Jamie Cassels Undergraduate Research Awards

Photo of JCURA recipient
Saul Brown, Political Science, 2015 Jamie Cassels Undergraduate Research Awards scholar.

The Jamie Cassels Undergraduate Research Awards (JCURA) were instituted in 2009-10 as the Undergraduate Research Scholarship program by the Vice-President Academic and Provost.

The program is designed to provide support for exceptional undergraduate students who might otherwise not be able to have direct research experience. The Learning and Teaching Centre (LTC) administers the award nomination process on behalf of the Provost’s Office.

Eligible students include all full-time third and fourth year undergraduate students (normally registered in 12 or more units of study in the winter session) in excellent academic standing (normally this is a minimum sessional GPA requirement of 7.0) who satisfy the general regulations of Student Awards and Financial Aid.

Award recipients will undertake a research investigation in dialogue with—and under the mentorship of—a faculty supervisor. Each academic unit is eligible for one to three student nominations per year, depending on the number of students in the unit.

Successful student applicants receive $1,500 credited directly to their UVic fee account.

2017-18 Call for Nominations

Academic unit eligibility

Frequently asked questions

Application/nomination forms:

Application/nomination form 2017-18 - Word format - .rtf format

Please note: We ask that units collect all eligible nominations together and submit them as individual digital files in one email to the .

The final deadline date for the Learning and Teaching Centre to receive nominations from the faculty/department/school is June 30th.
Faculties/departments/schools are asked to submit all their unit's eligible number of nominations at the same time. Nominations will be processed and notifications will be made before mid-August.

Final reports

  • Final report form - Student 2016-17 - Deadline date: Friday, April 28, 2017 (Will be sent out by email on March 9, 2017)
  • Final report form - Supervisor 2016-17 - Deadline date: Friday, April 28, 2017 (Will be sent out by email on March 9, 2017)

General and financial questions

General questions concerning the Jamie Cassels Undergraduate Research Awards should be directed to the .

Financial and related questions (for example regarding distribution of funds) after the award has been approved should be directed to the or 250-721-8107.

Printable list

JCURA 2016/17
StudentDepartmentProject title
Adams, Zachary Mathematics & StatisticsMathematical model of the monolignol biosynthetic pathway in higher plants
Alamolhoda, Armon Max EconomicsMeasuring the Effect of the Zero Lower “Bound” in Canada
Altherr, AnninaGeographyThe Potential of Marine Protected Areas to Promote Protection of Marine Mammals from Underwater Noise
Anderson, ZacharyNursingMemories Now: An Alzheimer’s Chorus
Ashton, MatthewMedical Sciences, Department of PsychologyThe Effects of Minor Traumatic Brain Injury on Hippocampal Structural Plasticity
Bartlett, Chad Electrical & Computer EngineeringCharacterization of the Protein Streptavidin
Benner, RebeccaEducational Psychology & Leadership StudiesPersonalized Learning in Teacher Education: Impact on Student Experience
Bharadwaj, DeveshMechanical EngineeringOsmotic Energy Storage (Storing Energy using Osmosis)
Blackall, Alanna Medieval StudiesThe Changing Status of the Manuscript
Blosmanis-Lund, Tia Germanic & Slavic StudiesHuman Trafficking in German Refugee Camps and Law Enforcement’s Response
Boothroyd, Malcolm GeographyHabitat patterns affecting Arctic fox predation on tundra nesting shorebirds
Bowditch, FloraMathematics & StatisticsAnalysis of the eternal colouring game
Brander, LeoneWritingThe Legend of Candle Lake: An Exploration of Saskatchewan Folklore
Bratanovic, IvicaChemistryTargeting a Protein that isn’t there: Synthesis of MTA Analogues for Targeted Cancer Therapy
Brock, Teddie EnglishSonic Objects, Living Bodies: A Study in Oramics and Representation
Buchanan, EmilyBiologyN-acetylglucosaminidase: Characterization and DNA repair studies for potential treatment of Sanfilippo B syndrome
Cameron, Brooke Curriculum & InstructionYouth Representation in School Media and Academic Self-efficacy
Campos, Juan Pablo Mendez EconomicsOportunidades: Effects on Education and Employment in Mexico
Cassidy, Elise Child & Youth CareCreative Pedagogies in the Child and Youth Care
Chen, DavidSociologyExpansion and Contraction: Political and Economic Rights in the Post-Modern Society
Chestnut, Taylor Exercise Science, Physical & Health EducationThe Neural Basis of Human Decision Making
Chin, MichaelPsychologyTesting the perceptual strategies of expert radiologists to detect cancer in mammograms
Clerihue, Mary Barbara TheatreLegal Performances and Social Behaviour in early Victoria (1858-1889)
Cleveland, SarahNursingCompetencies required for rural, remote and northern nursing: A scoping review of the literature
Conover, Cassidy ChemistrySynthesis and pKa study of cis-oxalyl Nindigo derivatives
Crocker, Jordan HistoryWWI in video-games and on YouTube
Czerwinski, Charlotte Exercise Science, Physical & Health EducationNeural basis of motor control: feedback error-related negativity
Dino, Sahil Mechanical EngineeringSystems Engineering for Energy Systems
Dodd, Anna Political ScienceMaking Vicious Circles Virtuous: Motivating Consumers to Support Private Regulatory Arrangements
Duhaime, Zoé Religious StudiesDiverse Methods of Timekeeping within Canada
Dupuis, MarianaHistoryEgypt Before and After 2011: an Uncertain History of Revolution
Edwards, Jensen FrenchIrony, Politics, Literature: Quebec’s 1980 Referendum Represented in the Novel
Egner, KelsyeEnglishArthur Rimbaud’s Influence on Hart Crane
Ezeuko, (Obidigbo) Harmony PhilosophyThe Use of Scientific Evidence in Legal Context
Feldman, Artemis Visual ArtsMany Lemmas
Ferguson, McKaila Art History & Visual StudiesContextualizing Boucher: Reconstructing Madame de Pompadour's Dressing Room
Finley, TheronEarth & Ocean SciencesNeotectonics of the Cascadia Subduction Zone: Constraints on Crustal Fault Activity on Southern Vancouver Island
Fitzpatrick, Shannon Exercise Science, Physical & Health EducationUnderstanding the neuronal basis of human learning
Fraser, Lorinda Art History & Visual StudiesDenoting and Representing the Other through the Legend of Saint George and the Dragon
Gaudet, Renee EnglishJ.S. Le Fanu’s Sensational Tales in Illustrated Victorian Periodicals
Gilmour, Thomas Mechanical EngineeringDesign and Application of cooperative mobile and aerial robotics
Goatley, Sasha PsychologyThe Interrelationships Between Maternal Emotion Regulation and Cellphone Use
Graeme, MichaelAnthropologyThe Agroforestry Antidote: Enacting Biocultural Restoration in Ecuador
Guthrie, MadisonGeographyDendroglaciological discoveries at Forest Kerr Glacier, northern British Columbia Coast Mountains
Hanneson, Cedar Earth & Ocean SciencesThe Interplanetary Magnetic Field in the Inner Heliosphere: Dependance on Heliospheric Distance
Heilig, Abbey Gender StudiesTranslated Subjectivities
Heizer, Melanie AnthropologyGrave Monument RTI Photography: Uncovering Lost Inscriptions
Helps, Carolyn PsychologyNarrative Development and Executive Function in Children
Horne, Melanie BiologyEvaluation of negative effects of radiotelemetry in field studies of vertebrates
Houston, Kathryn Hispanic & Italian StudiesAesthetic experience in the public space: the case of Mexico City
Ingram, ErikaCurriculum & InstructionEcological Gratitude: Cultivating Appreciation in Students of Global Interconnectedness
Jensen, Tahsis Gender Studies"It's only politics:" Constructing Others in Concept Musicals
Johnson, Gregory English"Something to get it outside of me": Betroffenheit and Mental Illness
Justice, SandraFrenchAt the drop of a hat: consequences of the omission of the circumflex for Anglophones learning French
Kaehn, Olivia Child & Youth CareContributors to successful supported employment for youth with disabilities: An evaluation
Kates, Stephanie Germanic & Slavic StudiesA Pro-Nazi Vichy Regime: France's Collaboration in the Holocaust
Kennedy, Sofia Biochemistry & MicrobiologyDetermining Essential Features of the Ars2 RNA-processing Factor
Klassen, Alex Music12 pieces for Paul Sacher: a cross sectional analysis
Krause, KatherineChemistryRole of interfacial water in adsorbed protein structure
Lam, HollyWritingLet’s Make a Baby: 2 decades of queer motherhood on TV
Lazin, Sarah Hispanic & Italian StudiesEffects of Zika Virus on Health Law in Ecuador
Leverett, Conner GeographyUnderstanding free-floating car share movement patterns by leveraging user-generated GPS location data: a Vancouver case study
Lightbourn, Ryleigh FrenchThe network of words: an analysis of the word PETIT in French collocations
Loten, Robert IsaiasPhilosophyKantian Ethics and Consequentialism: Exploring Compatibility
MacLennan, Eva BiologyBehavioural responses in the Plainfin Midshipman to anthropogenic acoustic stimuli
Mahbub, Rahat Computer Science, Software EngineeringPeer-to-peer exchange of EMR data to perform statistical analysis
Makaro, Tyler Physics & AstronomyALTAIR Dark Energy Analysis and Instrumentation Development
McCartan, Delaney SociologyAn insight into online social networking communities and their affect on suicidal behaviour
McCarthy, Morgan NursingThe Impact of Super InTent City on the harms of Homelessness
McKenna, Adam EconomicsGold Mining and the Likelihood of Conflict: A Panel Data Analysis
Mollard, SimoneGreek & Roman StudiesEmotion and Moral Agency in Bks 1 & 2 of the Iliad
Moore, Dylan Curriculum & InstructionSocial Learning: Building Equitable Classroom Community through the Listening Circle
Moore, LoganBiologyTesting whether a bacterial symbiont defends its insect host against parasitic nematodes
Murray, Emma Germanic & Slavic StudiesThe Impact of Euromaidan on Ukraine
Murray, Matthew Computer ScienceAugmented Extrusion: Interactive 3D Modeling in Augmented Reality
Nagrocki, JacobMathematics & StatisticsCrime Data Analysis by Computer-Assisted Mathematics
Nguyen, Peter ChemistryStudy of Chemiluminescence Using Orthogonal Instrumental Techniques: UV/Vis Spectroscopy and ESI-MS
Noseworthy, Matthew Biochemistry & MicrobiologyVisualization of tumor-reactive CD8+ T cells and cognate antigen-bearing tumor cells by in situ PCR
Pagani, DaltonAnthropologyArchives, Museums, and Public Space in the Production of History
Pang, Angela Medical Sciences, Department of BiologyEffects of Pre-natal Ethanol Exposure on Long-Term Depression in the Dentate Gyrus of Rats
Poole, Brandon Visual ArtsUnlike-Likes: Metaphor and Truth in the Visual Arts
Pulsifer, Lia Public Health & Social PolicyThe Relationship Between Social Connectedness and Health Among Young Adults in a BC Town
Radisavljevic, Nina Biochemistry & MicrobiologyMechanisms of Neuroinvasion by Treponema pallidum
Raftery, Erinn Earth & Ocean SciencesTracking off-axis hyrdrothermal alteration with Sr/Rb isotopes
Rekis, JaclynPhilosophyHumour in Kierkegaard’s Existential and Religious Philosophy
Ruiz, Lena Computer Science, Mathematics & StatisticsThe Pancake Problems: Sorting and Permutations
Sabino, Jenna Exercise Science, Physical & Health EducationComparison of postural sway measurement technologies’ ability to predict fall risk
Sandhu, Guleena Political ScienceThe Effects of Public Opinion on Euro Adoption in the Czech Republic, Hungary, and Poland
Savage, Alyssa EconomicsValuing Traditional Ecological Knowledge in British Columbia’s Environmental Impact Assessment Process
Shamei, ArianLinguisticsAn Acoustic Analysis of Cannabis-intoxicated Speech
Shier, Jordan MusicInsights into the Emergence of Drum Samples in Recorded Music
Siemens, Kathryn (Kate)HistoryHistory on the web: prototyping a website on Japanese Canadian dispossession
Simmons, Jake Steven ZimmermannMathematics & StatisticsProperties of the Cone Generated by Triangles in Graphs on n Vertices
Slager, LisaSociologyThe relationship between family and substance abuse: Experiences of addiction recovery
Slamka, CatherinePacific & Asian StudiesTranslating Reflexivity
Speakman, Mark Peter B. Gustavson School of BusinessFoxconn in the Czech Republic: How Foxconn and Czech Policy are Changing the Czech Economy
Tidey, Leah TheatreIntergenerational Theatre in Education Sexual Health Project
Turner, Iliana Political ScienceDecolonizing Political Theory: Intersectionality as a Possible Tool
VanGils, Ian MusicWestern Brass Instrument Pedagogy Through Traditional Chinese Music
Wang, Zifei Pacific & Asian StudiesTwo Recipes for Japan: Tampopo and Udon
Wenezenki, Makaila Environmental StudiesUVic Activist Archive
Wiebe, IndiaNursingInstilling simulation pedagogy through the BSN Curriculum
Wood, FloraEducational Psychology & Leadership Studies#YYJ EdChat Community: A Study of Community Conversations as Curriculum
Wooding, Jennifer Social WorkEquity Orientated Pain Management
Woodley, BayleeArt History & Visual StudiesThe Visual and Generative Medieval Mind
Yoon-Potkins, QwisunInterdisciplinary Studies, Social Justice StudiesPrecarity and Aging: Emerging Challenges of Contemporary Late Life
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Student recipients 2015-2016


Adam Fitterer

Project title:

Department: Philosophy

Faculty supervisor: Dr. Colin Macleod

"I wish to study Christine Korsgaard's theory of practical identity, and her use of it to secure a rational foundation for moral obligations. I'm interested in comparing her notions to the moral foundation of the Thomist philosophers working in the Aristotelian tradition, as I suspect them to be similar.  Accordingly, I will investigate the advantages and disadvantages of each, as they generate very different moral philosophies."

Alanna Blackall

Project title:

Department: English

Faculty supervisor: Dr. Adrienne Williams Boyarin

"McPherson Library MS Eng.1, a late fifteenth-century copy of John Lydgate’s Fall of Princes, is one of few complete medieval manuscripts housed at UVic; it is our only Middle English manuscript. In 1978, Anthony Edwards assessed it in the journal Manuscripta and claimed, “the Victoria [Lydgate] manuscript is unlikely to be a text of great significance to students.” This project openly challenges Edward’s appraisal through study of the manuscript and its poem, with special focus on its marginalia. The Victoria Lydgate is a valuable resource, and its marginalia in particular opens multiple avenues of research on medieval and early modern readership and book ownership. Although the main text is Middle English, the marginalia is trilingual—Middle English, Latin, and French—and it consists of structural markings (e.g., section labels or titles not introduced by the original scribe), scribal notations and corrections, an early modern signature (“Wyllham Fermer”), and commentary on the text. There is ample marginalia to examine, and there is evidence that some has been washed (and may be recoverable under UV light). The main goal of this project is to transcribe and catalogue all of the marginalia; from there, research questions may grow or shrink based on evidence. Possibilities include: examination of the relationship of this manuscript to others (through available digitised copies), investigation of provenance and ownership, and study of reader interests and habits. This project will result in a record of all marginalia in MS Eng.1, for use by Special Collections and future students and researchers."

Alayna Payne

Project title:

Department: Nursing

Faculty supervisor: Dr. Debra Sheets

Technologies to Support Community-Dwelling Older Adults with Compromised Health and Independence
Community dwelling older adults with complex health conditions often experience a decline in independence and need support from family members (informal) or paid (formal) caregivers. In-home monitoring technologies offer great potential in reducing caregiver load. Effective caregiving support will arise from highly integrated systems that make intelligent decisions based on continuous, multidimensional data collection that captures variations in health, behavior, mobility and cognition. Modern computational methods can use the data to predict adverse events, detect unnoticed deterioration, and even intervene in the caregiver’s absence. The present study is unique in that it matches continuous sensor-based activity data from the home to gold standards of day-to-day functioning and cognitive function. We will gather sensor data in the homes of four at-risk clients. Patterns in the sensor data will be correlated with RAI-Homecare and independent measures of cognitive functioning and more immediate adverse events (e.g., delirium, falls, wondering). This study pilots a crucial step in the evolution of technology-driven caregiver support. It identifies algorithms that will be validated in the next study. Once validated, technology becomes a partner in caregiving.”


Alexander Hoffman

Project title:

Department: Psychology

Faculty supervisor: Dr. Scott Hofer

"I will be engaged in research activities associated with the Canadian Longitudinal Study on Aging (CLSA). The CLSA is a large, national, long-term study that will follow approximately 50,000 men and women between the ages of 45 and 85 for at least 20 years. The study will collect information on the changing biological, medical, psychological, social, lifestyle and economic aspects of people’s lives. I will assisting in a variety of research activities the Data Collection Site (DCS) at the Gorge Hospital where participants come to complete a comprehensive assessment that includes dexascan (i.e. bone density), EKG, echocardiogram, vision and hearing testing, cognitive testing, performance measures (e.g. gait, balance), etc. I will learn about clinical data collection for a national study involving older adults and I will focus on developing a specific research project that will inform my knowledge of geriatrics and prepare me for medical school."

Alexander Lam

Project title:

Department: Economics

Faculty supervisor: Dr. Elisabeth Gugl

"There is an emerging subfield in economics that considers how conceptions of social identity affect economic outcomes. The gender ratio of workers in different occupations may not only be determined by gender differences in education and work experience, but also by the degree to which an occupation conforms to (or defies) social gender norms and expectations. As such, the prevalence of male-dominated and female-dominated industries, such as engineering and nursing, respectively, may be explained by a theory of economics and identity. My plan is to use microeconomic theory to model how gender roles create and perpetuate gender-segregated labour markets. I also plan to analyze how social identities may change over time as a result of social forces or government policies, and how this may in turn affect gender segregation in labour markets."

Aliayta Foon-Dancoes

Project title:

Department: Music

Faculty supervisor: Prof. Ann Elliott-Goldschmid

"This year I will be tackling one of the most important and renowned pieces in the violin repertoire, Bach’s Ciaconna. A work for solo violin lasting fifteen minutes, it is  technically challenging with long and demanding chordal passages that require vast attention to detail, particularly voicing and left-hand gymnastics that have to be executed with utter precision.  As a result not only does the product have to be completely accurate – it is impossible to hide your mistakes, however minimal – but the performer alone has to also emotionally carry the audience, taking them on a journey that will remain fascinating throughout the length and intimacy of this solo work.

In order to achieve a high standard in its presentation, I propose a harmonic analysis of the Ciaconna as well as historical research regarding the era of its composition, with special focus on the performance practice of the time. This summer I participated in a two-week seminar with the renowned Baroque Orchestra, Tafelmusik. This gave me a platform from which to begin my research and achieve a historically informed rendition the Ciaconna. By March 9th I will be ready to present my research in a performance of a piece that has remained integral to the violin repertoire for four hundred years."


Alicia Williamson

Project title:

Department: Educational Psychology & Leadership Studies

Faculty supervisor: Dr. Valerie Irvine

"The project will carry out the implementation and evaluation of a robotics pilot in a k12 classroom, where learners will be able to choose how they want to join the class. I will help conduct the data collection through interviews during a limited term trial period. The goal is to determine the impact on quality of learning, class community, and attendance to learning. The results will be presented to the school community and via open access webinar. The writeup of results will be submitted for dissemination in the Canadian Journal of Learning and Technology and at research and professional conferences."

