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Rachel Cleves

Cleves

  Email:

 rcleves@uvic.ca 

  Office:

  Cle B202

  Phone:

  250-721-7385

Field: American
Specialty: Early American history, 1750-1850, with a focus on the histories of gender, sexuality, and violence.
Office Hours Spring 2014: On leave.

Bio

My love for American history emerged initially from travelling through the United States. To date, I have visited every state except Alaska (and maybe Missouri). I grew up and went to college in New York City, moved to Berkeley, California for graduate school, then taught for four years in Northern Illinois before joining the faculty at UVic in 2009. I am presently writing a history of two women who lived in a same-sex marriage in Vermont from 1807 to 1851.

Selected publications

Books

 The Reign of Terror in America: Visions of Violence from Anti-Jacobinism to Antislavery (Cambridge University Press, 2009)

Articles

“Battling the Slaveholders’ ‘Reign of Terror’: Anti-Jacobinism and Abolitionism in the Early American Republic” Annales Historiques de la Revolution Francaise  (March 2011)

“‘Savage Barbarities!’: Slavery, Race, and the Uncivilizing Process in the United States”  Christa Buschendorf and Astrid Franke, eds. American (De)Civilizing Processes (Cambridge Scholars Publishing, 2011) 103-122.

"'Hurtful to the State': The Political Morality of Federalist Antislavery" John Craig Hammond and Matthew Mason, eds. Contesting Slavery: The Politics of Bondage and Freedom in the New American Nation (University of Virginia Press, 2011) 207-226.

“‘Heedless Youth’: The Revolutionary War Poetry of Ruth Bryant, 1760-1783” The William and Mary Quarterly (July 2010): 519-548.

“‘Jacobins in this Country’: The United States and the Transatlantic Language of Anti-Jacobinism” Early American Studies (May 2010):410-445.

Courses

Courses:
HIST 101 Discovering the Past
HIST 110 History of the United States
HIST 301A Revolutionary America and the Early Republic
HIST 301B AntebellumAmerica and the Civil War
HIST 302A American Women to 1900
HIST 302B American Women from 1900 to the Present

Topics include:

  • Sex and Violence from the Medieval Times to the Present
  • History of Violence
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