior to taking this course.

Prerequisites:

Permission of the department.

GRS 599 - MA Thesis

Units: 6.0-9.0
Formerly: CLAS 599

Schedule

Notes:

Before beginning the thesis the candidate must arrange with the supervisory committee and the Graduate Adviser the number of units to be assigned.

Grading: INP, COM, N, F

GRS 601B - Readings in Classical Literature (Latin)

Units: 1.5

Schedule

GRS 699 - PhD Dissertation

Units: 18.0

Schedule

Grading: INP, COM, N, F

HA 300A - Masterpieces of Art and Architecture

Units: 1.5

Schedule

An analysis of selected works of art central to the traditions of Western art.

HA 310D - Environmental Art

Units: 1.5

Schedule

A survey of examples of Environmental Art to the present day, beginning with the 1960s Land Art movement. Topics may include: earthworks, environmental art, performances and actions by artists ranging from Robert Smithson, Walter de Maria, Ana Mendieta, Andy Goldsworthy, Alice Aycock.

HA 363 - The Cinema and Modern Art Movements

Units: 1.5

Schedule

An examination of the history of film in relationship to the major art movements of the 20th century. Students will view and analyze films by such directors as Lang, Eisenstein, Bunuel, Brakhage, and Snow; these films will be discussed in the light of their connection to such influential modern art movements as German Expressionism, Russian Constructivism, Surrealism, Abstract Expressionism and Conceptual Art.

HA 392 - Special Topics in History in Art

Units: 1.5 or 3.0

Schedule

An investigation of a special aspect or area of History in Art. Specific topics may vary from year to year.

Notes:

May be taken more than once for credit in different topics with permission of the Chair of the department, to a maximum of 6 units.

HA 488G - Public Programming

Units: 1.5

Schedule

Examines the central role of public programming and interpretation in museums, galleries, heritage programs/sites and related agencies, and the relationship with learning and education. Emphasizes approaches which respond to community interests and reflect curatorial priorities. Planning, delivery, management and evaluation strategies for a range of programming approaches are covered.

Notes:

Subject to differential fees; consult Fees for Undergraduate Programs.

HA 488H - Topics in Museum Studies

Units: 0.5-1.5

Schedule

An intensive study of some special aspect or area of museum studies. Content may vary each year.

Notes:

May be taken more than once for credit in different topics with permission of the department to a maximum of 3 units.

Subject to differential fees; consult Fees for Undergraduate Programs.

HA 488M - Topics in Cultural Management

Units: 0.5-1.5

Schedule

An intensive study in some special aspect or area of cultural management. Content may vary each year.

Notes:

May be taken more than once for credit in different topics with permission of the department to a maximum of 3 units.

Subject to differential fees; consult Fees for Undergraduate Programs.

HA 488P - Human Resource Management in Cultural Organizations

Units: 1.5

Schedule

An intensive examination of the ways in which staff and volunteers are managed in cultural organizations, with particular emphasis on museum and heritage agencies, and stresses integrated, planned approaches to human resource development. Topics include organizational dynamics; leadership and decision-making; board/staff relations; policy development; position descriptions; recruitment; performance planning; communications; legal considerations; and ethics and professionalism.

Notes:

Subject to differential fees; consult Fees for Undergraduate Programs.

HA 489A - Heritage Area Conservation

Units: 1.5

Schedule

Topics in the conservation and rehabilitation of historic urban and rural areas. The historical, aesthetic, economic, social, and legal aspects of heritage area planning will be considered. Case histories and planning models will be discussed. An applied studies project normally will be assigned.

Notes:

May be taken more than once for credit in different topics with permission of the department to a maximum of 3 units.

Subject to differential fees; consult Fees for Undergraduate Programs.

HA 489E - Topics in Heritage Conservation

Units: 0.5-1.5

Schedule

An intensive study of some special aspect or area of heritage conservation. Content may vary each year.

Notes:

May be taken more than once for credit in different topics with permission of the department to a maximum of 3 units.

Subject to differential fees; consult Fees for Undergraduate Programs.

HINF 310 - Electronic Records and Decision Support Systems

Units: 1.5

Schedule

A critical analysis of the automation of clinical data acquisition, processing and storage in health care settings. Topics include: electronic health records, departmental systems (e.g., lab, pharmacy, intensive care,) PACS, computerized physician order entry (CPOE), clinical data repositories, health plans, personal health records and data warehouses.

Prerequisites:

200.

HINF 330 - Legal Issues in Health Informatics

Units: 1.5

Schedule

Introduces students to legal aspects of their profession, including aspects of confidentiality, privacy, legal liability of software systems and contractual issues. Students will gain an appreciation for legal terminology, reasoning, and processes as well as basic principles of law which apply to and govern health systems in Canada.

Notes:

Credit will be granted for only one of 330, NURS 487.

HINF 345 - Networks, Interoperability and Systems Security

Units: 1.5
Formerly: 445

Schedule

A management perspective to data communications technology, networks, and distributed processing. Emphasis is on examining the impact of emerging communications technology on health information systems in varying sectors of the health care delivery system. Topics also include: telehealth, home health care monitoring and pervasive computing in healthcare.

Notes:

Credit will be granted for only one of 345, 445.

Prerequisites:

201.

HINF 351 - Information Technology Procurement

Units: 1.5
Formerly: 451

Schedule

Investigation of the methodologies and processes used to select Information Technology (IT), primarily as they apply to Regional Health Authorities (RHA). The primary goal is to appreciate the dynamics and compromises that take place, particularly when a RHA procures IT to support patient care. Students will be encouraged to think from a clinical point of view, as opposed to taking a more technical perspective.

Notes:

Credit will be granted for only one of 351, 451.

HINF 371 - Clinical Methodologies

Units: 1.5

Schedule

The process of clinical decision making in diagnosis, treatment, planning and prognosis will be covered. Topics include: alternate models for clinical decision making using subjective and objective data and information, case based reasoning, and the role of clinical practice guidelines.

Notes:

Credit will be granted for only one of 371, 270.

Prerequisites:

280.

HINF 591 - Topics in Health Informatics

Units: 1.5

Schedule

Advanced topics in various areas of health informatics. Topics vary depending on faculty interests and availability. Students may take this course more than once.

HINF 598 - Research Project

Units: 3.0

Schedule

The student is required to conduct a major research project in health informatics under the supervision of a faculty member.

Grading: INP, COM, N, F

HINF 599 - Health Informatics Thesis

Units: 6.0

Schedule

The thesis provides the student with the opportunity of conducting original research and interpretation of those results in Health Informatics.

Grading: INP, COM, N, F.

HINF 693 - Candidacy Exam

Units: 3.0

Schedule

Students enroll in 693 for the duration of their preparations for their candidacy examinations. This begins at the time a student first enrolls in the PhD program and continues until candidacy requirements have been completed, normally at the end of first year of program.

Notes:

Grading: INP, COM, N, F.

HINF 699 - Dissertation

Units: 30.0

Schedule

Prerequisites:

693

Grading: INP, COM, N, F.

HLTH 351 - Practice of Evaluation Research

Units: 1.5

Schedule

This applied course explores the use of evaluation research within health contexts and settings. Evaluation as a systematic approach to assess effectiveness of health care and health care strategies will be examined. Students will acquire skills in the effective utilization of existing health evaluation research as well as in the basic design of evaluation frameworks.

HLTH 360 - Health Literacy and System Navigation

Units: 1.5
Formerly: part of 322.

Schedule

Health literacy, the capacity to understand and use health related knowledge, has implications for people`s ability to make healthy decisions and play an active role in managing their own health. This course examines ways to improve literacy and communication to enhance self-care including e-health literacy and the increasing use of the internet in access to health information. The importance of health system navigation in the integration of primary and community care will be explored.

Notes:

Credit will be granted for only one of 360, 322.

HSD 460 - Special Topics in Human and Social Development

Units: 1.5

Schedule

A variable content course which will focus on current and emerging issues in the human services. Examples of appropriate content include the prevention and treatment of alcohol and drug abuse and cross-cultural issues in the human services.

Notes:

Restricted to students in the Faculty of Human and Social Development in the third- or fourth-year of study. May be taken more than once for credit to a maximum of 3 credits. Offered as resources permit.

HSD 580 - Special Topics in Human and Social Development

Units: 1.5 or 3.0

Schedule

A variable content course focusing on the policy, practice and/or research interests of faculty and students in the Faculty of Human and Social Development.

Notes:

May be taken more than once for credit in different topics.

HSTR 115 - The Second World War

Units: 1.5
Formerly: HIST 245

Schedule

Survey of the military, diplomatic, economic, social and political aspects of this global conflict. The causes and ramifications of the war will also be considered.

Notes:

Credit will be granted for only one of 115, HIST 245

Not open to students with credit in HIST 392.

Recommended for students wishing to take advanced courses in military history.

Grading:

HSTR 308 - The United States and Vietnam

Units: 1.5
Formerly: HIST 316

Schedule

Exploration of the origins, consequences and legacy of U.S. involvement in Vietnam from 1941 to 1975. Analysis of American policy in the context of the Cold War and Third World nationalism and assessment of the impact of the Vietnam War on American society and the broader region of Southeast Asia.

Notes:

Credit will be granted for only one of 308, HIST 316, 318 (if taken in the same topic).

HSTR 310C - American History in Film

Units: 1.5

Schedule

Examines critical points in U.S. history through major Hollywood films that document the American story, asking whether this film works as history. Covers material from the colonial era (Last of the Mohicans) to the Civil War (Gangs of New York) to the Cold War (Thirteen Days).

Notes:

Credit will be granted for only one of 310C, HIST 318 (if taken in the same topic).

HSTR 330D - Drink and Social Control in Canada

Units: 1.5

Schedule

Introduces the history of drinking in Canadian life from 1828 to the present. Topics include the rise of the temperance movement, the struggle over legislation, prohibition's victory during WWI and the shift to government regulation in most provinces by the end of the 1920s. Explores related issues including gender, race, class and age as well as the history of leisure and the habits of everyday life, recreational drug use and evolving state policy.

Notes:

Credit will be granted for only one of 330D, HIST 358 (if taken in the same topic).

HSTR 350B - Weimar and Nazi Germany

Units: 1.5
Formerly: HIST 373

Schedule

Examination of the principal themes and developments in German history between the end of World War I and the collapse of the Third Reich in 1945.

Notes:

Credit will be granted for only one of 350B, HIST 373.

112A and 112B, or 240A and 240B are recommended prior to taking this course.

HSTR 370 - Topics in World and Comparative History

Units: 1.5
Formerly: HIST 468

Schedule

Notes:

Credit will be granted for only one of 370, HIST 468 (if taken in the same topic).

May be taken more than once for credit in different topics with permission of the department.

HSTR 379 - Western Imperialism in the Middle East and North Africa

Units: 1.5
Formerly: HIST 444

Schedule

Examines the rise and decline of European political and economic power over different parts of the Middle East and North Africa. Includes: theories of imperialism; the increasing integration of the region into the world economy in the 19th century; patterns and structures of colonial rule; changing ways of life and thought in colonized societies; the nationalist and religious opposition to European influence; the legacies of imperial rule in post-colonial nations.

Notes:

Credit will be granted for only one of 379, HIST 440 (if taken in the same topic), 444.

HSTR 528 - Field School in Ethnohistory

Units: 1.5
Formerly: HIST 528

Schedule

A 6-week intensive community-based course where students move to the host First Nations’ community to research.

Notes:

Credit will be granted for only one of 528, HIST 528.

HSTR 550 - Non-Thesis MA Historiography/Research Methods

Units: 1.5
Formerly: HIST 550

Schedule

Notes:

Credit will be granted for only one of 550, HIST 550.

HSTR 598 - MA Major Research Paper

Units: 6.0
Formerly: HIST 598

Schedule

Notes:

Credit will be granted for only one of 598, HIST 598.

Grading: INP, COM, N, F

HSTR 599 - MA Thesis

Units: 9.0-10.5
Formerly: HIST 599

Schedule

Notes:

Credit will be granted for only one of 599, HIST 599.

Grading: INP, COM, N, F

HSTR 693 - PhD Candidacy Examinations

Units: 3.0
Formerly: HIST 693

Schedule

Students enrol in 693 for the duration of their preparations for their candidacy examinations. This begins at the time a student first enrols in the PhD program and continues until candidacy requirements have been completed.

Notes:

Credit will be granted for only one of 693, HIST 693.

Grading: INP, COM, N, F

HSTR 699 - PhD Thesis

Units: 25.5 - 36.0
Formerly: HIST 699

Schedule

Notes:

Credit will be granted for only one of 699, HIST 699.

Prerequisites:

693

Grading: INP, COM, N, F.

IB 409 - Selected Topics in International Business Management

Units: 1.5

Schedule

An analysis of international business as it relates to specialized fields with specific topics added on a regular basis to reflect changing issues and faculty availability. Topics vary on a yearly basis, and thus students should consult with the Gustavson School of Business for current offerings.

Notes:

May be taken more than once for credit with permission of the Gustavson School of Business.

Prerequisites:

301 or COM 361; and

minimum fourth-year standing; or

permission of the Program Director.

IB 415 - Cross-National Management

Units: 1.5

Schedule

An analysis of the influence of national culture on managerial practices, including the issues surrounding the transferability of such managerial practices.

Notes:

Credit will be granted for only one of 415, 302.

Prerequisites:

Either COM 321 and 361, or IB 301 and COM 220; and

minimum fourth-year standing.

IB 416 - International Marketing

Units: 1.5

Schedule

Opportunities, characteristics, and trends in foreign markets as well as strategies and problems of adapting marketing concepts and methods in international settings.

Notes:

Credit will be granted for only one of 416, 401.

Prerequisites:

Either COM 351 and 361, or COM 250 and IB 301; and

minimum fourth-year standing.

IB 417 - International Finance

Units: 1.5

Schedule

Financial problems of multinational business; international financial environment; long-term capital commitment to an international venture; financial techniques for firm operation.

Notes:

Credit will be granted for only one of 417, 403.

Prerequisites:

Either COM 371 and 361, or COM 240 and IB 301; and

minimum fourth-year standing.

IED 371 - The History of Indigenous Education in Canada

Units: 1.5
Formerly: EDCI 371, IS 371

Schedule

A broad overview of the history of First Nations, Métis, and Inuit education in Canada. Various eras in the history of K-12 Indigenous Education in Canada will be examined. Pre-contact forms of Indigenous knowledge and pedagogy are emphasized. The purpose of education from both historical and contemporary Indigenous perspectives will be explored as well as the current situation and future directions in both public schools and Indigenous-controlled schools in BC.

Notes:

Credit will be granted for only one of 371, EDCI 371, IS 371.

Grading: COM, N, F

IED 374 - Indigenous Pedagogies

Units: 1.5

Schedule

Provides students with an examination of traditional and contemporary approaches to teaching and learning within an Indigenous worldview. Elements include distinctive features of Indigenous knowledge and pedagogy such as learning by observation and doing, learning through enjoyment, teachings of the Elders, and the use of humor among others.

Notes:

Credit will be granted for only one of 374, 499 (if taken in the same topic).

Grading: COM, N, F.

IED 387 - Special Topics in Indigenous Education

Units: 1.5

Schedule

Notes:

May be taken more than once for credit in different topics with the permission of the program.

IED 473 - CENENITEL TW TOLNEW: Helping each other to learn

Units: 1.5

Schedule

Introduction to an Indigenous world of learning and teaching through hands-on practical activities integrated with theoretical and academic goals. Experiences in the principles of traditional Indigenous ways of teaching and learning such as mentorship and apprenticeship. Respectful practice, community engagement and personal responsibility help learners develop insight into Indigenous pedagogy while working alongside community knowledge keepers, elders and artists.

Notes:

Credit will be granted for only one of 473, EDCI 499 (if taken on the same topic). May be taken more than once for credit in different topics with the permission of the program.

Grading: COM, N, F.

IED 530 - Indigenous Research Methods

Units: 1.5

Schedule

Indigenous methodologies, research practices and protocols are examined including specific topics such as research ownership, research process and outcomes. Approaches to research that are culturally respectful, ethical, and reciprocal will be explored.

IED 597 - Comprehensive Examination

Units: 1.5

Schedule

A required element of non-thesis graduate students. Areas of examination and examination format, either written or oral, will be determined by the supervisory committee in consultation with the candidate.

Grading: INP, COM, N, F

IED 598 - Major Project

Units: 3.0

Schedule

Evidence of independent research work will be presented in the form of an extended paper, project, or report as determined with the supervisory committee. Students will design their project in partnership with an Indigenous community or Indigenous organization. The project will enhance the community or organization's capacity to support language revitalization while providing an opportunity for students to approach the real world challenges of language revitalization in an Indigenous context.

Grading: INP, COM, N, F

IED 599 - Thesis

Units: 4.5

Schedule

Research on a topic chosen in consultation with the student's supervisory committee.

Grading: INP, COM, N, F

IET 400 - Practicum in Intercultural Education

Units: 1.5 or 3.0

Schedule

Students may choose to undertake a 1.5 or 3.0 unit practicum toward the end of their program. A practicum focuses on an area of professional interest and provides an opportunity to consider intercultural principles and issues in a practical setting. Placements are arranged through the program office with an approved institution or organization. A 1.5 unit practicum consists of at least 50 hours of activity; a 3.0 unit practicum involves a minimum of 100 hours.

Notes:

May be taken more than once for credit to a maximum of 3 units.

Grading: INP, COM, N, F

IET 410 - Final Project in Intercultural Education

Units: 1.5 or 3.0

Schedule

Students may choose to undertake a 1.5 or 3.0 unit final project toward the end of the Intercultural Education Program. The final project provides an opportunity to demonstrate knowledge of both theory and practice in a selected area of intercultural studies.

Grading: INP, COM, N, F

IGOV 598 - Community Governance Project

Units: 4.5 or 6.0

Schedule

Graduate course in the Indigenous Governance program administered by the Faculty of Graduate Studies.

Projects are geared toward providing a practical learning experience and opportunity for students to face the real world challenges of governance in an Indigenous context. They also serve as a crucial function for affilitated communities in providing access to the University's resources and expertise through the students' participation in projects to enhance the community's governance capacity.

Community governance project interns will work on a designated research or policy development project in an Indigenous organization, under the direction of a project management team that includes community leaders and IGOV faculty. Internship placements must be approved by the Director, and will typically involve 100 hours of work in the community and the completion of a comprehensive report based on the internship experience.

Notes:

Only students who entered the MA program prior to September 2009 need to register in the 6.0 unit section of 598 (requires permission of the department). Students who start their MA program on or after September 2009 need to register in the 4.5 unit section of 598.

Prerequisites:

Before registering in a Community Governance Project, a student must have completed all core courses (IGOV 520, 530, 540 and 550) as well as mentorship (575) and their elective.

Grading: INP, COM, N, F

IGOV 699 -

Units:

Schedule

INGH 453 - Wise Practices in Indigenous Community Health

Units: 1.5

Schedule

Focuses on population and public health models to examine the current state of Indigenous health policies, programs and services in Canada, with particular emphasis on those that function to improve Indigenous community health. Students will also explore jurisdictional barriers to optimal health as well as community-based interventions that promote health. Within this framework, the concept and utility of cultural safety within mainstream health care systems will be examined.

INGH 520 - Community Engagement and Leadership

Units: 1.5

Schedule

The concepts of respect, trust and cultural safety and their historical significance in engaging with Indigenous communities are explored. De-colonizing practices are emphasized through the exploration of relational practice and community capacity building as methods for effective engagement of community. Topics include the implications of recognizing the communal ownership of knowledge within Indigenous culture; the value of Indigenous knowledge and mentorship in the emergence of Indigenous health leaders are explored.

INGH 522 - Indigenous Health Research Methodologies

Units: 1.5

Schedule

Topics include the value of being in relationship with community as a foundation for research; knowledge of indigenous life course determinants relevant to the health of Indigenous Peoples; ethical, legal and social issues related to research with Indigenous Peoples.

INTS 460 - Foundations in International and Global Health and Human Development

Units: 1.5

Schedule

Focuses on the history and context of international and global work in health and human development sectors. Students will critically examine various models and frameworks that have traditionally been used in providing international aid. The impact of colonization and globalization on health and human development will be explored including an examination of factors such as economics, politics and technology.

ITAL 149 - Beginners' Italian

Units: 3.0

Schedule

Exploration of the language and culture of Italy, equivalent to ITAL 100A and 100B. Acquisition of basic skills of pronunciation, reading and writing. Instruction in essential points of grammar, basic syntax and vocabulary for daily interaction.

Notes:

Credit will be granted for only one of 149, 100, 100A, 100B.

ITAL 598 - Master's Essay

Units: 3.0

Schedule

Grading: INP, COM, N, F.

LAW 301 - The Administrative Law Process

Units: 2.0

Schedule

An investigation of the nature and function of the administrative process with particular reference to the development of tribunals and agencies with a wide variety of disparate functions and interactions with private life. Similarly, investigates the way in which tribunals and courts interact, with specific reference to the judicial arsenal available for the control of administrative behaviour.

LAW 307B -

Units:

Schedule

LAW 309 - The Law of Evidence

Units: 2.0

Schedule

The objective structure and content of the law governing proof of facts in both civil and criminal trials, as well as before administrative tribunals. Rules of evidence respecting burdens of proof and presumptions, competence and compellability of witnesses, corroboration, hearsay, character, opinion evidence and a variety of other topics will be critically examined in the light of objectives of the legal process.

LAW 315 - Business Associations

Units: 2.0 or 2.5

Schedule

Conceptual overview of business organizations including legal and fiduciary concepts in commercial relationships. Analyzes and discusses various legal forms for carrying on business, such as sole proprietorship, partnership, co-operatives and corporations. Also covers agency law. Recognizes that the corporation as an organizational form is of immense legal and commercial significance and accordingly focuses on statutory provisions and case law governing the modern corporation.

LAW 343 - Contemporary Issues in Law

Units: 0.5-2.0

Schedule

Contemporary and problematic legal issues will be examined in the light of existing legal rules, social and related implications, the legal process, and possible reform.

Notes:

Unit value may vary from 0.5 to 2 units per term. May be taken more than once for credit.

LAW 349 - Business Law Clinic

Units: 1.5-3.0

Schedule

Using a clinical approach, students will apply knowledge gained in LAW 315 Business Associations as they assist small business owners and those who are considering going into business to assess their legal requirements. By working with the Clinic Counsel and with the mentors from the Victoria Bar, students develop practical legal skills and examine the role of the legal profession in the small business environment.

Notes:

May be taken twice for credit to a maximum of 3.0 units with the prior approval of the Associate Dean Academic and Student Realations and the instructor. Priority will be given to students registering in the course for the first time.

Pre or co requisites:

315.

Grading: COM, N, F.

LAW 350 - Clinical Term

Units: 7.5

Schedule

Students receive training in interviewing, counselling, negotiation, mediation, advocacy before Provincial Court and administrative tribunals, and drafting. Represent numerous clients who present with problems related to the criminal law, corrections law, family law, human rights law, and variety of civil law issues. Develop awareness of legal and social problems of economically disadvantaged, significantly ill, liberty challenged, indigenous and aged members of society.

Notes:

Credit will be granted for only one of 350, 350A.

Prerequisites:

309.

Grading: COM, N, F.

LAW 353 - Environmental Law Centre Clinic

Units: 1.0-2.0

Schedule

An opportunity to study the theory and engage in the practice of public interest environmental lawyering in a supervised clinical setting. Students enrolled in the Clinic provide legal information and assistance to environmental NGOs, community groups and First Nations. They also develop public interest lawyering skills including advocacy through media, client counselling, and case development and management. The class meets for a weekly seminar to discuss ongoing projects and related readings, and to exercise skills. At the end of term, every student will submit for evaluation a major written product prepared for a designated clinic client.

Notes:

May be taken twice for credit to a maximum of 4 units with the approval of the Associate Dean.

Grading: COM, N, F.

LAW 384 - Field Course in Environmental Law and Sustainability

Units: 1.5
Also: ES 403

Schedule

Analyzes the structure of law, policy, and sustainability in a particular geographic region. Review of overlapping jurisdictional and governance systems that shape a region.

Notes:

Credit will be granted for only one of 384, 343 (if taken in the same topic), ES 403.

Undergraduate course in Law and Environmental Studies offered by the Faculty of Law and School of Environmental Studies in the Faculty of Social Sciences.

Grading:

LAW 388 - Advanced Legal Research and Writing

Units: 1.5

Schedule

Builds upon the research and writing skills learned in the first year. Students will explore a wide range of research sources, both legal and nonlegal, including computer assisted legal research. Students will analyze various types of legal writing. The importance of context, organization and audience in legal writing will be stressed. Parts, sections or clauses of written documents will be analyzed, evaluated, criticized, edited and rewritten to improve and develop the students' analytical and writing skills.

LAW 399 - Supervised Research and Writing

Units: 1.0-4.0

Schedule

During either of the second or third years of a student's program, a student may undertake a substantial research and writing project on a legal subject approved by a member of the Faculty of Law who agrees to supervise the project. With the approval of the Dean or the Dean's nominee: (1) a student may be awarded credit for two separate supervised research papers provided that the total credit does not exceed 4 units and each paper is started and completed in separate terms; (2) this course may be extended over two terms; and (3) this course is to be taken for 1 unit only.

LAW 598 - Major Research Paper in Law

Units: 6.0

Schedule

Grading: INP, COM, N, F.

LAW 599 - LLM Thesis

Units: 9.0

Schedule

Grading: INP, COM, N, F.

LAW 693 - PhD Candidacy Examinations

Units: 3.0

Schedule

The PhD Candidacy Examination consists of an oral examination. This examination should be taken and passed within two years of entering the PhD program.

Grading: INP, COM, N, F.