Alison Dennis

Project title: Alison Dennis

Department: English

Faculty supervisor: Dr. Erin Kelly

"Thomas Heywood (ca 1570-1641) may have been the most prolific of all early modern English playwrights; he claimed to have had “an entire hand or at least a maine finger in two hundred and twenty plays.” Only a few of these plays, however, are available in well-edited modern textbooks, much less regularly studied by undergraduate students. Even the few that do receive attention, however, such as A Woman Killed with Kindness, suggest that he was strongly interested in wide-ranging women’s experiences.

A first edition of Gynaikeion (1623), Heywood’s treatise on historical and mythic women from the classical period to the seventeenth century, is available in UVic’s Special Collections. By reading a selection of Thomas Heywood’s plays, as well as the obscure Gynaikeion in its entirety, I aim to answer the following questions: Which common or obscure themes link the different women in Heywood’s plays? What is in Gynaikeion that can deepen my insight into female characters in Heywood’s plays? And, finally, how are the ways women are portrayed in Heywood’s plays similar or different to other early modern plays?"


Alison Thomas

Project title:

Department: Earth & Ocean Sciences

Faculty supervisor: Dr. Vera Pospelova

"Reconstructing sea surface salinity change in the western North Pacific over the last ~18,000 years, using Operculodinium centrocarpum process length variation
My research project tests a method of quantitatively reconstructing past sea-surface salinity change in the North Pacific, using dinoflagellate cyst process lengths from the sedimentary record. Dinoflagellates are a group of marine plankton that produces resting stages or cysts. I will complete biometric measurements of cysts Protoceratium reticulatum (Operculodinium centrocarpum sensu Wall & Dale 1966) from a sediment core representing paleoceanographic change over the last 40 ka in the northern Japan Sea. Mertens et al. (2012) have shown that the average process length variation of Operculodinium centrocarpum can be related to seawater density or salinity. This work will use the proposed method for paleoenvironmental reconstruction and it has potential to reconstruct oceanographic conditions and document its variability well beyond the existing instrumental records at a sub-millennial scale resolution."


Alyssa Foote

Project title:

Department: Health Information Science

Faculty supervisor: Dr. Elizabeth Borycki

"People today are being encouraged to take their health into their own hands. Many people also like the convenience and ease of mobile applications. Thus I would like to investigate how mobileapplications can be used to help promote patient self-care along with the software features and functions required for a successful patient use and health system implementation, including full user acceptance, and how to integrate mobile applications with an existing EHR system."

Angela Harris and Lisa Harris

Project title:

Department: Interdisciplinary Studies

Faculty supervisor: Dr. Margo Matwychuk

"Recent research suggests that queer individuals are at increased risk for depression, anxiety, self-harm, suicide, substance abuse, and other serious mental health issues. Moreover, several studies indicate that queer people face unique barriers to accessing mental health services and receiving appropriate care for their mental health. The University of Victoria has recently affirmed its commitment to supporting student mental health by implementing the UVic Mental Health Strategy. A study on the accessibility and inclusivity of on-campus counselling services for queer students could potentially contribute to this larger project, especially in relation to its stated goals of eliminating barriers and building more inclusive campus services. In our study, we will conduct semi-structured interviews with queer students about the ideas they may have to make on-campus counselling services more accessible and inclusive. We will also interview counsellors at UVic Counselling Services to determine what policies and practices currently exist to promote a safe and inclusive environment for queer clients. The results of our study could potentially inform future counselling practices at UVic Counselling Services."


Angela Wignall

Project title:

Department: Nursing

Faculty supervisor: Dr. Lenora Marcellus

"I will be working with Dr. Marcellus on analyzing qualitative data generated through a CIHR funded project based on women’s experiences of accessing services and support in Victoria within the context of substance use during pregnancy. The data has already been collected. I will be working with the research team to conduct analysis and develop a manuscript for publication. I will also be involved in developing innovative community based knowledge translation strateiges. I will be preparing and giving a presentation with the team at CAR BC based on our findings."

Ariel Merriam

Project title:

Department: History

Faculty supervisor: Dr. Jordan Stanger-Ross

How did Japanese Canadians challenge their dispossession during World War II?: Inside the case files of the Custodian of Enemy Property
Following the attack on Pearl Harbour on 7 December 1941, the Canadian government began enacting “security measures” against Japanese Canadians living on the west coast of British Columbia. These included the immediate seizure of more than 1000 fishing boats owned by Japanese Canadians and the internment of male Japanese nationals. Japanese Canadians of all ages and origins were quickly classified as “enemy aliens” under the War Measures Act and, beginning in February 1942, 23000 were forced to leave their coastal homes and communities for internment camps in BC’s interior or for destinations east of the Rocky Mountains. During this displacement, Japanese-Canadian property, possessions, and finances were placed under the control of the Custodian of Enemy Property, which mediated access to property and held the power to dispose of it without consent.

The records of the Vancouver Office of the Custodian of Enemy Property offer insight into the experiences and mechanisms of this displacement and dispossession. Each case file contains correspondences between the Custodian and Japanese Canadians, mainly concerning access to finances and the status and sale of property and possessions. These records provide detailed narratives of family and economic life that can inform us on where displaced Japanese Canadians went and what was important to them. Most importantly, they reveal a dialogue between Japanese Canadians and the government that can deepen our understanding of how power functions. The dynamics of these correspondences were diverse, affected by factors of gender, class, time, and space, and they unfolded according to certain rules of argument that could enable Japanese Canadians to strategically gain access to possessions and freedoms by appealing to the practical, economic, and moral sensibilities of the Custodian. Analysis of these records can lend us a better understanding of how power operates and allow us to consider Japanese Canadians not simply as victims of oppression, but as agents of their own lives.”


Arnoldus van Roessel

Project title:

Department: Greek & Roman Studies

Faculty supervisor: Dr. Cedric Littlewood

"I intend to investigate the context of a series of metamorphoses in Ovid's Metamorphoses.  I am interested in how Ovid's Metamorphoses engages with the canonical epics of the Greek author Homer and the Latin author Virgil, in addition to Ovid's interaction with other poetic genres. I will focus on Metamorphoses 12, in which Ovid employs numerous Iliadic references to explore the concept of change within a literary tradition."

Aviva Lessard

Project title:

Department: Anthropology

Faculty supervisor: Prof. Brian Thom

"By drawing on the principles of ethnographic mapping, I want to produce a high-quality cyber map that re-enacts the events of the Oka Crisis and provides the Mohawk historical and political context. I have developed a preliminary digital map in Google Earth portraying the crisis in Quebec. This map marks the important locations during the events such as the blockades, contested areas and solidarity protests in the rest of Canada, as well as the historical borders and land allotments of the Mohawk people. The Google Earth medium challenges traditional cartography in the sense that viewers of the map are navigating themselves and interacting with information. I seek to further this research by enriching the map with video, photos and interview data, improve the layout and experiment with different mapping tools such as tourbuilder. I want to post it online on a website as an interactive educational tool geared toward enhancing high school curriculum. This digital map can offer Indigenous perspectives on a major historical event in Canada. Much of Indigenous knowledge and experiences are silenced in our current education system and teachers often do not have the resources to supplement the current curriculum. I will also conduct a scholarly review of historical cartography projects. Cyber cartography combined with ethnographic knowledge is an emerging approach to revealing Indigenous histories and contemporary issues. I will examine similar projects and begin to unravel some of the opportunities and ideological problems that go along with cartography."

Beatrice Toner

Project title:

Department: Women's Studies

Faculty supervisor: Dr. Annalee Lepp

"My research aims to reveal the shortcomings of our current elementary education system in regards to involving non-Indigenous children in learning about colonial violence in the context of historical and ongoing settler colonialism. These gaps in curriculum contribute to the maintenance of a white supremacist education system and allows children to be socialized without understanding their role in ongoing colonialism. My goal is to uncover how such violence histories can be taught in culturally safe ways, using Indigenous knowledge systems and ways of knowing as basis for this. I intend to design a series of workshops aimed at early elementary grades that could serve as a starting point for opening the conversation with children about land, language, residential schools, institutionalized violence, and colonialism. "

Ben Hawker

Project title:

Department: Computer Science

Faculty supervisor: Dr. Margaret-Anne Storey

"Working with Margaret-Anne Story and the CHISEL Group we are building innovative tools for the visual analysis of big data. I hope to help analysts make sense of large data sets by helping them identify the key concepts and structures expanding their knowledge from the bottom up. The tools will be centered around three domains.

  • Cyber Forensics — including network analysis and malware analysis.
  • Social Media — including data from Twitter and Reddit over time as well as geographic data.
  • Assembly Code — including malware disassembly and identification.

The tools developed will aim to support discovery, documentation, backtracking and collaboration over these data sets. In particular, these tools will attempt to bridge the gap between the machine and the analyst — allowing the machine to leverage its computational power and the analyst to leverage their decisional and intuitive powers. Another goal for the tools will be to assist the analyst in identifying starting points for their bottom up investigation, previously a pain point for large data sets."


Braden Siempelkamp

Project title:

Department: Biochemistry & Microbiology

Faculty supervisor: Dr. John Burke

"My research project will aim to characterise the molecular mechanism by which a number of novel mutations in the enzyme phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K) mediate primary immune disorders in patients. The goal of this project is to 1) clone these mutations into suitable expression vectors, 2) express and purify each of the different mutant enzymes, 3) characterise the lipid kinase and lipid binding of the mutants compared to the wild-type enzyme, and 4) analyse the structural determinants of how these mutations mediate function through a detailed structural study using hydrogen-deuterium exchange mass spectrometry."

Brendan Smithwick

Project title:

Department: Earth & Ocean Sciences

Faculty supervisor: Prof. Lucinda Leonard

"For my Honours research project, I will focus on the deployment of instrumentation for the assessment of submarine slope stability in the Kitimat Arm Fjord, British Columbia. The project is an extension of research that I began during a Co-op work term with the Geological Survey of Canada at the Pacific Geoscience Centre, and it will contribute to a larger-scale geohazard assessment of waterways in northern British Columbia.

The Kitimat Arm Fjord is vulnerable to submarine slope failures that may cause tsunamis. In 1974 and 1975 dock facilities at Kitimat were impacted by significant tsunamis generated by submarine slope failures. Future failures remain a concern, especially given the extensive development at the head of the fjord.

Submarine slope stability is strongly affected by marine sediment pore pressure. If the pore pressure is greater than the hydrostatic pressure the slope may be unstable. Groundwater leaching into the slope can cause heightened pore pressure. Monitoring of slopes affected by groundwater leaching will provide critical data on conditions leading to slope failure.

My objective is to analyze available data, including multibeam sonar, seismic reflection data, and marine sediment cores, to determine ideal locations for the deployment of instruments in submarine slopes of the Kitimat Arm Fjord. Locations of possible groundwater leaching will be identified and targeted for deployment of piezometers, which will provide measurements of marine sediment pore pressure for submarine slope stability assessment. The project will also involve instrument testing to determine optimum deployment strategies."


Brett Koenig

Project title:

Department: Sociology

Faculty supervisor: Dr. André Smith

"The research that I am proposing is to look at the local street-involved population’s interaction with Victoria’s healthcare system. Essentially, it will seek to better understand the reasoning behind why or why not this population seeks services from the healthcare system in the city. The research will also look into which services are being accessed and in what capacity. For instance, it will look into hospital use, clinic use, and alternative service use. Potential areas to explore will be services that are accessed, such as sexual health testing or counselling; perceived treatment during these healthcare interactions; and reasons for accessing certain services instead of others. The research will be carried out with the intention of gaining insight into other identity categories, such as age, race, and sexual orientation, in hopes of better understanding the intersections between street-involvement and other social barriers as they relate to healthcare access. By understanding this marginalized population’s interaction with the healthcare system, the research will gain better insight into the barriers to accessing healthcare that certain populations face."

Brianna Crighton

Project title:

Department: Exercise Science, Physical & Health Education

Faculty supervisor: Dr. Sandra Hundza and Dr. Marc Klimstra

"Predictive validity of gait parameters and gait initiation for prospectively identifying fall risk in older adults.

Gait has been investigated in order to assess whether it can be useful as a way of predicting healthy older adults at risk of falling, however, there is little information with regards to this and gait initiation. The objective of this study will be to investigate the differences in gait parameters and initiation in healthy older adults with no history of falling, and healthy older adults with history of falling, and to investigate if these characteristics can be used to make predictions about future falls in older adults.  Participants will be 25 healthy older adults (aged 70+) with no history of falling, and healthy older adults (70+) who have fallen at least once in the last year. A history will be taken of the participants to track any fall incidences in the past and the participants will track any falls that may occur in the future for a period of one year. Outcomes measures will be CoM, CoP, step variability, and velocity. Data gathering procedures will be done with two force plates and gaitRite mat. Participants will perform gait initiation on the force plates 10 times and on the gaitRite 20 times, both cognitively loaded and unloaded. This study aims to identify whether gait can be used as a prospective fall intervention method, allowing for early prevention and thereby reducing the expenses and increasing the quality of life of at risk adults."


Cameron Dallas

Project title:

Department: Mechanical Engineering

Faculty supervisor: Dr. Curran Crawford

"The purpose of the research project is to design and optimize the mechanical and controls systems of an experimental small wind turbine. Wind power is an integral part of the quickly expanding renewable energy industry and small wind turbines can be used to provide power to residential areas, cabins, off grid developments or large ships. Preliminary testing has confirmed that the essential systems of the wind turbine are operational. The next step is to design and integrate a yaw drive controller to continuously track the wind direction and adjust the turbine accordingly to maximize efficiency and power harnessed from the wind.

The preliminary results revealed that there may be laminar separation bubbles forming along the airfoils, negatively affecting the lift coefficient. Methods to avert this, such as tripping the flow at the leading edge of the airfoils, will be investigated. This is projected to dramatically improve performance.

Once the yaw controller is installed and the separation bubbles are mitigated, steady state tests will be conducted to study the turbine under known conditions. Once the data from the initial tests is analyzed, the turbine will be stationed in normal environmental conditions where data will be collected to determine how the turbine functions in routine operating conditions."                     


Cameron Fish

Project title:

Department: History

Faculty supervisor: Professor Brian McKercher

“My project will consist of an analysis of the United States’ diplomatic posture in East Asia from the end of the Roosevelt presidency into the Cold War era. It will focus especially on how Roosevelt’s designs for the former colonies of France and Britain were altered after his death and the emergence of the Cold War. In my research, I intend to examine the course of the relationship between the United States and the Soviet Union in order to identify whether cooperation rather than conflict could have been the norm in the immediate post-colonial space of East Asia. Emphasis will be placed on the personal relationships between Roosevelt, Stalin, Churchill and later Truman as well as the views of the State Department and American Intelligence. The source material for this project will consist mainly of internal documents, mostly from the State Department concerning the Yalta and Potsdam Conferences. While the American point of view will be the primary focus, Russian, British and French perspectives will also be treated to varying degrees using a similar methodology.”

Chloe Lampman

Project title:

Department: Mathematics & Statistics

Faculty supervisor: Dr. Gary MacGillivray

"We will study a discrete-time dynamic graph domination problem where the goal is to maintain a dominating set, Dt, subject to the condition that, at each time t = 1, 2, …, a specified vertex not in Dt is replaced by one of its neighbours in Dt.  The goal is to investigate structural properties of edge-critical graphs. A graph G is edge-critical when adding an edge joining any pair of non-adjacent vertices of G decreases the number of vertices needed in a dynamic dominating set.  The project has four main phases.

Phase 1:  (1 month) Review existing results on domination critical graphs beginning with the original paper by Sumner and Blitch from 1983, the forthcoming survey paper by Fujita, Furuya and MacGillivray, and finally the recently submitted manuscript on structural properties of dynamic domination vertex-critical graphs by Klostermeyer and MacGillivray.

Phase 2:  (1.5 months) Search for constructions and examples of dynamic-domination edge-critical graphs, bounds on the number of vertices required in the dynamic dominating set, and a characterization of the graphs where the number of required vertices is small. The starting point will be the results of a similar flavour as those reviewed in phase one.

Phase 3:  (1.5 months) Investigate which of the structural properties of domination critical graphs (such as Hamiltonicity) may also be properties of dynamic domination edge-critical graphs.

Phase 4:  (1 month) Prepare a poster for the research fair and a manuscript detailing the research done."


Christie Lombardi

Project title:

Department: Chemistry

Faculty supervisor: Dr. Cornelia Bohne

"Kinetic studies of the binding dynamics of guests with cucurbit[n]urils have indicated that they are versatile macrocycles for a wide range of applications including drug delivery and supramolecular catalysis.  These and other applications rely on an understanding of host-guest equilibrium constants and binding mechanisms.  My proposed research project is to use fluorescence and stopped-flow experiments to determine the binding constants and mechanism of calcium cations with cucurbit[7]uril and compare the results with what has previously been determined for sodium cations.  It is hoped that a direct comparison of binding dynamics of these cations with cucurbit[7]uril will provide valuable insight into the utility of this macrocycle for practical applications that rely on exploitation of the kinetics of a supramolecular host-guest system to achieve a specific function."

Christina Price

Project title:

Department: Environmental Studies

Faculty supervisor: Dr. Jessica Demspey

"This project will focus on investigating the sources of funding for private land trusts in Canada. This would include researching how corporate donor identity and levels of support have changed over the past few decades, and deciphering whether organizations are receiving more or less corporate funding and from which different types of businesses. This will be done by delving into publicly available donor information and sifting through the annual reports of as many of the top private land trust organizations in Canada as solid information can be found for. This research will contribute to research being done by Jessica Dempsey and her grad student Karen Kalynka into non-state or private conservation efforts in Canada. This is an understudied yet important area of research into private conservation and the economic incentives for conservation. By discovering from whom land trusts are receiving funding, and if trends are visible over time, we can better understand how land trusts are able to fund land management for conservation and know more about the incentives for corporations to partner with and support land trust organizations."

Colin Scarffe

Project title:

Department: Economics

Faculty supervisor: Dr. Chris Auld

"It has been well documented that there is positive correlation between an individual’s level of education and voter participation. However, what has not been well documented is the relationship between education and voter tendencies. In other words, as education level increases, how do political preferences change? I plan to empirically investigate the effect of education on political ideology.  Exploiting large disaggregated survey data on individual education, political preferences, and demographics, I will develop and estimate multivariate statistical models which reveal the effect of education on voting patterns."

Daniel Hudson

Project title:

Department: Mathematics & Statistics

Faculty supervisor: Dr. Heath Emerson

"I will be conduction research into equivariant K-theory modules. The goal of the project is to construct interesting examples of spaces equipped with an action the higher-dimensional compact torus T. Such a ‘T-space’ has an associated T-equivariant K-theory module associated to it. I aim to understand how to classify such modules and to apply the classification to the geometric examples. Secondly, I aim to build on this background work to construct examples of T-spaces in which one has a natural T-equivariant symmetry. Such a symmetry has an invariant associated to it, which can be interpreted in two ways by the work of the supervisor Emerson (and co-authors). One interpretation is geometric, and involves the fixed-point manifold of the symmetry. The other is global and homological in nature, and involves the module trace of the module map on T-equivariant K-theory induced by the symmetry. The equality of the two description is an equivariant version of the Lefschetz fixed-point formula, which is already a published result. But there lack examples of situations where it applies. My goal is therefore to construct such examples."

Daniele Goulet

Project title:

Department: Child & Youth Care

Faculty supervisor: Prof. Jin-Sun Yoon

"Based upon the findings from my department’s JCURA research project last year, my research focus will be on transfer students (new students coming on campus with diplomas from other institutions) and why they do not feel a sense of belonging at the School of Child and Youth Care (SCYC). Upon data collection and analysis, I will provide recommendations for the Child and Youth Care Students’ Society and SCYC on ways to improve the transfer students' sense of belonging. My data collection methodology will be to facilitate a focus group of eligible transfer students using semi-structured group interview process. I will be working collaboratively with another JCURA student who will focus her study on another identified group of students who have indicated that they do not feel a strong sense of belonging. Together, we will work collaboratively with our supervisor but have our individual research pursuits with our specified target population."

