Frequently asked questions

About student life:

  1. How can I come up with my thesis topic?
  2. What area of research is Dr. Rhodes interested in?
  3. What topics of theses or dissertations has Dr. Rhodes supervised?
  4. What types of funding are available while I am a student?
  5. Can I find any employment?
  6. What other work or volunteer opportunities at UVic are there to help me complement my school training?
  7. What resources are there to help me effectively manage my time and stress levels?
  8. It looks like the graduate program is all about work and studying. Is this true?
  9. I'm thinking of doing an honours program. What do I need to have ready in order to work on my honours project?

About participating in a study:

  1. Why should I participate in physical activity research?
  2. How can I participate in your study?
  3. Are there any eligibility criteria to participate in your study?
  4. Where is the BMED lab?
  5. Where can I find information about participating in your study?

About Dr. Rhodes' research and professional activities:

  1. Where can I find his research contribution list?
  2. What are his professional involvements?
  3. What kinds of research is Dr. Rhodes currently conducting?
  4. What kinds of research has Dr. Rhodes conducted?
  5. What courses does Dr. Rhodes teach?
  6. What theses and dissertations has Dr. Rhodes supervised?

About student life:

1. How can I come up with my thesis topic?

It helps if you have some idea of the area that you want to study. However, if you only have a broad idea or are not too sure, don't worry! The first few months of graduate school will require a lot of reading and scanning of the literature. This will help to narrow your focus and determine what it is that you want to study.

It will also help you to understand what research has been done in your area of interest so that you can see where your study can expand to. There is lots of opportunity to discuss potential study ideas both with Dr. Rhodes and within your courses.

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2. What area of research is Dr. Rhodes interested in?

Dr. Rhodes's research focuses on exercise psychology. Please see the research page for specific topics of his research interests, his bio on the about us page for his publications,media archive for featured research in media, and on-going projects and completed projects for current and past projects.

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3. What topics of theses or dissertations has Dr. Rhodes supervised?

He has supervised a number of students with broad topics of exercise psychology. More information about his supervisory experience can be found in undergraduate supervisionand graduate supervision pages.

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4. What types of funding are available while I am a student?

There are a number of funding opportunities as a graduate student. The federal government offers master’s award competitions which can be applied for in the fall of your first year. These include SSHRC and CIHR.

There are also awards through the Michael Smith Foundation for Health Research. UVic also has graduate student awards that can be applied for through the Faculty of Graduate Studies. There are also other award competitions through the provincial government and other research offices both on- and off-campus. Graduate Studies also offers Academic Income Supplementation (AIS) to students who are employed on-campus.

More information about the kinds of fundings can be found in Expectations and Going to UVic pages.

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5. Can I find any employment?

There are employment opportunities for graduate students. Part-time employment is usually available through Dr. Rhodes as a research assistant in the Behavioural Medicine Lab. There are also opportunities through the School of Exercise Science, Physical & Health Education as lab instructors or teaching assistants for undergraduate classes.

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6. What other work or volunteer opportunities at UVic are there to help me complement my school training?

The great part about being a graduate student is that you have the flexibility and freedom to make the next couple of years rewarding and challenging in many different ways. You'll learn about yourself and which career path you want to take.

It's important to remember that graduate training may be demanding of your time, but if you want to balance your school training with practical experience there are many opportunities. You could become involved with student politics as a graduate student representative, or as a member of the Graduate Student Society council in a larger capacity (e.g., director of finance, director of communications, etc.).

UVic employs students in a variety of areas. These employments include working as a residence-life coordinator in on-campus housing, serving at the on-campus pub, or working for the school newspaper or radio station. You could also work as a orientation guide during the beginning of each semester or as a peer-support. The opportunities on campus are endless, and can be great experiences to enrich your academic program.

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7. What resources are there to help me effectively manage my time and stress levels?

While graduate training is an extremely rewarding experience, it is important to realize that there may be times when the workload seems extremely demanding and tough and life seems a little out of whack!

Remember, as a member of the BMED lab, you are a part of a very supportive team. Do not hesitate to meet with one of your fellow students or with Dr. Rhodes to discuss any academic concern! We all have valuable tools, resources and words of wisdom to share with each other, and sometimes it only takes someone saying “I understand” to help you get through the challenging times.

If you feel that you need additional resources to help you, UVic Counseling Servicesprovide free counseling sessions for students as well as a variety of workshops (e.g., thesis writing workshop, yoga, meditation, stress-reduction/management) to help you achieve your optimal health.

Dr. Rhodes' graduate students also created a guidebook. This information can be found in Living in Victoria page.

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8. It looks like the graduate program is all about work and studying. Is this true?

NO! In our lab, we have social events from time to time. We get together for lunch, dinner parties, drinks, you name it! We make plans for fun, and our social events are filled with games, prizes, and laughter. We work hard and play hard. Our lab culturepage showcases just how we make time to enjoy ourselves.

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9. I'm thinking of doing a honours program. What do I need to have ready in order to work on my honours project?

The most important thing to have is a good understanding of the material which you would like to work on. This good grasp will lead to an idea for where there is a gap in the published research you want to fill with your own research.

You should have completed a research proposal during your research methods course. It will have given you a good idea of the depth of knowledge you will need in order to creat your own research project. Learn more about undergraduate supervision.

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About participating in a study:

1. Why should I participate in physical activity research?

The statistics on obesity and inactivity within North America are astounding. Over half of the Canadian population is currently overweight or obese which is of huge concern. One of the reasons underlying this spike in obesity levels is the low levels of physical activity participation among Canadians.

Research in the Behavioural Medicine Lab focuses on exercise psychology. In other words, we're trying to help determine why people are active (and why they aren’t), and why people adhere to exercise programs (and why they don’t).

We have a number of different studies looking at a variety of populations (families, couples, new parents, dog owners, kids, etc.). By participating in one of our studies, you are helping us to better understand physical activity behaviour, which, in turn, will help you to lead to a healthy life. The research studies don't require a lot of time, and they're fun as well!

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2. How can I participate in your study?

If you know which study you'd like to volunteer your time for, you can contact a designated project coordinator. If you're not sure which study, you can find out in ourparticipants page. Or you can simply .

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3. Are there any eligibility criteria to participate in your study?

Yes. The eligibility criteria will depend on each study. Learn more about our on-going projects.

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4. Where is the BMED lab?

The BMED lab is located in the MacLaurin building (map).

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5. Where can I find information about participating in your studies?

Information about current projects can be found on the on-going projects page. Information about past projects can be found on the completed projects page. The how to participate page will help answer questions you might have.

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About Dr. Rhodes' research and professional activities:

1. Where can I find his research contribution list?

Read about Dr. Rhodes' publications, presentations, awards, and grants.

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2. What are his professional involvements?

Dr. Rhodes is involved in many professional organizations, editorials, and guest reviews for journal articles. See the service page.

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3. What kinds of research is Dr. Rhodes currently conducting?

See the on-going projects page to see the many projects Dr. Rhodes and his research team are conducting.

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4. What kinds of research has Dr. Rhodes conducted?

Dr. Rhodes' past research can be found on the completed projects page. Some project results were featured in the media.

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5. What courses does Dr. Rhodes teach?

See the student info page to learn about his current and past courses.

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6. What theses and dissertations has Dr. Rhodes supervised?

Information about his supervision can be found on the undergraduate supervision andgraduate supervision pages.

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