LAW 699 - PhD Dissertation

Units: 21.0-36.0

Schedule

Prerequisites:

693

Grading: INP, COM, N, F.

LING 100A - Introduction to Linguistics I

Units: 1.5
Formerly: half of 100

Schedule

An introduction to the subject matter of language and linguistics. Topics studied will include the nature of language through an overview of sound systems, word structures, writing systems, meaning and lexical sets and sentence structure.

Notes:

Credit will be granted for only one of 100A, 100, 181, 360, 362.

Knowledge of a language other than English not necessary.

LING 345 - Sign Language as Language

Units: 1.5

Schedule

Explores some common misconceptions about sign language that this course aims to dispel. Overview of linguistic research on sign language, which may include origins, structure, acquisition and issues in Deaf culture and Deaf rights.

Notes:

No knowledge of ASL or Linguistics required.

LING 370A - Psycholinguistics

Units: 1.5
Also: PSYC 370A

Schedule

The psychology of language, examining the process of comprehension and production, including language and cognition, conversational discourse and inference and semantics, among other topics.

Notes:

Credit will be granted for only one of 370A, 370, PSYC 370, 370A.

LING 390 - The Growth of Modern English

Units: 1.5

Schedule

The linguistic history of the English language from its Proto-Indo-European origins to the 18th century. Topics include the causes of language change, the development of the phonological, morphosyntactic and lexical systems of English, and the significance of social and regional dialects.

Notes:

Credit will be granted for only one of 390, ENGL 390, ENGL 440.

LING 574 - Seminar in Applied Linguistics

Units: 1.5

Schedule

A seminar on issues in applied linguistics, including an overview of second language learning and teaching principles, TESL/TEFL methodology, language situation contacts and multilingualism. Each participant selects a topic area of individual interest to report to the seminar.

LING 598 - Major Research Paper

Units: 3.0

Schedule

A major research paper (40-45 pages) reporting independent research under the direction of a faculty member. Students meet in a seminar weekly with the course instructor to discuss research topics including research designs, data collection and analyses, reporting and presentation research results, and other research related issues.

Grading: INP, COM, N, F.

LING 599 - MA Thesis

Units: to be determined

Schedule

Grading: INP, COM, N, F

LING 693 - Candidacy Examination

Units: 3.0

Schedule

The candidacy requirement must be satisfied within three years of registration in the doctoral program (see Faculty of Graduate Studies regulations). The candidacy examination consists of two substantial, original research papers, one in the area of phonological or syntactic theory, understood broadly, and the other in an area agreed to by the student and the supervisor.

Grading: INP, COM, N, F

LING 699 - PhD Dissertation

Units: to be determined

Schedule

Notes:

Credit to be determined; normally 18 units.

Prerequisites:

693.

Grading: INP, COM, N, F.

MATH 100 - Calculus I

Units: 1.5

Schedule

Review of analytic geometry; functions and graphs; limits; derivatives; techniques and applications of differentiation; antiderivatives; the definite integral and area; logarithmic and exponential functions; trigonometric functions; Newton's, Simpson's and trapezoidal methods; l'Hopital's rule.

Notes:

Credit will be granted for only one of 100, 102. See notes 1, 2, 3 and 4 under “Notes on Course Requirements”.

MATH 100 requires a greater facility with algebra and trigonometry than does MATH 102, an entry-level calculus course for students requiring no further calculus courses.

Prerequisites:

Either Principles of Mathematics 12 or Pre-calculus 12 with a minimum grade of 73%, or 120 with a minimum grade of C+, or MATH 100 pretest with a PASS.

MATH 101 - Calculus II

Units: 1.5

Schedule

Volumes; arc length and surface area; techniques of integration with applications; polar coordinates and area; Taylor's formula; improper integrals; series and tests for convergence; power series and Taylor series; complex numbers.

Notes:

See note 4 under “Notes on Course Requirements”.

Prerequisites:

100 or permission of the department.

MATH 102 - Calculus for Students in the Social and Biological Sciences

Units: 1.5

Schedule

Calculus of one variable with applications to the social and biological sciences.

Notes:

Credit will be granted for only one of 102, 100. See note 4 under “Notes on Course Requirements”.

MATH 102 does not prepare students for further study of calculus and will restrict future options by ruling out a range of courses which require MATH 100.

Prerequisites:

Either Principles of Mathematics 12, or Pre-calculus 12, or 120 with a minimum grade of C.

MATH 120 - Precalculus Mathematics

Units: 1.5
Formerly: MATH 012

Schedule

The essential topics prerequisite for calculus. Elementary functions with emphasis on the general nature of functions; polynomial, rational, exponential, logarithmic, and trigonometric functions. Conic sections, plane analytic geometry.

Notes:

Not open for credit to students with credit in any of 012, 100 or 102, and not intended for students who are proficient with the topics covered in Principles of Mathematics 12 or Pre-calculus 12.

See note 4 under “Notes on Course Requirements”.

Prerequisites:

Either Principles of Mathematics 11, or Pre-calculus 11, or permission of the department.

MATH 122 - Logic and Foundations

Units: 1.5
Formerly: 224

Schedule

Logic and quantifiers, basic set theory, mathematical induction and recursive definitions, divide and conquer recurrence relations, properties of integers, counting, functions and relations, countable and uncountable sets, asymptotic notation.

Notes:

Credit will be granted for only one of 122, 224, CENG 245.

Not open for credit to students with credit in any of 222, 422 or 423.

Students with 90% or higher in Principles of Mathematics 12 or Pre-calculus 12 are encouraged to request permission to register.

Prerequisites:

One of 100, 102, 151, permission of the department.

MATH 151 - Finite Mathematics

Units: 1.5

Schedule

Geometric approach to linear programming, linear systems, Gauss-Jordan elimination, matrices, compound interest and annuities, permutations and combinations, basic laws of probability, conditional probability, independence, tree diagrams and Bayes formula, random variables and their probability distributions (including binomial and hypergeometric), expectation, applications of discrete probability and Markov chains.

Notes:

Not open for credit to students with credit in 352.

Prerequisites:

Either Principles of Mathematics 11 or 12, or Pre-calculus 11 or 12, or Foundations of Mathematics 11 or 12, or 1.5 units of 100-level MATH or higher.

MATH 200 - Calculus of Several Variables

Units: 1.5

Schedule

Vectors and vector functions; solid analytic geometry; partial differentiation; directional derivatives and the gradient vector; Lagrange multipliers; multiple integration with applications; cylindrical and spherical coordinates; surface area; line integrals; Green's Theorem. The section of this course for engineering students will also cover the following topics: surface integrals and the divergence theorem.

Notes:

Credit will be granted for only one of 200, 202, 205. If all of 202, 200, and 201 are taken, credit will be granted for only 200 and 201.

Prerequisites:

101.

MATH 201 - Introduction to Differential Equations

Units: 1.5

Schedule

First order equations, linear second order equations and 2-dimensional systems of linear equations with constant coefficients, elementary qualitative methods, numerical Euler and Runge-Kutta methods, Laplace transform, applications.

Notes:

Credit will be granted for only one of 201, 202. If all of 200, 201, and 202 are taken, credit will be granted for only 200 and 201.

Prerequisites:

101.

MATH 211 - Matrix Algebra I

Units: 1.5
Formerly: 233A

Schedule

Matrices: simultaneous equations; determinants; vectors in 2-, 3- and n-tuple space; inner product; linear independence and rank; change of coordinates; rotation of axes in 2- and 3-dimensional Euclidean space; orthogonal matrices; eigenvalues and eigenvectors.

Notes:

Credit will be granted for only one of 211, 110, 133, 233A.

Prerequisites:

One of Principles of Mathematics 12 with a minimum grade of A, Pre-calculus 12 with a minimum grade of A, MATH 120 with a minimum grade of A, 3.0 units of MATH; or

permission of the department.

MATH 212 - Introduction to Algebra

Units: 1.5
Formerly: 233C

Schedule

Definitions and examples of groups, rings, fields, and integral domains; rational numbers, real numbers, and complex numbers; polynomials and their factorization; permutations. Additional topics chosen from Boolean algebras and lattices, and transfinite arithmetic.

Notes:

Credit will be granted for only one of 212, 233C.

Prerequisites:

122.

MATH 222 - Discrete and Combinatorial Mathematics

Units: 1.5
Formerly: 324

Schedule

Graph theory, counting, combinatorial arguments and proofs, inclusion-exclusion, partial orders and equivalence relations, deriving and solving recurrence relations, generating functions.

Notes:

Not open for credit to students registered in or with credit in any of 324, 422, or 423.

Prerequisites:

122 or permission of the department.

MATH 599 - Master's Thesis

Units: 6.0

Schedule

Grading: INP, COM, N, F.

MATH 693 - Candidacy Examination

Units: 3.0

Schedule

Grading: INP, COM, N, F.

MATH 699 - Dissertation

Units: 21.0-30.0

Schedule

Corequisites:

693.

Grading: INP, COM, N, F.

MBA 500 - Essentials of Business and Leadership

Units: 3.0

Schedule

An intensive course that constitutes the beginning of the MBA program. Provides students with a foundation on which to begin the study of business at an advanced level. Key areas of skill development include business writing, presenting, teambuilding, case analysis, cross-cultural communication and career development. Provides ethical frameworks for decision making and an exploration of issues relating to international business, sustainability and social responsibility.

Notes:

Attendance and participation are mandatory.

MBA 501A - Integrative Management Exercise (IME)

Units: 0

Schedule

One or more client-based business practice exercises which integrate program subject material, usually in the context of examining a particular industry or organization. Requires reports and/or presentations. Takes place on campus and will focus, when possible, on one or both of the International or Socially Responsible and Sustainable value pillars of the Gustavson School of Business.

Notes:

Attendance and participation are mandatory. Registration in MBA 501A is for the domestic, "on campus" IME.

Grading: INP, COM, N, F

MBA 530 - Managerial Finance

Units: 1.5

Schedule

Provides a framework, concepts, and tools for analyzing financial decisions. Topics include discounted cash flow techniques, valuation of financial assets, financial statement analysis, capital budgeting decisions, risk and return tradeoffs, diversification and portfolio theory, capital market efficiency, and the cost of capital to the firm. Focuses on management-shareholder agency problems, ethical issues in financial decision-making, and issues related to sustainability and corporate social responsibility (CSR) in project valuation and portfolio investments.

MBA 544 - Information Technology in the Organization

Units: 1.0

Schedule

An introduction to the capabilities and utilization of information technology (IT), information systems (IS) and networks. Different approaches using IT and IS will be covered to provide an understanding of how they can be used effectively in today's internetworked enterprise. Cases and other assignments will be used to illustrate the evolving role of IS and networks in today's interconnected organization both within and external to it.

MBA 560 - Managing Legal Risks

Units: 0.5

Schedule

Examines various legal risks (whether arising from the common law or through legislation) that must be identified and effectively managed within contemporary organizations (including for-profit businesses, not-for-profit firms and governmental organizations). Examines the legal risks associated with the manufacture, delivery and marketing of goods and services, the creation and protection of confidential information and other intellectual property, and risks arising from employment and contractor relationships. Also reviews risk management strategies available under the law of tort and contract.

MBA 585 - Consulting Methods

Units: 0.5

Schedule

Designed to provide an overview of management consulting. The main objective is to help students gain an understanding of management consulting skills and competencies. These consulting skills can be used in the pursuit of a consulting career or integrated as part of general management knowledge. Designed to prepare students for 501 Integrated Management Exercises and 596 Consulting Project.

MBA 596 - Management Consulting Report

Units: 3.0

Schedule

An individual or group consulting report. Participating students work individually or are placed into small teams and under faculty supervision, maintain a consulting/client relationship with a corporate sponsor. The students examine a problem of current interest to the sponsor and prepare detailed oral and written recommendations.

Grading: INP, COM, N, F

MBA 598 - Research Report

Units: 3.0

Schedule

A substantial analysis of a significant management problem or policy issue, prepared individually in consultation with a faculty adviser.

Notes:

Students choosing to take 598 Research Report, rather than 596 Management Consulting Report, will be required to take an appropriate Research Methods course of 1.5 units in lieu of or in addition to 585. Students choosing 598 should consult with their academic supervisor to identify an appropriate Research Methods course.

Grading:

MECH 220 - Mechanics of Solids I

Units: 1.5

Schedule

Review of bending moment and shear force diagrams for beams. Introduction of stress and strain; axial loading, torsion, pure bending and transverse loading. Status failure and factors of safety. Stress and strain transformation in two dimensions. Mohr's circle. Beam deflection, stability of columns. Energy methods.

Notes:

* Indicates a 3 hour laboratory taken by students on alternate weeks.

Prerequisites:

141 or ENGR 141.

Pre or co requisites:

MATH 200.

MECH 240 - Thermodynamics

Units: 1.5

Schedule

Properties and states of simple substances, P-v-T processes, equations of state, ideal gas law, first law of thermodynamics, control volume and control mass analyses, first law thermal efficiency, simple steady flow devices, heat engines, refrigerators, heat pumps, Carnot cycle, entropy, principle of increase of entropy, second law of thermodynamics, reversibility.

Prerequisites:

MATH 101.

MECH 242 - Dynamics

Units: 1.5

Schedule

Kinematics and dynamics of rigid bodies; analysis of planar rigid body motion using translating and rotating axes; two-dimensional rigid body dynamics using force/acceleration, work/energy and impulse/momentum methods; applications to one degree of freedom planar mechanisms and vibrations; introduction to three-dimensional rigid body dynamics.

Prerequisites:

141 or ENGR 141; and

CSC 110 or 111; and

MATH 101; and

MATH 110 or 211; and

One of PHYS 110, 122, 120.

Pre or co requisites:

One of MATH 200, 201, permission of the Department.

Corequisites:

MECH 285 - Properties of Engineering Materials

Units: 1.5

Schedule

Atomic structure, arrangement and movement; microstructural development and heat treatment; physical properties of ferrous and nonferrous metals, semiconductors, ceramics, polymers and composites; corrosion and mechanical properties.

Notes:

* Indicates a 3 hour laboratory taken by students on alternate weeks.

Not open to students with credit in 325.

Prerequisites:

One of CHEM 101, 102, 150.

MECH 295 - Engineering Fundamentals

Units: 1.5

Schedule

Ideal gas laws; work and heat; conservation of energy; thermodynamic properties of pure substances; equations of state; applications to open and closed systems; second law of thermodynamics; non-conservation of entropy; energy conversion systems; heat transfer by conduction, convection and radiation.

Notes:

Credit will be granted for only one of 295, ENGR 270.

Prerequisites:

MATH 101.

MECH 400 - Design Project

Units: 1.5

Schedule

Complete design of a product or a system; specification of function, analysis, selection of materials, strength calculations, preparation of working drawings, cost analysis and tenders, preparation of final design report and symposium presentation of final design. Weekly seminar series featuring topics related to design, safety, marketing and management.

Notes:

Credit will be granted for only one of 400, 464.

Prerequisites:

350 or BME 350; and

all of MECH 360, 380, ENGR 002.

MECH 420 - Finite Element Applications

Units: 1.5

Schedule

Formulation and application of the finite element method for modelling mechanical systems, including stress and vibration problems; stiffness method, stiffness and mass matrices, generalized force, numerical procedures; development of simple programs and exposure to general purpose packages.

Prerequisites:

320 and 330.

MECH 430 - Robotics

Units: 1.5

Schedule

Structure and specifications of robot manipulators; homogeneous transformations; kinematic equations and motion trajectories; dynamic models of robotic manipulators; position and force control; use of robots in industrial applications.

Prerequisites:

335 or permission of the Department; and

380 or ELEC 360; and

MATH 110 or 211.

MECH 447 - Energy Systems

Units: 1.5

Schedule

Characteristics of energy systems: evolution, energy currencies, energy sources, dynamics of energy systems. The role of storage: characteristics of storage technologies, analysis of storage impacts. Review of thermodynamic fundamentals and development of exergy balance expression. Efficiency metrics, technoeconomics, issues associated with the delivery of energy services such as sustainability, emissions, cost and energy intensity.

Prerequisites:

390 and 395.

MECH 455 - Instrumentation

Units: 1.5

Schedule

Overview of fundamental issues associated with measurement systems; response of 0th, 1st, and 2nd order systems, components in a measurement system, effects of digitization, sampling, aliasing, noise, quantization error. Frequency Response Function, voltage conversion, loading effects and filtering. Sensors and transducers for common physical measurements, including Optical techniques and sensors. Laboratories incorporate all elements of the lectures, with students designing and building complete measurement systems with digital acquisition.

Prerequisites:

All of 285, 320, 330, 380, 395; and

ELEC 365.

MECH 460 - Computer Aided Manufacturing

Units: 1.5

Schedule

Introduction to machining operations, features of numerically controlled machine tools, and types of CNC programming. Manual part programming with G-codes, canned cycles, subprograms, custom macros, and simulation program. NC machine tools and control and machine tool kinematics. CNC machining of curved surfaces with ball-mill and end-mill cutters; matching of tool and surface geometry. Curved surface machining strategies and case studies. Rapid prototyping. Machining mechanics and dynamics.

Notes:

* Indicates a 3 hour laboratory taken by students on alternate weeks.

Prerequisites:

One of 200, ENGR 150, ELEC 200, ELEC 299; and

380 or ELEC 360; and

CSC 349A.

MECH 466 - Microelectromechanical Systems

Units: 1.5

Schedule

Principles of MEMS theory, design and fabrication. Topics include: scaling law principles: micro-mechanical structures for sensing and actuation; electrostatic, micro-thermal, piezoresistive, piezoelectric and micro-magnetic devices; micro-fluidics; micro-optics; microassembly and packaging. Case studies of MEMS device operation and micro-fabrication.

Notes:

* Indicates four 3-hour labs.

Prerequisites:

285 or ELEC 220; and

ELEC 216 or PHYS 216; and

ELEC 250.

MECH 483 - Mechanics and Energy Conversion for Living Cells

Units: 1.5

Schedule

Engineering introduction to cell architecture. Cell components and their functions. Families of molecules used by cells. The role of water in cell architecture. Proteins -the machine systems of cells. DNA. Energy conversion and the control of metabolic processes. Mechanics of the cytoskeleton and cell membranes. Developments in diagnostic and treatment systems based on cell mechanobiology. Readings in bio-inspired engineering systems, biotechnology, tissue regeneration, molecular diagnostics and targeted drug delivery.

Notes:

Credit will be granted for only one of 483 and 450A, 450B, 450C, 450D, 450E, 450F (if taken in the same topic).

MECH 497 - Green Vehicle Technology Project

Units: 3.0

Schedule

General background of Hybrid Electric Vehicle (HEV) technologies; green vehicle technology training by industry experts; design using advanced modeling and simulation tools; design, analysis, prototyping and testing of vehicle subsystems or key components for green vehicle technology development. Each student will present a complete report at the end of the term, and make an oral presentation of the findings.

Notes:

May only be taken once. Credit will be granted for only one of 497, 498, 499. Duration can be one or two terms.

Prerequisites:

Approval of the department, participation in Uvic EcoCAR/Green Vehicle team.

Grading: INP, standard grade.

MECH 498 - Honours Thesis

Units: 3.0

Schedule

The honours thesis provides an opportunity for selected students to carry out a major design or research project under the supervision of a faculty member. The project will require independent study of the current technical literature, and independent research or design work. Each student will present a complete report at the end of the term, and make an oral presentation of the findings.

Notes:

May only be taken once. Credit will be granted for only one of 497, 498, 499.

Prerequisites:

Approval of the department. Available only for students who have completed all third-year courses with a minimum GPA of 6.0.

Grading: INP, standard grade

MECH 499 - Technical Project

Units: 1.5

Schedule

The technical project provides an opportunity for each student to carry out a design or research project associated with one or more of the higher level courses, under the supervision of a faculty member. The nature of the project selected should be such as to require independent study of current technical literature. When feasible, the design should be assessed in the laboratory. Each student must present a complete report at the end of the term.

Notes:

Credit will be granted for only one of 497, 498, 499.

May be taken only once.

Prerequisites:

Permission of the department.

MECH 510 - Living Cells and their Molecules: Mechanics &amp; Thermodynamics

Units: 1.5

Schedule

Provides an engineering introduction to cell architecture, and cell function in health and disease states. Cell components and functions. Families of molecules used by cells. The role of water in cell architecture. Proteins—the machine systems of cells. Thermodynamics of metabolic processes. Mechanical analyses of cytoskeleton, cell membranes. Cell movement and forces. Cellular mechanotransduction. Readings in bio-inspired engineering systems, biotechnology, molecular diagnostics, tissue regeneration, stem cells and cancer.

Notes:

Credit will be granted for one of 510, 580 if taken in the same topic.

MECH 521 - Computer-Aided Manufacture (CAM)

Units: 1.5

Schedule

Introduction to manufacturing operations, features of numerically controlled machine tools and types of CNC programming. Manual part programming with G-codes; canned cycles, subprograms, custom macros; simulation program. CNC machining of curved surfaces with ball-mill and end-mill cutters; matching of tool and surface geometry. Curved surface machining strategies and case studies; reverse engineering of curved surface models.

Notes:

Also a 3 hour laboratory requirement on alternate weeks.

MECH 580 - Selected Topics in Mechanical Engineering

Units: 1.5

Schedule

Notes:

May be taken more than once for credit in different topics.

MECH 595 - Seminar

Units: 1.5

Schedule

Participation in a program of seminars by internal and external speakers on current research topics. All MASc students will be required to give a seminar on their thesis research during the second year of the program. MEng students are not required to present.

Grading: INP, COM, N, F.

MECH 598 - MEng Project Report

Units: 3.0

Schedule

Grading: INP, COM, N, F

MECH 599 - MASc Thesis

Units: 9.0

Schedule

Grading: INP, COM, N, F

MECH 693 - Candidacy Examination

Units: 3.0

Schedule

PhD students enrol in 693 for the duration of their preparation for the candidacy examination. This begins at the time the PhD student first enrols in the PhD program and continues until the candidacy examination has been completed.

Notes:

601 is required before completition of 693.

Grading: INP, COM, N, F

MECH 695 - Seminar

Units: 1.5

Schedule

Participation in a program of seminars by internal and external speakers on current research topics. Normally, all PhD students are required to give two seminars on their thesis research within 16 months and 34 months of registration.

Grading: INP, COM, N, F.

MECH 699 - PhD Dissertation

Units: 27.0

Schedule

Prerequisites:

693

Grading: INP, COM, N, F.

MGB 182 - Language Skills III

Units: 1.0
Formerly: 582

Schedule

Further development of the language skills learned in 181.

Notes:

Credit will be granted for only one of 182, 582.

May not be used for credit in any other undergraduate or graduate program.

Pre or co requisites:

181

Grading: FNC

MGB 535 - Consulting Methods and Practice

Units: 1.0

Schedule

Provides an overview of the process of management consulting; introduces students to consulting methods to help them gain knowledge of consulting and to highlight specific consulting and research skills. To practice the application of these methodologies, student teams will examine an issue or problem being faced by their assigned overseas organizations, and provide them with consulting advice. In addition, this course will ultimately propare students for the MGB 536 International Research and Consulting Project.

MGB 536 - International Research and Consulting Project

Units: 3.0

Schedule

An individual or group consulting report. Participating students, working individually or in small teams and under faculty supervision, research issues and maintain a consulting/client relationship with a corporate sponsor. The students examine a problem of current interest to the sponsor and prepare detailed written recommendations, make in-person presentations to clients and submit a final report.

Grading: INP, COM, N, F

MGB 537 - Global Internship

Units: 1.5

Schedule

A preparatory program and at least 300 hours of work with an organization that normally (1) has an international component linking two or more regions, or (2) is located in any region of the world, provided that it is not the student's “home” region or country. Requires students to apply their learning through a reflective component that describes how the coursework and the Internship experience in particular have prepared them for global business related careers.

Notes:

Students who fail to complete an internship by the end of four academic terms may be required to withdraw.

Grading: INP, COM, N, F

MGB 540 - The South American Business Context

Units: 1.5

Schedule

An overview of business operations in the South American context in various industry sectors. Also examines socio-economic, cultural and legal factors that impact doing business in South America and that impact South American firms doing business in regional and global settings.

MGB 570 - Global Leadership and Cultural Intelligence

Units: 2.0

Schedule

An examination of the various dimensions of culture and cross-cultural leadership and management. Topics include how cultural intelligence and global mindset impact teamwork, conflict management, negotiations, motivation and overall leadership in international settings. Compares how people from the three regions of the MGB program modules (e.g., North America, Asia and Europe) are similar and how they differ along these dimensions, including the challenges resulting from these differences and how to resolve them.

MGB 583 - Language, Communication and Global Business

Units: 1.5

Schedule

Business research project report based on course work, research and language training. Students will conduct a research project on a specific business and management topic related to global business. Projects must be planned and approved by the instructor.

Pre or co requisites:

180.

MICR 302 - Molecular Microbiology

Units: 1.5

Schedule

Genetic, genomic, biochemical and molecular approaches to studying the structure and function of microbial cells. Use of microbial systems as laboratory tools, and as model organisms for investigating biological processes. Emphasis on the application of experimental techniques to scientific problem solving.

Prerequisites:

200A and 200B; and

BIOC 299 or 300A.

MICR 599 - MSc Thesis: Microbiology

Units: to be determined

Schedule

Grading: INP, COM, N, F

MICR 699 - PhD Dissertation: Microbiology

Units: to be determined

Schedule

Corequisites:

BCMB 693.

Grading: INP, COM, N, F.

MRNE 400 - Directed Studies

Units: 1.5 or 3.0

Schedule

Directed studies under the supervision of a member of faculty. Involves a research project approved by the supervisor in the field of interest of the student, and will be designed to take maximum advantage of the laboratory and/or field opportunities offered by the Bamfield Marine Sciences Centre.