Danielle Bruce

Project title:

Department: Public Health & Social Policy

Faculty supervisor: Dr. Catherine Worthington

"The JCURA student will be responsible for several tasks related to an ongoing research study entitled “Western Canada HIV Supported Housing Study: Outcome Measures Development”. This study is developing a standardized outcomes measurement tool to be used by supportive housing programs for people living with HIV/AIDS (Dr. Peter AIDS Foundation and McLaren Housing Society in Vancouver, BC; SHARP Foundation in Calgary, AB; and Sanctum Housing in Saskatoon, SK).

The student will support and review qualitative coding of service user interviews regarding their experiences in supported housing programs. This will allow the student to become familiar with the study, the prevailing issues in each agency, and to gain skills in qualitative data analysis.

In partnership with the research team, the student will incorporate results from the service user interviews into program logic models that each agency is developing for its programs.

The student will be responsible for creating a standardized logic model format or infographic to be used for each of the four agencies involved in the project. Standardizing logic models will allow the research team to draw conclusions about a final outcomes measurement tool."


Devon Chan

Project title:

Department: Exercise Science, Physical & Health Education

Faculty supervisor: Dr. Sandra Hundza and Dr. Marc Klimstra

"Older adults over the age of 65 risk experiencing one or more falls each year, in which 1 out of 10 falls results in serious injury (Tinetti, 2003). Subsequently, serious injuries following a fall can lead to long-term consequences such as impaired mobility and balance. In order to reduce fall risk through intervention strategies, a clinician requires a method of identifying older adults at risk of falling before the event occurs.  Many clinical balance and mobility measurment tools are available to distinguish “fallers” from “non-fallers”. The prospective predictive sensitivity and specificity of a selection of tools has been tested (Scott 2004)  however, the potential of a composite tool combining predictive power of multiple tools has yet to be explored and the battery of tools to be included requires expansion.  To that end, the purpose of this research project is to distinguish which balance and mobility clincal test or combination of tests best prospectively identifies fallers and non-fallers. This research project will include The Short Physical Performance Battery, Fuller Advanced Balance Scale, Berg Balance Scale, Clinical Test of Sensory Organization and Balance, and the Community Balance and Mobility Scale 5-Step, 30 Seconds Sit-to-Stand, Timed “Up and Go”, peak expiratory flow, hand grip strength, ankle range of motion, knee proprioception, and visual acuity using scores collected over a 1 year period. As part of a larger project that includes gait parameters and cognitive testing, this project will contribute towards the goal of determining the best composite measures of fall risk."

Devon McKinnon

Project title:

Department: Germanic & Slavic Studies

Faculty supervisor: Dr. Serhy Yekelchyk

"Remembering the Gulag: Memory and Amnesia in Post-Communist Russia

I propose to research how the system of Soviet labor camps for political prisoners, known as the Gulag, and their victims have been remembered in Russia after the fall of communism. I am going to trace the changes in the official politics of memory from condemnation of the Gulag and commemoration of its prisoners in the early years of the Yeltsin presidency to Putin’s identification with the Soviet repressive apparatus. I am also going to study society’s response to the marginalization of Stalinist terror and eventual silencing of those insisting on their right to remember, in particular the Memorial Society. I was originally attracted to this topic by news reports about the recent controversy in Russia surrounding the Perm-36 museum, a preserved Gulag site, which the present-day Russian authorities want to redefine as a museum of labor productivity in support of the Soviet war effort. I believe the memory of the Gulag to be a compelling area of study, as it remains a source of the political divide inside Russia, pitting admirers of Stalin as a strong leader against those who want the atrocities committed under his leadership to be acknowledged and remembered. The state’s position in these debates is reflective of the current political system and state of democracy in Russia. I intend to consult published studies by historians and sociologists and to comb through news reports about memorial practices in contemporary Russia."


Eleni Gibson

Project title:

Department: Geography

Faculty supervisor: Dr. Cam Owens

"I am applying for a JCURA scholarship to assist in a project I will undertake through a Directed Studies course under the supervision of Dr. Cam Owens. This project will consist of assisting Dr. Owens in conducting preliminary research for a book we will be writing highlighting sustainability initiatives in the Cascadia region. The project involves three major deliverables. First, I will compile a detailed literature review of other sources that, similar to our proposal, document sustainability efforts in particular regions. The specific purpose of this critical review is to inform us on best practices, useful and effective frameworks, layouts, and structures for our own book. As a second deliverable, using this preliminary research, as well as my own creative thinking and observations drawn from various media outlets (books on popular science/social issues, social media, blogs, magazines, news, etc), I will draft a document that details innovative visual formatting and interactive features to inspire the design of our book. Finally, I will conduct an initial literature review of both academic and non-academic sources to synthesize relevant material about sustainability efforts in the region. The research project will lay the foundations for Dr. Owens' book and will allow me to begin to explore the world of publishing and effective communication, as well as delve deeper into sustainability in Cascadia."

Elizabeth Gerow

Project title:

Department: Music

Faculty supervisor: Dr. Harald Krebs

"The German composer Josephine Lang (1815-80) wrote over 300 songs, only about half of which were published.  I am proposing to select two or three of her songs that have never appeared in print or been performed publicly, and to prepare an edition of them and perform them. Preparing an edition involves deciphering all existing sketches and drafts of a song (both its music and its German text), determining the latest version, and creating a readable copy using computer software. Dr. Harald Krebs, who has written a book on the composer (Oxford, 2007), has copies of all of Lang’s song manuscripts, and will guide me in making my selection and in the editorial process. Prof. Susan Young, my voice instructor, will supervise the preparation of the performance. During the editing process, I will learn to read the 19th-century script in which the poetic text is written; to make editorial decisions in ambiguous situations, based on my knowledge of music theory; and to use Sibelius notation software. I will also learn about Lang’s life, musical style, and personality (immersion in a composer’s manuscripts provides many insights into the latter!). I shall prepare a short talk about the songs, including some background about the composer, the music, and the poetry, but focusing mainly on the challenges of the editing process. I shall present the talk, and shall perform the songs at the Research Fair on March 9, 2016."

Ellery Rose Lamm

Project title:

Department: Writing

Faculty supervisor: Prof. Maureen Bradley

"Last semester I worked with Maureen Bradley in Writing 320 to make a claymation film, which has been selected to screen at the Montreal World Film Festival in late August. This film combined clay animation along with a audio recording of a story told by my grandmother. I would love the opportunity to continue my passion for storytelling and film, combining audio interviews and visual medium to create three short films over the course of the next two semesters. I will combine people's stories with visuals in various mediums such as stop-motion, live-action and computer animation. This project will allow me to experiment and build on my animation skills and create short films to add to my professional portfolio."

Emily Agopsowicz

Project title:

Department: Curriculum & Instruction

Faculty supervisor: Dr. Kathy Sanford

"I would like to explore the effect of storytelling pedagogy on building classroom community, particularly amongst ELL students in a public school classroom setting. I intend to create a storytelling unit focusing on personal storytelling during my 10 week teaching practicum and investigate whether the unit had a positive impact on the social and emotional connections between students. Through my previous research I have found that personal storytelling can be a valuable learning tool for adolescents, not only because it  provides a context to practice speaking and listening skills, but also helps to create trust and empathy between teachers and students alike. Personal storytelling by virtue of its highly personal and social nature supports the 21st century framework for learning and this will be at the centre of my research.My research project will consist of the following: I will build upon a literature review to see what relevant research has already been done in the area. I will consult with the Storytelling Guild of Victoria and participate in a storytelling workshop to learn strategies for storytelling. I will implement a storytelling unit during my upcoming practicum. Throughout my research I will keep a reflective journal in order to document my progress."

Emma De Vynck

Project title:

Department: Social Work

Faculty supervisor: Dr. Patricia MacKenzie

"If my application is successful, I hope to explore the student experience of navigating religion and/or spirituality while at university. I think that spiritual life is an oft-neglected piece at university, and I hope to draw more attention to this vital component of wellbeing and stimulate dialogue. I believe that this topic could speak meaningfully to many students of various religious and spiritual journeys.

I am involved with MultiFaith Services in the creation of a survey for students. This survey will aim to find ways to improve their services for students. I have been given permission to consider the results of the survey in my own research explorations. I would like to embark on a study of existing literature on the topic of university and religious and spiritual life, and incorporate what I have learnt through my work with MultiFaith services into a comprehensive report/presentation. I hope to have student voices woven throughout my project. If possible, I would like to create an informal platform—such as an anonymous blog—for students to share their stories regarding this topic. I think this platform could serve as a meaningful site of qualitative research, and ultimately, social support for students."


Eric Henwood-Greer

Project title:

Department: English

Faculty supervisor: Dr. Mary Elizabeth Leighton

"In July 1889, London police discovered a male brothel operating in Cleveland Street, frequented by aristocrats and employing Post Office telegraph boys.  The scandal erupted in the newly-prevalent tabloid press where it was popularized by teclmiques of "new journalism."  My JCURA research project will analyze contemporary press coverage of the "Cleveland Street Scandal," as it came to be known, which marks a turning point in Victorian culture because it made public the "vice" of male homosexuality for the first time.  Newspapers-notably The Illustrated Police News­ delighted in covering the case and subsequent trials in a similar manner to their earlier coverage of gruesome crimes such as the Whitechapel ("Jack-the-Ripper") murders.

The primary focus of my JCURA project will be how newspaper coverage differed depending on the paper's  intended readership-from the lurid Police News with its condenmation of the aristocrats, interviews with the prostitutes and detailed illustrations, to the Times' conservative coverage, including a bias against the prostitutes' testimonies. I will also investigate how this case constructed British public awareness of homosexuality, leading to Oscar Wilde's famous 1895 conviction for gross indecency and indeed future persecutions, including that of Alan Turing.  My research will include primary newspaper evidence, as well as general secondary material on Victorian sexuality. I will establish the importance of the tabloid press coverage of the "Cleveland Street Scandal," not only for how it informed the Victorian public's view of homosexuality but also for how it continues to resonate-a resonance only briefly touched upon in previous research."


Eric Holdijk

Project title:

Department: History

Faculty supervisor: Dr. Kristin Semmens

"Playing with the Past: Video Games, The Great War and Popular Memory

Game studies – an interdisciplinary approach to examining electronic and physical games – is a growth industry in the academic world. Historians, while initially slow to examine this new media, are realizing the potential of games as texts to be analyzed, pedagogical tools and forums for the generation of historical meaning. The study of games and how they represent and play with the past is the basis for a new subdiscpline of public history: historical game studies. The chief question of this field is how do games convey meaning? A consensus on the answer has yet to be reached and this thesis will position itself within this evolving discussion.

As Robert Rosenstone argued for historical film in 1988, historians cannot simply use the same methods and standards for games as they would in the analysis of a historical monograph. Using video games which represent the Great War (1914 – 1918), my thesis will argue that while historians can and should analyze games in terms of their visual and textual representations of history, the most important aspect is a game's procedural rhetoric – i.e. how a game makes arguments about (past) reality through the rules that it imposes on players.

While my thesis will consider the entire corpus of the Great War's video game historiography, it will focus its analysis on three games in particular: Valiant Hearts, Verdun and Commander: The Great War. Each of these games will be analyzed for its portrayal of a certain aspect of the Great War: Valiant Hearts for its use of artifacts to tell stories, Verdun for its simulation of trench warfare through game levels and Commander: The Great War for its emphasis on the grand strategy in the war."


Evan Wilde

Project title:

Department: Computer Science

Faculty supervisor: Dr. Daniel German

"With an average of over 900 top-level merges into the Linux kernel per release, maintenance of older versions of the kernel becomes nearly impossible. Maintainers must be able to understand how changes to the current vision of the kernel fit into older versions of the kernel. This presents the need for a tool to provide meaningful explanation of what is happening in the Kernel. Our goal is to design a web-based system capable of visualizing the commit and release information of the Linux kernel in a meaningful way."

Evelyn Feldman

Project title:

Department: Greek & Roman Studies

Faculty supervisor: Dr. Mark Nugent

"To research and write a thesis on ancient Roman libraries, to examine the Roman library and the ways Romans interacted with books for both education and leisure."

H. Claire le Nobel

Project title:

Department: Music

Faculty supervisor: Dr. Andrew Schloss and Prof. Paul Walde

"This research award will provide me with the opportunity to explore the creative applications of new technology in a cross-disciplinary practice, combining visual art and music. I will be able to work with the physical media necessary for sculptural installation, as well as hardware and software that allow for interactive control in my work. My purpose as an interdisciplinary artist is to create a subjective experience for people to become conscious of their existence through the perception of sound-related phenomena. My work inspires an awareness of self, space, and moment, and those who experience my work become educated about our physical and perceptual relationships with sound.

By working between the disciplines of visual art and electronic and computer music, my practice is liberated from a singular, defined context. Instead, I am able to embrace the various creative and technical approaches that these disciplines offer, while speaking to different artistic traditions from a new perspective. Working with Dr. Schloss and Professor Walde on a research-based sound art project will be a successful and transformative learning experience."


Haggai Liu

Project title:

Department: Mathematics & Statistics

Faculty supervisor: Dr. Peter Dukes

"I will be working on a blend of combinatorial designs, geometry, graph theory and computing. A possible specific project is a series of tests of the Nash-Williams conjecture on triangle decompositions of dense graphs."

Heather Derocher

Project title:

Department: Biochemistry & Microbiology

Faculty supervisor: Dr. Brad Nelson

"Endometrial cancers are classified into four molecular subtypes: Polymerase Epsilon (POLE) mutants, microsatellite instability, copy number high, and copy number low. These subtypes have distinct genetic, molecular, and clinical characteristics. The immune response to cancer is emerging as a major determinant of prognosis in a wide range of human cancers. There are recent reports that the POLE mutant subtype of endometrial cancer engenders extraordinarily strong immune responses that may underlie the excellent prognosis associated with this subtype. However, we lack a comprehensive understanding of the immune cell subsets that mediate protective immunity to POLE tumors, and far the other molecular subtypes of endometrial cancer know less about the immune response. The goal of this project is to perform the most comprehensive analysis to date of tumor infiltrating lymphocyte patterns across the molecular and clinical subtypes of endometrial cancer using a 450 patient tissue microarray (TMA). We will perform multicolour immunohistochemistry (IHC) staining using panels of antibodies against standard immune markers, including CD8/CD3/CD20, CD4/CD25/FoxP3, CD79a/CD138, PD-L1/PD-1/CD3, CD303/CD1a/CD208, CD68/CD16a/CD56, IDO-1/PD-L1/CD8, MHC I, and MHCII. Slides will be scanned using a Vectra multispectral imagine system (Perkin Elmer), and TIL subsets will be enumerated using inform software (Perkin Elmer). The 450 cases have undergone molecular subtyping and there is clinical data available for the patients. The immunohistochemistry data will be compared to clinical data from patients to see how the immune system responds in these four molecular subtypes of endometrial cancer."

Heather Haukioja

Project title:

Department: Sociology

Faculty supervisor: Dr. Karen Kobayashi

"Through the use of a mixed methods approach (both qualitative and quantitative), this sociological research project seeks to examine the informal and formal healthcare sectors that are currently in place for older adults in North America. This project seeks to analyze the experiences (both positive and negative) that older adults and their family members have had with either or both the informal or formal healthcare sector. Furthermore, this project seeks to identify ways that will reform the current healthcare system in order to maximize the wellbeing and health of aging population."

Hilary Desmarais

Project title:

Department: Exercise Science, Physical & Health Education

Faculty supervisor: Dr. Viviene Temple

"The noted motor development researcher Jane E. Clark said in her 2007 Alliance Scholar Lecture that “Motor skills do not just come as birthday presents. They must be nurtured, promoted and practiced”. Although Clark’s conclusion might seem self-evident, very few studies have examined the development of gross motor skills prospectively during the elementary years. This longitudinal study will examine the development of locomotor skills and object control skills of a cohort of children from kindergarten to grade 4. Further, change in the motor proficiency of children ‘at risk’ of motor delay in kindergarten will be compared to the rest of the cohort."

Hollis Roberts

Project title:

Department: Visual Arts

Faculty supervisor: Prof. Megan Dickie

"My work explores themes of trust, consumerism, preconceived knowledge and family. It is meant to disrupt spaces that would otherwise seem mundane. I want to ask the viewer to reflect on their own notions of vulnerability, intimacy, and passive relationships with the objects that surround them. By removing the function of the objects, my work will prompt the viewer to have a dialogue with themselves about how to interact with the work and how it challenges their perceptions. I intend to focus my research on the connection between design and function. I am also inspired by discussion of objects and their relationship to the human body. I will analyze this through writings by theorists such as Jacques Derrida, Sarah Ahmed. With this research I will create a series of objects that will occupy a liminal space. The pieces will represent the familiar while simultaneously disrupting it. I will repurpose found objects and manipulate the form so that they resemble items found within the home but confuse the original form. This kind of disruption will evoke disorientation, and displacement, not only in the objects themselves but also in the viewer and how they occupy the space with these objects."

Ida Jorgenson

Project title:

Department: Environmental Studies

Faculty supervisor: Dr. James Rowe

"I will be undertaking a historical analysis of climate change denial. I am particularly interested in what appears to be a new form of denial – climate change denial 2.0 – that accepts the validity of climate science while willfully neglecting required action. This seemingly new form denies the reality of climate change in deed if not in word. I will be developing a research paper that historicizes climate change denial and then seeks to understand how it is shifting under current conditions when the scientific consensus on climate change is hardening. How are historical deniers responding to this hardened consensus?"

Irina Ridzuan

Project title:

Department: Art History & Visual Studies

Faculty supervisor: Dr. Evanthia Baboula

"Garden of Déduit: The Influence of Byzantine Gardens on the Roman de Ia Rose

The Roman de Ia Rose is a 13th century French poem, written by Guillaume de Lorris and later completed by Jean de Meun, about a young man's dream of a guarded garden and his conquest of a rose. The allegorical themes and literary devices employed by the poets have led scholars to attribute the renaissance of the Hellenistic romance genre in 12th century Byzantium as the source of literary inspiration. However, little attention has been paid to the accompanying illustrations of the manuscripts in regards to this thesis.

This research proposes to examine the poem's illustrated garden setting, the Garden of Déduit, in the light of Byzantine garden representations. Byzantine illustrations are related to the ambiguous perception of a garden as an Edenic space and an earthly pleasure place. I argue that French painters made use of that Byzantine-derived ambiguity as a thematic device that strengthens the poem's allegorical nature. I will locate this project within the relationship between France and Byzantium after the siege of Constantinople by the Crusaders in 1204. This was a catalytic event that brought Byzantine and earlier Greek traditions into the French arts and literature scene, and one  that is  becoming an area of academic focus.

This project aims to situate Byzantine aesthetics into the artistic and cultural changes in medieval art that later brought about the European Renaissance."


Jack Baker

Project title:

Department: Geography

Faculty supervisor: Dr. David Atkinson

"Assessing the state of icefields in the Rockies is an important component to predicting the trajectory of water resources into the future. Several major Canadian and US rivers rise in the Canadian Rockies, yet field measurements from the source icefields and glaciers are rare; particularly measurements that go through the winter accumulation season. Another important component that is missing from many analyses is the impact that day-to-day weather events have on icefields that feed the valley glaciers. It is evident that the frequency of unusual weather events is increasing; one major event has the potential to change the course of a melt or accumulation season. These need to be factored into the more traditional, seasonally averaged climatology-based assessments that relate glacier response to atmospheric drivers on the broad scale.

