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Industry

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ViaTech

Tom Tiedje, Dean of Engineering, and Dan Gunn, VIATeC Executive Director

Benefit from partnering with UVic Engineering

Whether your business needs highly-trained students for work term positions or access to our cutting-edge research programs, a partnership between academia and industry is mutually beneficial. Contact us to learn how your company could benefit from collaboration.

Hire a co-op student

Connecting with students could be vital to your business' future. Our co-op program can help you connect with and mentor future industry leaders, and after graduation you'll have a chance to recruit the brightest and best from our program.

Provide a student design engineering project

Does your company have a design problem? Benefit from supplying an industry project for a multidisciplinary student team. The sustainable energy systems design engineering class solves design problems that can involve either a system or product. Your representative will work closely with the student teams, whose final output ranges from a detailed engineering design to a working prototype. Contact the Design Engineering Office for more information.

Collaborate with top researchers

The research expertise in the faculty is wide-ranging. Our world-renowned researchers individually and collaboratively investigate a vast array of research areas at the cutting edge of science and engineering.

Industry partners support the faculty

Many of our industry partners help fund scholarships, outreach programs, and student teams like AUVic, EcoCAR Challenge, UVic AERO and Formula SAE. Visit our donors page for ways you can help support our faculty.

Hire a student

Hiring a co-op student is simple, and our co-op coordinators are available to help you through every step.

  1. Develop a job description: Send us your job description, or give us a call if you would like help. You set the salary based on fair market wages. We'll post the job on our web-based posting board and send you resume's of student applicants.
  2. Interview the best candidates: Once you select the candidates you wish to interview, we will arrange an interview schedule to suit your needs. You can interview selected students at your office, on the phone on campus or via videoconference.
  3. Make a job offer: If you find a suitable candidate, we'll make the offer of employment.

Co-op student are available year-round. Work terms generally begin in January, May and September but job descriptions are accepted anytime. Work terms are typically four months long, but students sometimes work for one employer for more than one work term.

For more information, contact the Engineering and Computer Science/Math Co-operative Education Program and Career Services office at 250-472-5800 or engrcoop at uvic.ca.

For details about UVic's other co-operative education programs, or to hire a student for part-time, summer or full-time work, visit the Co-operative Education Program and Career Services websites.

Research partnerships

Our researchers work in partnership with industry, business and government to undertake research that makes a difference.

Hausi MullerComputer Science's Hausi Muller and his research group work in collaboration with IBM Canada, CA Canada, Canadian Consortium for Software Engineering Research (CSER), and the Carnegie Mellon Software Engineering Institute (SEI). They investigate methods, models, architectures, techniques, and feedback loops for autonomic, self-managing, self-adaptive, diagnosis, and SOA governance systems. In 2006 Dr. Muller received the IBM Faculty Fellow of the Year Award and the CSER Outstanding Leadership Award. His research is sponsored by NSERC, CSER, IBM Corporation, CA Inc., and the University of Victoria.

BuckhamMechanical Engineering's Brad Buckham is the primary investigator for the West Coast Wave Collaboration project (WCWCP), a network of researchers, engineers, entrepreneurs and computer modeling experts who will use wind, wave and tidal current data collected from a buoy near Ucluelet, to analyse wave energy potential off western Vancouver Island. The two-year project is co-funded by the Government of Canada and private industry to the sum of over $200k. To quote Dr. Buckham; "The modeling expertise developed through the WCWCP will advance potential wave energy projects in BC, and contribute to the development of future sites for the Canadian wave energy industry." Read more....

GordonA Canada-Spain research collaboration between Electrical and Computer Engineering professor Dr. Reuven Gordon and Institute of Photonic Sciences (ICFO) group leader Dr. Romain Quidant has developed a new method to gently trap, manipulate and study tiny, active objects as miniscule as viruses without inflicting any damage. Read more...

Technology transfer

UVic owns more technology transfer space than any other BC university. Our Innovation and Development Corporation (IDC) provides support, builds partnerships and arranges on-campus incubation space. IDC provides a comprehensive suite of services vital to the intellectual property (IP) protection and technology commercialization process.

Once start-up companies have outgrown UVic's incubation space, they can move to UVic's Vancouver Island Technology Park (VITP). VITP is the gateway to the region's high-tech community with the greatest concentration of high-tech companies and workers on Vancouver Island. The 28 businesses at the park employ 1,300 people and contribute $280 million annually to BC's economy.

Dr. Peter WildAs a mechanical engineer and director of UVic's Institute for Integrated Energy Systems, Peter Wild is committed to technology transfer. Dr. Wild's areas of research include energy systems for remote communities, wave and tidal energy systems, and optical sensors for monitoring fuel cells.

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