Notes:

May be taken more than once for credit with permission of the department.

May be counted toward the Concentration in Marine Biology if it has substantial marine content and with permission of the department.

This is a field course offered at the Bamfield Marine Sciences Centre for upper level Biology credit. Please visit www.bms.bc.ca for more information.

MRNE 401 - Special Topics in Marine Biology

Units: 3.0

Schedule

Offered, as opportunities arise, by distinguished scientists who are working at the Bamfield Marine Sciences Centre. It is expected that the course will generally be of a specialized nature and be at a level appropriate to graduate or senior undergraduate students.

Please visit www.bms.bc.ca for a current list of Special Topics courses.

Notes:

May be taken more than once for credit with permission of the department.

Permission of the department is required to count any topic toward the Marine Biology Concentration.

This is a field course offered at the Bamfield Marine Sciences Centre for upper level Biology credit. Please visit www.bms.bc.ca for more information.

MRNE 402 - Special Topics in Marine Biology

Units: 1.5

Schedule

Offered, as opportunities arise, by distinguished scientists who are working at the Bamfield Marine Sciences Centre and are prepared to offer a course extending over a three week period. This course will be of a specialized nature.

Please visit www.bms.bc.ca for a current list of Special Topics courses.

Notes:

May be taken more than once for credit with permission of the department.

Permission of the department is required to count any topic toward the Marine Biology Concentration.

This is a field course offered at the Bamfield Marine Sciences Centre for upper level Biology credit. Please visit www.bms.bc.ca for more information.

MRNE 410 - Marine Invertebrate Zoology

Units: 3.0

Schedule

A survey of marine invertebrate phyla, with emphasis on the benthic fauna in the vicinity of the Bamfield Marine Sciences Centre. Includes lectures, laboratory periods, field collection, identification and observation. Emphasis is placed on the study of living specimens in the laboratory and in the field.

Notes:

This is a field course offered at the Bamfield Marine Sciences Centre for upper level Biology credit. Please visit www.bms.bc.ca for more information.

MRNE 412 - Biology of Marine Fishes

Units: 3.0

Schedule

The taxonomic diversity, evolution, ecology and conservation of North Pacific fishes. Laboratory and field topics include fish identification, stable isotope methodologies, database design and statistical analyses, and collecting/fishing techniques. A student field research project is required.

Notes:

Credit will be granted for only one of 412, BIOL 335, 431, 431A, (if taken before May 2011).

BIOL 307 is recommended prior to taking this course.

Prerequisites:

BIOL 215.

MRNE 502 - Special Topics

Units: 1.5

Schedule

MUS 208 - Popular Music and Society I

Units: 1.5

Schedule

Topic varies and may include music for the cinema, folk music, rock music, the blues, or a specific performer or group.

Notes:

May be taken more than once for credit in different topics with permission of the department to a maximum of 6 units.

Not open to BMus students and cannot be used as a music elective.

MUS 308 - Popular Music and Society II

Units: 1.5

Schedule

The topic of the course will vary in different years, and may include intensive studies of music for the cinema, folk music, rock music, the blues, or a specific performer or group.

Notes:

May be taken more than once for credit in different topics with permission of the School to a maximum of 3 units.

Not for credit in the BMus program.

MUS 432A - Kodàly Level 1: Pedagogy and Music Literature

Units: 1.5
Formerly: ME 350, 400A.

Schedule

An overview of the Kodàly-inspired concept of music education, with strategies and techniques for teaching rhythmic and tonal skills, elements and musical attitudes. Includes songs, games and dances related to the primary curriculum (grades K-2); folk and art music; plus preliminary song analysis skills and the beginning of a categorized, annotated, retrievable music collection.

Notes:

Credit will be granted for only one of: 432A, ME 350, 400A.

Knowledge of music rudiments equivalent to RCM Preliminary Rudiments required.

Corequisites:

MUS 433A.

MUS 432B - Kodàly Level 2: Pedagogy and Music Literature

Units: 1.5

Schedule

A continued study of the Kodàly-inspired concept of music education strategies and techniques for teaching rhythmic and tonal skills, elements and musical attitudes. Focused study of Intermediate curriculum (grades 3-5, including older beginners in these grades); folk and art music. Continuation of song analysis skills and of the categorized, annotated and retrievable music collection.

Notes:

Credit will be granted for only one of: 432B, EDCI 487 (if taken in the same topic).

Prerequisites:

MUS 432A or ME 350, and MUS 433A, or permission of the instructor.

Corequisites:

MUS 433B.

MUS 433A - Kodàly Level 1: Musicianship, Conducting and Ensemble

Units: 1.5

Schedule

Beginning level vocal- and aural-centred musicianship skill development, emphasizing the use of relative solmization and rhythm syllables. Includes conducting techniques and choral singing. Daily in-class performance is expected.

Notes:

Credit will be granted for only one of: 433A, ME 319 (if taken summer of 2013 or 2014).

Knowledge of music rudiments equivalent to RCM Preliminary Rudiments required.

Corequisites:

MUS 432A.

MUS 433B - Kodàly Level 2: Musicianship, Conducting and Ensemble

Units: 1.5

Schedule

Intermediate level vocal- and aural-centred musicianship skill development emphasizing the use of relative solmization and rhythm syllables. Includes conducting techniques and choral singing. Daily in-class performance is expected.

Notes:

Credit will be granted for only one of: 433B, EDCI 487 (if taken in the same topic).

Prerequisites:

MUS 433A or ME319 (if taken in summer of 2013 or 2014), and MUS 432A, or permission of the instructor.

Corequisites:

MUS 432B.

NRSC 595 - MSc Thesis Preparation

Units: 1.5

Schedule

Students will be engaged in preparing a thesis proposal for presentation to their supervisory committee. This course will need to be completed by all MSc students enrolled in the Graduate Program in Neuroscience before having a thesis proposal evaluated by their supervisory committee.

Grading: INP, COM, N, F

NRSC 599 - MSc Thesis

Units: 9.0-12.0

Schedule

A thesis comprising an original scientific study and/or scientific analysis of a problem germane to contemporary neuroscience.

Prerequisites:

595 or equivalent

Grading: INP, COM, N, F

NRSC 693 - Candidacy Examination

Units: 3.0

Schedule

The Candidacy exam will consist of a defence of a written proposal (10 page CIHR format) on the student's proposed dissertation research project and an oral exam based on the background material and research components of the proposal. The exam committee will be composed of a chair (current director of the neuroscience program or their designate) and at least three examiners. Members of the student's supervisory committee (excluding the supervisor) may serve as examiners but at least one examiner must be from outside of the supervisory committee and at least one of the examiners must be from outside of the candidate's supervisor's department. The candidate's supervisor is permitted to be present during the exam but is not permitted to participate or aid the student in any manner. Both the oral and written components of the exam must be successfully completed to advance in the program and a student may be required by the examining committee to be re-examined on either component if performance in the first instance is not deemed satisfactory. Students are only permitted one re-test of either component, and re-tests must be undertaken within two months of the initial exam. Failure on both components of the exam initially, or one component twice, will be considered grounds for removal from the Neuroscience Program.

The candidacy examination must be held within 21 months of a student entering the PhD program. Students transferring from the MSc to the PhD program must complete the exam with 18 months from their entry into the PhD.

Notes:

Students enrol in NRSC 693 upon registering in the PhD program (or upon switching to the PhD program from the MSc program) and remain enrolled until all candidacy requirements are complete.

Grading: INP, COM, N, F.

NRSC 699 - PhD Dissertation

Units: 21-39

Schedule

A dissertation containing an original scientific study which adds new knowledge to the field of neuroscience.

Notes:

Students possessing a MSc will require 21 units to fulfill the program requirements.

Students possessing a BSc will require 30 units to fulfill the program requirements.

Prerequisites:

693 or equivalent

Grading: INP, COM, N, F

NUED 570 - Engaging with Pedagogy: Teaching and Learning in Nursing Education

Units: 1.5
Formerly: NURA 530

Schedule

Prepares students to explore and critically examine the philosophical, theoretical and ethical perspectives informing pedagogy in nursing education.

Notes:

Credit will be granted for only one of 570, NURA 530.

NUNP 537 - Family Nurse Practitioner Internship

Units: 1.5

Schedule

Designed to assist students in integrating and consolidating their practice as family nurse practitioners. Also designed to ensure that students are prepared to meet the regulatory requirements to achieve a Family NP designation. The main focus will be on students engagement of 200 hours of direct practice under the guidance of a faculty instructor and practice mentor(s). In addition to integrating and consolidating the theory and practice they have developed in NUNP 543/544, 545/546 and 547/548 students will increasingly take on leadership roles. This will include addressing gaps in needed health services, promoting continuity of health care and fostering prevention and health promotion programs. Students will draw on their knowledge about the health impact of community or population transitions as well as their knowledge of individual and family experiences in providing such leadership. There will be a required onsite component in this course.

Grading: INP, COM, N, F

NUNP 543 - Integrated Primary Health Care and Advanced Practice Nursing: I (Theory) (Adult I)

Units: 1.5

Schedule

Advanced practice nursing with persons who experience episodic illness conditions, chronic diseases, and complex health challenges. Particular attention is paid to theoretical perspectives and skill development related to nurse practitioner core competencies with culturally diverse young to middle-aged adults and families. Selected concepts, theories, and research associated with health promotion and maintenance, and illness prevention are explored within the community context. Students will receive a letter grade upon completion.

Notes:

Credit will be granted for only one of 543, 534, 550.

A student must pass both theory and practice corequisites to advance to the next set of corequisite theory and practice courses. If a student fails one corequisite they may be required to complete both corequisites again the next time they are offered. Students may be required to demonstrate knowledge and skills obtained in 531, 532, 540 and 541 upon enrolment in 543/544 if 12 months or more have lapsed between completing prerequisite courses and enrolling in 543/544.

Prerequisites:

531, 532, 540, 541.

Corequisites:

544 Integrated Primary Health Care and Advanced Practice Nursing: I (Practice) must be taken concurrently with 543.

NUNP 544 - Integrated Primary Health Care and Advanced Practice Nursing: I (Practice) (Adult I)

Units: 1.5

Schedule

An opportunity for 150 hours of practice experience through which students engage in advanced practice nursing under the guidance of a course instructor and clinical preceptor. Integration of philosophical, theoretical, and methodological perspectives gleaned from 543 as well as from core courses within the program is sought. There will be a required onsite component to this course. Upon completion of the practice component, students will receive a pass/fail grade.

Notes:

Credit will be granted for only one of 544, 534, 551.

A student must pass both theory and practice corequisites to advance to the next set of corequisite theory and practice courses. If a student fails one corequisite they may be required to complete both corequisites again the next time they are offered. Students may be required to demonstrate knowledge and skills obtained in 531, 532, 540 and 541 upon enrolment in 543/544 if 12 months or more have lapsed between completing prerequisite courses and enrolling in 543/544.

Prerequisites:

531, 532, 540, 541.

Corequisites:

543 Integrated Primary Health Care and Advanced Practice Nursing: I (Theory) must be taken concurrently with 544.

Grading: INC, COM, N, F

NUNP 593 - Evaluation Synthesis

Units: 1.5

Schedule

The culminating educational experience for NP students, and the singular opportunity for faculty members to assess students' evolution toward the terminal goals of the MN-NP program. Serves as an evaluation instrument in which students demonstrate their synthesis of coursework, knowledge, skills and experiential learning, to reveal a broad mastery of their learning across the curriculum in preparation for successful registration, initial employability and further career advancement.

Notes:

Students may be required to register in this course over two (2) consecutive terms.

Grading: INP, COM, N, F

NURA 516 - Nursing Leadership I

Units: 1.5

Schedule

Exploration of advanced practice nursing leadership roles and competencies with a focus on the patient/client and the nurses /nursing spheres of influence. Collaboration and consultation competencies as they relate to client-centred care and interprofessional/intersectoral teams will also be explored.

Pre or co requisites:

NURS 506, 507 or permission of the department.

NURS 341 - Professional Practice IV: Nursing Inquiry

Units: 1.5

Schedule

Builds on Professional Practice I, II and III. Knowledge for the discipline of nursing is explored as well as various modes of nursing inquiry. Relationships between practice, theory, and research are explored.

Prerequisites:

College-University Transfer BSN Program Students: Professional Practice III.

NURS 342 - Health and Healing VI: Global Health Issues

Units: 1.5

Schedule

Study of complex chronic and episodic global health challenges and issues. Emphasis is placed on the role of the nurse as care provider, community organizer/facilitator, educator and advocate within the context of the global society and the changing health care environment. Participants examine emerging health issues and trends further to develop their understanding of nursing practice.

NURS 345 - Family Nursing

Units: 3.0

Schedule

Building on existing knowledge of registered nurses, students have the opportunity to develop an understanding of health-promoting family nursing. Four major domains are explored theoretically and experientially: health, family, relational nursing practice and ethics.

Notes:

Credit will be granted for only one of 345, 330, 331.

NURS 350 - Health and Healing VII: Promoting Community and Societal Health

Units: 1.5

Schedule

The role of the nurse in promoting community and societal health. A companion course with Health and Healing Vl. Participants will continue to develop competencies in relational practice with a focus on community and society as client. Topics include the political role of the nurse in working with communities explored from a social justice and equity perspective; community development and capacity building for community health promotion; transformative and emancipatory approaches to teaching and learning.

Notes:

A student must pass both theory and practice co-requisites in the same term to advance in the program. If a student fails one co-requisite they will be required to complete both co-requisites again the next time they are offered.

Prerequisites:

College-University Transfer BSN Program students: Health and Healing VI

Post-diploma students: 345.

Corequisites:

Post-diploma and College-University Transfer BSN Program students (Aurora College and Selkirk College only): 351.

Grading: COM, F.

NURS 351 - Nursing Practice VI: Promoting Health of Communities and Society

Units: 1.5

Schedule

This nursing practice experience provides opportunities to develop caring relationships with families, groups and communities and/or populations with an emphasis on health promotion and community empowerment. Participants have opportunities to work with a community on an identified health issue.

Notes:

Credit will be granted for only one of 351, 456.

A student must pass both theory and practice co-requisites in the same term to advance in the program. If a student fails one co-requisite they will be required to complete both co-requisites again the next time they are offered.

Prerequisites:

College-University Transfer BSN Program students: Health and Healing VI.

Post-diploma students: 345.

Corequisites:

Post-diploma and College-University Transfer BSN Program students (Aurora College and Selkirk College only): 350.

Grading: COM, F.

NURS 360 - Professional Practice VI: Nursing Research

Units: 1.5

Schedule

Building on Professional Practice II, III, and IV, participants will enhance their understanding of nursing scholarship and their abilities to comprehend, critique, and utilize nursing research. Participants critically reflect on various scholarly works and research methodologies. Participants experience ways to critically examine their practice in relation to nursing research and to pose research questions for evidence-informed practice.

NURS 370 - Consolidated Practice Experience III

Units: 4.5

Schedule

This consolidated practice experience is designed to provide opportunities for participants to integrate learning from previous terms, and to advance their professional nursing practice. Participants have opportunities to consolidate learning and advance their clinical decision making in a variety of settings. Nursing practice experiences consist of a six week practice placement.

Notes:

CPE Workshops are required for College-University Transfer BSN Program students.

Prerequisites:

College-University Transfer BSN Program students (Aurora College and Selkirk College only): All of 341, 342, 350, 351.

College-University Transfer BSN Program students (Victoria campus): All of 341, 342, 350.

Grading: COM, F.

NURS 400 - Academic Writing for Nurses

Units: 1.5
Formerly: 300.

Schedule

Elective online credit course, gives students practice writing academic genres: summaries, analyses, arguments, abstracts and literature reviews. Students refresh grammar and APA skills and share and improve their writing through peer review and revision. Scaffolded assignments, drafting, revision, and self-reflective exercises assist students to develop writing voice and build confidence. This course is directed to undergraduate nursing students to improve academic writing.

Notes:

Credit will be granted for only one of 400, 300, 390, (Introduction to Academic Writing), 480 (Academic Writing for Nurses).

NURS 430 - Professional Practice V: Leadership in Nursing

Units: 1.5

Schedule

A study of nursing leadership in the promotion of health for individuals, families, groups and communities in a global context. Topics include: the role of the nurse in the Canadian health care system, the impact of global trends and issues, collaborative and ethical approaches for working within institutional philosophies and frameworks and the issues facing nurses in the current work environment.

Notes:

A student must pass both theory and practice co-requisites in the same term to advance to the next academic session. If a student fails one co-requisite they will be required to complete both co-requisites again the next time they are offered.

Prerequisites:

College-University Transfer BSN Program students (Aurora College & Selkirk College only): 350 and 351.

College-University Transfer BSN Program students (Victoria only): 350

Post-diploma students: All of 345, 350, 351.

Corequisites:

Post-diploma and College-University Transfer BSN Program students (Aurora College & Selkirk College only): 431

College-University Transfer BSN Program students (Victoria only): 456

NURS 431 - Nursing Practice VII: Engaging in Leadership

Units: 1.5

Schedule

Opportunities to further develop competencies in the areas of leadership, influencing and managing change, and using research to promote the health of individuals, families, communities and society within the context of the Canadian health care system. Focus on participants' growth as nursing professionals; opportunities to explore inter-professional practices and nursing leadership in the context of emerging Canadian and global health issues and trends.

Notes:

Credit will be granted for only one of 431, 456.

A student must pass both theory and practice co-requisites in the same term to advance to the next academic session. If a student fails one co-requisite they will be required to complete both co-requisites again the next time they are offered.

Prerequisites:

College-University Transfer BSN Program students (Aurora College & Selkirk College only): 350 and 351.

Post-diploma students: All of 345, 350, 351.

Corequisites:

Post-diploma and College-University Transfer BSN Program students (Aurora College & Selkirk College only): 430.

Grading: COM, F.

NURS 470 - Consolidated Practice Experience IV

Units: 4.5

Schedule

This consolidated practice experience is designed to provide opportunities for participants to integrate learning from previous terms, and to advance their professional nursing practice. Participants have opportunities to consolidate learning and advance their clinical decision making in a variety of settings. Nursing practice experiences consist of a six week practice placement.

Notes:

CPE Workshops are required for College-University Transfer BSN Program Students.

Prerequisites:

370.

Grading: COM, F.

NURS 480 - Special Topics

Units: 1.5 or 3.0

Schedule

Topics of current interest or concern to groups of students.

Notes:

May be taken more than once in different topics for credit in the BSN program with prior permission of Nursing Advising, and will usually fulfill credit toward nursing elective(s).

NURS 482 - Pharmacological Knowledge for Nursing Practice

Units: 1.5

Schedule

A systematic approach to develop knowledge of pharmacological, herbal and homeopathic interventions. Students will have opportunities to explore populations of interest and local, national, and/or global issues related to pharmacological interventions and marketing. Students will work collaboratively to develop and disseminate nursing knowledge.

Notes:

In the on-campus course, online work complements in-classroom instruction. In the online course, conferencing tools will be used to augment required learning activities, readings and assignments.

NURS 491 - Nursing Practice VIII: Transitions

Units: 4.5

Schedule

The nursing practice experience provides opportunities for participants to consolidate their learning and explore the transition to professional nursing as a BSN graduate. Participants also explore transitions in the health care system and the workplace that affect nurses. Participants may develop their practice within a specific area, e.g., particular setting of practice, a certain client population, or a specific health challenge.

Notes:

CPE Workshops are required for College-University Transfer BSN Program Students.

Prerequisites:

470.

Pre or co requisites:

475.

Grading: COM, F.

NURS 493C - Lived Experience of Health in Aging

Units: 1.5

Schedule

The complex nature of aging and health. Students will explore the determinants of health, as well as the common chronic and episodic challenges of health and healing in later life. Changing demographics and societal forces influencing present and future health care of older persons will be analyzed and critiqued. In addition, nursing theory and issues related to the delivery of care with older persons will be examined. Health promotion and nursing practice, and environments that support healthy aging are integral to this course.

Prerequisites:

College-University Transfer BSN Program Students: completion of Term 6, or permission of the department.

NURS 495 - Nursing Practice Synthesis

Units: 1.5-4.5

Schedule

This final practice course is designed to foster integration and synthesis of prior course work. The focus is on research and theory-based nursing practice.

Notes:

Post-diploma students may take 495 more than once for credit to a maximum of 4.5 units.

Students who wish to condense their practice hours will not be able to do so until after week six of the course.

Prerequisites:

Post-diploma students: 345, 350, 351.

Grading: COM, F.

NURS 500 - Scholarly Writing for Advanced Practice Nursing

Units: 1.5

Schedule

Review of academic writing fundamentals and processes. Students select topics relevant to their program foci and write a summary/critique of scholarly literature, a limited literature review, and an argument paper. Students learn to participate in peer review and revision to improve their writing.

NURS 508 - Methodological Knowledge and Advanced Practice Nursing

Units: 1.5

Schedule

Explores a variety of approaches to research guided by a philosophical framework that includes ontology, epistemology and ethics. Emphasis will be placed on developing student's abilities to critically appraise and synthesize research studies with a view to clarity, consistency and coherence.

Notes:

Credit will be granted for only one of 508, NURA 515.

Prerequisites:

506.

NURS 567 - Trends and Issues in Advanced Practice Nursing III

Units: 0.5

Schedule

Explores the notion of advanced practice nursing (APN) in light of the Canadian Nurses Association (CNA) Advanced Practice Nursing Framework as well as other relevant resources. Students are expected to consider the mandate, competencies, and divergent perspectives and knowledge bases related to APN as they challenge and extend the boundaries of nursing practice and advance the profession. Addresses professional, ethical and legal issues related to APN.

Prerequisites:

565, 566.

Grading: INC, COM, N, F.

NURS 598 - Practice Project

Units: 3.0

Schedule

Students will complete a project that is creative, innovative and contributes to scholarly nursing practice in an area of professional interest. The project is intended to facilitate synthesis of students' graduate experience and contribute to their development as advanced practice nurses. The project is an alternative to the Thesis Option (NURS 599). Evaluation of this course will be carried out as per Faculty of Graduate Studies regulations.

Notes:

Credit will be granted for only one of 598, 596.

The examining committee of a student sitting a non-thesis oral will be comprised of a supervisor, a committee member and a Chair.

Grading: INP, INC, COM, N, F.

NURS 599 - Thesis

Units: 6.0

Schedule

Students working independently, with faculty guidance, complete a thesis to meet specific professional and academic goals. The thesis will entail research in a topic area chosen in consultation with the student's supervisory committee. The thesis option is an alternative to the Practice Project (NURS 598). Evaluation of this course will be carried out as per Faculty of Graduate Studies regulations.

Grading: INP, COM, N, F.

NURS 693 - Candidacy Examination

Units: 3.0

Schedule

Students enrol in NURS 693 to prepare for their candidacy examination. Students are expected to work with their supervisory committees to generate a reading list and review these readings in preparation for the candidacy process. Must be completed prior to registration in NURS 699.

Grading: INP, COM, N, F.

NURS 699 - Dissertation

Units: 30.0

Schedule

All doctoral students must write and publicly defend a research proposal and have it approved by their supervisory committee before continuing the research process. All doctoral students are required to prepare a dissertation upon which a public examination and defense is conducted. The dissertation must qualify as a significant and original contribution to disciplinary knowledge.

Prerequisites:

693.

Grading: INP, COM, N, F.

PAAS 138 - Intensive Beginner Japanese I

Units: 3.0
Formerly: 130, JAPA 149

Schedule

Japanese language instruction for beginning language students. Development of basic language skills, including listening comprehension, speaking, reading and writing, through lectures, class discussions, tutorials for conversation practice, laboratory sessions, and other activities.

Notes:

Credit will be granted for only one of 138, 130, JAPA 100, 100A, 100B, 149.

PAAS 410 - Advanced Mandarin for Native Speakers of Chinese

Units: 3.0
Formerly: CHIN 420

Schedule

Intended for literate speakers of Chinese. Reading and discussion from the Chinese literary and cultural traditions.

Notes:

Credit will be granted for only one of 410, CHIN 420 (if taken in the same topic).

Not open to non-native speakers.

May be taken more than once in different topics to a maximum of 6 units with permission of the Chinese Program Adviser.

Prerequisites:

Minimum third-year standing or permission of the department.

PAAS 599 - MA Thesis

Units: 6.0-9.0

Schedule

Grading: INP, COM, N, F.

PADR 503 - Professional Integrity in the Public and Non-Profit Sectors

Units: 1.5

Schedule

Builds professional competencies and reflective practice skills for those working in the public and non-profit sectors. Using a case-based approach, topics include: ethical dilemmas and management of disputes, the issues of personal responsibility and accountability; loyalty to employer; political and professional neutrality and obligations to the public interest; conflict of interest; confidentiality and transparency; and privacy protection. Students study standards of conduct established in both sectors and the philosophical theories which underpin them.

Notes:

Credit will be granted for only one of 503, ADMN 422, 554, DR 512.

For MA in Dispute Resolution and MPA On Campus students.

PADR 504 - Public Leadership and Management

Units: 1.5

Schedule

Introduces theories of leadership and management development and practice. Examines the role of leaders, managers and conflict specialists as agents of positive influence in complex socio-technical systems. Leadership, management and dispute resolution competencies will be introduced and developed in individual, team, organizational, and inter-organizational contexts. Through experiential learning, students will apply concepts to self, others (as team members), leaders and managers.

Notes:

Credit will be granted for only one of 504, ADMN 507, DR 511.

For MA in Dispute Resolution and MPA On campus students.