This project will make use of a new data set gathered at a weather station located in the Canadian Rockies on Columbia Icefield, operated by Prof. Atkinson, and relate it to day-to-day weather events using weather maps. Of interest is determining where moisture comes from, the frequency of summertime snow and melt events, and the relationship between high and low pressure systems with surface melting response. I expect to improve my use of spreadsheets and I am hoping to learn some more advanced programming, perhaps using R language."


Jack McCaskill

Project title:

Department: Political Science

Faculty supervisor: Dr. Amy Verdun

"The North American Free Trade Agreement (NAFTA) enables Canada, the United States (US) and Mexico to trade freely with one another. An investor-state dispute settlement facilitates differences. NAFTA Article 11 empowers foreign investors to challenge the regulatory measures. A growing concern is that NAFTA leads to non-state actors impeding Canada’s ability to pursue policy relating to labour and environmentalism. Using interviews and assessing court cases, I will research how NAFTA has affected Canada’s sovereignty. I will interview various stakeholders. My project supervisor, Amy Verdun, will teach me about doing interviews with officials."

Janina Esquivel

Project title:

Department: Nursing

Faculty supervisor: Dr. Karen MacKinnon

"The project I am proposing is to explore changing work relationships between RN’s and LPN’s using a systematic review research method known as the Joanna Briggs Institute (JBI) approach. The JBI is an internationally renowned leader in evidence-based health care that provides a systematic process for finding and appraising evidence; a process supported by training, tools, a peer-review process, and networking to inform best practices. This method was initiated to have a collaborative approach for evaluating evidence from a variety of sources. In this way, healthcare professionals could have access to the best international evidence and consequently improve patient outcomes globally. Overall, JBI is one of the top Internet resources that supports evidence-based nursing practice, allowing easy use and access to high quality resources.

Regarding student development, working with JBI would provide invaluable learning and a chance to expand my knowledge by exposure to strong relationships between academic, research, practice, and policy partners. Specifically, I will focus on how the research review approach supports evidence informed practice and how it contributes to knowledge translation. Additionally, I will learn about the process of developing and conducting a systematic review with the focus on intradisciplinary collaborative relationships. Furthermore, this project will enable me to participate and learn how to search for relevant and appropriate research studies through team collaboration. Finally, I will learn to facilitate the review process of research papers. Overall, this academic project would be an incredible opportunity for learning, where knowledge and skill in academic inquiry can be challenged."


Jeffery Simpson

Project title:

Department: Germanic & Slavic Studies

Faculty supervisor: Dr. Julia Rochtchina

"This research project will provide an in-depth examination of the pre-Christian deities of the Slavic people, both etymologically as well as textually, through surviving works of the period in both English and the vernacular tongue. Due to the relative scarcity of surviving sources, little is known about the deities of the pagan Slavs, and the amount of academic work on the topic, especially in English is very little. Despite this, there is an obvious desire to determine the origins and meanings of these gods as evidenced by the quickly-growing neo-pagan cult in not only Russia, but Canada as well, headed by such influential men as Lev Sylenko and Volodomyr Shaian, both of whom were Ukrainian residents of Ontario. So great is the need by modern historians and neo-paganists alike to discover their Slavic heritage, forgeries such as the infamous Book of Veles have been created in an attempt to forge a national identity, which up until the late 20th century, was still being used as material in Slavic high schools.

This project not only hopes to explore and reveal the mysteries associated with the topic, but also to add to the body of English scholarship, making it more accessible for future students and enthusiasts to better understand the religious views of the pre-Christian Slavic people."


Jeremy Thomsen

Project title:

Department: Greek & Roman Studies

Faculty supervisor: Dr. Laurel Bowman

"The Hymn to Demeter tells the story of the abduction and rape of Persephone by Hades, and Demeter's heart-wrenching search for, and ultimate reunion with, her lost daughter. The Eleusinian Mysteries are one of the oldest and perhaps most famous of the ancient Greek mystery religions. In my research, I intend to demonstrate how the Hymn to Demeter provides many valuable insights into the Eleusinian Mysteries, its core rites, and its understanding and expression of birth, love, sex, death, and the afterlife."

Jesse Bachmann

Project title:

Department: Germanic & Slavic Studies

Faculty supervisor: Dr. Matt Pollard

"Friedrich Nietzsche’s infamous reputation originates in the notion that his philosophy has often been deemed infectious and dangerous, particularly for youth. The role Nietzsche played as an inspiration for the 1924 Leopold and Loeb case, resulting in the “trial of the century” as well as his misappropriation by the Nazis are indicative of this widespread connection between his writing and criminality / immorality. A more recent example of the “danger” of Nietzsche’s philosophy can be found in Black Metal. Emerging in Norway in the early 90’s as an extreme, highly transgressive sub-genre of Heavy Metal, Black Metal exhibited a combination of violence, Satanism, Neo-Nazism, and Nietzschean influences. More specifically, as the basis for the scene’s extremity and transgressive nature, Black Metal expressed a loose ideology that echoed Nietzschean philosophy. The goal of this project will be to investigate the nature of the link between Nietzsche and Black metal with the intent of proposing a series of theses around which to build a presentation. Preliminary research angles will investigate topics such as: What attracted Black Metal musicians to Nietzsche’s thought? How strongly did Nietzsche’s philosophy influence both the outlook but also the music of Black Metal musicians? Can Nietzsche’s philosophy actually be identified as a causal factor behind the violent and transgressive elements of Black Metal - if at all? If or if not, the questions remain: how do we understand the relationship between Black Metal and Nietzsche?"

Jesse Spooner

Project title:

Department: Biochemistry & Microbiology

Faculty supervisor: Dr. Caroline Cameron

"My honour’s project will revolve around a new project being initiated in the Cameron laboratory, in collaboration with Dr. Marty Boulanger (UVic), Dr. Tara Moriarty (University of Toronto) and Dr. Chris Kenyon (University of Antwerp, Belgium).  The overall research project will investigate the role of the protein products encoded by a novel operon found within the T. pallidum genome, encompassing open reading frames Tp0480-Tp0484.

We hypothesize this operon encodes proteins involved in human extracellular matrix component “mimicking”, thus facilitating a novel mechanism of immune evasion.  This mechanism could explain, at least partially, why Treponema pallidum can remain latent, with no associated host response, for up to 50 years following initial infection. 

My honours project will encompass three goals:

  1. In collaboration with Dr. Boulanger, design primers to amplify regions of the ORFs that have the highest chance for successfully producing soluble protein upon heterologous expression.
  2. Clone these PCR fragments into appropriate expression vectors, and express and purify the corresponding recombinant proteins.
  3. In collaboration with Dr. Moriarty, design primers to amplify the full length ORFs for heterologous expression in a non-infectious strain of the spirochete Borrelia burgdorferi.  These constructs will then be used in Dr. Moriarty’s artificial bloodstream model and for intravital microscopy within a living mouse, to determine the gain-of-function conferred by heterologous expression of these treponemal proteins within the non-infectious spirochete.

These investigations are expected to uncover a completely novel and highly exciting mechanism of successful host evasion."


Jesse York

Project title:

Department: Art History and Visual Studies

Faculty supervisor: Dr. Marcus Milwright

"With Clive, Roberts, and Allenby: The Role of Illustrations in British Adventure Novels of the 19th and 20th Centuries

Often deemed the "golden age" of children's literature, the mid-19th to early 20th centuries saw a rapid increase in the production of adventure novels aimed at an adolescent audience. Seminal authors like G. A. Henty and later F. S. Brereton captivated thousands of British youth with illustrated tales in Britain's distant colonies.

This research project addresses the collection of adventure novels residing in the University of Victoria's McPherson Library and Special Collections. While current scholarship has addressed how authors projected imperialist ideologies tied to heroism, masculinity, and duty onto their fictional narratives, fewer have addressed the significance of the novels' illustrations. This project does the latter by interpreting how these ideals are given visual credence through their depiction of real military figures like Clive, Roberts, and Allenby, and the contrasting portrayal of their adversaries. As these adversaries vary greatly between novels, a focus on those set in India and the Near East facilitates a closer look at the complexities of Britain's hierarchical colonial relationships as they were communicated to leaders in historic events like the Sepoy Mutiny and the Second Anglo-Afghan war. By inviting readers into the narrative, these illustrations both contributed  to the novels' verisimilitude and fostered stronger relationships between youth and empire.

This research is foundational to my honours thesis which, after participation in the Digital Humanities Summer Institute in June 2016, aims to digitize the illustrations in this collection.”


Joseph Takeda

Project title:

Department: English

Faculty supervisor: Dr. Nicole Shukin

"“Unless the stone bursts with telling,” explains the narrator of Joy Kogawa’s Obasan, “there is in my life no living word.” Kogawa's appraisal of the silencing force of Japanese-Canadian internment on both bodies and the environment echoes contemporary political scholar Glen Coulthard's theory of “grounded normativity.” As decolonial praxis, “grounded normativity” refers to the “modalities of Indigenous land-connected practices” that reflect the land as a “system of reciprocal relations and obligations” (Red Skin, White Masks, 13). Political wrongs, for Kogawa and Coulthard, affect not only human actors but also the environmental objects that inhabit the land. While new materialist thought and long-standing Indigenous epistemologies discuss the ethical and ontological relationships between humans and land, contemporary diasporic criticism tends to deconstruct concepts of land. Notions of a “homeland,” for diasporic scholars, are often discussed as discursive productions of the West which fail to address complex questions of belonging.

Marie Clements’ play Burning Vision sets the stage for a critical encounter between diasporic, ecological, and Indigenous thought. Set during World War II uranium mining on Sahtu Dene lands, Burning Vision questions the entanglements of colonialism, capitalism, diaspora, ecological crisis, and political apology. Informed by scholars such as Larissa Lai, Leanne Simpson, and Jane Bennett, my reading of Burning Vision unsettles two material actors that animate the ecology and the contemporary politics of land—rock and water— to ask two major questions: how does decolonizing ecological and diasporic thought affect understandings of land and how could land function as a technology of reconciliation?"


Kailey Allan

Project title:

Department: Mechanical Engineering

Faculty supervisor: Dr. Rishi Gupta

"The current state of modern (or stabilized) rammed earth structures in BC is unknown. It is unclear whether modern rammed earth will experience the same longevity as the ancient structures remaining today such as, the Great Wall of China. This research aims to address the following question: have the two modern rammed walls at the University of Victoria’s First Peoples House felt the effects of environmental weathering over the period of it’s 7 year life? A rebound hammer, infrared camera, and a new method developed to quantify surface deterioration were used in Non-Destructive Testing (NDT). The results provided insight into the compressive strength, thermal envelope and surface condition of the walls. Relationships between wind direction and wind speed are presented. It is postulated that the wall that is most exposed to a combination of both effects will exhibit the largest forms of deterioration. This hypothesis was addressed using results from NDT and local wind data.

Currently, little literature is available on the longevity of modern rammed earth. It is intended that this research provide the public with literature that will aid in the development of future modern rammed earth technology."


Katherine Savoy

Project title:

Department: Pacific & Asian Studies

Faculty supervisor: Dr. Tim Iles

"This project performs a detailed analysis and critique of escapism in select works of Japanese fantasy, exploring the meta-mechanism of in-text escapism and its relation to that of the audience. In this analysis, I will look at the role of, and understand, fantasy from the diegetic perspectives within the text, and the interaction between fantasy and the real. I will then examine how this relationship is situated beyond the text, looking between the narrative and its context."

Katherine Thwaites

Project title:

Department: Women's Studies

Faculty supervisor: Dr. Annalee Lepp

"My proposed research project will explore the implicit codes embedded in superhero fan subcultures through the limited representation of diverse subjects. With the majority of superheroes in leading comic book titles being White, cisgendered, and heterosexual men, fans who do not see themselves reflected in these identities employ unique and diverse strategies that help to produce space for them in a medium where they are often rendered invisible in the margins. I will interview 15 to 20 superhero comic fans whose identities do not comply with the limited frame of references that form the hegemony of this medium. These interviews will explore the reasons why they enjoy the superhero narrative, how they relate to the characters in these narratives, the strategies they use to engage in fan subcultures, their sense of inclusion and safety in fan spaces (both physical and online) and whether they consider an increased diversification of characters valuable/necessary for the future of the medium."

Kelsey Legault

Project title:

Department: Computer Science

Faculty supervisor: Dr. Yvonne Coady

"New communication tools used by mass media are concurrently emerging through the medium of software development. The efficiency and availability of these communication technologies (online advertising, user data analysis, instant messaging, etc.,) are influencing trends in popular culture and shaping the ways in which we communicate to one another, formulating a brand new culture that I am committed to exploring. I am passionate about investigating how popular culture is affected by the manipulation of mass media and software development, and how these entities influence the way in which we communicate.

Mass media has been majorly influencing popular culture through new communication technologies for the past century. 1Grossberg, Wartella, and Whitney explain in their article about popular culture that it is important to continue to question the way in which communication technologies affect popular culture, because the context and use case of these technologies will always correlate with forever changing historical and cultural situations.

Citation:

1. Grossberg, Lawrence, Ellen Wartella, and D. Charles Whitney. Mediamaking.
Thousand Oaks, Calif.: Sage Publications, 1998. Google Book Search. Web. February 25, 2015."


Kenda Chang-Swanson

Project title:

Department: Interdisciplinary Studies

Faculty supervisor: Dr. Martha McMahon

"My research project will explore how the realities of climate change can be presented to students in ways that enable them to engage the issues rather than leave them depressed or disempowered. The focus will be on enabling and encouraging community engagement by students as ways of learning about mitigating and adapting to climate change. The interconnections between social justice and climate change issues and a methodological lens of intersectionality will inform this interdisciplinary project. I will study food as a concrete case where undergraduates can see and study the opportunities for individual and community engagement in local initiatives as well as have the chance to study emerging regional and global networks of response to the issues of climate change. This is a research project that is grounded in recognizing the deep connections between social justice and ecological justice."

Kiera Anne Powell Smith

Project title:

Department: Geography

Faculty supervisor: Dr. Johannes Feddema

“Characterizing the Mixed Severity Fire Regime of the Sinclair Restoration Area, Kootenay National Park

The Sinclair Restoration Area, in Kootenay National Park would have historically been typified by an open grassland Douglas fir ecosystem ideal for winter and transitional habitat of the provincially blue listed Rocky Mountain Bighorn Sheep. This landscape structure was likely maintained by a mixed severity fire regime that included low severity decadal grass fires and high severity centennial stand replacing fires. Due to a policy of fire suppression, the last burn in the area likely occurred in the late 1880s. This management strategy resulted in a dense forest structure now unsuitable and undesirable for wildlife. Parks Canada managers are restoring this area by emulating the natural disturbance dynamic, maintained by fire in the past, through prescribed burning.

This project will directly aid mangers in determining objectives for prescribed burns by informing them of the recurrence interval of prehistorical fires and the historic forest structure. Tree cookies with fire scars will be collected from Douglas fir trees to describe the year and frequency of past fire events. Increment core samples will be collected from a minimum of 20 neighbouring trees to determine stand in-fill dynamics. Dendrochronological methods will provide insight on climate variation, historic fire frequency, return intervals, and the effects of fire on forest composition and structure, over length of the tree-ring record. To assist with ongoing management initiatives, recommendations will be made as to the desirable fire return interval needed to restore the natural forest structure.”


Kimberly Kuffner

Project title:

Department: Medieval Studies

Faculty supervisor: Dr. Erin McGuire

"Lamps from the Viking Age

When discussing artefacts from the Viking Age, there has often been a focus on more ornate and detailed objects such as weapons, brooches, or pendants; however, common domestic objects are often left out of the spotlight. The objects found in the domestic sphere help to provide opportunities for us to learn more about the habits of a Viking person as they went about their daily lives. One such object that is frequently overlooked is the lamp. These lamps are constructed of steatite, clay, or metal and were used as a source of light and heat in the dark dwellings of the Vikings.

Experimental archaeology provides an actualistic approach to archaeological research. Drawing on both published accounts of archaeological experiments and relevant excavation reports, it is my goal to design and implement a series of replicative experiments to examine Viking Age lamp technology. In doing so, I hope to achieve a number of research objectives. First, I will explore the construction process for the lamps. This will include the relative ease in which they are created with the tools Vikings would have had available to them. Second, I will experiment with several different lamp shapes, wick types, and fuel sources based on archaeological finds to discover which types, if any, are able to produce more light or heat, (and less smoke), and thus be considered a more useful product overall. Finally, I will explore options for the use of these lamps to discover if they were used for more than just light and warmth. This project will contribute to the growing body of literature associated with experimental archaeology."


Kyle McCreanor

Project title:

Department: Hispanic & Italian Studies

Faculty supervisor: Prof. Matthew Koch

"Terrorism and Resistance in the Basque Country, 1959-1975
My research project will address the philosophy and actions of the Basque revolutionary guerrilla organization, Euskadi ta Askatasuna (ETA) from its origin until the end of the Franco Regime. It will engage the definition of 'terrorism' and explore the applicability of the term to the Basque Conflict during the Franco Regime."

Kylie Pettifer

Project title:

Department: Geography

Faculty supervisor: Dr. Michele-Lee Moore

"Globally, we have the most educated generation of young people in history with a desire to live prosperous lives in safe and socially just countries. Yet, unemployment rates among youth remain high, not only reinforcing the cycle of poverty, but in many cases leading to civil unrest. At the same time, humanity is facing one of its largest challenges in history: climate change and the socio-environmental threat of a business-as-usual economic model. Could a solution be to address these issues in tandem? My research aims to explore this question in the Canadian context. How can we transform our private sector to promote more resilient socio-ecological systems? Is there a way to reduce Canada’s high un-and under-employment of youth in the process? I will address these questions by looking at the role of youth as change agents in the private sector. Specifically I will look at the opportunities, barriers and motivations of youth in Canada to engaging in intra- and entrepreneurship efforts for social and environmental change by interviewing young people age 18-30 that have been able to pursue profitable change endeavors such as starting a social enterprise at that age in the last 10 years, surveying youth on university campuses about their motivations and barriers towards these types of private sector roles  and examining alternative business models to better understand how we can support youth that want to engage in social enterprise and foster innovation for a greener, more resilient economy."

Kyra McLeod

Project title:

Department: Visual Arts

Faculty supervisor: Prof. Robert Youds

"I plan to explore the tensions in urban settings that arise from the global pressure put on individuals to become global citizens. As globalization expands and deepens into every aspect of our culture, it minimizes the importance of local community and puts a new focus on the global citizen. As a result, urban life is emphasized while the natural world is increasingly exploited. Through the mediums of sculpture and painting, I intend to study the relationship we form with our urban and natural environments in this context. From destroying nature in favour of urban development to reinstating nature within these developments, my research questions the conceptions of the natural world and the role it plays in our identity as both global and urban citizens. I intend to analyze Canadian political ecology and the myths surrounding Canada and the natural world. Using visual juxtapositions, I will highlight the tensions individuals face in adopting a global identity at the expense of national values. My research will be focused on studio based practice to create a body of work that challenges and explores notions of urban identity and the natural world."

Landon MacGillivray

Project title:

Department: Chemistry

Faculty supervisor: Dr. Scott McIndoe and Dr. Fraser Hof

"My honours’ project will be jointly run in the Hof and McIndoe groups. The impact of this work will be to develop ‘smart’ sensors that give unprecedented chemical understanding of life processes important to human development and disease.