PADR 505 - Policy-making and Policy Communities

Units: 1.5

Schedule

Students learn about the public policy-making process and develop skills in the art and craft of policy analysis. Introduces key concepts and theories and then builds skills and knowledge with information-gathering exercises, case studies, and preparation and presentation of decision briefs. Students review policy-making in a broad context, pulling together evidence and different analytical lenses for a variety of organizations and identify and recommend strategies and develop workable implementation and communication plans.

Notes:

Credit will be granted for only one of 505, ADMN 556.

For MA in Dispute Resolution and MPA On Campus students.

PHIL 201 - Critical Thinking

Units: 1.5

Schedule

An analysis of simple argument forms in natural language with close attention to the different uses of language in an argumentative context. A treatment of elementary principles of inductive logic, decision making, syllogistic reasoning, and informal fallacies.

Notes:

Designed as a first course in logic for students with little or no symbolic orientation; it may be taken before or after 203.

PHIL 203 - Elementary Formal Logic

Units: 1.5

Schedule

Explores the fundamentals of good reasoning by means of symbolic techniques in both propositional and predicate logic. Students will learn to translate English sentences into logical notation, as well as how to use truth tables and derivations to demonstrate the validity of arguments.

Notes:

Designed as a first course in logic for students with little or no symbolic orientation. May be taken before or after 201.

PHIL 232 - Moral Problems of Contemporary Society

Units: 1.5

Schedule

Philosophical introduction to a variety of controversial issues in contemporary society, focusing on understanding and critically assessing the practical ethical dimensions of such topics as abortion, euthanasia, the treatment of animals, violence and war, environmental protection, punishment, racism and free speech.

PHIL 592 - Professional Development Practicum

Units: 1.5

Schedule

Students must attend and demonstrate participation in philosophy colloquia, including regular preseminars, throughout the year. Attendance and evidence of participation will be tracked by the Graduate Adviser and Graduate Coordinator.

Grading: COM, N, F.

PHIL 598 - Major Research Project

Units: 4.5

Schedule

Students must complete a Major Research Project under the guidance of a supervisor and committee member. This project will normally take the form of a journal article-type submission. Normally the Major Research Project will be completed during the Summer Session following the first Winter Session. The Major Research Project is subject to Oral Examination by a committee.

PHSP 504 - Supportive Environments and Healthy Public Policy

Units: 1.5

Schedule

Social environmental factors that impact the health of the community. Using a social-ecological model, attends to understanding the integral role of policy in the development of supportive environments. With an emphasis on critical analysis of health policy, students explore the development of healthy public policy in the management of public health concerns.

PHSP 541 - Social Justice and Public Health Nursing

Units: 1.5

Schedule

Emphasis on social justice as a philosophical base for public health nursing. From a critical perspective, students explore and compare theories of social justice. Drawing on personal and professional experience and using case examples, students explore the embodiment of social justice as ethical nursing practice.

PHSP 542 - Advanced Public Health Nursing Practice

Units: 1.5

Schedule

Focuses on leadership and the conceptualization and application of advanced practice in public health nursing. Students engage in a critical analysis of advanced practice nursing as it relates to public health in Canadian and comparative contexts. Professional issues and advanced practice strategies are explored.

PHSP 550 - Perspectives in Social Policy and Public Health

Units: 1.5

Schedule

Informed by values of social justice, equity and diversity, focuses on a range of theoretical and practical perspectives that critically assess social policy and practice and public health issues in Canada in historical, contemporary and comparative contexts.

PHSP 552 - Healthy Public Policy Strategies

Units: 1.5

Schedule

Examines an assortment of public health approaches, including policy techniques and plans relating to health promotion, policy analysis and advocacy, capacity building, forming partnerships and collaborations, and strengthening communities. Also considers the importance of healthy public policies for various groups facing health disparities.

PHSP 591 - Special Topics in Public Health Studies

Units: 1.5

Schedule

This is a variable content course focusing on specific interests of students and faculty members in the School of Public Health and Social Policy.

Notes:

May be taken more than once in different topics for credit in the graduate program with prior permission of Adviser.

PHSP 599 - Thesis

Units: 6.0

Schedule

Students, working independently, with faculty guidance, complete a thesis to meet specific professional and academic goals. The thesis will entail research in a topic area chosen in consultation with the student's supervisory committee. The thesis option is an alternative to the Culminating Project (PHSP 598). Evaluation of this course will be carried out as per Faculty of Graduate Studies regulations.

Grading: INP, COM, N, F.

PHYS 111 - Introductory Physics II

Units: 1.5
Formerly: Part of 112, 125

Schedule

Heat engines; harmonic motion; wave motion; geometric and wave optics; modern physics. Engineering and Physical Science applications.

Notes:

Students with credit in 112, 125, or 130 may not take 111 for credit.

A basic course in physics for students planning a program of study in fields such as Physics, Astronomy, Chemistry, Earth and Ocean Sciences and Engineering.

Students with a strong interest in Physics or Astronomy are encouraged to consider registering in PHYS 130.

Students are strongly encouraged to concurrently enrol in MATH 101.

Prerequisites:

110

Pre or co requisites:

MATH 100 or 102.

PHYS 215 - Introductory Quantum Physics

Units: 1.5

Schedule

Experimental basis of quantum mechanics. Atomic structure and wave properties of matter. Time-independent Schroedinger equation - wavefunctions and probability. Introduction to the Hydrogen atom.

Prerequisites:

Either 110 and 111, or 112, or 120 and 130, or 122 and 125.

Pre or co requisites:

MATH 200 and 201.

PHYS 217 - Thermodynamics

Units: 1.5

Schedule

Ideal gas laws. Laws of Thermodynamics. Temperature and entropy. Thermodynamic potentials such as free energy and their use. Heat engines and Carnot cycles. Introductory statistical physics: Maxwell and Boltzmann distributions. Microscopic derivations of thermodynamic properties such as heat capacities.

Notes:

Credit will be granted for only one of 217, 317.

Prerequisites:

Either 110 and 111, or 112, or 120 and 130, or 122 and 125.

Pre or co requisites:

MATH 200 and 201.

PHYS 314 - Nuclear Physics and Radioactivity

Units: 1.5
Formerly: part of 413B

Schedule

Applications of quantum physics to atomic nuclei; nuclear properties, structure, models and modes of decay. Radioactivity and applications in industry, medicine, archaeology and cosmology. Fission and fusion.

Notes:

Credit will be granted for only one of 313, 413B.

Normally offered in alternate years.

Students are advised to consult the department to determine when the course is offered.

323 is strongly recommended prior to this course.

Prerequisites:

215 and 216.

Pre or co requisites:

One of MATH 300, 330A, 334, 335, 336; and

one of MATH 323, 325, 342.

PHYS 325 - Optics

Units: 1.5

Schedule

Reflection and refraction at plane and spherical surfaces, thin lenses, lens aberrations, optical instruments, interference, diffraction, polarization.

Prerequisites:

216; and

all of MATH 200, 201, 211; or

permission of the department.

PHYS 511A - Topics in Nuclear and Particle Physics I

Units: 1.5

Schedule

A selection of advanced topics in nuclear and/or particle physics.

Notes:

May be taken more than once for credit.

PHYS 545 - Anatomy and Physiology for the Medical Physicist

Units: 0.5

Schedule

WebCT based course covering basics of anatomy and physiology. Aimed at students in medical physics who are interested in clinical and/or academic careers that will require interaction with radiation oncologists and other health care professionals.

Grading: INC, COM, N, F

PHYS 546 - Clinical Shadowing

Units: 0.5

Schedule

Shadowing course designed to give the student some insight into the clinical aspects of the medical physics profession. Under the guidance of a clinical physicist, students progress through a series of clinical areas. Modules illustrate the collaborative nature of the profession and the interaction with other medical professionals.

Grading: INC, COM, N, F

PHYS 599 - MSc Thesis

Units: to be determined

Schedule

Notes:

Credit to be determined, but normally 6 units.

Grading: INP, COM, N, F

PHYS 693 - PhD Candidacy Examination

Units: 3.0

Schedule

Students enrol in PHYS 693 during their preparation for the candidacy examination. This begins at the time a student first enrols in the PhD program and continues until candidacy requirements have been completed. The candidacy examination is to be completed no later than two years after the student first registers in (or transfers to) the PhD program.

Grading: INP, COM, N, F

PHYS 699 - PhD Dissertation

Units: to be determined

Schedule

Notes:

Credit to be determined, but normally 30 units.

Corequisites:

693.

Grading: INP, COM, N, F

POLI 240 - International Politics

Units: 1.5

Schedule

An introduction to the study and practice of international politics. Topics covered include the historical evolution of the international system, the major theoretical approaches to the study of international politics, state and non-state actors, and key contemporary issues in the areas of security and political economy.

POLI 300C - Post-Enlightenment Political Thought

Units: 1.5
Formerly: half of 300

Schedule

An examination of basic texts and persistent themes in Western political thought from the Enlightenment to the late 19th century, including study of texts by such key thinkers as Rousseau, Hegel, Marx and J.S. Mill.

Notes:

Credit will be granted for only one of 300C, 300.

300A or 300B is recommended prior to taking this course.

POLI 340 - International Studies

Units: 1.5, formerly 3

Schedule

The historical development of the modern states system with reference to its changing social, economic, and political environments, and to related theoretical developments.

POLI 344 - International Political Economy

Units: 1.5, formerly 3

Schedule

The politics of international economic relations in trade, investment, finance and macroeconomic policies from a variety of theoretical perspectives.

POLI 351 - Public Policy Analysis

Units: 1.5

Schedule

A practical approach to the concepts and conduct of public policy analysis, including problem definition and policy design, the application of analytical techniques and issues in public policy implementation.

POLI 369 - Issues in Canadian Politics

Units: 1.5

Schedule

An analysis of contemporary issues in Canadian politics.

Notes:

May be taken more than once for credit in different topics with permission of the department.

POLI 370 - The Politics of Surveillance

Units: 1.5

Schedule

Examination of contemporary forms of surveillance in Canada and globally. Considers the roots of surveillance, its impact on our lives, and the legal, political, social and technical strategies to challenge its effects.

POLI 379 - Topics in Contemporary European Politics

Units: 1.5

Schedule

Analysis of contemporary issues in European politics in comparative perspective, with a strong emphasis on the European Union and the process of European integration.

Notes:

May be taken more than once for credit in different topics with permission of the department.

POLI 383 - Global Indigenous Nationalisms

Units: 1.5

Schedule

Comparative analysis of Indigenous politics with primary focus on indigenous-state relations in Canada, United States, Australia, and New Zealand.

Notes:

Credit will be granted for only one of 383, 433 (if taken in the same topic).

POLI 433 - Issues in Politics

Units: 1.5 or 3.0

Schedule

A seminar course covering selected contemporary political issues.

Notes:

May be taken more than once for credit in different topics with permission of the department.

POLI 599 - Thesis

Units: 9.0

Schedule

Grading: INP, COM, N, F.

POLI 693 - PhD Candidacy Examinations

Units: 3.0

Schedule

Students enrol in POLI 693 for the duration of their preparation or their two candidacy examinations. This begins at the time a student first enrols in the PhD program and continues until candidacy requirements have been completed.

Grading: INP, COM, N, F.

POLI 699 - Dissertation

Units: 30.0

Schedule

Grading: INP, COM, N, F.

PSYC 100A - Introductory Psychology I

Units: 1.5
Formerly: half of 100

Schedule

An introduction to concepts, theories and research findings of modern psychology. Topics may include psychological research methods, biological bases of behaviour, perception, development, consciousness, learning and cognition.

Notes:

Credit will be granted for only one of 100A, 100.

A minimum grade of C+ is required for the Major or Honours program.

PSYC 100B - Introductory Psychology II

Units: 1.5
Formerly: half of 100

Schedule

An introduction to concepts, theories and research findings of modern psychology. Topics may include cognition, development, personality, health psychology, psychological disorders, psychological therapies, and social behaviour.

Notes:

Credit will be granted for only one of 100B, 100.

A minimum grade of C+ is required for the Major or Honours program.

PSYC 201 - Research Methods in Psychology

Units: 1.5
Formerly: half of 200

Schedule

Introduction to basic research techniques in psychology; emphasis on the conceptual rather than the statistical rationale underlying various research strategies. Areas include the nature of variables, types of measurement, how to generate and test hypotheses, types of validity, and how to interpret and report results. Laboratory exercises and class demonstrations on the processes involved in conducting empirical research.

Notes:

Credit will be granted for only one of 201, 200.

Prerequisites:

100A and 100B.

PSYC 210 - Conceptual Foundations of Psychology

Units: 1.5, formerly 3

Schedule

Provides students with the background necessary to facilitate a full appreciation of upper-level courses. Current problems in psychology will be examined with reference to outstanding past and present persons and issues.

Notes:

See Note 1, here.

Pre or co requisites:

100A and 100B.

PSYC 215A - Introduction to Biological Psychology

Units: 1.5
Formerly: half of 230

Schedule

Basic concepts of brain function in relation to behaviour. Topics will include basic aspects of neuronal functions, neuroanatomy, and behavioural genetics, as well as the functioning of the nervous system in relation to sensation, motor output, and at least one other aspect of behaviour.

Notes:

Credit will be granted for only one of 215A, 230. See Note 1, here.

Prerequisites:

100A and 100B; or

minimum second-year standing; and

either 1.5 units of BIOL, or one of EPHE 141, 241, 242.

PSYC 300A - Statistical Methods in Psychology

Units: 1.5
Formerly: half of 300

Schedule

Brief review of research methodology; univariate description, bivariate description, and an introduction to probability and inferential statistics as applied in Psychology. Introduction to microcomputer software and computer based analyses of the statistical procedures covered in the course.

Notes:

Credit will be granted for only one of 300A, 300.

See "Credit Limit - Beginning Level Statistics Courses" on page xx".

Prerequisites:

All of 100A, 100B, 201, 210, ENGL 135; and

MATH 12 or 120; or

permission of the department.

PSYC 300B - Statistical Methods in Psychology II

Units: 1.5
Formerly: half of 300

Schedule

Contains a brief review of the topics covered in 300A and deals with statistical analysis procedures for two-group and multi-group experimental designs. The focus is on t-tests and analysis of variance. The differences between repeated measures and independent groups designs and analyses are emphasized. Students are expected to analyze an experimental data set using the appropriate statistical procedures, and to prepare a research report.

Notes:

Credit will be granted for only one of 300B, 300.

Prerequisites:

300A.

PSYC 317 - Sensation and Perception

Units: 1.5
Formerly: 317A, 317B

Schedule

Discusses the construction of our perceptual world from sensory input, with an emphasis on visual experience. Functional models of the sensory system and measurement of sensory experiences such as stimulus detection and discrimination are examined. Topics include the perception of motion, form, colour, and individual differences in perceptual experience.

Notes:

Credit will be granted for only one of 317, 317A, 317B.

Prerequisites:

201 and 251; or

all of 100A, 100B, 215A (this set of prerequisites will only be accepted through summer 2017).

PSYC 330 - Personality

Units: 1.5, formerly 3

Schedule

An introduction to personality theory and its applications. A survey of several major strategies followed in conceptualizing personality, e.g., psychoanalytic, dispositional plus emphasis on measurement of personality, current research, and approaches to personality change.

Prerequisites:

201 and 260; or

100A and 100B; and 201 or

permission of the department.

PSYC 332 - Health Psychology

Units: 1.5

Schedule

A study of health issues from the standpoint of biological, psychological, and social factors acting together. Topics include health promotion, approaches to health-behaviour change, stress and coping, patient-practitioner interaction, pain, psychological issues in chronic and terminal illness, death and bereavement, the role of psychological factors in disease and treatment.

Prerequisites:

One of 231, 251, 260; or

100A and 100B (this set of prerequisites will only be accepted through summer 2017).

PSYC 335 - Infant and Child Development

Units: 1.5

Schedule

Overview of developmental changes from conception through about 12 years of age; prenatal development, neurological development, physical growth, perceptual and motor development, cognitive, social, and emotional processes, language acquisition, personality development, parenting, and the socio-cultural context of development.

Notes:

Credit will be granted for only one of 335, 333A.

Prerequisites:

201 and 243; or

100A and 100B; and 201 or

permission of the department.

PSYC 336 - Adolescent Development

Units: 1.5

Schedule

Overview of important developments during adolescence, including neurological development and biological changes, physical growth, cognitive social, and emotional processes, psychopathology and the social-cultural context of adolescent development.

Notes:

Credit will be granted for only one of 336, 333A.

Prerequisites:

201 and 243; or

100A and 100B; and 201 or

permission of the department.

PSYC 338 - Behavioural Interventions: Children and Adults

Units: 1.5

Schedule

Introduces the science of behavioural principles and applied behaviour analysis (ABA). Reviews basic principles of classical and operant conditioning, including stimulus control, motivation, reinforcement, punishment, extinction, and schedules of reinforcement, using examples of everyday behaviours. Consideration is given to behavioural procedures for assessing and changing problem behaviours, with examples from both children and adults.

Prerequisites:

201 and 260; or

100A and 100B (this set of prerequisites will only be accepted through summer 2017).

PSYC 345A - Drugs and Behaviour: Basic Principles

Units: 1.5
Formerly: half of 345

Schedule

An introductory course designed to review the scientific literature on drugs, behaviour, and the central nervous system. Topics include introductions to pharmacology, neuropharmacology, the experimental analysis of behaviour, and the behavioural determinants of drug action.

Notes:

Credit will be granted for only one of 345A, 345.

Prerequisites:

251; or

all of 100A, 100B, 215A (this set of prerequisites will only be accepted through summer 2017).

PSYC 351A - Cognitive Psychology

Units: 1.5
Formerly: 313, 313A, 313B

Schedule

The basic approach to studying cognitive processes. Particular topics will vary depending on the course instructor but will include domains such as attention, memory, object identification, language processing, embodied cognition, problem solving, reasoning, and decision making.

Notes:

Credit will be granted for only one of 351A, 313, 313A, 313B.

Prerequisites:

All of 201, 210, 251; or

100A and 100B; and 201 or

permission of the department.

PSYC 351B - Human Neuropsychology

Units: 1.5
Formerly: 315

Schedule

An introduction to neuroanatomy and neurophysiology as related to brain function and behaviour. Approaches to examining the brain-behaviour relationship (e.g. neuroimaging) will be discussed. Covers the major domains of cognitive functioning (e.g. memory, language, executive skills) as well as neurological syndromes and disturbances resulting from brain damage in selected areas.

Notes:

Credit will be granted for only one of 351B, 315.

Prerequisites:

All of 201, 210, 251; or

all of 100A, 100B, 215A (this set of prerequisites will only be accepted through summer 2017).

PSYC 360 - Psychological Disorders of Adulthood

Units: 1.5
Formerly: half of 430

Schedule

Examines theory and research related to an understanding of psychological disorders of adulthood. Topics include mood and anxiety related disorders, personality disorders, substance abuse and dependence, schizophrenia and other psychotic disorders, and cognitively based disorders. Topics will be discussed in terms of biological, learning, developmental, humanistic, and cross-cultural perspectives.

Notes:

Credit will be granted for only one of 360, 430.

361 or volunteer experience with a community agency is recommended prior to taking this course.

Prerequisites:

All of 100A, 100B, 201; and

215A or 251.

PSYC 366 - Psychological Disorders of Childhood and Adolescence

Units: 1.5
Formerly: 436

Schedule

Examines research and theory in clinical child psychology and developmental psychopathology. Discusses a variety of mental health challenges with respect to their description, etiology, treatment, and prevention. Multiple theoretical perspectives are covered to understand risk and protective factors across childhood and adolescence.

Notes:

Credit will be granted for only one of 366, 436.

Prior course in developmental or child psychology and 361 or prior volunteer experience with a community agency are recommended.

Prerequisites:

201 and 260; or

100A and 100B; and 201 or

permission of the department.

PSYC 370A - Psycholinguistics

Units: 1.5
Also: LING 370A

Schedule

The psychology of language, examining the process of comprehension and production, including language and cognition, conversational discourse, and inference and semantics, among other topics.

Notes:

Credit will be granted for only one of 370A, 370, LING 370, 370A.

Prerequisites:

100A and 100B; or

permission of the department.

PSYC 375 - Interpersonal Relationships

Units: 1.5

Schedule

An introduction to social psychological research and theory on close relationships with a focus on adult romantic relationships. Topics include relationship formation, maintenance and dissolution.

Prerequisites:

201 and 231; or

all of 100A, 100B, 201 (this set of prerequisites will only be accepted through summer 2017).

PSYC 386 - Cultural Psychology

Units: 1.5

Schedule

Explores how cultural context shapes cognition, motivation, emotion, self, personality, and development.

Prerequisites:

201 and 231; or

100A, 100B; and 201 or

permission of the department.

PSYC 431B - Social Cognition

Units: 1.5

Schedule

Intensive examination of the social psychological literature emphasizing how people think about and make sense of their social experience. Topics may include how people create and maintain a sense of identity, close relationships, attitudes, persuasion, applications of social psychology.

Notes:

Prerequisites:

300A; and two of 330, 375, 385, 386; or

all of 100A, 100B, 331 (this set of prerequisites will only be accepted through summer 2017).

Pre or co requisites:

300B or permission of the department.

PSYC 503 - Practicum in Clinical Psychology

Units: 4.0

Schedule

Practicum in a clinical setting. 1 unit of credit is equivalent to approximately 100 hours.

Prerequisites:

Acceptance to clinical psychology graduate program and approval of clinical program practicum coordinator.

Grading: INP, COM, N, F.

PSYC 505 - Clinical Intervention Practicum

Units: 4.0

Schedule

Practicum in a clinical setting with emphasis on various forms of intervention. 1 unit of credit is equivalent to approximately 100 hours.

Prerequisites:

Acceptance to clinical psychology graduate program and approval of clinical program practicum coordinator.

Grading: INP, COM, N, F.

PSYC 506A - Psychology Clinic Practice

Units: 1.5
Formerly: 506

Schedule

Supervised psychological practice in the Psychology Clinic, Department of Psychology.

Notes:

May be taken more than once for credit.

Prerequisites:

Acceptance to clinical psychology graduate program, with permission of instructor, and approval of the Director of Clinical Training.

Grading: INP, COM, N, F.

PSYC 599 - Thesis

Units: 3.0-6.0

Schedule

Grading: INP, COM, N, F.

PSYC 603 - Advanced Clinical Practicum

Units: 4.0

Schedule

Practicum in an approved clinical setting. 1 unit of credit is equivalent to approximately 100 hours.

Prerequisites:

Acceptance to clinical psychology graduate program and approval of clinical program practicum coordinator.

Grading: INP, COM, N, F.

PSYC 606 - Clinical Internship

Units: 15.0

Schedule

Full-year internship with 1600 to 2000 hours of supervised practical experience in settings approved by the committee on clinical training.

Prerequisites:

Completion of clinical course sequence and approval by Committee on clinical training.

Grading: INP, COM, N, F.

PSYC 699 - PhD Dissertation

Units: 15.0-30.0

Schedule

Pre or co requisites:

693.

Grading: INP, COM, N, F.

SDH 599 - Thesis

Units: 6.0

Schedule

Grading: INP, COM, N, F

SDH 693 - Comprehensive Exam

Units: 3.0

Schedule

Three questions related to their particular research area will be crafted by the student in consultation with their supervisory committee. The questions will be answered in a written format, drawing upon pertinent literature and will be evaluated on a pass/fail basis.

Grading: INP, COM, N, F

SDH 699 - Dissertation

Units: 15.0

Schedule

Prerequisites:

693 Comprehensive Exam.

Grading: INP, COM, N, F.

SENG 265 - Software Development Methods

Units: 1.5

Schedule

Systematic methods for designing, coding, testing and documenting medium-sized programs. Tools and techniques to promote programming productivity and software quality. Topics include specifications, code review and inspection techniques, testing and debugging methods and tools, reusable software components and templates, file system navigation, scripting languages, software tools, environments, instrumenting and profiling, and the fundamentals of software configuration management.

Notes:

Credit will be granted for only one of 265, CSC 265.

Prerequisites:

CSC 115 or 116.

SENG 299 - Software Architecture and Design

Units: 1.5
Formerly: 271

Schedule

An introduction to analysis and design of software architectures with UML (Unified Modelling Language) and their subsequent synthesis at the program level. Topics include requirements analysis, analysis and design of static and dynamic view points of architectures and model driven code engineering. Design patterns are introduced and applied as solutions to recurring design problems. Students are familiarized with component reuse, event-driven programming and computer-aided software engineering (CASE) tools. The course includes a major design project.

Notes:

Credit will be granted for only one of 299, 271.

Prerequisites:

265.

SENG 310 - Human Computer Interaction

Units: 1.5

Schedule

Understanding human behaviour as it applies to user interfaces: work activity analysis, observational techniques, questionnaire administration and unobtrusive measures. Operating parameters of the human cognitive system, task analysis and cognitive modelling techniques and their application to designing interfaces. Interface representation and prototyping tools. Cognitive walkthroughs, usability studies and verbal protocol analysis. Case studies of specific user interfaces.

Prerequisites:

One of 221, 265, CENG 241.

SENG 422 - Software Architecture

Units: 1.5

Schedule

Architectural design of complex software systems. Techniques for designing, evaluating and implementing software system structures, models and formal notations for characterizing and reasoning about architectures, tools and generating specific instances of an architecture, and case studies of actual system architectures. Role of Standards. Students must complete a project that involves substantial software design. Students work in teams. Progress is determined through a preliminary design review; presentation; demonstration of the design; and final report.

Prerequisites:

One of 271, 299, 330.

SENG 426 - Software Quality Engineering

Units: 1.5

Schedule

Emphasizes software quality engineering as an integral facet of development, from requirements through delivery and maintenance. The students will learn how to choose appropriate quality goals and select, plan, and execute quality assurance activities throughout development and evolution to predictably meet quality and schedule goals. They will learn how quality assurance can be incorporated into process improvement feedback loops that amplify the ability of an organization to cost-effectively prevent and detect faults.

Prerequisites:

One of 321, 371, CENG 356.

SENG 440 - Embedded Systems

Units: 1.5

Schedule

Characteristics and design of embedded systems. Formal models and specification languages for capturing system behaviour. Techniques for specification, exploration and refinement. System partitioning and hardware/software co-design. Tools for validation, verification and simulation. Quality and performance metrics.

Prerequisites:

CENG 355 or CSC 355.

SENG 480A - Topics in Software Engineering

Units: 1.5
Formerly: 480

Schedule

Presents material in an emerging field or one not covered in regular offerings. Topics depend primarily on the interests of the instructor.

Entrance will be restricted to third- and fourth-year students who meet the prerequisite specified for the topic to be offered.

Notes:

Credit will be granted for only one of 480A, 480B, 480C, 480D (if taken in the same topic).

May be taken more than once for credit in different topics with permission of the department.

* Lab hours may vary depending on the topic.

SENG 499 - Design Project II

Units: 1.5

Schedule

The student is required to pursue an independent project under the supervision of a faculty member, to prepare a written report and present a seminar describing the work. Projects will normally focus on large software systems, and collaboration with an industrial sponsor is encouraged.

Notes:

Credit will be granted for only one of 499, CENG 499, ELEC 499.

Prerequisites:

399 and ENGR 002; and

minimum fourth-year standing in the Faculty or permission of the Program.

SLST 599 - Thesis

Units: 6.0-9.0

Schedule

Grading: INP, COM, N, F

SMGT 415 - Service Marketing Management

Units: 1.5
Formerly: HSM 415

Schedule

Focuses on what it takes to successfully design and deliver a superior experience to customers. Among the topics covered are: service design, integrated marketing communication, customer loyalty and relationship management; managing customer participation, service pricing and understanding consumer decision making.

Notes:

Credit will be granted for only one of 415, HSM 415.

Prerequisites:

Third-year Commerce core or permission of the Program Director.

Corequisites:

416 and 417.

SMGT 416 - Service Operations and Quality Management

Units: 1.5
Formerly: HSM 416

Schedule

Explores the key challenge in managing specific service processes and also considers quality management frameworks and principles. Topics to be examined are: defining and measuring service quality, quality economics and customer worth, designing and planning for service quality, QFD and the House of Quality, service capacity planning and waiting line management, service control and service quality improvement.

Notes:

Credit will be granted for only one of 416, HSM 416.

Prerequisites:

Third-year Commerce core or permission of the Program Director.

Corequisites:

415 and 417.

SMGT 417 - Service Human Resource Management

Units: 1.5
Formerly: HSM 417

Schedule

In services companies, the interaction between the customer and the employee is both an opportunity and a challenge for management. An examination of the unique aspects of building an excellent human resource management system in hospitality and services. Topics include: the role of the servant leader, creating a service culture, attracting, developing and retaining high performers, reward systems in service organizations and designing systems to support service delivery.

Notes:

Credit will be granted for only one of 417, HSM 417.

Prerequisites:

Minimum third-year Commerce core or permission of the Program Director.

Corequisites:

415 and 416.

SOCI 100A - Introduction to Sociology: Culture and Socialization

Units: 1.5
Formerly: part of 100

Schedule

Introduction to the discipline of sociology: its basic concepts, theoretical orientations, intellectual debates, and research approaches. Topics include socialization, culture, norms and deviance, social interactions, self and identity, emotions, and social roles.

Notes:

Credit will be granted for only one of 100A, 100.

SOCI 100B - Introduction to Sociology: Institutions and Social Change

Units: 1.5
Formerly: part of 100

Schedule

Introduction to the study of social systems and the processes of stratification, regulation, and social change. Topics include social movements, families, religion, ethnicity, education, health and medicine, the environment, and the militarization of society.

Notes:

Credit will be granted for only one of 100B, 100.

Although 100A and 100B may be taken in either order or concurrently, we recommend students first enrol in 100A.

SOCI 103 - Canadian Society

Units: 1.5

Schedule

The origins, development, and structure of Canadian society analyzed through a sociological lens. Examines topics such as immigration, nation building, ethnic diversification, language, war and peacekeeping, work, education, Canadian identity, and citizenship rights.

Notes:

Credit will be granted for only one of 103, 200.

SOCI 210 - Foundations of Sociological Theory

Units: 1.5
Formerly: 308

Schedule

Survey of major sociological theories from the foundation of sociology in the early 1800s until early 1900s. The course outlines the main ideas and concepts of the principal schools of thought in the formative era of sociology, and the socio-historical context in which these ideas developed.

Notes:

Credit will be granted for only one of 210, 209, 300, 308.

Pre or co requisites:

100A and 100B.

SOCI 305B - Families and Social Change

Units: 1.5
Formerly: part of 305

Schedule

Considers the relationship between families and society, looking at continuity and change in contemporary Canadian family forms in the context of other cultures and periods. Emphasizes how social, economic and demographic changes in Canadian society have reshaped family forms and practices over the past century; discusses current family trends and evaluates their social policy implications.

Notes:

Credit will be granted for only one of 305B, 305.

It is recommended that students take 205 before enrolling in this course.

It is recommended that students take this course before enrolling in 443.

SOCI 306 - Crime and Deviance

Units: 1.5
Formerly: part of 301

Schedule

Examines processes relating to the social construction of crime and deviance, ranging from 'victimless crimes' and street crimes to corporate crimes and state crimes against humanity, using classic and contemporary theoretical frameworks.

Notes:

Credit will be granted for only one of 306, 301.

It is recommended that students take 202 before enrolling in this course.

Students are strongly encouraged to take this course before enrolling in 401.

SOCI 309 - Modern Social Theory

Units: 1.5

Schedule

Survey of major theoretical perspectives influential in sociology since the early twentieth century. Covers key concepts in sociology such as power, ideology, rationality, inequality, feminism, social structure, agency and identity. Emphasis is placed on connections both to classical theories and to broad cultural and political currents.

Prerequisites:

210

SOCI 310 - Religion in Society

Units: 1.5

Schedule

Cultural, social, and institutional impacts of religion in modern societies. Foundational and classical approaches to religion are considered, along with contemporary phenomena pertaining to the social role of religious institutions and beliefs. These may include millenarian and evangelical movements, denominational religion in the Anglo-American context, popular religious movements, liberation theology, cults, and the process of secularization.

SOCI 320 - Mass Media and Popular Culture

Units: 1.5

Schedule

Sociological perspectives on mass communication and popular culture, focusing on film, television, music, fashion, books, magazines, and the Internet. Topics include: the history and social organization of the culture industries; the relations between production, distribution and reception of media; the relationship between cultural consumption and social status; the role of popular cultural forms in ethnic and other subcultures; the significance of branding, celebrity and infotainment; and the role of gender differences in popular culture.

Notes:

Credit will be granted for only one of 320, 390, (if taken in the topic).

SOCI 345 - Sociology of Mental Health

Units: 1.5

Schedule

Topics may include: theoretical foundations of the sociology of mental health; the social conditions that influence mental well-being; the experience and social meaning of mental illness and its treatment; the social construction of mental disorders; and the processes of institutionalization and deinstitutionalization.

Notes:

It is recommended that students take 285 before enrolling in this course.

Students are strongly encouraged to take this course before enrolling in 445.

SOCI 412 - Sociological Explanations

Units: 1.5

Schedule

In-depth examination of how sociological explanations are created. Examines several schools of thought, including positivist, interpretive, phenomenological, critical, structural-functional, feminist, and deconstructive and/or postmodern. Traces the historical and philosophical roots of each school of thought to show how theories and methods are linked.

Notes:

Credit will be granted for only one of 412, 300, 302.

Prerequisites:

All of 210, 309, declared Major or Honours in Sociology.

SOCI 598 - Extended Essay

Units: 3.0

Schedule

Prerequisites:

Normally, a student is expected to have completed all course work prior to registration.

Grading: INP, COM, N, F.

SOCI 599 - Thesis

Units: 6.0

Schedule

Prerequisites:

Normally, a student is expected to have completed all course work prior to registration. After 16 months of course work, the student is required to have an approved proposal on file to maintain registration in 599.

Grading: INP, COM, N, F.

SOCI 693 - PhD Candidacy Examinations

Units: 3.0

Schedule

Students enrol in SOCI 693 for the duration of their preparation for their candidacy examinations. This begins at the time a student first enrols in the PhD program and continues until candidacy requirements have been completed. Students are expected to complete all required course work and comprehensive exams within 25 months after entering the PhD program.

Grading: INP, COM, N, F.

SOCI 699 - PhD Dissertation

Units: 21.0

Schedule

Prerequisites:

693

Grading: INP, COM, N, F.

SOCW 200A - An Introduction to Social Work Practice

Units: 1.5

Schedule

An introduction to the practice of social work beginning with a critical examination of the ethics, values and historical development of the profession. Students will become familiar with several critical social theories that inform anti-oppressive social work practice. The relationship between private troubles and public issues as well as the concepts of power, oppression, privilege, identity and social justice will be explored. Emphasis on self reflection which will assist students in examining their identities and their interest, motivation and capacity for social work practice.

SOCW 200B - Introduction to the Critical Analysis of Social Welfare in Canada

Units: 1.5

Schedule

Students critically analyze the current and historical development of Canadian social welfare policy, and explore the impact of economic and social restructuring trends on patterns of exclusion, structural inequities and increased needs for social protection. Students will become familiar with the ways that systems of oppression have intersected to produce a particular focus on some social problems and not others.

SOCW 304A - Social Work Practicum by Prior Learning Assessment (PLA)

Units: 3.0 or 4.5

Schedule

Students with significant work or volunteer experience in social work may complete the first BSW practicum by Prior Learning Assessment. Students will present evidence of their prior learning and practice which specifically demonstrates their anti-oppressive practice and their acquisition of the skills and knowledge required in 304.

Notes:

Credit will be granted for only one of 304A, 304.

Prerequisites:

Either 323, or 311 and 312.

Grading: COM, N, F.

SOCW 311 - Understanding Oppression

Units: 1.5
Formerly: part of 323.

Schedule

An examination of key concepts such as 'whiteness', 'oppression', 'marginalization', 'difference', 'rank' and 'power' that animate the practice of social work within a difference-centred, social justice framework. Critical theoretical and conceptual insights from frameworks such as Indigenous, feminist, anti-racist, queer, and postmodern theories will be explored in order to arrive at a nuanced understanding of critical social work.

Notes:

Credit will be granted for only one of 311, 323.

SOCW 312 - Collaborative Conversations: Working within Communities

Units: 1.5
Formerly: part of 323.

Schedule

Focuses on developing social work practice skills with individuals and communities in ways that are both difference-centred and collaborative in nature. Students will critically analyze and develop their own individual practice skills in various community contexts, within a social justice framework. Examples of these include social service agencies and their clientele, the classroom, and grass roots organizations. Students will examine ways to further anti-oppressive skills that are effective, participatory and collaborative.

Notes:

Credit will be granted for only one of 312, 323.

On-campus component required.

Pre or co requisites:

311.

SOCW 319 - Research for Social Change

Units: 1.5
Formerly: part of 318.

Schedule

An introduction to research as social justice work. Students will learn about a range of qualitative and quantitative methodologies, with an emphasis on Indigenous, critical and anti-oppressive approaches. Students will be engaged in critically analyzing what counts as knowledge, developing alternative ways of understanding social issues, redefining the relationship between researchers and participants, and developing skills in data collection, data analysis and proposal writing.

Notes:

Credit will be granted for only one of 319, 318.

Pre or co requisites:

Either 311 or 323 and 312.

SOCW 350A - Social Work, Social Justice and the Law

Units: 1.5

Schedule

Provides an overview of critical perspectives on social justice, law, the legal system, and the legal processes that impact on social work practice. Students will critically examine and self-reflect on the interplay between marginalization and structural inequalities and law. Areas examined may include child welfare, mental health, human rights, youth justice, poverty and restorative practices.

Notes:

Credit will be granted for only one of 350A, 350, CYC 350A.

Open to third- and fourth-year non-BSW students with permission of the department.

SOCW 350B - Legal and Social Justice Skills for Social Workers

Units: 1.5

Schedule

A skill-based course focusing on the development of legal skills in an anti-oppressive framework. Emphasis is given to a critical analysis of the skills necessary to practice in statutory settings such as child welfare, and may include dispute resolution, advocacy, mediation, investigation, evidence-giving and report writing.

Notes:

Credit will be granted for only one of 350B, 350, CYC 350B.

Open to third- and fourth-year non-BSW students with permission of the department.

Prerequisites:

350A or CYC 350A.

SOCW 354 - Indigenous Perspectives on Practice Issues

Units: 1.5

Schedule

Critically examines the historical process of colonization in Canada, the resulting barriers embedded in policy and practice, and alternative ways of viewing the social-psychological position of Indigenous people in Canadian Society. Contemporary issues and the movement toward self-determination will be discussed in relation to social work theory and practice.

Notes:

Credit will be granted for only one of 354, 454.

Pre or co requisites:

Either 311 or 323 and 312.

SOCW 356 - Human Development and the Social Environment within a Global Context

Units: 1.5

Schedule

An overview of human development within a global context with a focus on social justice and diversity related to gender, race, class, ethnicity, culture, sexual orientation and disability. In particular, focuses on the impact of the cultural, global, spiritual and natural worlds people inhabit on understanding lifespan development with the implications of this understanding for social work practice.

Notes:

This course meets the Child Welfare Specialization requirements for a development course.

Open to 3rd and 4th year non-BSW students with permission of the department.

SOCW 400 - Introduction to Social Work in the Health Care Sector

Units: 1.5

Schedule

Examines the knowledge and skills required for social workers to be effective advocates while carrying out a range of responsibilities in the health sector within the context of a practice framework that focuses on the social determinants of health. The challenges and opportunities provided by the cultural and organizational contexts of practice in health care will be an important focus while examining the inter-professional nature of practice. Particular aspects of practice such as appropriate documentation, informed consent and community development will be included.

Prerequisites:

Either 311 or 323 and 312.

SOCW 402 - Social Work Practicum II

Units: 4.5

Schedule

In the second BSW practicum (350 hours) students have a further opportunity to develop, refine and apply generalist practice knowledge, skills, values and ethics under supervision in an agency setting. Generalist practice can include individual family, group and community work, organizational development and policy change.

Notes:

Students must submit an application for practicum at least one term in advance of registration in order to ensure adequate time is available for planning and organizing their practicum.

Credit will be granted for only one of 402, 404, 404A.

Students completing a 3.0 unit SOCW 304 practicum must complete a 420 hour SOCW 402.

A concurrent seminar or approved equivalent will be required.

Prerequisites:

Either 311 or 323 and 312; and

one of 301, 318, 319; and

304 or 304A.

Pre or co requisites:

One of 354, 350A, 413.

Grading: INP, COM, N, F.

SOCW 404A - Child Welfare Specialization: Child Welfare Practicum

Units: 4.5

Schedule

In this second BSW practicum (350 hours), students have a further opportunity to develop, refine and apply generalist practice knowledge, skills, values and ethics while working under supervision in a child and/or youth and/or family serving agency with those who are affected by child welfare law, policy and practice.

Notes:

Students must submit an application for practicum at least one term in advance of registration in order to ensure adequate time is available for planning and organizing their practicum.

Credit will be granted for only one of 404A, 404, 402.

Students completing a 3.0 unit SOCW 304 practicum must complete a 420 hour SOCW 404A.

A concurrent seminar or approved equivalent will be required.

Prerequisites:

One of 301, 318, 319; and

either 323, or 311 and 312; and

304 or 304A; and

all of 350A, 354, 356, 475; and

two of 350B, 469, 471.

For Indigenous Child Welfare placements:

One of 301, 318, 319; and

304 or 304A; and

either 323, or 311 and 312; and

all of 350A, 350B, 354, 356, 391, 491, 492.

Pre or co requisites:

All of 413, 451, 476.

For Indigenous Child Welfare placements:

323 or 413; and

451.

Grading: INP, COM, N, F.

SOCW 413 - Critical Social Work Practices

Units: 1.5

Schedule

Exploration of the application of various practice approaches, including narrative, solution-oriented, and embodied practices, which reflect examples of critical social work in action with individuals, groups, children, families and communities. Opportunities are provided to critically analyze the limitations and strengths of these practices through the lenses of marginalization and difference. The assumptions of professionalism and the wider context within which these particular types of interventions are practiced will also be interrogated.

Prerequisites:

Either 311 and 312, or 323.

SOCW 435 - Critical Perspectives in Mental Health Practice

Units: 1.5

Schedule

An examination of the concepts of mental health and mental illness from a critical perspective. Provides an overview of key areas in knowledge and theory, as well as practical information about how to work within various service contexts. Particular attention is given to the historical, socio-cultural, and political connections to mental illness and addictions—and this information is presented in a way that reflects a diversity of paradigms and standpoints.

Prerequisites:

Either 311 and 312, or 323.

SOCW 451 - Indigenous Policy Analysis in Social Work

Units: 1.5

Schedule

Builds on the structural theories and perspectives of social work practice introduced in 354. Focuses on in-depth exploration and critical analysis of past and present policies of Canadian governments that affect the lives of Indigenous peoples. Contemporary responses and initiatives of Indigenous peoples through their own policies and practices will also be discussed.

Prerequisites:

354.

SOCW 460 - Special Topics in Social Work and Social Welfare

Units: 1.5 or 3.0

Schedule

Special issues in social welfare and approaches to social work practice.

Notes:

May be taken more than once for credit to a maximum of 3.0 units.

Offered as resources permit.

SOCW 471 - Addictions in Society: Theory, Practice and Policy

Units: 1.5

Schedule

Critically examines the theoretical perspectives on practice, programs, and policy in the field of addictions. Addiction and recovery will be examined as transactional processes that take place within larger socio-cultural contexts. Places particular emphasis on the historical, social, geographic, and political contexts of addictions among women, youth, seniors, Indigenous peoples, and members of other marginalized social groups. Examines issues in the regulation and control of substances and relevant trends in policy and program development. Students are expected to use critical reflection to articulate their own perspectives on addiction.

Notes:

Credit will be granted for only one of 471, 479.

Open to third- and fourth-year non-BSW students with permission of department.

SOCW 475 - Child Welfare Practice

Units: 1.5

Schedule

An opportunity to explore all aspects of child welfare practice with a particular focus on balancing the issues of power and authority with helping approaches, identifying and resolving ethical dilemmas, and developing community based approaches to serving families and children. Students will explore their own conceptual and philosophical orientation to child welfare practice.

Prerequisites:

Either 311 and 312, or 323.

SOCW 476 - Family and Child Welfare Policy

Units: 1.5

Schedule

Critiques of family and child welfare policy and practice such as the feminist and Indigenous perspectives are challenging the social work profession. Provides an opportunity to critically examine assumptions in family and child welfare policy including notions of family, substitute care, conceptions about violence and neglect, how family and child welfare policy is developed and administered, and the political role of social work.

Prerequisites:

Either 311 and 312, or 323.

SOCW 506A - MSWI Practicum

Units: 4.5

Schedule

A minimum of 450 hours of social work practice and demonstration of the application of critical analysis to practice are required. Faculty of Human and Social Development regulations concerning practica apply to the MSWI practicum.

Prerequisites:

Advanced Program Standing, 6 units of coursework (4.5 units of Advanced Program core course plus 1.5 units of elective).

Corequisites:

Must be taken concurrently with 571.

Grading: INP, COM, N, F.

SOCW 531 - Critical Exploration of Leadership Roles for Social Workers in Health Care

Units: 1.5

Schedule

Inquiry based opportunity for students to critically examine their leadership styles and develop a foundational knowledge and skill base for effective involvement in organizational change, staff management, coaching and supervision, coordination of inter-professional teams and development of policies to address the social determinants of health.

Notes:

Offered as resources permit.

SOCW 540 - Foundation Practicum

Units: 4.5

Schedule

A minimum of 450 hours of social work practice and demonstration of the application of critical analysis to practice are required. Faculty of Human and Social Development regulations concerning practice apply to the MSW practicum.

Prerequisites:

541 and 4.5 Social Work graduate-level units.

Pre or co requisites:

546.

Grading: INP, COM, N, F.

SOCW 571 - MSW Capstone

Units: 1.5

Schedule

A culminating educational experience to consolidate learning and demonstrate preparation for advanced social work practice. Students will integrate, articulate, and evaluate learning from the courses and practica in the MSW program within the context of their other professional activities and prior academic experiences.

Notes:

Students are expected to have completed all required coursework except 506/506A.

506, 506A can be taken as a pre or co-requisite although it is normally taken concurrently with 571.

Pre or co requisites:

Grading: INP, COM, N, F.

SOCW 598 - Individual Graduating Research Project/Report

Units: 3.0

Schedule

Students working under social work faculty supervision complete a research project. This can include undertaking a research project for a social agency.

Prerequisites:

Students must have completed 6 units of Advanced coursework, including 516, before registering.

Grading: INP, COM, N, F.

SOCW 599 - Thesis

Units: 6.0
Formerly: HSD 599.

Schedule

Specialized research on a topic area chosen in consultation with the student's supervisory committee.

Prerequisites:

Normally, a student is expected to have completed all course work prior to registration. After 16 months of course work, the student is required to have an approved proposal on file to maintain registration in 599.

Grading: INP, COM, N, F.

SOCW 699 -

Units:

Schedule

SPAN 149 - Beginners' Spanish

Units: 3.0

Schedule

Exploration of the language and cultures of the Hispanic World, equivalent to SPAN 100A and 100B. Acquisition of basic skills of pronunciation, reading and writing. Instruction in essential points of grammar, basic syntax and vocabulary for daily interaction.

Notes:

Credit will be granted for only one of 149, 100, 100A, 100B.

Not open to students with credit in Spanish 12.

SPAN 305 - Advanced Topics in Hispanic Culture (in English)

Units: 1.5

Schedule

Themes and cultural trends in Latin American countries or Spain. May be taught on-line.

Notes:

May be taken more than once for credit in different topics with permission of the department.

Prerequisites:

Minimum second-year standing.

SPAN 598 - Master's Essay

Units: 3.0

Schedule

Grading: INP, COM, N, F.

SPAN 599 - MA Thesis/Oral

Units: 6.0

Schedule

Grading: INP, COM, N, F.

SPAN 693 -

Units:

Schedule

SPAN 699 -

Units:

Schedule

SPP 598 - Extended Essay

Units: 3.0

Schedule

An in-depth examination of a topic related to policy and/or practice.

Grading: INP, COM, N, F

SPP 599 - Thesis

Units: 6.0

Schedule

Specialized research on a topic area chosen in consultation with the student's supervisory committee.

Grading: INP, COM, N, F

STAT 254 - Probability and Statistics for Engineers

Units: 1.5

Schedule

Probability axioms, properties of probability, counting techniques, conditional probability, independence, random variables, discrete and continuous probability distributions, expectation, variance; binomial, hypergeometric, negative binomial, Poisson, uniform, normal, gamma and exponential distributions; discrete and continuous joint distributions, independent random variables, expectation of functions of random vectors, covariance, random samples and sampling distributions, central limit theorem; point and interval estimation; hypothesis testing; linear regression and correlation.

Notes:

Credit will be granted for only one of 254, 250, 260.

See "Credit Limit - Beginning Level Statistics Courses".

Prerequisites:

Admission to the BEng program.

Corequisites:

MATH 200.

STAT 255 - Statistics for Life Sciences I

Units: 1.5

Schedule

Descriptive statistics; probability; random variables and probability distributions; expectation; binomial, Poisson, and normal distributions; random sampling and sampling distributions; point and interval estimation; classical hypothesis testing and significance testing. Statistical examples and applications from life sciences will be emphasized.

Notes:

Credit will be granted for only one of 255, 252.

Not open to students registered in or with credit in one of 254, 250, 260.

See "Credit Limit - Beginning Level Statistics Courses".

Intended primarily for students in Biochemistry, Microbiology, Biology, Environmental Studies combined with a Science discipline, Kinesiology, and Combined Computer Science and Health Information Science.

Prerequisites:

1.5 units of MATH courses numbered 100 or higher.

STAT 598 - Master's Project

Units: 3.0

Schedule

Grading: INP, COM, N, F

STAT 599 - Master's Thesis

Units: 6.0

Schedule

Grading: INP, COM, N, F

STAT 693 - Candidacy Examination

Units: 3.0

Schedule

Grading: INP, COM, N, F

STAT 699 - Dissertation

Units: 21.0-30.0

Schedule

Corequisites:

693

Grading: INP, COM, N, F.

THEA 394 - Directed Studies in Applied Theatre

Units: 1.5 or 3.0

Schedule

Supervised research in Applied Theatre culminating in the production of a specific project either written or practical.

Notes:

May be taken more than once for credit in different topics to a maximum of 6 units.

Prerequisites:

Permission of the department.

THEA 598 - MA Essay

Units: 4.5

Schedule

Grading: INP, COM, N, F

THEA 693 - Dissertation Proposal/Candidacy Exam

Units: 3.0

Schedule

Grading: INP, COM, N, F

THEA 699 - Dissertation

Units: 30.0

Schedule

Prerequisites:

693.

Grading: INP, COM, N, F.