Calixarenes are bowl shaped molecules that can strongly bind cationic molecules in their open cavity. The Hof research group has found that calixarenes decorated with fluorescent appendages are quenched through self-aggregation. This phenomenon suggests that these molecules can be used as sensors for certain biomolecules (called trimethyllysines), which bind to the sensors, disaggregate them, and restore a bright fluorescence.

1. My plan is to prepare the appropriate calixarene, functionalize it with a fluorescent tag, and examine the self-quenching behavior of the fluorescent calixarene at various concentrations. I will also synthesize peptides containing a lysine residue that is modified such that tri-, di- and mono-methylated lysine products are isolated. I will then determine which degree of methylation expresses the best binding affinity for the calixarene pocket by monitoring the increase in fluorescent activity upon addition to a self-quenching fluorescent calixarene system.

2. Additionally, I will monitor the loss of fluorescence upon addition of demethylase enzymes. The enzyme JMJD2a causes demethylation of lysine residues, and is linked to the development of aggressive cancers. The processing of peptides by JMJD2a will be monitored in real time by both fluorescence and Electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (ESI-MS)—the area of expertise of the McIndoe group. Both analyses are unprecedented for this class of enzymes, and the combination of both methods in a single analysis is a specialized kind of analysis being developed by the McIndoe group that will help us to understand the individual steps in the reaction in minute detail."


Laurence Godard

Project title:

Department: Linguistics

Faculty supervisor: Dr. Ewa Czaykowska-Higgins

"When a language is lost or under pressure of disappearing, it is not only a means of communication that is threatened but also the world views and the culture of individuals and communities that are associated with these languages. As shown in the report of the Truth and Reconciliation Commission (2015), in the Canadian context, language and cultural loss has resulted from drastic population loss and from oppressive and marginalizing policies enacted by the government, and reinforced through residential schools. The effects of this oppression are still felt today: the 2014 Report of the Status of B.C. First Nation Languages specifies that all Indigenous languages of B.C. are in critical state of endangerment. As part of a reclamation and decolonization process, numerous communities have initiated cultural and language revitalization efforts. These initiatives have led researchers worldwide to begin to explore the question: what is the role of language revitalization in the healing process of Indigenous communities and individuals? This research project proposes to contribute to this emergent body of literature and to our understanding of the connection between language and healing by considering healing through a holistic view of wellness. As well, this research also aims to assist non-Indigenous people, including the researcher (me), to have a better understanding of the possible positive impacts of language revitalization for Indigenous communities and individuals.  The project will be based upon a survey of published work as well as interviews with individuals who are involved in language revitalization initiatives. The project will use the principles of Grounded Theory and Feminist Theory and will be framed within an Indigenist paradigm, informed by Indigenous world views."

Libby Edwards

Project title:

Department: Philosophy

Faculty supervisor: Dr. Cindy Holder

"I am interested in exploring sites of moral tension as they exist within the context of human rights. Specifically, I am eager to explore the ways in which moral tensions present in communities struggling for recognition of basic human rights act as catalysts for moral creativity and moral transformation. This research project will involve first and foremost an investigation into the philosophy of human rights and an in-depth exploration of the question: “what are we talking about when we talk about ‘human rights’?”. It will also necessarily include an elucidation of John Wall’s notion of moral creativity as it is given in his book Moral Creativity: Paul Ricoeur and the Poetics of Possibility (2005). Briefly stated, Wall defends a view in which creativity is posited as a “primordial human capability” that is presupposed in moral life (2005). When properly channelled, our moral creativity works to create new social relations and moral worlds. Working within this framework, I will conduct further research into the nature of various human rights struggles across the globe in order to identify moral tensions present in these contexts. Ultimately, I seek to examine sites of moral tension to the end of revealing the ways in which they motivate moral creativity and lead to the transformation of social relations and moral worlds."

Lindsay Cavanaugh

Project title:

Department: Curriculum & Instruction

Faculty supervisor: Dr. Kathy Sanford

"Drawing on queer theory and feminist discourses, I will be examining and constructing practical ways that educators can foster queer-affirming spaces – spaces that positively acknowledge the diversity of gender and sexual identities both through curricular learning and school atmosphere.  I am interested in learning about various barriers teachers face to integrating knowledge of gender and sexuality in their classrooms. I believe that overcoming these obstacles will enable educators to better support LGBTQ* learners.

In my research so far, I have investigated the idea of consciousness-raising – the sharing of personal stories – as a means for fostering and strengthening community bonds.  I now wish to develop consciousness-raising techniques that teachers can apply in their classrooms – lesson activities that bridge curriculum expectations with conversations about gender and sexuality.  In this research project, I would apply my understanding of consciousness-raising while teaching English on my upcoming practicum.  Before introducing this material, however, I would gauge the school’s attitudes and knowledge about LGBTQ* identities through administrating surveys to staff and students (following UVic’s Human Research Ethics).  After applying consciousness-raising methodologies, I would follow up with the students and staff where possible and with consent, to see if attitudes and understandings have shifted at all.  I anticipate this research to be purely qualitative – based on observations, interviews, and surveys."


Lisa Szostek

Project title:

Department: Biology

Faculty supervisor: Dr. Julia Baum

"Kiritimati, Kiribati is a remote Pacific atoll whose citizens are faced with challenges such as climate change and overfishing which threaten the local fish stocks that most residents rely on for subsistence fishing. In addition to these stressors, a storm unprecedented in size and vigour hit the atoll in January 2015. My research project aims to understand how this storm affected coral reef benthos communities on Kiritimati. As extreme weather events are becoming more common, this research could provide essential information for island and coastal nations that have or will experience large storms. This project will be done by analyzing the coral reef composition and cover in photos taken of the coral reef benthos before (August 2014), during (January 2015) and after (May and July 2015) the storm at various sites around the atoll. Subsequent steps include statistical analysis and formal reporting of the findings. This project is especially interesting to me because I had the chance to volunteer on two intensive trips to Kiritimati this summer during which much of the data I will be using was collected (May and July 2015). It will allow me to experience all aspects of conducting scientific research including preparing for a field season, collecting data, analyzing data, conducting statistical analyses and writing a formal report."


Lucy Bartlett

Project title:

Department: Psychology

Faculty supervisor: Dr. James Tanaka

"Facial expressions are the window into our emotions, allowing us to decipher and interpret what we are feeling in a particular moment. As "face experts", most people can quickly and accurately produce and decode facial expressions. Autism spectrum disorder (ASD) is typified by poor social skills, as well as impairments in expression perception and difficulty generating appropriate facial affect. Individuals with ASD may instead produce emotionally flat or ambiguous expressions which further jeopardize effective facial communication, and by extension, social skills.

To ameliorate these deficits, we will provide a low cost, safe, evidence-based intervention using an engaging, game-style training program called "FaceMaze". FaceMaze utilizes expression recognition software that analyzes expression quality in real-time, as well as gives feedback to the user. In a Pac-Man-style game interface, users have fun practicing expression production and receive instantaneous feedback about expression type and strength. We hypothesize a functional link between identifying and producing facial expressions, where practice in expression production positively influences expression identification. Game-play should improve facial expression production and perception, and by extension, elevate the quality of social interactions leading to a higher quality of life."


Luke Fair

Project title:

Department: Visual Arts

Faculty supervisor: Prof. Robert Youds

"Canadian culture is often identified as having a strong connection to the environment in its northern condition. Starting in the early twentieth century, Canadian artists sought to create art that could build Canadian identity apart from European styles and subject matter. Though clearly evident in Canadian culture, the grandeur of environment appears to be more romantic and mythological than true representation. These artworks have created the look and feel of an environmental state thought to be 'natural'. I am interested in how the experience of a 'natural' place can influence ones thoughts and emotions. Experiencing artworks that are influenced by place therefore has insight into the experience of the artist.

I would like to investigate such art forms that have contributed to the Canadian mythology of environment and create art that is inspired by the myths themselves rather than the actual land. My research will involve exploring different visual art, performing art, music and literature inspired by 'Canadian' landscape. Such research will not be limited by political 'Canadian' borders but rather geographical areas in order to explore the tie between place and identity. I will primarily use painting and sculpture to convey my interpretations of the land that the researched artist experienced. The art work created will bypass the traditional way of pictorially representing landscape and enter an abstracted realm using geographical inspired artworks as the source. In addition to the JCURA exhibit, my proposed research will seek to exhibit in local galleries and public locations around Victoria."


Madeline Guy

Project title:

Department: Nursing

Faculty supervisor: Dr. Lenora Marcellus

"The HerWay Home program is an integrated primary maternity program in Victoria that provides support for pregnant and newly parenting women coping with substance use, mental health issues, violence and trauma, poverty, unstable housing, and other social issues. Dr. Marcellus has received a CIHR grant to interview women and men who are clients of this program about their experiences and recommendations for health care providers and communities on how to best support families. I will be working with Dr. Marcellus to conduct qualitative analysis of data specifically focused on how participants define success related to how the HerWay Home program works. Following analysis, we will be preparing a manuscript for publication and a presentation or poster for the February 2016 Perinatal Services BC conference."

Maria Finnsdottir

Project title:

Department: Sociology

Faculty supervisor: Dr. Zheng Wu

"I propose to study issues related to social inequality in education using Statistics Canada databases. The focus will be on identifying key variables that account unequal access to higher education in a subset of the Canadian population (to be determined in consultation with my supervisor)."

Mark McIntyre

Project title:

Department: Anthropology

Faculty supervisor: Dr. Alexandrine Boudreault-Fournier

“In the age of digital supremacy, where an infinite amount of music is available at the click of a button, there has been a resurgence of formerly obsolete musical formats.  Vinyl records, a medium thought to have faded into oblivion when CDs were embraced as the industry standard, have since seen a resurgence among underground music labels and their major label counterparts, selling over 4 million units in 2014.  Physical media in the age of the MP3 is rare, yet both independent and major record labels have embraced the vinyl medium.  Interestingly, in tandem with the vinyl revival, cassette tapes have become the medium of choice for independent bands interested in distributing their music and ideas on the cheap.  While many online platforms allow the free distribution of music, cassette tapes can be found on merchandise tables of independent Victoria bands whose music spans the underground spectrums of folk, punk rock, garage, noise, metal, and indie rock.  This project will seek to understand why Victoria bands, record labels, and consumers prefer the physical medium of the cassette tape in the MP3 era and the importance that cassettes play in Victoria’s underground music communities.

This project’s methodology will consist of a literature review, interviews with bands, labels, record shop owners, and consumers, and deep hanging out at venues where cassettes are bought and sold, namely concerts and record stores.  As this research involves human subjects, I will seek ethics approval from the University of Victoria’s Human Ethics Board.”


Mary Drohan

Project title:

Department: Social Work

Faculty supervisor: Dr. Bruce Wallace, Social Work and Centre for Addictions Research (CARBC)

"Meth pipes: An exploratory study of harm reduction services for users of methamphetamine in Victoria, BC
Needle exchange programs that offer sterile needles and syringes have been implemented by service providers as a harm reduction practice in response to high rate of HIV, Hepatitis C (HCV), and other blood-borne illnesses among people who are injection drug users. More recently, some service providers have begun to offer safer smoking crack pipe kits. The intention behind these harm reduction measures is primarily to reduce the risk of the transmission of blood-borne illnesses by the practice of sharing consumption equipment. AIDS Vancouver Island (AVI) operates the primary needle exchange for the greater Victoria area and also provides safer smoking crack pipe kits.

The Centre for Addictions Research of BC (CARBC) has found that the rate of crystal methamphetamine use in so-called Victoria has steadily increased from 2010-2015 through The BC Alcohol and Other Drug (AOD) Monitoring Project’s High Risk Population Survey. Recognizing these trends in the community they serve, AVI implemented a meth pipe pilot program in June 2014.

In this exploratory research project I aim to investigate the needs of crystal methamphetamine users in Victoria and assess how their needs are being met and risk is reduced by the pilot project. To do this I will conduct a survey of clients who use crystal methamphetamine to create a small sample from which to draw preliminary findings. This information will inform service implementation at AVI as well as provide insights for much needed further research to best support the emerging needs the trend towards crystal methamphetamine use requires."


Mary Makowski

Project title:

Department: Psychology

Faculty supervisor: Dr. Ulrich Mueller

"It has been argued that the ability to work together with others (i.e., to cooperate with others) toward a shared goal is particularly pronounced in humans compared to other species. Recent research on the development of cooperation indicates that cooperative behaviours already emerge in the second year of life. However, it is unclear to what extent these behaviours reflect an understanding of working toward a shared goal. Using an experimental paradigm, the aim of the present study is to examine whether an understanding of shared goals underlies 1- to 2-year-old children's cooperative behaviours. The infants will work with a research assistant toward completing a task that cannot completed by either one alone, thus cooperation is required. The task will be interrupted, and in one condition the experimenter will express an interest in continuing the task, and in the other condition the experimenter will signal that she is not interested in the task anymore. The researcher's disinterest reflects that the original goal is no longer desired by the researcher. The infants' reactions (e.g., their communication to reengage the experimenter) once the researcher has signaled her disinterest in the task will indicate whether they understand shared goals. Through the testing of infant social cognitive capacities, the project will contribute to and clarify research findings from studies conducted by Warneken and Tomasello (2006). The proposed project will extend the existing body of knowledge concerning infant development through the analysis of cooperative behavior."

Melissa Starke

Project title:

Department: Chemistry

Faculty supervisor: Dr. Fraser Hof

"Post-translational methylation (PTM) is understood to have a very important role in proteins. The pre-enrichment of methylated proteins is essential for identification, however current techniques are not very effective. During my research I plan to pre-enrich methylated proteins using a supramolecular methyl-affinity column, which will be optimized to increase selectivity for methylated proteins over unmethylated proteins. Proteomics analysis on these pre-enriched methylated proteins is expected to give improved identification of methylation sites over the non-enriched protein samples. This analysis is intended to increase our understanding of PTM in proteins, confirming known methylation sites and identifying unknown methylation sites."


Nicholas Guerreiro

Project title:

Department: Theatre

Faculty supervisor: Dr. Anthony Vickery

"HMS Parliament, or the Lady who loved a Government Clerk is a Canadian political satire from the 1880s that criticizes the corruption of John A. MacDonald's second government by casting him as the captain on an ersatz version of Gilbert and Sullivan's HMS Pinafore. Although the topical nature of this text makes its humour inaccessible to modern readers, I believe that, with careful annotation, playwright William H. Fuller's imaginative libretto will reveal its secrets. By using archival material and other primary sources to provide context I will endeavor to use HMS Parliament to show how the strong links between British and Early Canadian identity, both artistically and politically, are revealed in both the form and content of this popular operetta."

Nick Benson

Project title:

Department: Mathematics & Statistics

Faculty supervisor: Dr. Kieka Mynhardt

"The problem of placing (a maximum number of) independent queens on an n-by-n chessboard, and its counterpart of using (the fewest number of) queens to dominate an n-by-n chessboard, are well-known problems in graph theory, since they are are easy to state and pleasant to view, but give rise to some surprisingly difficult questions. They are also well-known in computer science, since they can be used to illustrate basic algorithmic techniques in an intuitive way, yet they demand continually more inventive algorithms to solve the larger cases. This summer, Kieka and I have been studying the generalization of these problems to chessboards of more than two players, and have found that this problem maintains the intrigues of the two-player case while adding interesting dynamics of its own. (A couple of examples: independence is no longer an easy problem, and, due to board constructions relying heavily on the parity of n, the dominating number sequence is no longer monotonic!) We have proven (or in some cases generalized) a variety of results, but have encountered many questions as well. We would like to use this upcoming year to delve further into this problem, and to prepare an enjoyable poster and paper."

Nicola Craig Hora

Project title:

Department: Pacific & Asian Studies

Faculty supervisor: Dr. Tim Iles

"I will be examining how Japanese society is dealing with the issues that have arisen as a result of urbanisation and the increasing dependence on urbanised spaces in Japan. The issue that I will be concentrating my research on is alienation as a result of living in an urban environment. Alienation is a central theme in contemporary Japanese horror, which generally takes place in an urban setting. My research project will provide a historical overview of urbanisation in Japan to allow for a better understanding of how the contemporary issue of alienation has arisen. There will be an analysis of a number of texts from the contemporary horror genre to examine how the general public is reacting to these issues, including common fears and concerns."


Nova Hanson

Project title:

Department: Biology

Faculty supervisor: Dr. Rana El-Sabaawi

"I am investigating the differences in nutrient excretion between multiple morphological variants of the three-spine stickleback, Gasterosteus aculeatus, which can result in ecosystem-level impacts on nutrient cycling. The morphological variation that I am interested in are the distinct phenotypes that determine body armour level, with full, partial and low being the different possible phenotypes. My honours project for my undergraduate degree will focus on two local populations of stickleback, one from Swan Lake (freshwater with low armour level), and the other from Gorge Waterway (marine with full armour level)."


Pam Blackstone

Project title:

Department: Linguistics

Faculty supervisor: Dr. Li-Shih Huang

"Anglophones experience certain pronunciation challenges in learning French as a second language (FSL), due—among other things—to differences in the phonological inventories of the two languages. Both research and my own learning experience have shown that certain French vowel sounds present great difficulty for English speakers. Researchers (e.g., Levy 2004; Garrott, 2009) have provided evidence for possible cross-linguistic interference in this regard— findings that are supported by research on FSL acquisition among Japanese and Spanish L1s (e.g., Kamiyama & Vaissière, 2009; Pillot-Loiseau, Antolík, & Kamiyama, 2013; Kartushina & Frauenfelder, 2014). However, research on FSL vowel production in L1s other than those mentioned is scanty.

This study will examine the relationship between the existence of certain sounds (/y, ø, ɛ̃, ɔ̃, ɑ̃, ʁ/ and/or nearby phonemes) in a person's L1 phonological inventory and that individual's successful production of certain L2 French sounds. Through a web-based survey and collection of oral samples, it will involve four groups of participants: one English-speaking and three non-anglophone FSL groups. The languages involved will be determined by the backgrounds of students undertaking an L2 French program who indicate willingness to participate in the study. The web survey will collect background information such as duration and frequency of French exposure, age, gender, and so on. Word lists containing the target sounds within a carrier sentence will be used to elicit the French L2 oral samples, which will be evaluated for intelligibility (i.e., proximity to L1 French sound) by three L1 French speakers.

The findings of this study could have implications for the teaching of French pronunciation, helping instructors identify which phonemes may present the most difficulty for students with a particular L1. It will also contribute to the body of research on cross-linguistic interference, particularly involving speakers of L1s other than English, Japanese, and Spanish.

L1= first language or mother tongue
L2 = second language"


Pamela Langevin

Project title:

Department: Curriculum & Instruction

Faculty supervisor: Dr. Valerie Irvine

“Pamela's project will carry out the implementation and evaluation of a robotics pilot in a K-12 classroom, where learners will be able to choose how they want to join the class. She will help conduct the data collection through interviews during a limited term trial period. The goal is to determine the impact on quality of learning, class community, and attendance to learning. The results will be presented to the school community and via open access webinar. The writeup of results will be submitted for dissemination in the Canadian Journal of Learning and Technology and at research and professional conferences.”

Patrick Dwyer

Project title:

Department: Psychology

Faculty supervisor: Dr. Stephen Lindsay

"We will conduct empirical studies of eyewitness identification performance among individuals who do versus do not self-identify as being on the autism spectrum.  We will measure a number of other factors previously shown to be related to eyewitness identification accuracy, such as response latency and self-rated confidence."

Patrick Teichreb

Project title:

Department: Sociology

Faculty supervisor: Dr. André Smith

"In my proposed research project, I will examine the social factors that inhibit the successful treatment of depression and anxiety disorders and to what extent fictional and non-fictional media contribute to upholding these social barriers."


Petra Francesca Bell Peters

Project title:

Department: Medical Sciences

Faculty supervisor: Dr. Brian Christie

"The tau protein is a microtubule-associated protein, which facilitates tubulin assembly into microtubules and is essential for structural integrity as well as axonal transport. When tau becomes hyperphosphorylated, it aggregates into neurofibrillary tangles disrupting proper cellular functioning. These neurofibrillary tangles are seen dispersed throughout Alzheimers diseased brains, as well as those with neurodegenerative diseases resulting from repeated traumatic brain injury. Understanding the upstream cause of tau phosphorylation is critical in the fight to develop new treatments against tau-mediated neurodegeneration. My project will look at determining the relative phosphorylation levels of tau protein following mild traumatic brain injury (mTBI), as well as quantifying activities of two tau-associated kinases, GSK3-β and CDK5, to determine if changes in these accompany changes in tau protein phosphorylation. Relative levels of tau phosphorylation and activities of GSK3-β and CDK5 will be measured by Western blotting for phosphorylation of tau residues shown to induce microtubule disassembly, and post-translational modifications shown to activate or inhibit GSK3-β and CDK5.

By comparing animals that have received a single concussion with those that have received multiple concussions we will be able to determine the threshold and additive biochemical effects of multiple concussions on kinase activity and tau hyper-phosphorylation. Measuring these at different time points after the final concussion will allow us to create a better picture of what is happening biochemically within the cell to cause these changes, and observe the duration of these changes."


Regina Grishko

Project title:

Department: French

Faculty supervisor: Dr. Catherine Léger

"At the beginning of the 18th century, under the reign of Peter the Great, French culture, literature and language became prestigious in Russia. During this period and subsequently, numerous loanwords, particularly nouns, found their way into the Russian language. For this project, I will examine morphological adaptations of French loanwords into Russian. The language has incorporated into its lexicon numerous nominal borrowings, while transforming them so to respect the rules of word construction in Russian. For instance, the equivalent of French constitution in Russian is constitutsiya; while the root was preserved intact, the nominal suffix -tsiya is used instead of French -tion, creating a whole series of Russian words having French roots and Russian suffixes (presentatsiya, illustratsiya, etc.). However, other lexical items were borrowed from French, without any morphological adaptation; this is the case for engagement, règlement, etc. Therefore, this study will shed light on the different borrowing processes in Russian. Being an international student from Russia, this research will allow me to combine my two passions, French and Russian. It will thus permit me to learn in depth about the long-standing French influence on Russia."

Rhea Ashmead

Project title:

Department: Biology

Faculty supervisor: Dr. Francis Choy

"My research project involves the expression and purification of recombinant alpha -N-acetylglucosaminidase (Naglu-PTD4). My goal is to transfect Spodoptera frugiperda cells to stably express Naglu-PTD4 and then to purify Naglu-PTD4 using high performance column chromatography. The object of this research is to potentially improve the transducibility of Naglu to traverse the cell membrane and the blood brain barrier by using a PTD4 domain. My aim is to improve the delivery of functional Naglu to the central nervous system and make enzyme replacement therapy a more viable treatment for Sanfilippo disease."

Richard May

Project title:

Department: Computer Science

Faculty supervisor: Dr. Sue Whitesides

"My proposed research project is to prove a lower bound on the number of moves required to solve the Tower of Hanoi puzzle, for any number of pegs. I have already researched this topic, and am in the process of writing a finalized academic paper on my results. These results are already presentable, however I am looking into additional problems in the field of Computer Science, and may change the focus of my project if I can gather enough research."

Robert Keel

Project title:

Department: Economics

Faculty supervisor: Dr. Paul Schure

"I would like to conduct an empirical examination of the relationship between the Immigrant Investor program and the price of houses in Vancouver. This program was established in 1986 with the stated goal of making it easier for high net worth individuals to immigrate to Canada. Vancouver's rising housing prices have fueled speculation that demand is being driven by wealthy foreign buyers. The goal of my research project will be to gather empirical data and test the validity of this assumption."

Robyn White

Project title:

Department: Curriculum & Instruction

Faculty supervisor: Dr. Kathy Sanford

"My proposed research topic is to explore ways in which teachers and students view the importance of performative arts programs in schools (i.e., drama/theatre and dance). Through observation, interviews and possibly focus group meetings with teachers and students involved in these programs, I will focus specifically on how  programs build communities, foster relationships and identities for students that they might not otherwise have. I want to explore the potentially profound impact on students’ socio-emotional learning and how various educators through arts education build socially and emotionally safe learning spaces. I will explore the important 'life skills' that arts classrooms focus on, for example development of relationships, time management, accountability, working collaboratively and positively with all types of people that might be in similar social circles, etc. In addition, I want to explore these components of a safe learning community, and find ways to incorporate arts education into the academic classroom in meaningful, contextual, and appropriate ways."

Samantha Bahan

Project title:

Department: Religious Studies

Faculty supervisor: Dr. Paul Bramadat

The phrase “spiritual but not religious” has commonly been used by researchers seeking to understand the spirituality of individuals who have shifted away from institutionalized religion. However, the meaning of this category has evolved in the millennial generation, insomuch as many have spiritual experiences very similar to their “spiritual but not religious” counterparts, but intentionally avoid identification with the term “spiritual”; consequently, these individuals are going undetected in academic literature. In an effort to clarify contemporary understandings of spirituality for non-religious millennials, I intend to administer a three part survey using Survey Monkey and a snowball sample to persons in Canada born in 1980 or later. This survey focuses on: personal non-religious identification; emotions, practices and settings related to experiences of interconnectedness or something transcendent; and the personal significance for such experiences. The survey’s design makes no direct reference to the terms “spiritual” or “spirituality” (though that is what is being investigated), going beyond contrasting categories of “religion”, “spirituality”, and “spiritual but not religious” to create an opportunity to hear from individuals who do not perceive these terms to be appropriate descriptors of their experience. Implementing this survey will require approval of a Human Research Ethics Application. This research is important given the incredible growth of the non-religious population in Canada, predominantly in British Columbia over recent years. It will contribute to clarifying the attitudinal trends of millennials towards religion and spiritual practices, and may offer insight into future shifts of religious establishment attendees in cities such as Victoria BC.”


Samuel Hogman

Project title:

Department: Exercise Science, Physical & Health Education

Faculty supervisor: Dr. Marc Klimstra

"Currently, the Canadian men’s national rowing team utilizes a regular test to measure the aerobic baseline fitness of the athletes over time. The test involves a standardized warm-up followed by a 20 minute work piece at a prescribed intensity on the rowing ergometer. Immediately following the piece, blood lactate is measured. The goal is to find an intensity for the athletes that results in a blood lactate measurement of less than 2 mmol/L. This tests their baseline aerobic fitness in a way that is currently not implemented in rowing programs, nor is it’s value yet recognized. Ideally, with the training program, the athletes’ prescribed intensities will increase while maintaining the necessary low blood lactate levels as they become fitter. The aim of this present study is to analyze the effectiveness, validity and reliability of this testing protocol, applied to University male rowers. Specifically, the monthly administration of the protocol will be carried out, and the results and associated variables will be analyzed. If the protocol proves to be an effective tool in accurately and effectively tracking the baseline fitness of the athletes and it is deemed readily applicable to competitive rowing programs, it may be utilized by more coaches as a useful tool to direct and prescribe rowing training."

Sarah Maleska

Project title:

Department: Earth & Ocean Sciences

Faculty supervisor: Dr. Adam Monahan

"Urbanization is known to influence local climates. In particular, urban areas tend to be warmer (especially at night) than neighbouring rural areas. My research will use long time series of observations from the School-Based Weather Station Network to characterize the urban heat island in the CRD by constructing maps of mean temperature across the region for different seasons and times of day. Using GIS techniques to classify the surface types near the weather stations, I will investigate how temperature variations are influenced by urbanization (and other factors such as proximity to water). Time permitting, I will also investigate the how the urban heat island affects other meteorological variables (such as wind). Beyond assessing the effect of urbanization on the climate of Victoria, this work will provide a benchmark temperature climatology for the region."

Saromi Kim

Project title:

Department: Art History & Visual Studies

Faculty supervisor: Dr. Lianne McLarty

“I will explore what we may learn from media and how identity is constructed, and reinforced within it. I will specifically look at the various representations of Asians in film and TV shows as well as interview people on their ideas of them. I intend to research the Asian stereotypes such as the model minority, the exotic hyper-sexual female, the effeminate funny  man, the Kung Fu fighting master as well as the development of those roles over the last few decades. My research will be concluded in an experimental documentary where I explore different identities with regards to films, TV shows and even Youtube channels we watch. I want to challenge and question how much media influences society as well as our identities. 

As a young woman born in Canada with parents who emigrated from South Korea there is a hard feat trying to identify with many of the Hollywood movies playing today. I realized growing up I put these stereotypes onto myself and allowed other people to place them onto me because that is what I learned from media. I would like to uncover what makes someone like me "exotic" and what types of conventions Hollywood uses to create an ideal world. I would like to continue with my anotherfansview website by placing myself into current films but also research and write in a critical view what roles minority groups in particular play to create meaning within a film.”


Saul Brown

Project title:

Department: Political Science

Faculty supervisor: Dr. James Tully

“Since time immemorial, the Heiltsuk have developed and maintained sophisticated laws, known as Gvi’ilas, to govern our territories, manage relationships, and resolve disputes. Despite the imposition of the Canadian legal system over Indigenous peoples and territories, our Gvi’ilas have persisted. According to my late great grandfather, Hemas Mauxmisa’gami, Gvi’ilas refers to our “power” or authority over all matters that affect our lives.

My project explores Heiltsuk Gvi’ilas, with a focus on marine stewardship and governance. I will examine Heiltsuk creation stories that embody our Gvi’ilas. I will implore a methodology that mirrors the legal rigor of the Canadian judicial system to analyze our creation stories. This methodology is similar to case briefing that law students use to analyze and synthesize Canadian court cases, however it includes truth grounding from my Heiltsuk worldview. This research is timely in light of the recent conflicts between the Heiltsuk and Department of Fisheries and Ocean (DFO). On March 29, 2015, a Heiltsuk delegation occupied a DFO office to insist on the recognition of Heiltsuk authority to regulate commercial fishing activities in our territory. This action is a prime example of Heiltsuk people abiding by our Gvi’ilas, protecting herring from the threat of over-fishing. As a result, the DFO agreed not to open the waters to commercial gill-net fleets and promised to hold talks to avoid another confrontation next year. My project will illuminate the Heiltsuk Gvi’ilas that should be guiding these discussions and any activities across Heiltsuk territory and waters.”


Simon Moffatt

Project title:

Department: Mechanical Engineering

Faculty supervisor: Dr. Peter Oshkai and Prof. Afzal Suleman

"Investigation of aspects of the design and development of Pintle Injectors for Liquid Propellant Rocket Engines to reduce time and cost required to produce new engine designs. Pintle Injectors are more reliable, easier to manufacture, and more efficient than traditional injectors. This research could increase fuel efficiency of rocket engines and reduce their emissions."

Sydney McIvor

Project title:

Department: Economics

Faculty supervisor: Dr. Herbert Schuetze

"I plan to examine wage differentials across the public and private labour markets. It is well known that wages and benefits tend to be higher in the public sector when compared to private sector outcomes. Indeed a number of recent government initiatives appear to be aimed at reducing this differential. However, the differential, in part, might be explained by the existence of Pay Equity and Employment Equity legislation that applies to the public but not private sector. While a number of econometric studies have examined public-private wage differentials relatively few have focused on the role of Pay and Employment Equity in explaining the differences across sectors. Utilizing Canadian Census data I will attempt to identify the role played by Pay and Employment Equity legislation in explaining differences in wage outcomes across the two sectors. In particular, utilizing a econometric decomposition approach that will allow me to sort between those aspects of the overall differential that are due to pure public-private pay differences and those that may be attributable to Pay and Employment Equity legislation."

Taylor Smith

Project title:

Department: Anthropology

Faculty supervisor: Dr. Helen Kurki

"The field of paleopathology, study of health and disease in the past, has its origins in Medicine, and continues some of the traditions of that field, such as the publication of case studies. Case studies outline a particular case of a disease, trauma, or anomaly in an individual, with little attention paid to what it means to the population. Yet, paleopathology has evolved since the mid 20th century into a discipline aligned with Bioarchaeology and taking a more holistic, population-focused perspective. Why then are paleopathological case studies still prevalent in the literature? What role do they serve? Are they a critically engaged component of the literature that serves to align diagnostic approaches in Medicine with Bioarchaeology’s focus on paleodemography and biocultural perpectives? This research will address these questions through a literature review of relevant paleopathological journals – such as The International Journal of Osteoarchaeology, and The International Journal of Paleopathology. I will examine the frequency of case studies in these journals through time and track when and in what contexts case studies are cited in other bioarchaeological studies. Given the similar origins of medical and paleopathological case studies I will compare their approaches, focusing on how diseases are diagnosed, and to what degree the biocultural perspective informs their interpretations. The goal of this research is to provide a critically reflective examination of the factors underlying the prevalence of the case study in paleopathology and how they have shaped and been shaped by the evolution of the discipline at the divergence from its medical origins."


Tyler Irwin

Project title:

Department: Biology

Faculty supervisor: Dr. Juergen Ehlting

"Wood is an extraordinary, sustainable feedstock for construction, pulp and paper, and potentially for bioenergy production. Wood is largely composed of secondary cell walls containing carbohydrates (such as cellulose) and lignin. The latter provides mechanical stability, but negatively impacts pulp and bioethanol generation. To better understand the genetic architecture of wood biogenesis, genome wide genetic association studies have been performed previously, linking genetic variation within a population of poplar trees with wood trait variations. Among other genes, it was suggested that a putative solute carrier gene, named SLC, in Populus trichocarpa was genetically associated with secondary cell wall biogenesis and lignin biosynthesis. SLC belongs to a large family of transporters involved in nitrate, peptide, and secondary metabolite transport, but its actual physiological function is unknown. The connection and possible role of SLC in secondary cell wall biogenesis will be examined in my Honours research by using reverse genetic approaches: Poplar trees and isolated roots will be used to characterize transgenic plants overexpressing or down-regulating SLC. The mutants will be analyzed through chemical analysis using HPLC to test for changes in secondary metabolites in the mutants compared to wild-type. Furthermore, a nutrient experiment will be performed by growing mutant whole plants under different nitrogen fertilization regimes. This will test the hypothesis that differences in nutrient uptake efficiencies may indirectly explain the observed association of SLC with wood chemistry traits. In summary, the purpose of this project is to gain insight into the biological role of SLC using a functional genomics approach."

Victoria Philibert

Project title:

Department: Pacific & Asian Studies

Faculty supervisor: Dr. Katsuhiko Endo

"I wish to research and critically evaluate recent natalist policy in Japan to address the declining population. Specifically, I am interested in the strategies and protocols employed by the government, their efficacy, in what capacity they are influencing the attitudes and actions of the targeted generations involved, and how all this intersects with Japanese feminism."

Warda Ibrahim

Project title:

Department: Child & Youth Care

Faculty supervisor: Prof. Jin-Sun Yoon

"Last year, the JCURA research student projects conducted surveys to both on campus and distance students in the undergraduate program. The focus was on their sense of belonging to the School of Child and Youth Care (SCYC) and the Child and Youth Care Students’ Society (CYCSS). They provided several recommendations for further study. I will focus my research towards examining the factors that exist as to why international students do not feel as though they belong within the Child and Youth Care community. Furthermore, my research aims to provide informative recommendations for the CYCSS and SCYC to promote improvements of international students' sense of belonging. My research methodology will be to facilitate a focus group with a sample population of International students using a semi-structured interview process and then to do a thorough qualitative analysis. I will be working collaboratively with another JCURA student who will focus her study on another identified group of students who have indicated that they do not feel a strong sense of belonging. Together, we will work collaboratively with our supervisor but have our individual research pursuits with our specified target population."

Yasmine El-Hamamsy

Project title:

Department: Political Science

Faculty supervisor: Dr. Feng Xu

“The Malaysian government recognizes the refugees and forced migrants within its borders as illegal immigrants. Despite this, the state acts as transit country for increasing numbers of refugees from surrounding regions looking for temporary (and undocumented) work while awaiting relocation. My research as part of this JCURA grant will examine how the Malaysian state and the international community respond to forced migrants in Malaysia, particularly in terms of their 'illegal' status. In particular, I will examine how these responses and systems materially affect migrants, and how various characteristics of migrants (e.g. class, language, religion and/ or gender) may influence their experiences as migrants. My research will involve both secondary and primary research, the latter based on my work as an intern at the Malaysian Social Research Institute (MSRI) in Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia in the summer & fall of 2015. This internship will allow me to collect empirical data of the region's migrants and carryout interviews with individuals working with MSRI such as the Institute’s teachers, nurses, translators and facilitators, many of which are refugees themselves. My research will then be available to MSRI for their databases and used to develop an honours thesis. Under Dr. Xu’s supervision, I will submit an ethics application and develop interview questions. Dr. Xu’s extensive experience with primary research and her expertise in migration and Asian politics will support this project, and will help me strengthen my own research skills.”