DepartmentFacultyLevelCourse
School of Public AdministrationFaculty of Human and Social DevelopmentUndergraduateADMN 316 - Written Communications in the Public and Non-Profit Sectors
School of Public AdministrationFaculty of Human and Social DevelopmentUndergraduateADMN 470 - Contemporary Topics in Administration
School of Public AdministrationFaculty of Human and Social DevelopmentUndergraduateADMN 477 - Strategic Planning and Implementation
School of Public AdministrationFaculty of Human and Social DevelopmentGraduateADMN 502B - Data Analysis &amp; Interpretation
School of Public AdministrationFaculty of Human and Social DevelopmentGraduateADMN 512 - Resource Accountability and Management in the Public Sector
School of Public AdministrationFaculty of Human and Social DevelopmentGraduateADMN 551 - Administrative Justice System in Canada
School of Public AdministrationFaculty of Human and Social DevelopmentGraduateADMN 582 - Topics in Program Evaluation, Performance Measurement, Performance Management and Knowledge Management
School of Public AdministrationFaculty of Human and Social DevelopmentGraduateADMN 596 - Evaluation Project
School of Public AdministrationFaculty of Human and Social DevelopmentGraduateADMN 598 - Master's Project
School of Public AdministrationFaculty of Human and Social DevelopmentGraduateADMN 599 - Master's Thesis
School of Public AdministrationFaculty of Human and Social DevelopmentGraduateADMN 693 - PhD Candidacy Examination
School of Public AdministrationFaculty of Human and Social DevelopmentGraduateADMN 699 - Dissertation
Department of Curriculum and InstructionFaculty of EducationUndergraduateAE 200 - Design
Department of Curriculum and InstructionFaculty of EducationUndergraduateAE 201 - Image Development
Department of Curriculum and InstructionFaculty of EducationUndergraduateAE 303A - Ceramics I
Department of Curriculum and InstructionFaculty of EducationUndergraduateAE 305 - Drawing
Department of Curriculum and InstructionFaculty of EducationUndergraduateAE 306 - Painting
Department of Curriculum and InstructionFaculty of EducationUndergraduateAE 307 - Printmaking
Department of Curriculum and InstructionFaculty of EducationUndergraduateAE 308 - Sculpture
Department of Curriculum and InstructionFaculty of EducationUndergraduateAE 309 - Ceramics: Hand Building
Department of Curriculum and InstructionFaculty of EducationUndergraduateAE 319 - Photography
Department of Curriculum and InstructionFaculty of EducationUndergraduateAE 322 - Digital Arts
School of Public Health and Social PolicyFaculty of Human and Social DevelopmentUndergraduateAGEI 473 - Chronic Disease and Ageing
Department of AnthropologyFaculty of Social SciencesUndergraduateANTH 100 - Introduction to Anthropology
Department of AnthropologyFaculty of Social SciencesUndergraduateANTH 200 - Cultural and Social Anthropology
Department of AnthropologyFaculty of Social SciencesUndergraduateANTH 302 - Globalization, Health, and the Environment
Department of AnthropologyFaculty of Social SciencesUndergraduateANTH 343 - Archaeological Field Techniques
Department of AnthropologyFaculty of Social SciencesUndergraduateANTH 344 - Regional Topics in Archaeology
Department of AnthropologyFaculty of Social SciencesUndergraduateANTH 352 - Human Osteology
Department of AnthropologyFaculty of Social SciencesUndergraduateANTH 391 - Selected Problems in Anthropology: Ethnology
Department of AnthropologyFaculty of Social SciencesUndergraduateANTH 393 - Selected Problems in Anthropology: Cultural Anthropology
Department of AnthropologyFaculty of Social SciencesUndergraduateANTH 395 - Selected Problems in Anthropology: Method and Theory
Department of AnthropologyFaculty of Social SciencesGraduateANTH 597 - Thesis Proposal Development
Department of AnthropologyFaculty of Social SciencesGraduateANTH 598 - Comprehensive Examinations
Department of AnthropologyFaculty of Social SciencesGraduateANTH 599 - Thesis
Department of AnthropologyFaculty of Social SciencesGraduateANTH 693 - Doctoral Candidacy Examinations
Department of AnthropologyFaculty of Social SciencesGraduateANTH 699 - PhD Dissertation
Department of Visual ArtsFaculty of Fine ArtsUndergraduateART 334 - Multi-Media Printmaking
Department of Visual ArtsFaculty of Fine ArtsUndergraduateART 351 - Special Studies
Department of Visual ArtsFaculty of Fine ArtsGraduateART 570 - Directed Study
Department of Physics and AstronomyFaculty of ScienceUndergraduateASTR 102 - Exploring the Cosmos
Department of Biochemistry and MicrobiologyFaculty of ScienceUndergraduateBCMB 298 - Research Experience
Department of Biochemistry and MicrobiologyFaculty of ScienceUndergraduateBCMB 301A - Lab Techniques &amp; Projects I
Department of Biochemistry and MicrobiologyFaculty of ScienceUndergraduateBCMB 301B - Lab Techniques &amp; Projects II
Department of Biochemistry and MicrobiologyFaculty of ScienceUndergraduateBCMB 398 - Research Experience
Department of Biochemistry and MicrobiologyFaculty of ScienceUndergraduateBCMB 498 - Research Experience
Department of Biochemistry and MicrobiologyFaculty of ScienceGraduateBCMB 580 - Research Seminar
Department of Biochemistry and MicrobiologyFaculty of ScienceGraduateBCMB 680 - Advanced Research Seminar
Department of Biochemistry and MicrobiologyFaculty of ScienceGraduateBCMB 693 - PhD Candicacy Examination
Department of Biochemistry and MicrobiologyFaculty of ScienceUndergraduateBIOC 300A - General Biochemistry I
Department of Biochemistry and MicrobiologyFaculty of ScienceUndergraduateBIOC 300B - General Biochemistry II
Department of Biochemistry and MicrobiologyFaculty of ScienceGraduateBIOC 599 - MSc Thesis: Biochemistry
Department of Biochemistry and MicrobiologyFaculty of ScienceGraduateBIOC 699 - PhD Dissertation: Biochemistry
Department of BiologyFaculty of ScienceUndergraduateBIOL 150B - Modern Biology
Department of BiologyFaculty of ScienceUndergraduateBIOL 184 - Evolution and Biodiversity
Department of BiologyFaculty of ScienceUndergraduateBIOL 186 - Physiology and Cell Biology
Department of BiologyFaculty of ScienceUndergraduateBIOL 225 - Principles of Cell Biology
Department of BiologyFaculty of ScienceUndergraduateBIOL 329 - Biology of the Vertebrates of British Columbia
Department of BiologyFaculty of ScienceUndergraduateBIOL 360 - Cell Biology
Department of BiologyFaculty of ScienceUndergraduateBIOL 361 - Molecular Genetics and Genomics
Department of BiologyFaculty of ScienceUndergraduateBIOL 400 - History of Biology
Department of BiologyFaculty of ScienceUndergraduateBIOL 499A - Honours Thesis I
Department of BiologyFaculty of ScienceUndergraduateBIOL 499B - Honours Thesis II
Department of BiologyFaculty of ScienceGraduateBIOL 560 - Annual Biology Graduate Symposium
Department of BiologyFaculty of ScienceGraduateBIOL 599 - Thesis
Department of BiologyFaculty of ScienceGraduateBIOL 693 - PhD Candicacy Examination
Department of BiologyFaculty of ScienceGraduateBIOL 699 - PhD Dissertation
-Faculty of EngineeringUndergraduateBME 200 - Molecular and Cellular Physiology for Engineers
-Faculty of EngineeringUndergraduateBME 201 - Quantitative Human Physiology
-Faculty of EngineeringUndergraduateBME 403 - Medical Image Processing
-Faculty of EngineeringUndergraduateBME 499 - Design Project
-Peter B. Gustavson School of BusinessGraduateBUS 693 - Doctoral Candidacy Exam
-Peter B. Gustavson School of BusinessGraduateBUS 694 - Thesis Proposal Defence
-Peter B. Gustavson School of BusinessGraduateBUS 695 - Special Topics in Business Administration
--GraduateBUSI 699 -
School of Public AdministrationFaculty of Human and Social DevelopmentGraduateCD 501 - Anchoring a Change Agenda: Foundations
School of Public AdministrationFaculty of Human and Social DevelopmentGraduateCD 510 - Leadership, Management and Governance within Organizations
School of Public AdministrationFaculty of Human and Social DevelopmentGraduateCD 524 - Leadership and Organizational Development for Communities
School of Public AdministrationFaculty of Human and Social DevelopmentGraduateCD 525 - Managing Organizations, Systems and Community Transformations
School of Public AdministrationFaculty of Human and Social DevelopmentGraduateCD 526 - Agenda for Social Change: Moving Forward
School of Public AdministrationFaculty of Human and Social DevelopmentGraduateCD 598 - Master's Project
Department of Electrical and Computer EngineeringFaculty of EngineeringUndergraduateCENG 241 - Digital Design
Department of Electrical and Computer EngineeringFaculty of EngineeringUndergraduateCENG 242 - Discrete Structures in Engineering
Department of Electrical and Computer EngineeringFaculty of EngineeringUndergraduateCENG 299 - Introduction to Electrical and Computer Engineering Design
Department of Electrical and Computer EngineeringFaculty of EngineeringUndergraduateCENG 441 - Design of Digital and VLSI Systems
Department of Electrical and Computer EngineeringFaculty of EngineeringUndergraduateCENG 499 - Design Project II
Department of ChemistryFaculty of ScienceUndergraduateCHEM 091 - Introduction to Chemistry
Department of ChemistryFaculty of ScienceUndergraduateCHEM 101 - Fundamentals of Chemistry I
Department of ChemistryFaculty of ScienceUndergraduateCHEM 222 - Introduction to Inorganic Chemistry
Department of ChemistryFaculty of ScienceUndergraduateCHEM 232 - Organic Chemistry with Biological Applications
Department of ChemistryFaculty of ScienceUndergraduateCHEM 298 - Research Experience
Department of ChemistryFaculty of ScienceUndergraduateCHEM 364 - Physical Chemistry Laboratory
Department of ChemistryFaculty of ScienceUndergraduateCHEM 398 - Research Experience
Department of ChemistryFaculty of ScienceUndergraduateCHEM 399 - Research Experience
Department of ChemistryFaculty of ScienceUndergraduateCHEM 499A - Honours Thesis I
Department of ChemistryFaculty of ScienceUndergraduateCHEM 499B - Honours Thesis II
Department of ChemistryFaculty of ScienceGraduateCHEM 599 - MSc Thesis
Department of ChemistryFaculty of ScienceGraduateCHEM 693 - PhD Candidacy Examination
Department of ChemistryFaculty of ScienceGraduateCHEM 699 - PhD Dissertation
-Faculty of EngineeringUndergraduateCIVE 210 - Sustainable Development in Civil Engineering
-Faculty of EngineeringUndergraduateCIVE 285 - Civil Engineering Materials
-Peter B. Gustavson School of BusinessUndergraduateCOM 220 - Organizational Behaviour
-Peter B. Gustavson School of BusinessUndergraduateCOM 240 - Management Finance
-Peter B. Gustavson School of BusinessUndergraduateCOM 250 - Fundamentals of Marketing
-Peter B. Gustavson School of BusinessUndergraduateCOM 270 - Financial and Management Accounting For Specialists
-Peter B. Gustavson School of BusinessUndergraduateCOM 400 - Strategic Management
-Peter B. Gustavson School of BusinessUndergraduateCOM 402 - Legal Issues in Management
-Peter B. Gustavson School of BusinessUndergraduateCOM 405 - Career Preparation Across Borders
-Peter B. Gustavson School of BusinessUndergraduateCOM 410 - Leadership Strategies
-Peter B. Gustavson School of BusinessUndergraduateCOM 425 - Taxation for Managers
-Peter B. Gustavson School of BusinessUndergraduateCOM 426 - Management Accounting II
-Peter B. Gustavson School of BusinessUndergraduateCOM 435 - Corporate Relations and Responsibilities
-Peter B. Gustavson School of BusinessUndergraduateCOM 445 - Corporate Finance
-Peter B. Gustavson School of BusinessUndergraduateCOM 446 - Investments
-Peter B. Gustavson School of BusinessUndergraduateCOM 450 - Selected Topics in Management
-Peter B. Gustavson School of BusinessUndergraduateCOM 495 - Marketing Communications
Diploma Program in Canadian StudiesInterdisciplinary ProgramsUndergraduateCS 101 - Introduction to Canadian Culture
Department of Computer ScienceFaculty of EngineeringUndergraduateCSC 106 - The Practice of Computer Science
Department of Computer ScienceFaculty of EngineeringUndergraduateCSC 110 - Fundamentals of Programming I
Department of Computer ScienceFaculty of EngineeringUndergraduateCSC 115 - Fundamentals of Programming II
Department of Computer ScienceFaculty of EngineeringUndergraduateCSC 225 - Algorithms and Data Structures I
Department of Computer ScienceFaculty of EngineeringUndergraduateCSC 230 - Introduction to Computer Architecture
Department of Computer ScienceFaculty of EngineeringUndergraduateCSC 320 - Foundations of Computer Science
Department of Computer ScienceFaculty of EngineeringUndergraduateCSC 360 - Operating Systems
Department of Computer ScienceFaculty of EngineeringUndergraduateCSC 370 - Database Systems
Department of Computer ScienceFaculty of EngineeringUndergraduateCSC 426 - Computational Geometry
Department of Computer ScienceFaculty of EngineeringUndergraduateCSC 429 - Cryptography
Department of Computer ScienceFaculty of EngineeringUndergraduateCSC 466 - Overlay and Peer-to-Peer Networking
Department of Computer ScienceFaculty of EngineeringUndergraduateCSC 485A - Topics in Systems
Department of Computer ScienceFaculty of EngineeringGraduateCSC 526 - Computational Geometry
Department of Computer ScienceFaculty of EngineeringGraduateCSC 529 - Cryptography
Department of Computer ScienceFaculty of EngineeringGraduateCSC 579 - Overlay and Peer-to-Peer Networking
Department of Computer ScienceFaculty of EngineeringGraduateCSC 586A - Topics in Computer Systems and Software
Department of Computer ScienceFaculty of EngineeringGraduateCSC 597 - Industrial Master's Project
Department of Computer ScienceFaculty of EngineeringGraduateCSC 598 - Master's Project
Department of Computer ScienceFaculty of EngineeringGraduateCSC 599 - Master's Thesis
Department of Computer ScienceFaculty of EngineeringGraduateCSC 693 - PhD Candidacy
Department of Computer ScienceFaculty of EngineeringGraduateCSC 699 - PhD Dissertation
School of Child and Youth CareFaculty of Human and Social DevelopmentUndergraduateCYC 166A - Lifespan Development (Conception to Late Childhood)
School of Child and Youth CareFaculty of Human and Social DevelopmentUndergraduateCYC 210 - Supervised Practicum I
School of Child and Youth CareFaculty of Human and Social DevelopmentUndergraduateCYC 310 - Supervised Practicum II
School of Child and Youth CareFaculty of Human and Social DevelopmentUndergraduateCYC 310A - Child and Youth Care Practicum by Prior Learning Assessment (PLA)
School of Child and Youth CareFaculty of Human and Social DevelopmentUndergraduateCYC 370 - Applying Assessment and Case Planning in Child and Youth Care Practice
School of Child and Youth CareFaculty of Human and Social DevelopmentUndergraduateCYC 410A - Advanced Supervised Block Practicum
School of Child and Youth CareFaculty of Human and Social DevelopmentUndergraduateCYC 423 - Research Methods in Child and Youth Care
School of Child and Youth CareFaculty of Human and Social DevelopmentUndergraduateCYC 424 - Qualitative and Quantitative Analysis in Child and Youth Care
School of Child and Youth CareFaculty of Human and Social DevelopmentUndergraduateCYC 461 - Child Life Practice in Hospitals and Community Settings
School of Child and Youth CareFaculty of Human and Social DevelopmentUndergraduateCYC 475 - Advanced Child and Youth Care Practice with Families and Groups
School of Child and Youth CareFaculty of Human and Social DevelopmentGraduateCYC 546 - Human Change Processes: From Theory to Practice
School of Child and Youth CareFaculty of Human and Social DevelopmentGraduateCYC 552 - Ethics in Practice
School of Child and Youth CareFaculty of Human and Social DevelopmentGraduateCYC 553 - Practicum in Child and Youth Care
School of Child and Youth CareFaculty of Human and Social DevelopmentGraduateCYC 562 - Special Topics in Child and Youth Care Intervention
School of Child and Youth CareFaculty of Human and Social DevelopmentGraduateCYC 563 - Specialized Practicum in Child and Youth Care
School of Child and Youth CareFaculty of Human and Social DevelopmentGraduateCYC 598 - Applied Research Project
School of Child and Youth CareFaculty of Human and Social DevelopmentGraduateCYC 599 - Thesis
School of Child and Youth CareFaculty of Human and Social DevelopmentGraduateCYC 682A - Internship in Child and Youth Care Research
School of Child and Youth CareFaculty of Human and Social DevelopmentGraduateCYC 682B - Practice Internship in Child and Youth Care
School of Child and Youth CareFaculty of Human and Social DevelopmentGraduateCYC 693 - Candidacy Exams
School of Child and Youth CareFaculty of Human and Social DevelopmentGraduateCYC 699 - PhD Dissertation
Master of Arts in Dispute ResolutionFaculty of Human and Social DevelopmentGraduateDR 506 - Mediation Processes and Skills
Master of Arts in Dispute ResolutionFaculty of Human and Social DevelopmentGraduateDR 509 - Dispute Resolution System Design and Public Interest Disputes
Master of Arts in Dispute ResolutionFaculty of Human and Social DevelopmentGraduateDR 598 - Master's Project
Master of Arts in Dispute ResolutionFaculty of Human and Social DevelopmentGraduateDR 599 - Master's Thesis
School of Public Health and Social PolicyFaculty of Human and Social DevelopmentUndergraduateDSST 441 - Enabling Technologies
Department of EconomicsFaculty of Social SciencesUndergraduateECON 103 - Principles of Microeconomics
Department of EconomicsFaculty of Social SciencesUndergraduateECON 104 - Principles of Macroeconomics
Department of EconomicsFaculty of Social SciencesUndergraduateECON 180 - Introduction to Principles of Microeconomics and Financial Project Evaluation
Department of EconomicsFaculty of Social SciencesUndergraduateECON 203 - Intermediate Microeconomics I
Department of EconomicsFaculty of Social SciencesUndergraduateECON 204 - Intermediate Macroeconomics
Department of EconomicsFaculty of Social SciencesUndergraduateECON 225 - Writing for Economists
Department of EconomicsFaculty of Social SciencesUndergraduateECON 245 - Descriptive Statistics and Probability
Department of EconomicsFaculty of Social SciencesUndergraduateECON 246 - Statistical Inference
Department of EconomicsFaculty of Social SciencesUndergraduateECON 306 - International Economics
Department of EconomicsFaculty of Social SciencesUndergraduateECON 320 - Economic Development
Department of EconomicsFaculty of Social SciencesUndergraduateECON 321 - The Economic History of Canada
Department of EconomicsFaculty of Social SciencesUndergraduateECON 325 - Public Economics
Department of EconomicsFaculty of Social SciencesUndergraduateECON 345 - Applied Econometrics
Department of EconomicsFaculty of Social SciencesUndergraduateECON 350 - Mathematical Economics I: An Introduction to Static Methods
Department of EconomicsFaculty of Social SciencesUndergraduateECON 422 - Issues in European Economic Integration
Department of EconomicsFaculty of Social SciencesGraduateECON 548 - Applied Econometric Modelling
Department of EconomicsFaculty of Social SciencesGraduateECON 598 - Extended Essay
Department of EconomicsFaculty of Social SciencesGraduateECON 599 - Thesis
Department of EconomicsFaculty of Social SciencesGraduateECON 693 - PhD Candidacy Examinations
Department of EconomicsFaculty of Social SciencesGraduateECON 699 - Dissertation
Department of Curriculum and InstructionFaculty of EducationUndergraduateEDCI 208 - Studio Piano Class I
Department of Curriculum and InstructionFaculty of EducationUndergraduateEDCI 303 - Historical and Philosophical Foundations of Canadian Education
Department of Curriculum and InstructionFaculty of EducationUndergraduateEDCI 308 - Studio Piano Class II
Department of Curriculum and InstructionFaculty of EducationUndergraduateEDCI 311 - Studio Guitar Class: I
Department of Curriculum and InstructionFaculty of EducationUndergraduateEDCI 312 - Studio Guitar Class: II
Department of Curriculum and InstructionFaculty of EducationUndergraduateEDCI 335 - Learning Design
Department of Curriculum and InstructionFaculty of EducationUndergraduateEDCI 337 - Interactive &amp; Multimedia Learning
Department of Curriculum and InstructionFaculty of EducationUndergraduateEDCI 339 - Distributed and Open Learning
Department of Curriculum and InstructionFaculty of EducationUndergraduateEDCI 404 - Curriculum and Instruction in Elementary or Middle School Social Studies
Department of Curriculum and InstructionFaculty of EducationUndergraduateEDCI 410 - Literacy in the Digital Age
Department of Curriculum and InstructionFaculty of EducationUndergraduateEDCI 452 - Cultural Studies in Education
Department of Curriculum and InstructionFaculty of EducationUndergraduateEDCI 463 - Visual Thinking
Department of Curriculum and InstructionFaculty of EducationUndergraduateEDCI 476 - Organization and Instruction in French Immersion
Department of Curriculum and InstructionFaculty of EducationUndergraduateEDCI 487 - Special Topics in Education
Department of Curriculum and InstructionFaculty of EducationUndergraduateEDCI 499 - Professional Development - Curriculum and Instruction
Department of Curriculum and InstructionFaculty of EducationGraduateEDCI 510 - Research Issues and Studio Development in Art
Department of Curriculum and InstructionFaculty of EducationGraduateEDCI 512B - Digital Presentation
Department of Curriculum and InstructionFaculty of EducationGraduateEDCI 517 - Reading Processes in the School Curriculum: Research and Processes
Department of Curriculum and InstructionFaculty of EducationGraduateEDCI 531 - Critical Discourses in Curriculum Studies
Department of Curriculum and InstructionFaculty of EducationGraduateEDCI 556 - Language Processes in the School Curriculum: Writing and Representing
Department of Curriculum and InstructionFaculty of EducationGraduateEDCI 570 - Research in Curriculum and Instruction in the Elementary Grades
Department of Curriculum and InstructionFaculty of EducationGraduateEDCI 580 - Qualitative Research Methods
Department of Curriculum and InstructionFaculty of EducationGraduateEDCI 591 - Selected Topics in Curriculum and Instruction
Department of Curriculum and InstructionFaculty of EducationGraduateEDCI 597 - Comprehensive Examination
Department of Curriculum and InstructionFaculty of EducationGraduateEDCI 598A - Project Proposal and Literature Review
Department of Curriculum and InstructionFaculty of EducationGraduateEDCI 598B - Project
Department of Curriculum and InstructionFaculty of EducationGraduateEDCI 599 - Thesis - Curriculum and Instruction
Department of Curriculum and InstructionFaculty of EducationGraduateEDCI 693 - Candidacy Examination - Curriculum and Instruction
Department of Curriculum and InstructionFaculty of EducationGraduateEDCI 699 - PhD Dissertation - Curriculum and Instruction
Department of Curriculum and InstructionFaculty of EducationGraduateEDCI 787 - Cross-curricular Inquiry Strategies
Department of Educational Psychology and Leadership StudiesFaculty of EducationUndergraduateED-D 408 - Promoting Prosocial Behaviour: Strategies and Management
Department of Educational Psychology and Leadership StudiesFaculty of EducationUndergraduateED-D 414 - Group Processes
Department of Educational Psychology and Leadership StudiesFaculty of EducationUndergraduateED-D 415 - Learning Difficulties: Assessment and Intervention
Department of Educational Psychology and Leadership StudiesFaculty of EducationUndergraduateED-D 417 - Skills for Effective Interpersonal Communication
Department of Educational Psychology and Leadership StudiesFaculty of EducationUndergraduateED-D 418 - Introduction to Theories of Counselling
Department of Educational Psychology and Leadership StudiesFaculty of EducationUndergraduateED-D 420 - Learning Support: Context and Key Issues
Department of Educational Psychology and Leadership StudiesFaculty of EducationUndergraduateED-D 424 - Teaching Students with Developmental Disabilities
Department of Educational Psychology and Leadership StudiesFaculty of EducationUndergraduateED-D 425 - Assistive Technology in the Inclusive Classroom
Department of Educational Psychology and Leadership StudiesFaculty of EducationGraduateED-D 503 - Program Development and Evaluation
Department of Educational Psychology and Leadership StudiesFaculty of EducationGraduateED-D 514 - Assessment in Counselling
Department of Educational Psychology and Leadership StudiesFaculty of EducationGraduateED-D 516 - Advanced Intervention in Special Education
Department of Educational Psychology and Leadership StudiesFaculty of EducationGraduateED-D 518 - Advanced Seminar in Theories of Counselling Psychology
Department of Educational Psychology and Leadership StudiesFaculty of EducationUndergraduateED-D 519A -
Department of Educational Psychology and Leadership StudiesFaculty of EducationUndergraduateED-D 519C -
Department of Educational Psychology and Leadership StudiesFaculty of EducationUndergraduateED-D 519D -
Department of Educational Psychology and Leadership StudiesFaculty of EducationUndergraduateED-D 519H -