Yuebo Yang

Project title:

Department: Medical Sciences

Faculty supervisor: Dr. Brian Christie

"Changes of synaptic and extrasynaptic NMDA receptors in the Fmr1 knockout mice with hippocampal NMDA receptor hypofunction
The N-methyl-D-aspartate receptors (NMDARs) are ionotropic glutamate receptors which regulate synaptic plasticity. NMDARs show varied subunit composition in different developmental stages with a general trend towards a decreasing contribution from the NR2B subunit during development in association with an increasing contribution of NR2A-containing NMDARs in the synaptic current in mature neurons. NMDARs present at the synapse with dominant NR2A-containing receptors and on the extrasynaptic membrane with dominant NR2B-containing receptors. Emerging evidence has demonstrated that synaptic NMDARs initiate changes in synaptic efficacy and promote pro-survival events, whereas extrasynaptic NMDARs are coupled to cell death pathways, suggesting activation of synaptic and extrasynaptic NMDAR may have diverse actions. In adult Fmr1 knockout mice, a mouse of neurodevelopmental disorder: Fragile X Syndrome (FXS), our previous findings have reported that behavioral impairment in a DG-dependent learning and memory task is in association with a region-specific impairment in NMDAR-dependent synaptic plasticity. These DG-specific deficits decreased NR1, NR2A and NR2B subunits. We propose to investigate the developmental profile of synaptic and extrasynaptic NMDAR subunits in the DG by western blot analysis in Fmr1 KO and wildtype mice at postnatal days 14, 28 and 60. Electrophysiology will be performed to examine synaptic and extrasynaptic NMDAR responses with the use of memantine (≤ 4 uM, preferentially blocks extrasynaptic NMDAR activity without disrupting synaptic function) (Garcia-Munoz et al., 2014). Understanding changes in extrasynaptic and synaptic NMDAR expressions may shed light on enhancing NMDAR-dependent synaptic function in the hippocampus of FXS."
Student recipientDepartmentProject title

Student recipients 2014-2015

Department Student recipient Faculty supervisor
Anthropology Bradley Clements Dr. Andrea Walsh
Anthropology Shawn Curé   Dr. Andrea Walsh
Anthropology (Indigenous Studies) David Parent Dr. Robert Hancock
Anthropology Nicholas Wees Dr. Alexanderine Boudreault-Fournier
Art History & Visual Studies Holly Cecil Prof. Erin Campbell
Art History & Visual Studies Aimee Hawker Dr. Catherine Harding
Art History & Visual Studies Laurie White Prof. Allan Antliff
Biochemistry & Microbiology (Centre on Aging) James Dunbar Dr. Debra Sheets
Biochemistry & Microbiology Karthik Gopalakrishnan Dr. Brian Christie
Biochemistry & Microbiology Hayden McClure Dr. Terry Pearson
Biochemistry & Microbiology Kate McWilliams Dr. Terry Pearson
Biology Laila Drabkin Dr. Brian Christie
Biology Graeme Keais Dr. Ben Koop
Biology Kelly Turner Dr. Francis Choy
Biology Peter Watson Dr. Bob Chow
Chemistry Karlee Bamford Prof. Neil Burford and Dr. Scott McIndoe
Chemistry Rehan Higgins Prof. Robin Hicks
Chemistry Tasha Jarisz Prof. Dennis Hore
Chemistry Andrew Roberts Dr. Fraser Hof and Dr. Scott McIndoe
Child & Youth Care Annika Benoit-Jansson Prof Jin-Sun Yoon
Child & Youth Care Laura Sharp Prof Jin-Sun Yoon
Computer Science Xinghang Ye Dr. Jianping Pan
Curriculum & Instruction David Fletcher Dr. Kathy Sanford
Curriculum & Instruction Rachel Lallouz Dr. Kathy Sanford
Curriculum & Instruction Emily Tench Dr. Kathy Sanford
Earth & Ocean Sciences Michael Conlin Dr. Kristin Morell
Earth & Ocean Sciences Maura Dewey Dr. Colin Goldblatt
Earth & Ocean Sciences Curtis Martin Dr. Diana Varela
Economics Maya Kryzan Prof. Cornelis van Kooten
Economics Craig Logan Dr. Kenneth Stewart
Economics Carolyn Tsao Dr. Chris Auld
Educational Psychology & Leadership Studies Alison Hill Dr. Valerie Irvine
Electrical & Computer Engineering Peter Kremler Dr. Kin Fun Li
English Katherine Goertz Dr. Misao Dean
English James Kendrick Dr. Sheila Rabillard
English Tye Landels Dr. Richard van Oort
English Brianna Wright Dr. Janelle Jenstad
Environmental Studies Peter Gibbs Dr. Karena Shaw
Environmental Studies Nina Moffat Dr. Trevor Lantz
Environmental Studies Megan Spencer Dr. Jessica Dempsey
Exercise Science, Physical & Health Education Isaac Davies Dr. Marc Klimstra
Exercise Science, Physical & Health Education Travis Gordon Dr. Sandra Hundza and Dr. Marc Klimstra
Exercise Science, Physical & Health Education Steven Noble Dr. Catherine Gaul
Exercise Science, Physical & Health Education Stephanie Norman Dr. Catherine Gaul
French Taryn Burgar Dr. Claire Carlin  
French Phelan Hourigan Dr. Marc Lapprand
Geography Colin Crawford Dr. Reuben Rose-Redwood
Geography Stephen Finnis Dr. Maycira Costa
Geography Travis Muir Dr. Chris Darimont
Geography Megan Neufeld Dr. Cameron Owens
Germanic & Slavic Studies Alexandra Hill Dr. Megan Swift
Germanic & Slavic Studies Lucas McKinnon Prof. Elena Pnevmonidou
Greek & Roman Studies Elliott Fuller Prof. Brendan Burke
Greek & Roman Studies Mac MacDonald Prof. Brendan Burke
Hispanic & Italian Studies Elise Côté Dr. Pablo Restrepo-Gautier
Hispanic & Italian Studies Kirsten (Kay) Gallivan Dr. Beatriz de Alba-Koch
Hispanic & Italian Studies Jennifer McLean Dr. Lloyd Howard
History Alissa Cartwright Prof. Jason Colby
History Erin Cotton Dr. Eric Sager
History Céilidhe Maher Dr. Perry Biddiscombe
History Derek Turkington Dr. Wendy Wickwire
Linguistics Alexah Konnelly Dr. Alexandra D’Arcy
Linguistics Severne Robertson-Hooper Dr. Suzanne Urbancyzk
Linguistics Jeness Weisgerber  Dr. Li-Shih Huang
Mathematics & Statistics Zhiyu Gong Dr. Junling Ma and Dr. Reinhard Illner
Mathematics & Statistics Shayla Redlin  Dr. Gary MacGillivray
Mathematics & Statistics Chadi Saad-Roy Prof. Pauline van den Driessche
Mathematics & Statistics Robin Spillette Dr. Laura Cowen
Mechanical Engineering Edward Alley Dr. Zuomin Dong
Mechanical Engineering John Edgar Prof. Stephanie Willerth
Mechanical Engineering Tyler Klassen Dr. Scott Iverson
Medieval Studies Sarah Jenkinson Prof. Helene Cazes
Nursing Jasmine Cox Dr. Debra Sheets
Nursing Courtney Ellis Dr. Katherine Bertoni
Nursing Courtney Greenway Dr. Karen MacKinnon and Dr. Lynne Young  
Nursing Richelle Stanley Dr. Debra Sheets
Pacific & Asian Studies Patrick Musgrave Dr. Katsuhiko Endo
Pacific & Asian Studies N’Donna Russell Dr. Timothy Iles
Philosophy Jasmin Brown Dr. Patrick Rysiew
Philosophy Bianca Crewe Dr. Cindy Holder
Philosophy Katie Lauriston Dr. Colin Macleod
Philosophy Jessica Parker Prof. Dr. David Scott
Physics & Astronomy James Hartwick Prof. Justin Albert
Physics & Astronomy Marlene Machemy Dr. Pavel Kovtun
Physics & Astronomy Douglas Rennehan Dr. Arif Babul
Political Science Scott Aubrey Dr. Scott Watson
Political Science Chase Blair Dr. Janni Aragon
Political Science Sophia Ciavarella Dr. Janni Aragon
Political Science Kristoffer Jorgensen Dr. Marlea Clarke
Psychology Catalina Dau Dr. Steve Lindsay
Psychology David Drohan Prof. Scott Hofer
Psychology Jacob Koudys Dr. Colette Smart and Dr. Jodie Gawryluk
Psychology Phil MacIntyre Dr. Jodie Gawryluk and Dr. Mauricio Garcia-Barrera
Public Administration/Public Health & Social Policy Candace McKivett Dr. Charlotte Reading
Social Work Julie Casey Dr. Robina Thomas
Social Work Nicole Siemens Prof. Gayle Ployer
Sociology Zachary Lewis Dr. André Smith
Sociology Renay Maurice Dr. Cecilia Benoit
Sociology Jason Miller Dr. André Smith
Theatre Brandon (Chase) Hiebert Prof. Jan Wood
Theatre Emma Leck Dr. Allana Lindgren and Prof. Conrad Alexandrowicz
Visual Arts Elizabeth Charters Prof. Robert Youds
Visual Arts Hovey Eyres Prof. Lynda Gammon
Visual Arts Olivia Prior Prof. Jennifer Stillwell
Women's Studies and Political Science (Social Justice Studies) Lane Foster-Adamson Dr. Laura Parisi
Women's Studies Bo Ya (Lena) Li Dr. Jo-Anne Lee
Women's Studies Fenn Olson-Mayes Dr. Annalee Lepp
Writing Jerry Flexer Prof. David Leach
Writing Cody Gies Prof. Lee Henderson

Student recipients 2013-2014

Department Student Recipient Faculty Supervisor

Anthropology

Amy Becker

Dr. Brian Thom

Anthropology

Angela Dyck

Dr. Erin McGuire

Anthropology

Sharonne Specker

Prof. Alexandrine Boudreault-Fournier

Biochemistry & Microbiology

Kellie Brown

Dr. Caroline Cameron

Biochemistry & Microbiology

Emily MacLean

Dr. Jeremy Wulff

Biochemistry & Microbiology

Steven Wong

Dr. Alisdair Boraston

Biology

Marissa Davies

Dr. Terri Lacourse

Biology

Mary Elrick  

Dr. Julian Lum

Biology

Nick Slater

Adjunct Prof. Patrick Walter

Biology

Misha Warbanski

Dr. Rana El-Sabaawi

Centre on Aging

Johanna Berryman

Dr. Debra Sheets

Centre on Aging

Sarah Gibson

Dr. Debra Sheets

Chemistry

Amarjot Dev

Dr. Fraser Hof

Chemistry

Amelia Hesketh

Dr. Scott McIndoe

Chemistry

Janessa Li

Dr. Fraser Hof

Chemistry

Daniel Motyka

Dr. Dennis Hore

Child & Youth Care

Nasim Naraghi

Dr. Gord Miller

Child & Youth Care

Kaeli Rose Sort

Prof. Jin-Sun Yoon and Dr. Gord Miller

Child & Youth Care

Christina Yee

Dr. Gord Miller

Computer Science

Charlie Magnuson

Dr. Ulrike Stege

Curriculum and Instruction

Aaron Bailey   

Dr. Valerie Irvine

Curriculum and Instruction

Jamie Burren

Dr. Jilliane Code

Earth & Ocean Sciences

Jinny Donovan

Dr. Dante Canil and Dr. Stephen Rowins

Earth & Ocean Sciences

Robert Fajber

Dr. Adam Monahan

Earth & Ocean Sciences

Jeremy Gosselin

Dr. Stan Dosso

Economics

Qinlu (Louisa) Chen

Dr. David Giles

Economics

Nicholas Garmulewicz

Dr. Kenneth Stewart

Economics

Rachel Lott

Dr. Elisabeth Gugl

Economics

Zoey Verdun

Dr. Chris Auld

Educational Psychology & Leadership Studies

Hannah Caird

Dr. Allyson Hadwin

Educational Psychology & Leadership Studies

Neta Herage

Dr. Jillianne Code

English

Patrick Close

Dr. Jentery Sayers

English

Quinn MacDonald

Dr. Stephen Ross

English

Raya MacKenzie

Dr. Alison Chapman

English

Kaelan Unrau

Dr. Janelle Jenstad and Dr. Erin Kelly

Environmental Studies

Craig Axford

Dr. James Rowe

Environmental Studies

Christopher Madsen

Dr. Brian Starzomski

Exercise Science, Physical & Health Education

Simone Beattie

Dr. E. Paul Zehr

Exercise Science, Physical & Health Education

Megan Cox

Dr. Sandra Hundza

Exercise Science, Physical & Health Education

Molly Hulbert

Dr. Sandra Hundza

Exercise Science, Physical & Health Education

Kristy Inouye

Dr. Sandra Hundza

French

Rachel Baker

Dr. Marie Vautier

French

Andrea Cownden

Dr. Marc Lapprand

French

Spencer Trerice

Dr. Marc Lapprand

Geography

Montanna Diakun

Dr. Dennis Jelinski

Geography

Paige Erickson-McGee

Dr. Cameron Owens

Geography

Sean Grisdale

Dr. Reuben Rose-Redwood

Geography

Bradd Tuck

Dr. Rosaline Canessa

Germanic & Slavic Studies

Erin Lowey

Dr. Ulf Schuetze

Germanic & Slavic Studies

Rowan Meredith

Dr. Megan Swift

Germanic & Slavic Studies

Lauren Thompson

Dr. Helga Thorson

Greek & Roman Studies

Nick Falzon 

Prof. Brendan Burke

Greek & Roman Studies

Rose Pappas-Acreman 

Dr. Ingrid Holmberg

Health Information Science

Robert Bittner

Dr. Karen Courtney

Health Information Science

Naima Salemohamed

Dr. Karen Courtney

Hispanic and Italian Studies

Aidan Fridman

Dr. Maria Bettaglio

Hispanic and Italian Studies

Kathleen Mullaney

Dr. Dan Russek

History

Benjamin Fast

Dr. Lynne Marks

History

Courtney Reynoldson

Dr. Tom Saunders

History

Monique Ulysses

Dr. Jason Colby

History in Art

Caroline Baicy

Dr. Astri Wright

History in Art

Justin Barski

Dr. Allan Antliff

History in Art

Evelyn Brotherston

Dr. Catherine Harding and Dr. Evanthia Baboula

Indigenous Studies Minor

Jodi Beniuk 

Dr. Catherine Richardson

Linguistics

Nicole Edgar

Dr. Alexandra D'Arcy

Linguistics

Geoff Stevenson

Dr. Suzanne Urbanczyk

Mathematics & Statistics

Danika Law

Dr. Gary MacGillivray

Mathematics & Statistics

Carolyn Tsao

Dr. Mary Lesperance

Mathematics & Statistics

Maria Warren

Dr. Ian Putnam

Mathematics & Statistics

Stephanie Yurchak

Dr. Laura Cowen

Mechanical Engineering

Anaïssia Franca

Dr. Ned Djilali

Mechanical Engineering

Craig King

Dr. Stephanie Willerth

Mechanical Engineering

Aakash Rao

Dr. Curran Crawford

Medical Sciences

Ross Prager

Dr. Leigh Anne Swayne

Medical Sciences

Scott Sawchuk

Dr. Brian Christie

Medieval Studies

Jennifer McLean

Dr. Hélène Cazes

Medieval Studies

Josef Méthot

Dr. Hélène Cazes

Music

Sondra Moyls

Mr. Kirk McNally

Nursing

Scott Beck

Dr. Lenora Marcellus

Nursing

Marilise Engeland

Dr. Debra Sheets

Nursing

Rosanna Sheppard

Ms. Wanda Martin with Dr. Marjorie MacDonald

Pacific & Asian Studies

Jessica Dearman 

Dr. Katsuhiko Endo

Pacific & Asian Studies

Alice Yi-Tzu Lai

Prof. Cody Poulton

Philosophy

Zacharius Braciszewicz

Dr. Margaret Cameron

Philosophy

Austin Horn

Dr. Scott Woodcock

Philosophy

Fiona Schick

Dr. Audrey Yap

Physics & Astronomy

James Hartwick

Dr. Justin Albert

Political Science

Heather Clifford

Dr. James Lawson

Political Science

Nicola Simpson

Dr. James Lawson

Political Science

Maria Tulli

Dr. Janni Aragon

Psychology

Nicholas Hargrove

Dr. Ronald Skelton

Psychology

Ryan Lim

Dr. Mauricio Garcia-Barrera

Psychology

Naomi Ridley   

Dr. Ulrich Mueller

Psychology

Kelly Sutton

Dr. Mauricio Garcia-Barrera

Public Health & Social Policy

Alexandra Kent

Dr. Charlotte Reading

Public Health & Social Policy

Marla Turner

Dr. Catherine Worthington

Religious Studies

Karin Dayton

Dr. Martin Adam

Social Justice Studies

Nadine Graham

Dr. Audrey Yap

Social Justice Studies

Jesse Henderson

Dr. Margo Matwychuk

Social Work

Alex Filippelli

Dr. Pat MacKenzie

Social Work

Melanie Nicol

Prof. Gayle Ployer

Sociology

Lyanna Renaud

Dr. Helga Hallgrímsdóttir

Sociology

Renée Rogers

Dr. Andrew Wender

Sociology

Brad van Dyck

Dr. Neena Chappell

Sociology

Isabela Vera

Dr. André Smith

Theatre

Alannah Bloch

Dr. Allana Lindgren  

Theatre

Jocelyne Lamarche

Dr. Allana Lindgren

Visual Arts

Abigail Laycock

Prof. Daniel Laskarin

Visual Arts

Graham Macaulay

Prof. Jennifer Stillwell

Women's Studies

Katrina Fukuda

Dr. Heather Tapley

Women's Studies

Carly Greene Hill

Dr. Annalee Lepp

Writing

Bethany Hughes

Prof. Lee Henderson

Writing

Benjamin Willems

Dr. Tim Lilburn

Student recipients 2012-2013

Department Student Recipient Faculty Supervisor

Anthropology

Sebastian Irvine

Dr. April Nowell

Anthropology

Sarah Leckie

Dr. Brian Thom

Anthropology

Emma Weatherley

Dr. Peter Stahl

Biochemistry & Microbiology

Melissa Fowler

Dr. Terry Pearson

Biochemistry & Microbiology

Kathleen Kolehmainen

Dr. Paul Romaniuk

Biochemistry & Microbiology

Daniel Moller

Dr. Martin Boulanger

Biology

Jake Gambling

Dr. Perry Howard

Biology

Barbara Gauthier

Dr. Laura Arbour

Biology

Esther Wagner

Dr. Tom Reimchen

Biology

Maryann Watson

Dr. Julia Baum

Business

Connor Bildfell

Dr. Carmen Galang

Centre on Aging

Jessica Dakin

Dr. Kelli Stajduhar and Ms. Darcee Bidgood

Centre on Aging

Laura Walzak

Dr. Holly Tuokko

Chemistry

William FitzGerald

Prof. Dennis Hore

Chemistry

Colin Hammond

Prof. Jeremy Wulff

Chemistry

Marie Malone

Prof. Fraser Hof

Chemistry

Taylor Quon

Prof. Fraser Hof

Child & Youth Care

Angela Cooper

Prof. Jin-Sun Yoon

Child & Youth Care

Jessica Renfrew

Dr. Gord Miller

Child & Youth Care

Mattie Walker

Dr. J.N. ("Cole") Little

Computer Science

Monique Du Plessis

Dr. Ulrike Stege

Computer Science

Jordan Ell

Dr. Daniela Damian

Computer Science

Trevor Maryka

Prof. Daniel German

Curriculum and Instruction

Aaron Bailey

Dr. Valerie Irvine

Curriculum and Instruction

Jamie Elbert

Dr. Jillianne Code

Earth & Ocean Sciences

Lucas Kavanagh

Dr. Colin Goldblatt

Earth & Ocean Sciences

Pearce Luck

Dr. Laurence Coogan

Earth & Ocean Sciences

Kei Quinn

Dr. Stephen Johnston

Economics

Dania Clarke

Dr. Pascal Courty

Economics

Man Wan Lai

Dr. Pascal Courty

Economics

Monica Mow

Dr. Pascal Courty

Economics

Derrick Persson

Dr. Elisabeth Gugl

Educational Psychology & Leadership Studies

Adrianna Haffey

Dr. Allyson Hadwin

Educational Psychology & Leadership Studies

Jeffrey Horncastle

Dr. Jillianne Code

Electrical & Computer Engineering

David Rusk

Dr. Kin Fun Li

Electrical & Computer Engineering

Elaine Yan

Dr. Kin Fun Li

English

Jayme Collins

Dr. Evelyn Cobley

English

Taylor "Amy" Coté

Dr. Lisa Surridge

English

Megan Halford

Dr. Mary Elizabeth Leighton

Environmental Studies

Rebecca Segal

Dr. Trevor Lantz

Environmental Studies

Tanya Taggart-Hodge

Prof. Eric Higgs

European Studies Program

Yang You

Dr. Emannuel Brunet-Jailly

Exercise Science, Physical & Health Education

Drew Commandeur

Dr. Marc Klimstra and Dr. Sandra Hundza

Exercise Science, Physical & Health Education

Christina McLean

Dr. Joan Wharf Higgins

Exercise Science, Physical & Health Education

Nikita Pardiwala

Dr. Viviene Temple

Exercise Science, Physical & Health Education

Michael Slater

Dr. Geri Van Gyn

French

Dylan Trerice

Dr. Catherine Leger

French

Emily Walker

Dr. Emile Fromet de Rosnay

Geography

Kayla Cheeke

Dr. Cameron Owens

Geography

Kalyani Child

Dr. Chris Darimont

Geography

Georgia Clyde

Dr. Cameron Owens

Geography

Lauren Ka-Po Law

Dr. Philip Dearden

Germanic & Slavic Studies

Taylor Antoniazzi

Dr. Peter Golz

Germanic & Slavic Studies

Carley Campbell

Dr. Serhy Yekelchyk

Germanic & Slavic Studies

Elise Polkinghorne

Dr. Charlotte Schallié

Greek & Roman Studies

Glenn Beauvais

Dr. Ingrid Holmberg

Greek & Roman Studies

Susana Reyes

Prof. Brendan Burke

Hispanic and Italian Studies

Cory Kreger

Dr. Dan Russek

Hispanic and Italian Studies

Dex McNally

Dr. Sonya Bird and Prof. Lloyd Howard

Hispanic and Italian Studies

Andrea Meyes

Dr. Maria Bettaglio

History

Hannah Anderson

Dr. Rachel Cleves

History

Morgan Balderson

Dr. Christine O'Bonsawin

History

Montanna Rose Mills

Dr. Jordan Stanger-Ross

History

Andrew Wong

Dr. Zhongping Chen

History in Art

Sara Fruchtman

Dr. Evanthia Baboula and Dr. Marcus Milwright

History in Art

Alexandra Macdonald

Dr. Dennine Dudley

History in Art

Christine Oldridge

Dr. Catherine Harding

Indigenous Studies Minor

Ryan Nicolson

Dr. Christine O'Bonsawin

Linguistics

Kazuya Bamba

Dr. Martha McGinnis and Dr. Leslie Saxon

Linguistics

Dylan Barkowsky

Dr. Li-Shih Huang

Linguistics

Matthew Windsor

Dr. Leslie Saxon

Mathematics & Statistics

Dean Koch

Dr. Laura Cowen

Mathematics & Statistics

Rylan Miszkiel

Dr. Gary MacGillivray

Mathematics & Statistics

Jacqueline Warren

Dr. Gary MacGillivray

Mathematics & Statistics

Stephanie Yurchak

Dr. Alfonso Gracia-Saz

Mechanical Engineering

Pranav Shrestha

Dr. Daniela Constantinescu

Mechanical Engineering

Pranay Shrestha

Prof. Rustom Bhiladvala

Mechanical Engineering

Reed Teyber

Dr. Andrew Rowe

Medical Sciences

Brett Hryciw

Dr. Brian Christie

Medical Sciences

Eric McGinnis

Dr. Brian Christie

Medieval Studies

Elisabeth Hill

Dr. Iain Higgins

Medieval Studies

Sarah White

Dr. Joseph Grossi

Nursing

Sophia Gardezy

Dr. Debra Sheets

Nursing

Suzy Prowse

Dr. Lenora Marcellus

Nursing

Brittany Reed

Dr. Debra Sheets

Pacific & Asian Studies

Hugh Davis

Dr. Timothy Iles

Philosophy

Brendan Downey

Dr. Cindy Holder

Philosophy

Jamaal Hyder

Dr. Patrick Rysiew

Philosophy

Zoey Ockenden

Dr. Scott Woodcock

Physics & Astronomy

Alice Koning

Dr. Jon Willis

Physics & Astronomy

Ryan Porter

Dr. Richard Keeler

Political Science

George Benson

Dr. Matt James

Political Science

Alannah James

Dr. Janni Aragon

Political Science

Adrienne Sanders

Dr. James Tully

Psychology

David Jewett

Dr. Mauricio Garcia-Barrera

Psychology

Meghan Richey

Dr. Elizabeth Brimacombe

Public Health & Social Policy

Dylan Collins

Dr. Charlotte Reading

Religious Studies

Kelly Lindsay

Dr. Martin Adam

Religious Studies

Rosa Lea McBee

Prof. Tamsin Jones

Social Justice Studies

Tanya Cooper

Dr. Margo Matwychuk

Social Justice Studies

Jessamyn Polson

Dr. Marlea Clarke

Social Work

Jonas Breuhan

Dr. Leslie Brown

Social Work

Jenna Simonds

Prof. Jacquie Green

Sociology

Bryan Benner

Dr. Helga Hallgrimsdottir

Sociology

Olivia Guerra

Prof. André Smith

Sociology

Olivia Merritt

Dr. Neena Chappell

Theatre

Stewart Gibbs

Dr. Jennifer Wise

Theatre

Sarah Johnson

Dr. Warwick Dobson

Theatre

Jennifer Taylor

Dr. Jennifer Wise

Visual Arts

Bronwyn McMillin

Prof. Daniel Laskarin

Visual Arts

Willie Seo

Prof. Robert Youds

Women's Studies

Renay Maurice

Dr. Annalee Lepp

Women's Studies

Kyla Slobodin

Dr. Thea Cacchionni

Writing

Claire Garneau

Prof. Maureen Bradley

Writing

Liz Snell

Prof. David Leach

Student recipients 2011-2012

Department Student Recipient Faculty Supervisor

Anthropology

Melanie Callas

Dr. Eric Roth

Anthropology

Claire Rawlinson

Dr. Erin McGuire

Biochemistry & Microbiology

Shannon Brown

Dr. Marty Boulanger

Biochemistry & Microbiology

Danelle Chan

Dr. Robert Burke

Biology

Lauren Braun

Dr. Bob Chow

Biology

Elizabeth Hoffman

Dr. Terri Lacourse

Biology

Geoffrey Morris

Dr. Francis Choy

Chemistry

Rebecca Dixon

Prof. Dennis Hore

Chemistry

Manuel Ma

Prof. Fraser Hof

Chemistry

Tsuki Naka

Prof. Dennis Hore

Child & Youth Care

Julia-Anne Cameron

Dr. Doug Magnuson

Child & Youth Care

Danielle Jimeno

Dr. Doug Magnuson

Computer Science

Naomi Harrington

Dr. Yvonne Coady

Curriculum and Instruction

Matt Christie

Dr. Jason Price

Curriculum and Instruction

David Fainstein

Dr. Valerie Irvine

Earth & Ocean Sciences

Jordan Clark

Prof. Tom Pedersen

Earth & Ocean Sciences

Rohanna Gibson

Prof. Stephen Johnston

Economics

Matthew Agbay

Dr. Herbert J. Schuetze

Economics

Alisha Chicoine

Dr. Herbert J. Schuetze

Economics

Brad Hackinen

Dr. Herbert J. Schuetze

Economics

Samantha Taylor

Dr. Herbert J. Schuetze

Educational Psychology & Leadership Studies

Renee Jordan

Dr. Donna McGhie-Richmond

Electrical & Computer Engineering

Stephanie Fulcher

Dr. Kin Fun Li

Electrical & Computer Engineering

Mark Johnson

Dr. Kin Fun Li

English

Cameron Butt

Dr. Erin Ellerbeck

English

Willow Falconer

Dr. Mary Elizabeth Leighton

English

Megan Welsh

Dr. Richard Pickard

Environmental Studies

Chloe Donatelli

Dr. Wendy Wickwire

European Studies Program

Michael Lenaghan

Dr. Emmanuel Brunet-Jailly

Exercise Science, Physical & Health Education

Lisette Cheng

Dr. Viviene Temple

Exercise Science, Physical & Health Education

Michelle Cox

Dr. Viviene Temple

Exercise Science, Physical & Health Education

Sarah Monsees

Dr. Sandra Hundza

Exercise Science, Physical & Health Education

Andrew Robb

Dr. Geraldine Van Gyn

French

Gabrielle Berron-Styan

Dr. Yvonne Hsieh

French

Bernadette Perry

Dr. Hélène Cazes

Geography

Kira Hoffman

Dr. Dan Smith

Geography

Kimberly House

Dr. Trisalyn Nelson

Geography

Malcolm MacLean

Dr. Cameron Owens

Geography

Alison Stockwell

Dr. Rosaline Canessa

Germanic & Slavic Studies

Rebecca Rogers

Dr. Megan Swift

Germanic & Slavic Studies

Elizabeth Sharp

Dr. Elena Pnevmonidou

Greek & Roman Studies

Charlotte Dawe

Dr. Gregory Rowe

Greek & Roman Studies

Melissa Mann

Dr. Brendan Burke

Greek & Roman Studies

Ana Wagner

Dr. Brendan Burke

Hispanic and Italian Studies

Emma Gerlach

Dr. Marina Bettaglio

Hispanic and Italian Studies

Andrea Meyes

Dr. Marina Bettaglio

History

Shiraz Higgins

Dr. Jason Colby

History

Bryan Smith

Dr. David Zimmerman

History

David Swanson

Dr. Robert Alexander

History

Simon Teague

Dr. Jason Colby

History in Art

Ryan Church

Dr. Erin Campbell

History in Art

Regan Shrumm

Dr. Evanthia Baboula

Linguistics

Brittney O'Neill

Dr. Li-Shih Huang

Mathematics & Statistics

Marcel Celaya

Dr. Gary McGillivray

Mathematics & Statistics

Takaaki Ichu

Dr. Mary Lesperance

Mathematics & Statistics

Jesse Short-Gershman

Dr. Peter Dukes

Mechanical Engineering

Alan Magni

Dr. Curran Crawford

Mechanical Engineering

Stephanie Morrison

Dr. Stephanie Willerth

Mechanical Engineering

Maxym Rukosuyev

Dr. Martin B. G. Jun

Medical Sciences

Kevin Bushell

Dr. Brian Christie

Medieval Studies

Courtney Burrell

Dr. John Tucker

Medieval Studies

Kelly Ditmars

Dr. Shamma Boyarin

Music

Thor Kell

Mr. Kirk McNally

Music

Stefan Maier

Dr. Jonathan Goldman

Music

Dominique Ryser

Mr. Kirk McNally

Nursing

Melissa Buchanan

Dr. Lenora Marcellus

Nursing

Cherie Geering Curry

Dr. Lenora Marcellus

Pacific & Asian Studies

Elise May Farand

Dr. Hiroko Noro

Pacific & Asian Studies

Shaun Kellett-Lemon

Dr. Timothy Iles

Pacific & Asian Studies

Erin Lofting

Dr. Cody Poulton

Philosophy

Jonathan Baron

Dr. Scott Woodcock

Philosophy

Megan Hyska

Dr. Margaret Cameron

Philosophy

Bianca Torchia

Prof. Cindy Holder

Physics & Astronomy

Trystyn Berg

Drs Sara Ellison and Kim Venn

Physics & Astronomy

Brendan Thorn

Dr. Kim Venn

Political Science

Emily Barner

Dr. Janni Aragon

Political Science

Russell Claus

Dr. James Lawson

Political Science

Adrian Hartrick

Dr. Michael Webb

Political Science

Geneva List

Dr. Marlea Clarke

Psychology

Emma Fraser

Dr. Robert Gifford

Psychology

Lara Oberg

Dr. Colette Smart and Dr. Mauricio Garcia-Barrera

Psychology

Kassandra Plante

Dr. Frederick Grouzet

Psychology

Tina Quade

Dr. Stuart MacDonald

Religious Studies

Sarah Moselle

Dr. Paul Bramadat

Social Justice Studies

Johanna McBurnie

Dr. Bill Carroll

Social Justice Studies

Erin Legare

Dr. Heather Tapley

SociologyΩ

Adam Finch

Dr. Bill Carroll

Sociology

Alexander Luscombe

Prof. Kevin Walby

Sociology

Barbara Merrick

Dr. Steve Garlick

Theatre

Randi Edmundson

Dr. Warwick Dobson

Theatre

Sarah Johnson

Dr. Warwick Dobson

Visual Arts

Elyse Portal

Assoc. Prof. Lynda Gammon

Visual Arts

Danielle Proteau

Prof. Megan Dickie

Women's Studies

Jasmine Nielsen

Dr. Jo-Anne Lee

Women's Studies

Taylor Teal

Dr. Thea Cacchioni

Writing

Connor Gaston

Prof. Maureen Bradley

Writing

Caitlin Bergman Jessen

Prof. Joan MacLeod

Student recipients 2010-2011

Department Student Recipient Faculty Supervisor

Anthropology

Amy Krull

Dr. Helen Kurki

Anthropology

Georgina Lorimer

Dr. Ann Stahl

Biochemistry & Microbiology

Lincoln Foerster

Dr. Martin Boulanger

Biochemistry & Microbiology

Celina Horn

Dr. Juan Ausio

Biology

Keith Johnstone

Dr. Julian Lum

Biology

Aimee Kernick

Dr. Brian Christie

Biology

Tracy MacKeracher

Dr. Brad Anholt

Business

Jill Doucette

Dr. Charlene Zietsma

Business

Jin Liang

Dr. Basma Majerbi

Chemistry

Nikita Kuklev

Dr. David Steuerman

Chemistry

Hollis Roth

Dr. Dennis Hore

Chemistry

Miranda Skjel

Dr. Lisa Rosenberg

Computer Science

David Audet

Dr. Kui Wu

Computer Science

Andreas Bergen

Dr. Yvonne Coady

Computer Science

Warren Koch

Dr. Valerie King

Curriculum and Instruction

Dallas Hermanson

Dr. Valerie Irvine

Earth & Ocean Sciences

Danielle Mountjoy

Dr. Dante Canil

Earth & Ocean Sciences

Tess Zyla

Dr. George Spence

Economics

Laurie Kan

Dr. Chris Auld and Mr. Martin Farnham

Economics

Andrew Mollard

Dr. Graham Voss

Economics

John Sim

Dr. Pascal Courty

Educational Psychology & Leadership Studies

Andrea James

Dr. Gina Harrison

Electrical & Computer Engineering

Christian McMechan

Dr. Poman So

Electrical & Computer Engineering

Brendan Morgan

Dr. Alexandra Branzan Albu

English

Kelly Berthelot

Dr. Elizabeth Grove-White

English

Natalia Esling

Dr. Janelle Jenstad

English

Emma Gerlach

Dr. Luke Carson

Environmental Studies

Stuart Higgs

Dr. Eric Higgs

Environmental Studies

Elizabeth Sargeant

Dr. John Volpe

Exercise Science, Physical & Health Education

Shannon Clarke

Dr. PJ Naylor

Exercise Science, Physical & Health Education

Dawn Curtis

Dr. Viviene Temple and Dr. Geri Van Gyn

Exercise Science, Physical & Health Education

Lauren Talley

Dr. Geri Van Gyn and Dr. Viviene Temple

French

Adrian Cocking

Dr. Helene Cazes

French

Nichelle Soetaert

Dr. Marc Lapprand

Geography

Skye Augustine

Dr. Philip Dearden

Geography

Mathieu Bourbonnais

Dr. Trisalyn Nelson

Geography

Amy Ganton

Dr. Rosaline Canessa and Dr. Peter Keller

Germanic & Slavic Studies

Nathan Horgan

Dr. Helga Thorson

Germanic & Slavic Studies

Alyssa Marren

Dr. Julia Rochtchina

Greek & Roman Studies

Diotima Coad

Dr. Greg Rowe

Greek & Roman Studies

Ruben Post

Dr. Geof Kron

Health Information Science

Paule Bellwood

Ms. Elizabeth Borycki

Health Information Science

Rebecca Campbell

Dr. Andre Kushniruk

Hispanic and Italian Studies

Amanda Bolz

Prof. Dan Russek

Hispanic and Italian Studies

Ariana Galeano Garcia

Dr. Maria Bettaglio

History

Katrina Eschner

Dr. Jordan Stanger-Ross

History

Kara Johancsik

Dr. Jason Colby

History

Timothy Noddings

Dr. Rachel Cleves

History in Art

Gwendolyn Donaldson

Dr. Marcus Milwright

History in Art

Julie Gennai

Dr. Allan Antliff

Linguistics

Kathleen Connors

Dr. Suzanne Urbanczyk

Linguistics

Marcelle Wheeler

Dr. John Esling

Mathematics & Statistics

Wanda Boyer

Dr. Gary MacGillivray

Mathematics & Statistics

Catherine Shenton

Dr. Gary MacGillivray

Mechanical Engineering

Geoff Burton

Dr. Martin Jun

Mechanical Engineering

Heshan Fernando

Dr. Curran Crawford

Medical Sciences

Russ Gothard

Dr. Brian Christie

Medieval Studies

Courtney Burrell

Dr. John Tucker

Nursing

Kaitlyn Noye

Dr. Judy Burgess

Nursing

Marlene van Vuuren

Dr. Judy Burgess

Pacific & Asian Studies

Ruji Auethavornpipat

Dr. Leslie Butt

Pacific & Asian Studies

Nicole McFadyen

Dr. Leslie Butt

Political Science

Myles Carroll-Preyde

Dr. Avigail Eisenberg

Political Science

Joshua Kepkay

Dr. Janni Aragon

Psychology

Jamie Bartfai

Dr. Ulrich Mueller

Psychology

Alyssa Idler

Dr. Frederick Grouzet

Psychology

Sonja Catherine Murchison

Dr. Ron Skelton

Religious Studies

Pamela Andrews

Dr. Martin Adam

Sociology

Russ Dawson

Dr. Steve Garlick

Sociology

Kyle Phillippe

Dr. Steve Garlick

Theatre

Eric Smith

Dr. Warwick Dobson

Theatre

Liam Volke

Dr. Jennifer Wise

Visual Arts

Laura Anderson

Prof. Lucy Pullen

Visual Arts

Aubrey Burke

Dr. Daniel Laskarin

Women's Studies

Sinead Charbonneau

Dr. Christine St. Peter

Women's Studies

Tara Paterson

Dr. Laura Parisi

Writing

Martin Ainsley

Mr. Bill Gaston

Writing

Megan Hyska

Prof. Lorna Crozier

Student recipients 2009-2010

Student Recipient
Department Faculty Supervisor

Ashton, Dean

Pacific & Asian Studies

Dr. Richard King

Bell, Jonathan

Exercise Science, Physical & Health Education

Dr. Geri Van Gyn

Buzzalino, Sabrina

Women's Studies

Dr. Laura Parisi

Caulfield, Rachel

Psychology

Dr. Mauricio Garcia-Barrera

Churchley, Ross

Mathematics & Statistics

Dr. Jing Huang

Cross, Liam

Chemistry

Dr. Dennis Hore

Czop, Jordan

Child & Youth Care

Dr. Doug Magnuson

Davies, Julius

Computer Science

Dr. Daniel German

Down, Nathalie

Women's Studies

Dr. Jo-Anne Lee

Duclos, Buck C.

Pacific & Asian Studies

Dr. Robert Christopher Morgan

Earnshaw, Jacob

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Dr. Quentin Mackie

English, Willow

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Dr. Louise Page

Forster, Martina

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Dr. P. J. Naylor

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Dr. Pablo Restrepo-Gautier

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Dr. Paul J. Romaniuk

Hermanson, Dallas

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Hoxsey, Dann

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Dr. Steve Garlick

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Prof. Bill Linwood

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Dr. Feng Xu

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Dr. Allana Lindgren

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Ms. Sandra Meigs

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Dr. Laurel Bowman

Manning, Cara

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Dr. Roberta Hamme

Marass, Francesco

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Dr. Ulrike Stege

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Dr. Brad Nelson

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Meixner, Tamara

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Dr. James Tanaka

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Dr. Karen Kobayashi

Owen, Greg

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Dr. Lisa Surridge and Dr. Mary Elizabeth Leighton

Price, Andrea

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Dr. Vera Pospelova

Regehr, Kyeren

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Prof. Lorna Crozier

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Dr. Marie Vautier

St. Clair, Morag

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Dr. Janelle Jenstad

Service, Christina

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Dr. Trisalyn Nelson

Sita, Danica

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Dr. Pablo Restrepo-Gautier

Smith, Sarah

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Dr. Sonya Bird

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Dr. Dennis Jelinski

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Dr. Eric Higgs

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Dr. Warwick Dobson

Student in Economics

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Dr. Carl Mosk

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Dr. James Young

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Dr. Merwan Engineer

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Dr. Brendan Burke

Vincent, Serge

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Dr. Reuven Gordon

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Dr. Robin Hicks

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Dr. Ming Xiang

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Dr. Simon Devereaux

Wilson, Chelsea

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Dr. Helen Kurki

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Dr. Daniela Constantinescu

Zoehner, Amelja

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Dr. Allan Antliff