Department of Educational Psychology and Leadership StudiesFaculty of EducationUndergraduateED-D 519L -
Department of Educational Psychology and Leadership StudiesFaculty of EducationUndergraduateED-D 519P -
Department of Educational Psychology and Leadership StudiesFaculty of EducationUndergraduateED-D 519S -
Department of Educational Psychology and Leadership StudiesFaculty of EducationGraduateED-D 521 - Theory and Practice in Family Counselling
Department of Educational Psychology and Leadership StudiesFaculty of EducationGraduateED-D 522 - Skills and Practice for Counselling
Department of Educational Psychology and Leadership StudiesFaculty of EducationGraduateED-D 523 - Internship in Counselling
Department of Educational Psychology and Leadership StudiesFaculty of EducationGraduateED-D 531 - Concepts and Theory of Organization
Department of Educational Psychology and Leadership StudiesFaculty of EducationUndergraduateED-D 533A -
Department of Educational Psychology and Leadership StudiesFaculty of EducationUndergraduateED-D 533D -
Department of Educational Psychology and Leadership StudiesFaculty of EducationGraduateED-D 535 - Global Comparative Perspectives on Leadership and Education
Department of Educational Psychology and Leadership StudiesFaculty of EducationGraduateED-D 540 - Women, Learning and Leadership
Department of Educational Psychology and Leadership StudiesFaculty of EducationUndergraduateED-D 541 - Leadership in Rural Education
Department of Educational Psychology and Leadership StudiesFaculty of EducationGraduateED-D 561A - Methods in Educational Research
Department of Educational Psychology and Leadership StudiesFaculty of EducationGraduateED-D 561B - Research Methods in Leadership
Department of Educational Psychology and Leadership StudiesFaculty of EducationGraduateED-D 570 - Instruction and Technologies to Promote Self-Regulated Learning and Strategy Use
Department of Educational Psychology and Leadership StudiesFaculty of EducationUndergraduateED-D 591D -
Department of Educational Psychology and Leadership StudiesFaculty of EducationUndergraduateED-D 591E -
Department of Educational Psychology and Leadership StudiesFaculty of EducationGraduateED-D 597 - Comprehensive Examination - Educational Psychology and Leadership Studies
Department of Educational Psychology and Leadership StudiesFaculty of EducationGraduateED-D 598 - Project - Educational Psychology and Leadership Studies
Department of Educational Psychology and Leadership StudiesFaculty of EducationGraduateED-D 599 - Thesis - Educational Psychology and Leadership Studies
Department of Educational Psychology and Leadership StudiesFaculty of EducationGraduateED-D 693 - Doctoral Candidacy Exam in Educational Psychology
Department of Educational Psychology and Leadership StudiesFaculty of EducationGraduateED-D 699 - PhD Dissertation
-Faculty of EducationUndergraduateED-P 490 - Transformative Inquiry
Department of Electrical and Computer EngineeringFaculty of EngineeringUndergraduateELEC 216 - Electricity and Magnetism
Department of Electrical and Computer EngineeringFaculty of EngineeringUndergraduateELEC 220 - Electrical Properties of Materials
Department of Electrical and Computer EngineeringFaculty of EngineeringUndergraduateELEC 250 - Linear Circuits I
Department of Electrical and Computer EngineeringFaculty of EngineeringUndergraduateELEC 260 - Continuous-Time Signals and Systems
Department of Electrical and Computer EngineeringFaculty of EngineeringUndergraduateELEC 299 - Introduction to Electrical and Computer Engineering Design
Department of Electrical and Computer EngineeringFaculty of EngineeringUndergraduateELEC 310 - Digital Signal Processing I
Department of Electrical and Computer EngineeringFaculty of EngineeringUndergraduateELEC 403 - Engineering Design by Optimization
Department of Electrical and Computer EngineeringFaculty of EngineeringUndergraduateELEC 404 - Microwaves and Fiber Optics
Department of Electrical and Computer EngineeringFaculty of EngineeringUndergraduateELEC 410 - Power Electronics
Department of Electrical and Computer EngineeringFaculty of EngineeringUndergraduateELEC 435 - Medical Image Processing
Department of Electrical and Computer EngineeringFaculty of EngineeringUndergraduateELEC 450 - Communications Theory and Systems II
Department of Electrical and Computer EngineeringFaculty of EngineeringUndergraduateELEC 452 - Optical Communication Technology
Department of Electrical and Computer EngineeringFaculty of EngineeringUndergraduateELEC 456 - Wireless and Mobile Communications
Department of Electrical and Computer EngineeringFaculty of EngineeringUndergraduateELEC 466 - System-on-Chip Engineering for Signal Processing
Department of Electrical and Computer EngineeringFaculty of EngineeringUndergraduateELEC 484 - Audio Signal Processing
Department of Electrical and Computer EngineeringFaculty of EngineeringUndergraduateELEC 486 - Multiresolution Signal and Geometry Processing with Software Applications
Department of Electrical and Computer EngineeringFaculty of EngineeringUndergraduateELEC 499 - Design Project II
Department of Electrical and Computer EngineeringFaculty of EngineeringGraduateELEC 503 - Engineering Design by Optimization I
Department of Electrical and Computer EngineeringFaculty of EngineeringGraduateELEC 509 - Seminar
Department of Electrical and Computer EngineeringFaculty of EngineeringGraduateELEC 512 - Digital Communications
Department of Electrical and Computer EngineeringFaculty of EngineeringGraduateELEC 543 - Design of Digital and VLSI Systems
Department of Electrical and Computer EngineeringFaculty of EngineeringGraduateELEC 568 - System-on-Chip Engineering for Signal Processing
Department of Electrical and Computer EngineeringFaculty of EngineeringGraduateELEC 569A - Selected Topics in Computer Engineering
Department of Electrical and Computer EngineeringFaculty of EngineeringGraduateELEC 581 - Power Electronics
Department of Electrical and Computer EngineeringFaculty of EngineeringGraduateELEC 586 - Multiresolution Signal and Geometry Processing with Software Applications
Department of Electrical and Computer EngineeringFaculty of EngineeringGraduateELEC 598 - MEng Project
Department of Electrical and Computer EngineeringFaculty of EngineeringGraduateELEC 599 - MASc Thesis
Department of Electrical and Computer EngineeringFaculty of EngineeringGraduateELEC 609 - Seminar
Department of Electrical and Computer EngineeringFaculty of EngineeringGraduateELEC 693 - PhD Candidacy Examination
Department of Electrical and Computer EngineeringFaculty of EngineeringGraduateELEC 699 - PhD Dissertation
Department of EnglishFaculty of HumanitiesUndergraduateENGL 135 - Academic Reading and Writing
Department of EnglishFaculty of HumanitiesUndergraduateENGL 146 - The Literature of Our Era
Department of EnglishFaculty of HumanitiesUndergraduateENGL 200A - English Literature to 1660
Department of EnglishFaculty of HumanitiesUndergraduateENGL 366C - Shakespeare: Comedies, Problem Plays, and Romances
Department of EnglishFaculty of HumanitiesUndergraduateENGL 437B - Modern Drama Since World War II
Department of EnglishFaculty of HumanitiesGraduateENGL 503 - Special Studies I
Department of EnglishFaculty of HumanitiesGraduateENGL 598 - Master's Essay
Department of EnglishFaculty of HumanitiesGraduateENGL 599 - MA Traditional or Alternative Thesis
Department of EnglishFaculty of HumanitiesGraduateENGL 693 - Candidacy Examination
Department of EnglishFaculty of HumanitiesGraduateENGL 699 - PhD Dissertation
-Faculty of EngineeringUndergraduateENGR 297 - Technology and Society
-Faculty of EngineeringUndergraduateENGR 446 - Technical Report
-Peter B. Gustavson School of BusinessUndergraduateENT 402 - Entrepreneurship and Small Business for the Non-Specialist
-Peter B. Gustavson School of BusinessUndergraduateENT 410 - Venture Marketing Expertise (Promise Skills)
-Peter B. Gustavson School of BusinessUndergraduateENT 411 - Venture Planning/Finance Expertise (Planning Skills)
-Peter B. Gustavson School of BusinessUndergraduateENT 412 - Acquiring Expert Venture Cognitions
-Peter B. Gustavson School of BusinessUndergraduateENT 413 - Portfolio Practicum
School of Earth and Ocean SciencesFaculty of ScienceUndergraduateEOS 300 - Earth Science Field School
School of Earth and Ocean SciencesFaculty of ScienceUndergraduateEOS 400 - Advanced Field Geology
School of Earth and Ocean SciencesFaculty of ScienceUndergraduateEOS 499A - Honours Thesis I
School of Earth and Ocean SciencesFaculty of ScienceUndergraduateEOS 499B - Honours Thesis II
School of Earth and Ocean SciencesFaculty of ScienceGraduateEOS 599 - MSc Thesis
School of Earth and Ocean SciencesFaculty of ScienceGraduateEOS 693 - PhD Candidacy Examination
School of Earth and Ocean SciencesFaculty of ScienceGraduateEOS 699 - PhD Dissertation
School of Exercise Science, Physical and Health EducationFaculty of EducationUndergraduateEPHE 134 - Yoga
School of Exercise Science, Physical and Health EducationFaculty of EducationUndergraduateEPHE 142 - Personal Health, Wellness and Potential
School of Exercise Science, Physical and Health EducationFaculty of EducationUndergraduateEPHE 155 - Introduction to Nutrition: Concepts and Controversies
School of Exercise Science, Physical and Health EducationFaculty of EducationUndergraduateEPHE 346 - Motor Development and Physical Maturation
School of Exercise Science, Physical and Health EducationFaculty of EducationUndergraduateEPHE 356 - Principles of Facility Administration
School of Exercise Science, Physical and Health EducationFaculty of EducationUndergraduateEPHE 359 - Fiscal and Legal Management in Recreation and Health
School of Exercise Science, Physical and Health EducationFaculty of EducationGraduateEPHE 572 - Physiology in Physical Education and Sport
School of Exercise Science, Physical and Health EducationFaculty of EducationGraduateEPHE 575 - Applied Sport Psychology
School of Exercise Science, Physical and Health EducationFaculty of EducationGraduateEPHE 576 - Teaching and Coaching Effectiveness in Physical Education and Sport
School of Exercise Science, Physical and Health EducationFaculty of EducationGraduateEPHE 577 - Research Methods and Techniques in Coaching Studies
School of Exercise Science, Physical and Health EducationFaculty of EducationGraduateEPHE 579 - Current Issues in Coaching Studies
School of Exercise Science, Physical and Health EducationFaculty of EducationGraduateEPHE 585 - Qualitative Research Genres Applied to Education, Health and Society
School of Exercise Science, Physical and Health EducationFaculty of EducationGraduateEPHE 591 - Selected Topics in Exercise Science, Physical and Health Education
School of Exercise Science, Physical and Health EducationFaculty of EducationGraduateEPHE 597 - Comprehensive Examination - Exercise Science, Physical and Health Education
School of Exercise Science, Physical and Health EducationFaculty of EducationGraduateEPHE 598 - Project - Exercise Science, Physical and Health Education
School of Exercise Science, Physical and Health EducationFaculty of EducationGraduateEPHE 599 - Thesis - Exercise Science, Physical and Health Education
School of Exercise Science, Physical and Health EducationFaculty of EducationGraduateEPHE 693 - Candidacy Exam - Kinesiology
School of Exercise Science, Physical and Health EducationFaculty of EducationGraduateEPHE 699 - PhD Dissertation - Kinesiology
School of Environmental StudiesFaculty of Social SciencesUndergraduateER 312A - Field Study in Ecological Restoration I
School of Environmental StudiesFaculty of Social SciencesUndergraduateER 329 - Mining Restoration
School of Environmental StudiesFaculty of Social SciencesUndergraduateER 390 - Environmental Restoration Project
School of Environmental StudiesFaculty of Social SciencesUndergraduateER 400 - Seminar in Environmental Restoration
School of Environmental StudiesFaculty of Social SciencesUndergraduateER 411 - Advanced Principles and Concepts of Ecological Restoration
School of Environmental StudiesFaculty of Social SciencesUndergraduateES 200 - Introduction to Environmental Studies
School of Environmental StudiesFaculty of Social SciencesUndergraduateES 301 - Political Ecology
School of Environmental StudiesFaculty of Social SciencesUndergraduateES 370 - Intermediate Field Study
School of Environmental StudiesFaculty of Social SciencesUndergraduateES 380 - Environmental Topics: Topics in Political Ecology
School of Environmental StudiesFaculty of Social SciencesUndergraduateES 382 - Environmental Topics: Topics in Ecological Restoration
School of Environmental StudiesFaculty of Social SciencesUndergraduateES 402 - Global Issues in Sustainability
School of Environmental StudiesFaculty of Social SciencesUndergraduateES 403 - Field Course in Environmental Law and Sustainability
School of Environmental StudiesFaculty of Social SciencesUndergraduateES 415 - Integral Systems Theory: Philosophy and Practice
School of Environmental StudiesFaculty of Social SciencesUndergraduateES 441 - Advanced Principles and Concepts in Ecological Restoration
School of Environmental StudiesFaculty of Social SciencesGraduateES 593 - Thesis Proposal Preparation
School of Environmental StudiesFaculty of Social SciencesGraduateES 599 - MA, MSc Thesis
School of Environmental StudiesFaculty of Social SciencesGraduateES 693 - PhD Candidacy Examination
School of Environmental StudiesFaculty of Social SciencesGraduateES 699 - PhD Dissertation
Department of BiologyFaculty of ScienceGraduateFORB 560 - Forest Biology Seminar
Department of FrenchFaculty of HumanitiesUndergraduateFRAN 100 - Intensive French I
Department of FrenchFaculty of HumanitiesUndergraduateFRAN 250 - Experiential Learning
Department of FrenchFaculty of HumanitiesUndergraduateFRAN 275 - Writing in French I
Department of FrenchFaculty of HumanitiesUndergraduateFRAN 325 - Studies in the Cultures of the French-speaking World (in English)
Department of FrenchFaculty of HumanitiesUndergraduateFRAN 475 - Modern French
Department of FrenchFaculty of HumanitiesGraduateFRAN 598 - Reading List/Oral
Department of FrenchFaculty of HumanitiesGraduateFRAN 599 - Thesis/Oral
Department of GeographyFaculty of Social SciencesUndergraduateGEOG 103 - Introduction to Physical Geography
Department of GeographyFaculty of Social SciencesUndergraduateGEOG 222 - Introduction to Maps and GIS
Department of GeographyFaculty of Social SciencesUndergraduateGEOG 306 - Geography of Canada
Department of GeographyFaculty of Social SciencesUndergraduateGEOG 314 - Global Environment Change and Human Response
Department of GeographyFaculty of Social SciencesUndergraduateGEOG 325 - Field Surveying
Department of GeographyFaculty of Social SciencesUndergraduateGEOG 391 - Topics in Geography
Department of GeographyFaculty of Social SciencesUndergraduateGEOG 424 - Field Studies in Coastal Geomorphology
Department of GeographyFaculty of Social SciencesUndergraduateGEOG 456 - Wildlife Conservation
Department of GeographyFaculty of Social SciencesUndergraduateGEOG 457 - Marine Protected Areas
Department of GeographyFaculty of Social SciencesUndergraduateGEOG 474 - Field Studies in Biogeography
Department of GeographyFaculty of Social SciencesUndergraduateGEOG 499A - Honours Thesis
Department of GeographyFaculty of Social SciencesUndergraduateGEOG 499B - Honours Thesis
Department of GeographyFaculty of Social SciencesGraduateGEOG 599 - MA, MSc Thesis
Department of GeographyFaculty of Social SciencesGraduateGEOG 693 - Candidacy Examination
Department of GeographyFaculty of Social SciencesGraduateGEOG 699 - PhD Dissertation
Department of Germanic and Slavic StudiesFaculty of HumanitiesUndergraduateGMST 410 - Special Topics
Department of Germanic and Slavic StudiesFaculty of HumanitiesGraduateGMST 599 - Thesis
Department of Greek and Roman StudiesFaculty of HumanitiesUndergraduateGRS 495 - Practicum in Archaeology
Department of Greek and Roman StudiesFaculty of HumanitiesGraduateGRS 599 - MA Thesis
Department of Greek and Roman StudiesFaculty of HumanitiesGraduateGRS 601B - Readings in Classical Literature (Latin)
Department of Greek and Roman StudiesFaculty of HumanitiesGraduateGRS 699 - PhD Dissertation
Department of History in ArtFaculty of Fine ArtsUndergraduateHA 300A - Masterpieces of Art and Architecture
Department of History in ArtFaculty of Fine ArtsUndergraduateHA 310D - Environmental Art
Department of History in ArtFaculty of Fine ArtsUndergraduateHA 363 - The Cinema and Modern Art Movements
Department of History in ArtFaculty of Fine ArtsUndergraduateHA 392 - Special Topics in History in Art
Department of History in ArtFaculty of Fine ArtsUndergraduateHA 488G - Public Programming
Department of History in ArtFaculty of Fine ArtsUndergraduateHA 488H - Topics in Museum Studies
Department of History in ArtFaculty of Fine ArtsUndergraduateHA 488M - Topics in Cultural Management
Department of History in ArtFaculty of Fine ArtsUndergraduateHA 488P - Human Resource Management in Cultural Organizations
Department of History in ArtFaculty of Fine ArtsUndergraduateHA 489A - Heritage Area Conservation
Department of History in ArtFaculty of Fine ArtsUndergraduateHA 489E - Topics in Heritage Conservation
School of Health Information ScienceFaculty of Human and Social DevelopmentUndergraduateHINF 310 - Electronic Records and Decision Support Systems
School of Health Information ScienceFaculty of Human and Social DevelopmentUndergraduateHINF 330 - Legal Issues in Health Informatics
School of Health Information ScienceFaculty of Human and Social DevelopmentUndergraduateHINF 345 - Networks, Interoperability and Systems Security
School of Health Information ScienceFaculty of Human and Social DevelopmentUndergraduateHINF 351 - Information Technology Procurement
School of Health Information ScienceFaculty of Human and Social DevelopmentUndergraduateHINF 371 - Clinical Methodologies
School of Health Information ScienceFaculty of Human and Social DevelopmentGraduateHINF 591 - Topics in Health Informatics
School of Health Information ScienceFaculty of Human and Social DevelopmentGraduateHINF 598 - Research Project
School of Health Information ScienceFaculty of Human and Social DevelopmentGraduateHINF 599 - Health Informatics Thesis
School of Health Information ScienceFaculty of Human and Social DevelopmentGraduateHINF 693 - Candidacy Exam
School of Health Information ScienceFaculty of Human and Social DevelopmentGraduateHINF 699 - Dissertation
School of Public Health and Social PolicyFaculty of Human and Social DevelopmentUndergraduateHLTH 351 - Practice of Evaluation Research
School of Public Health and Social PolicyFaculty of Human and Social DevelopmentUndergraduateHLTH 360 - Health Literacy and System Navigation
Interdisciplinary CoursesFaculty of Human and Social DevelopmentUndergraduateHSD 460 - Special Topics in Human and Social Development
Interdisciplinary CoursesFaculty of Human and Social DevelopmentGraduateHSD 580 - Special Topics in Human and Social Development
Department of HistoryFaculty of HumanitiesUndergraduateHSTR 115 - The Second World War
Department of HistoryFaculty of HumanitiesUndergraduateHSTR 308 - The United States and Vietnam
Department of HistoryFaculty of HumanitiesUndergraduateHSTR 310C - American History in Film
Department of HistoryFaculty of HumanitiesUndergraduateHSTR 330D - Drink and Social Control in Canada
Department of HistoryFaculty of HumanitiesUndergraduateHSTR 350B - Weimar and Nazi Germany
Department of HistoryFaculty of HumanitiesUndergraduateHSTR 370 - Topics in World and Comparative History
Department of HistoryFaculty of HumanitiesUndergraduateHSTR 379 - Western Imperialism in the Middle East and North Africa
Department of HistoryFaculty of HumanitiesGraduateHSTR 528 - Field School in Ethnohistory
Department of HistoryFaculty of HumanitiesGraduateHSTR 550 - Non-Thesis MA Historiography/Research Methods
Department of HistoryFaculty of HumanitiesGraduateHSTR 598 - MA Major Research Paper
Department of HistoryFaculty of HumanitiesGraduateHSTR 599 - MA Thesis
Department of HistoryFaculty of HumanitiesGraduateHSTR 693 - PhD Candidacy Examinations
Department of HistoryFaculty of HumanitiesGraduateHSTR 699 - PhD Thesis
-Peter B. Gustavson School of BusinessUndergraduateIB 409 - Selected Topics in International Business Management
-Peter B. Gustavson School of BusinessUndergraduateIB 415 - Cross-National Management
-Peter B. Gustavson School of BusinessUndergraduateIB 416 - International Marketing
-Peter B. Gustavson School of BusinessUndergraduateIB 417 - International Finance
-Faculty of EducationUndergraduateIED 371 - The History of Indigenous Education in Canada
-Faculty of EducationUndergraduateIED 374 - Indigenous Pedagogies
-Faculty of EducationUndergraduateIED 387 - Special Topics in Indigenous Education
-Faculty of EducationUndergraduateIED 473 - CENENITEL TW TOLNEW: Helping each other to learn
-Faculty of EducationGraduateIED 530 - Indigenous Research Methods
-Faculty of EducationGraduateIED 597 - Comprehensive Examination
-Faculty of EducationGraduateIED 598 - Major Project
-Faculty of EducationGraduateIED 599 - Thesis
Diploma in Intercultural Education and TrainingInterdisciplinary ProgramsUndergraduateIET 400 - Practicum in Intercultural Education
Diploma in Intercultural Education and TrainingInterdisciplinary ProgramsUndergraduateIET 410 - Final Project in Intercultural Education
MA in Indigenous GovernanceFaculty of Human and Social DevelopmentGraduateIGOV 598 - Community Governance Project
MA in Indigenous GovernanceFaculty of Human and Social DevelopmentGraduateIGOV 699 -
School of Public Health and Social PolicyFaculty of Human and Social DevelopmentUndergraduateINGH 453 - Wise Practices in Indigenous Community Health
School of Public Health and Social PolicyFaculty of Human and Social DevelopmentGraduateINGH 520 - Community Engagement and Leadership
School of Public Health and Social PolicyFaculty of Human and Social DevelopmentGraduateINGH 522 - Indigenous Health Research Methodologies
School of Public Health and Social PolicyFaculty of Human and Social DevelopmentUndergraduateINTS 460 - Foundations in International and Global Health and Human Development
Department of Hispanic and Italian StudiesFaculty of HumanitiesUndergraduateITAL 149 - Beginners' Italian
Department of Hispanic and Italian StudiesFaculty of HumanitiesGraduateITAL 598 - Master's Essay
-Faculty of LawUndergraduateLAW 301 - The Administrative Law Process
-Faculty of LawUndergraduateLAW 307B -
-Faculty of LawUndergraduateLAW 309 - The Law of Evidence
-Faculty of LawUndergraduateLAW 315 - Business Associations
-Faculty of LawUndergraduateLAW 343 - Contemporary Issues in Law
-Faculty of LawUndergraduateLAW 349 - Business Law Clinic
-Faculty of LawUndergraduateLAW 350 - Clinical Term
-Faculty of LawUndergraduateLAW 353 - Environmental Law Centre Clinic
-Faculty of LawUndergraduateLAW 384 - Field Course in Environmental Law and Sustainability
-Faculty of LawUndergraduateLAW 388 - Advanced Legal Research and Writing
-Faculty of LawUndergraduateLAW 399 - Supervised Research and Writing
-Faculty of LawGraduateLAW 598 - Major Research Paper in Law
-Faculty of LawGraduateLAW 599 - LLM Thesis
-Faculty of LawGraduateLAW 693 - PhD Candidacy Examinations
-Faculty of LawGraduateLAW 699 - PhD Dissertation
Department of LinguisticsFaculty of HumanitiesUndergraduateLING 100A - Introduction to Linguistics I
Department of LinguisticsFaculty of HumanitiesUndergraduateLING 345 - Sign Language as Language
Department of LinguisticsFaculty of HumanitiesUndergraduateLING 370A - Psycholinguistics
Department of LinguisticsFaculty of HumanitiesUndergraduateLING 390 - The Growth of Modern English
Department of LinguisticsFaculty of HumanitiesGraduateLING 574 - Seminar in Applied Linguistics
Department of LinguisticsFaculty of HumanitiesGraduateLING 598 - Major Research Paper
Department of LinguisticsFaculty of HumanitiesGraduateLING 599 - MA Thesis
Department of LinguisticsFaculty of HumanitiesGraduateLING 693 - Candidacy Examination
Department of LinguisticsFaculty of HumanitiesGraduateLING 699 - PhD Dissertation
Department of Mathematics and StatisticsFaculty of ScienceUndergraduateMATH 100 - Calculus I
Department of Mathematics and StatisticsFaculty of ScienceUndergraduateMATH 101 - Calculus II
Department of Mathematics and StatisticsFaculty of ScienceUndergraduateMATH 102 - Calculus for Students in the Social and Biological Sciences
Department of Mathematics and StatisticsFaculty of ScienceUndergraduateMATH 120 - Precalculus Mathematics
Department of Mathematics and StatisticsFaculty of ScienceUndergraduateMATH 122 - Logic and Foundations
Department of Mathematics and StatisticsFaculty of ScienceUndergraduateMATH 151 - Finite Mathematics
Department of Mathematics and StatisticsFaculty of ScienceUndergraduateMATH 200 - Calculus of Several Variables
Department of Mathematics and StatisticsFaculty of ScienceUndergraduateMATH 201 - Introduction to Differential Equations
Department of Mathematics and StatisticsFaculty of ScienceUndergraduateMATH 211 - Matrix Algebra I
Department of Mathematics and StatisticsFaculty of ScienceUndergraduateMATH 212 - Introduction to Algebra
Department of Mathematics and StatisticsFaculty of ScienceUndergraduateMATH 222 - Discrete and Combinatorial Mathematics
Department of Mathematics and StatisticsFaculty of ScienceGraduateMATH 599 - Master's Thesis
Department of Mathematics and StatisticsFaculty of ScienceGraduateMATH 693 - Candidacy Examination
Department of Mathematics and StatisticsFaculty of ScienceGraduateMATH 699 - Dissertation
-Peter B. Gustavson School of BusinessGraduateMBA 500 - Essentials of Business and Leadership
-Peter B. Gustavson School of BusinessGraduateMBA 501A - Integrative Management Exercise (IME)
-Peter B. Gustavson School of BusinessGraduateMBA 530 - Managerial Finance
-Peter B. Gustavson School of BusinessGraduateMBA 544 - Information Technology in the Organization
-Peter B. Gustavson School of BusinessGraduateMBA 560 - Managing Legal Risks
-Peter B. Gustavson School of BusinessGraduateMBA 585 - Consulting Methods
-Peter B. Gustavson School of BusinessGraduateMBA 596 - Management Consulting Report
-Peter B. Gustavson School of BusinessGraduateMBA 598 - Research Report
Department of Mechanical EngineeringFaculty of EngineeringUndergraduateMECH 220 - Mechanics of Solids I
Department of Mechanical EngineeringFaculty of EngineeringUndergraduateMECH 240 - Thermodynamics
Department of Mechanical EngineeringFaculty of EngineeringUndergraduateMECH 242 - Dynamics
Department of Mechanical EngineeringFaculty of EngineeringUndergraduateMECH 285 - Properties of Engineering Materials
Department of Mechanical EngineeringFaculty of EngineeringUndergraduateMECH 295 - Engineering Fundamentals
Department of Mechanical EngineeringFaculty of EngineeringUndergraduateMECH 400 - Design Project
Department of Mechanical EngineeringFaculty of EngineeringUndergraduateMECH 420 - Finite Element Applications
Department of Mechanical EngineeringFaculty of EngineeringUndergraduateMECH 430 - Robotics
Department of Mechanical EngineeringFaculty of EngineeringUndergraduateMECH 447 - Energy Systems
Department of Mechanical EngineeringFaculty of EngineeringUndergraduateMECH 455 - Instrumentation
Department of Mechanical EngineeringFaculty of EngineeringUndergraduateMECH 460 - Computer Aided Manufacturing
Department of Mechanical EngineeringFaculty of EngineeringUndergraduateMECH 466 - Microelectromechanical Systems
Department of Mechanical EngineeringFaculty of EngineeringUndergraduateMECH 483 - Mechanics and Energy Conversion for Living Cells
Department of Mechanical EngineeringFaculty of EngineeringUndergraduateMECH 497 - Green Vehicle Technology Project
Department of Mechanical EngineeringFaculty of EngineeringUndergraduateMECH 498 - Honours Thesis
Department of Mechanical EngineeringFaculty of EngineeringUndergraduateMECH 499 - Technical Project
Department of Mechanical EngineeringFaculty of EngineeringGraduateMECH 510 - Living Cells and their Molecules: Mechanics &amp; Thermodynamics
Department of Mechanical EngineeringFaculty of EngineeringGraduateMECH 521 - Computer-Aided Manufacture (CAM)
Department of Mechanical EngineeringFaculty of EngineeringGraduateMECH 580 - Selected Topics in Mechanical Engineering
Department of Mechanical EngineeringFaculty of EngineeringGraduateMECH 595 - Seminar
Department of Mechanical EngineeringFaculty of EngineeringGraduateMECH 598 - MEng Project Report
Department of Mechanical EngineeringFaculty of EngineeringGraduateMECH 599 - MASc Thesis
Department of Mechanical EngineeringFaculty of EngineeringGraduateMECH 693 - Candidacy Examination
Department of Mechanical EngineeringFaculty of EngineeringGraduateMECH 695 - Seminar
Department of Mechanical EngineeringFaculty of EngineeringGraduateMECH 699 - PhD Dissertation
-Peter B. Gustavson School of BusinessGraduateMGB 182 - Language Skills III
-Peter B. Gustavson School of BusinessGraduateMGB 535 - Consulting Methods and Practice
-Peter B. Gustavson School of BusinessGraduateMGB 536 - International Research and Consulting Project
-Peter B. Gustavson School of BusinessGraduateMGB 537 - Global Internship
-Peter B. Gustavson School of BusinessGraduateMGB 540 - The South American Business Context
-Peter B. Gustavson School of BusinessGraduateMGB 570 - Global Leadership and Cultural Intelligence
-Peter B. Gustavson School of BusinessGraduateMGB 583 - Language, Communication and Global Business
Department of Biochemistry and MicrobiologyFaculty of ScienceUndergraduateMICR 302 - Molecular Microbiology
Department of Biochemistry and MicrobiologyFaculty of ScienceGraduateMICR 599 - MSc Thesis: Microbiology
Department of Biochemistry and MicrobiologyFaculty of ScienceGraduateMICR 699 - PhD Dissertation: Microbiology
Department of BiologyFaculty of ScienceUndergraduateMRNE 400 - Directed Studies
Department of BiologyFaculty of ScienceUndergraduateMRNE 401 - Special Topics in Marine Biology
Department of BiologyFaculty of ScienceUndergraduateMRNE 402 - Special Topics in Marine Biology
Department of BiologyFaculty of ScienceUndergraduateMRNE 410 - Marine Invertebrate Zoology
Department of BiologyFaculty of ScienceUndergraduateMRNE 412 - Biology of Marine Fishes
Department of BiologyFaculty of ScienceGraduateMRNE 502 - Special Topics
School of MusicFaculty of Fine ArtsUndergraduateMUS 208 - Popular Music and Society I
School of MusicFaculty of Fine ArtsUndergraduateMUS 308 - Popular Music and Society II
School of MusicFaculty of Fine ArtsUndergraduateMUS 432A - Kodàly Level 1: Pedagogy and Music Literature
School of MusicFaculty of Fine ArtsUndergraduateMUS 432B - Kodàly Level 2: Pedagogy and Music Literature
School of MusicFaculty of Fine ArtsUndergraduateMUS 433A - Kodàly Level 1: Musicianship, Conducting and Ensemble
School of MusicFaculty of Fine ArtsUndergraduateMUS 433B - Kodàly Level 2: Musicianship, Conducting and Ensemble
-Division of Medical SciencesGraduateNRSC 595 - MSc Thesis Preparation
-Division of Medical SciencesGraduateNRSC 599 - MSc Thesis
-Division of Medical SciencesGraduateNRSC 693 - Candidacy Examination
-Division of Medical SciencesGraduateNRSC 699 - PhD Dissertation
School of NursingFaculty of Human and Social DevelopmentGraduateNUED 570 - Engaging with Pedagogy: Teaching and Learning in Nursing Education
School of NursingFaculty of Human and Social DevelopmentGraduateNUNP 537 - Family Nurse Practitioner Internship
School of NursingFaculty of Human and Social DevelopmentGraduateNUNP 543 - Integrated Primary Health Care and Advanced Practice Nursing: I (Theory) (Adult I)
School of NursingFaculty of Human and Social DevelopmentGraduateNUNP 544 - Integrated Primary Health Care and Advanced Practice Nursing: I (Practice) (Adult I)
School of NursingFaculty of Human and Social DevelopmentGraduateNUNP 593 - Evaluation Synthesis
School of NursingFaculty of Human and Social DevelopmentGraduateNURA 516 - Nursing Leadership I
School of NursingFaculty of Human and Social DevelopmentUndergraduateNURS 341 - Professional Practice IV: Nursing Inquiry
School of NursingFaculty of Human and Social DevelopmentUndergraduateNURS 342 - Health and Healing VI: Global Health Issues
School of NursingFaculty of Human and Social DevelopmentUndergraduateNURS 345 - Family Nursing
School of NursingFaculty of Human and Social DevelopmentUndergraduateNURS 350 - Health and Healing VII: Promoting Community and Societal Health
School of NursingFaculty of Human and Social DevelopmentUndergraduateNURS 351 - Nursing Practice VI: Promoting Health of Communities and Society
School of NursingFaculty of Human and Social DevelopmentUndergraduateNURS 360 - Professional Practice VI: Nursing Research
School of NursingFaculty of Human and Social DevelopmentUndergraduateNURS 370 - Consolidated Practice Experience III
School of NursingFaculty of Human and Social DevelopmentUndergraduateNURS 400 - Academic Writing for Nurses
School of NursingFaculty of Human and Social DevelopmentUndergraduateNURS 430 - Professional Practice V: Leadership in Nursing
School of NursingFaculty of Human and Social DevelopmentUndergraduateNURS 431 - Nursing Practice VII: Engaging in Leadership
School of NursingFaculty of Human and Social DevelopmentUndergraduateNURS 470 - Consolidated Practice Experience IV
School of NursingFaculty of Human and Social DevelopmentUndergraduateNURS 480 - Special Topics
School of NursingFaculty of Human and Social DevelopmentUndergraduateNURS 482 - Pharmacological Knowledge for Nursing Practice
School of NursingFaculty of Human and Social DevelopmentUndergraduateNURS 491 - Nursing Practice VIII: Transitions
School of NursingFaculty of Human and Social DevelopmentUndergraduateNURS 493C - Lived Experience of Health in Aging
School of NursingFaculty of Human and Social DevelopmentUndergraduateNURS 495 - Nursing Practice Synthesis
School of NursingFaculty of Human and Social DevelopmentGraduateNURS 500 - Scholarly Writing for Advanced Practice Nursing
School of NursingFaculty of Human and Social DevelopmentGraduateNURS 508 - Methodological Knowledge and Advanced Practice Nursing
School of NursingFaculty of Human and Social DevelopmentGraduateNURS 567 - Trends and Issues in Advanced Practice Nursing III
School of NursingFaculty of Human and Social DevelopmentGraduateNURS 598 - Practice Project
School of NursingFaculty of Human and Social DevelopmentGraduateNURS 599 - Thesis
School of NursingFaculty of Human and Social DevelopmentGraduateNURS 693 - Candidacy Examination
School of NursingFaculty of Human and Social DevelopmentGraduateNURS 699 - Dissertation
Department of Pacific and Asian StudiesFaculty of HumanitiesUndergraduatePAAS 138 - Intensive Beginner Japanese I
Department of Pacific and Asian StudiesFaculty of HumanitiesUndergraduatePAAS 410 - Advanced Mandarin for Native Speakers of Chinese
Department of Pacific and Asian StudiesFaculty of HumanitiesGraduatePAAS 599 - MA Thesis
--GraduatePADR 503 - Professional Integrity in the Public and Non-Profit Sectors
--GraduatePADR 504 - Public Leadership and Management
--GraduatePADR 505 - Policy-making and Policy Communities
Department of PhilosophyFaculty of HumanitiesUndergraduatePHIL 201 - Critical Thinking
Department of PhilosophyFaculty of HumanitiesUndergraduatePHIL 203 - Elementary Formal Logic
Department of PhilosophyFaculty of HumanitiesUndergraduatePHIL 232 - Moral Problems of Contemporary Society
Department of PhilosophyFaculty of HumanitiesGraduatePHIL 592 - Professional Development Practicum
Department of PhilosophyFaculty of HumanitiesGraduatePHIL 598 - Major Research Project
School of Public Health and Social PolicyFaculty of Human and Social DevelopmentGraduatePHSP 504 - Supportive Environments and Healthy Public Policy
School of Public Health and Social PolicyFaculty of Human and Social DevelopmentGraduatePHSP 541 - Social Justice and Public Health Nursing
School of Public Health and Social PolicyFaculty of Human and Social DevelopmentGraduatePHSP 542 - Advanced Public Health Nursing Practice
School of Public Health and Social PolicyFaculty of Human and Social DevelopmentGraduatePHSP 550 - Perspectives in Social Policy and Public Health
School of Public Health and Social PolicyFaculty of Human and Social DevelopmentGraduatePHSP 552 - Healthy Public Policy Strategies
School of Public Health and Social PolicyFaculty of Human and Social DevelopmentGraduatePHSP 591 - Special Topics in Public Health Studies
School of Public Health and Social PolicyFaculty of Human and Social DevelopmentGraduatePHSP 599 - Thesis
Department of Physics and AstronomyFaculty of ScienceUndergraduatePHYS 111 - Introductory Physics II
Department of Physics and AstronomyFaculty of ScienceUndergraduatePHYS 215 - Introductory Quantum Physics
Department of Physics and AstronomyFaculty of ScienceUndergraduatePHYS 217 - Thermodynamics
Department of Physics and AstronomyFaculty of ScienceUndergraduatePHYS 314 - Nuclear Physics and Radioactivity
Department of Physics and AstronomyFaculty of ScienceUndergraduatePHYS 325 - Optics
Department of Physics and AstronomyFaculty of ScienceGraduatePHYS 511A - Topics in Nuclear and Particle Physics I
Department of Physics and AstronomyFaculty of ScienceGraduatePHYS 545 - Anatomy and Physiology for the Medical Physicist
Department of Physics and AstronomyFaculty of ScienceGraduatePHYS 546 - Clinical Shadowing
Department of Physics and AstronomyFaculty of ScienceGraduatePHYS 599 - MSc Thesis
Department of Physics and AstronomyFaculty of ScienceGraduatePHYS 693 - PhD Candidacy Examination
Department of Physics and AstronomyFaculty of ScienceGraduatePHYS 699 - PhD Dissertation
Department of Political ScienceFaculty of Social SciencesUndergraduatePOLI 240 - International Politics
Department of Political ScienceFaculty of Social SciencesUndergraduatePOLI 300C - Post-Enlightenment Political Thought
Department of Political ScienceFaculty of Social SciencesUndergraduatePOLI 340 - International Studies
Department of Political ScienceFaculty of Social SciencesUndergraduatePOLI 344 - International Political Economy
Department of Political ScienceFaculty of Social SciencesUndergraduatePOLI 351 - Public Policy Analysis
Department of Political ScienceFaculty of Social SciencesUndergraduatePOLI 369 - Issues in Canadian Politics
Department of Political ScienceFaculty of Social SciencesUndergraduatePOLI 370 - The Politics of Surveillance
Department of Political ScienceFaculty of Social SciencesUndergraduatePOLI 379 - Topics in Contemporary European Politics
Department of Political ScienceFaculty of Social SciencesUndergraduatePOLI 383 - Global Indigenous Nationalisms
Department of Political ScienceFaculty of Social SciencesUndergraduatePOLI 433 - Issues in Politics
Department of Political ScienceFaculty of Social SciencesGraduatePOLI 599 - Thesis
Department of Political ScienceFaculty of Social SciencesGraduatePOLI 693 - PhD Candidacy Examinations
Department of Political ScienceFaculty of Social SciencesGraduatePOLI 699 - Dissertation
Department of PsychologyFaculty of Social SciencesUndergraduatePSYC 100A - Introductory Psychology I
Department of PsychologyFaculty of Social SciencesUndergraduatePSYC 100B - Introductory Psychology II
Department of PsychologyFaculty of Social SciencesUndergraduatePSYC 201 - Research Methods in Psychology
Department of PsychologyFaculty of Social SciencesUndergraduatePSYC 210 - Conceptual Foundations of Psychology
Department of PsychologyFaculty of Social SciencesUndergraduatePSYC 215A - Introduction to Biological Psychology
Department of PsychologyFaculty of Social SciencesUndergraduatePSYC 300A - Statistical Methods in Psychology
Department of PsychologyFaculty of Social SciencesUndergraduatePSYC 300B - Statistical Methods in Psychology II
Department of PsychologyFaculty of Social SciencesUndergraduatePSYC 317 - Sensation and Perception
Department of PsychologyFaculty of Social SciencesUndergraduatePSYC 330 - Personality
Department of PsychologyFaculty of Social SciencesUndergraduatePSYC 332 - Health Psychology
Department of PsychologyFaculty of Social SciencesUndergraduatePSYC 335 - Infant and Child Development
Department of PsychologyFaculty of Social SciencesUndergraduatePSYC 336 - Adolescent Development
Department of PsychologyFaculty of Social SciencesUndergraduatePSYC 338 - Behavioural Interventions: Children and Adults
Department of PsychologyFaculty of Social SciencesUndergraduatePSYC 345A - Drugs and Behaviour: Basic Principles
Department of PsychologyFaculty of Social SciencesUndergraduatePSYC 351A - Cognitive Psychology
Department of PsychologyFaculty of Social SciencesUndergraduatePSYC 351B - Human Neuropsychology
Department of PsychologyFaculty of Social SciencesUndergraduatePSYC 360 - Psychological Disorders of Adulthood
Department of PsychologyFaculty of Social SciencesUndergraduatePSYC 366 - Psychological Disorders of Childhood and Adolescence
Department of PsychologyFaculty of Social SciencesUndergraduatePSYC 370A - Psycholinguistics
Department of PsychologyFaculty of Social SciencesUndergraduatePSYC 375 - Interpersonal Relationships
Department of PsychologyFaculty of Social SciencesUndergraduatePSYC 386 - Cultural Psychology
Department of PsychologyFaculty of Social SciencesUndergraduatePSYC 431B - Social Cognition
Department of PsychologyFaculty of Social SciencesGraduatePSYC 503 - Practicum in Clinical Psychology
Department of PsychologyFaculty of Social SciencesGraduatePSYC 505 - Clinical Intervention Practicum
Department of PsychologyFaculty of Social SciencesGraduatePSYC 506A - Psychology Clinic Practice
Department of PsychologyFaculty of Social SciencesGraduatePSYC 599 - Thesis
Department of PsychologyFaculty of Social SciencesGraduatePSYC 603 - Advanced Clinical Practicum
Department of PsychologyFaculty of Social SciencesGraduatePSYC 606 - Clinical Internship
Department of PsychologyFaculty of Social SciencesGraduatePSYC 699 - PhD Dissertation
Social Dimensions of Health ProgramFaculty of Social SciencesGraduateSDH 599 - Thesis
Social Dimensions of Health ProgramFaculty of Social SciencesGraduateSDH 693 - Comprehensive Exam
Social Dimensions of Health ProgramFaculty of Social SciencesGraduateSDH 699 - Dissertation
Software EngineeringFaculty of EngineeringUndergraduateSENG 265 - Software Development Methods
Software EngineeringFaculty of EngineeringUndergraduateSENG 299 - Software Architecture and Design
Software EngineeringFaculty of EngineeringUndergraduateSENG 310 - Human Computer Interaction
Software EngineeringFaculty of EngineeringUndergraduateSENG 422 - Software Architecture
Software EngineeringFaculty of EngineeringUndergraduateSENG 426 - Software Quality Engineering
Software EngineeringFaculty of EngineeringUndergraduateSENG 440 - Embedded Systems
Software EngineeringFaculty of EngineeringUndergraduateSENG 480A - Topics in Software Engineering
Software EngineeringFaculty of EngineeringUndergraduateSENG 499 - Design Project II
Department of Germanic and Slavic StudiesFaculty of HumanitiesGraduateSLST 599 - Thesis
-Peter B. Gustavson School of BusinessUndergraduateSMGT 415 - Service Marketing Management
-Peter B. Gustavson School of BusinessUndergraduateSMGT 416 - Service Operations and Quality Management
-Peter B. Gustavson School of BusinessUndergraduateSMGT 417 - Service Human Resource Management
Department of SociologyFaculty of Social SciencesUndergraduateSOCI 100A - Introduction to Sociology: Culture and Socialization
Department of SociologyFaculty of Social SciencesUndergraduateSOCI 100B - Introduction to Sociology: Institutions and Social Change
Department of SociologyFaculty of Social SciencesUndergraduateSOCI 103 - Canadian Society
Department of SociologyFaculty of Social SciencesUndergraduateSOCI 210 - Foundations of Sociological Theory
Department of SociologyFaculty of Social SciencesUndergraduateSOCI 305B - Families and Social Change
Department of SociologyFaculty of Social SciencesUndergraduateSOCI 306 - Crime and Deviance
Department of SociologyFaculty of Social SciencesUndergraduateSOCI 309 - Modern Social Theory
Department of SociologyFaculty of Social SciencesUndergraduateSOCI 310 - Religion in Society
Department of SociologyFaculty of Social SciencesUndergraduateSOCI 320 - Mass Media and Popular Culture
Department of SociologyFaculty of Social SciencesUndergraduateSOCI 345 - Sociology of Mental Health
Department of SociologyFaculty of Social SciencesUndergraduateSOCI 412 - Sociological Explanations
Department of SociologyFaculty of Social SciencesGraduateSOCI 598 - Extended Essay
Department of SociologyFaculty of Social SciencesGraduateSOCI 599 - Thesis
Department of SociologyFaculty of Social SciencesGraduateSOCI 693 - PhD Candidacy Examinations
Department of SociologyFaculty of Social SciencesGraduateSOCI 699 - PhD Dissertation
School of Social WorkFaculty of Human and Social DevelopmentUndergraduateSOCW 200A - An Introduction to Social Work Practice
School of Social WorkFaculty of Human and Social DevelopmentUndergraduateSOCW 200B - Introduction to the Critical Analysis of Social Welfare in Canada
School of Social WorkFaculty of Human and Social DevelopmentUndergraduateSOCW 304A - Social Work Practicum by Prior Learning Assessment (PLA)
School of Social WorkFaculty of Human and Social DevelopmentUndergraduateSOCW 311 - Understanding Oppression
School of Social WorkFaculty of Human and Social DevelopmentUndergraduateSOCW 312 - Collaborative Conversations: Working within Communities
School of Social WorkFaculty of Human and Social DevelopmentUndergraduateSOCW 319 - Research for Social Change
School of Social WorkFaculty of Human and Social DevelopmentUndergraduateSOCW 350A - Social Work, Social Justice and the Law
School of Social WorkFaculty of Human and Social DevelopmentUndergraduateSOCW 350B - Legal and Social Justice Skills for Social Workers
School of Social WorkFaculty of Human and Social DevelopmentUndergraduateSOCW 354 - Indigenous Perspectives on Practice Issues
School of Social WorkFaculty of Human and Social DevelopmentUndergraduateSOCW 356 - Human Development and the Social Environment within a Global Context
School of Social WorkFaculty of Human and Social DevelopmentUndergraduateSOCW 400 - Introduction to Social Work in the Health Care Sector
School of Social WorkFaculty of Human and Social DevelopmentUndergraduateSOCW 402 - Social Work Practicum II
School of Social WorkFaculty of Human and Social DevelopmentUndergraduateSOCW 404A - Child Welfare Specialization: Child Welfare Practicum
School of Social WorkFaculty of Human and Social DevelopmentUndergraduateSOCW 413 - Critical Social Work Practices
School of Social WorkFaculty of Human and Social DevelopmentUndergraduateSOCW 435 - Critical Perspectives in Mental Health Practice
School of Social WorkFaculty of Human and Social DevelopmentUndergraduateSOCW 451 - Indigenous Policy Analysis in Social Work
School of Social WorkFaculty of Human and Social DevelopmentUndergraduateSOCW 460 - Special Topics in Social Work and Social Welfare
School of Social WorkFaculty of Human and Social DevelopmentUndergraduateSOCW 471 - Addictions in Society: Theory, Practice and Policy
School of Social WorkFaculty of Human and Social DevelopmentUndergraduateSOCW 475 - Child Welfare Practice
School of Social WorkFaculty of Human and Social DevelopmentUndergraduateSOCW 476 - Family and Child Welfare Policy
School of Social WorkFaculty of Human and Social DevelopmentGraduateSOCW 506A - MSWI Practicum
School of Social WorkFaculty of Human and Social DevelopmentGraduateSOCW 531 - Critical Exploration of Leadership Roles for Social Workers in Health Care
School of Social WorkFaculty of Human and Social DevelopmentGraduateSOCW 540 - Foundation Practicum
School of Social WorkFaculty of Human and Social DevelopmentGraduateSOCW 571 - MSW Capstone
School of Social WorkFaculty of Human and Social DevelopmentGraduateSOCW 598 - Individual Graduating Research Project/Report
School of Social WorkFaculty of Human and Social DevelopmentGraduateSOCW 599 - Thesis
School of Social WorkFaculty of Human and Social DevelopmentGraduateSOCW 699 -
Department of Hispanic and Italian StudiesFaculty of HumanitiesUndergraduateSPAN 149 - Beginners' Spanish
Department of Hispanic and Italian StudiesFaculty of HumanitiesUndergraduateSPAN 305 - Advanced Topics in Hispanic Culture (in English)
Department of Hispanic and Italian StudiesFaculty of HumanitiesGraduateSPAN 598 - Master's Essay
Department of Hispanic and Italian StudiesFaculty of HumanitiesGraduateSPAN 599 - MA Thesis/Oral
Department of Hispanic and Italian StudiesFaculty of HumanitiesGraduateSPAN 693 -
Department of Hispanic and Italian StudiesFaculty of HumanitiesGraduateSPAN 699 -
-Faculty of Human and Social DevelopmentGraduateSPP 598 - Extended Essay
-Faculty of Human and Social DevelopmentGraduateSPP 599 - Thesis
Department of Mathematics and StatisticsFaculty of ScienceUndergraduateSTAT 254 - Probability and Statistics for Engineers
Department of Mathematics and StatisticsFaculty of ScienceUndergraduateSTAT 255 - Statistics for Life Sciences I
Department of Mathematics and StatisticsFaculty of ScienceGraduateSTAT 598 - Master's Project
Department of Mathematics and StatisticsFaculty of ScienceGraduateSTAT 599 - Master's Thesis
Department of Mathematics and StatisticsFaculty of ScienceGraduateSTAT 693 - Candidacy Examination
Department of Mathematics and StatisticsFaculty of ScienceGraduateSTAT 699 - Dissertation
Department of TheatreFaculty of Fine ArtsUndergraduateTHEA 394 - Directed Studies in Applied Theatre
Department of TheatreFaculty of Fine ArtsGraduateTHEA 598 - MA Essay
Department of TheatreFaculty of Fine ArtsGraduateTHEA 693 - Dissertation Proposal/Candidacy Exam
Department of TheatreFaculty of Fine ArtsGraduateTHEA 699 - Dissertation

Course description.