Speakers Bureau 2013-2014 Topics

 Graduate student topic.
Topics appropriate for K-12 students: E(K-5) M(6-8) S(9-12)

Animals & Plants

Bog Ecosystems in the Very Wet Hypermaritime, Great Bear Rainforest ǂ (S) NEW

Ms. Kira M. Hoffman
Graduate Student
School of Environmental Studies

I study blanket bog ecosystems on the central coast of BC in the Great Bear Rainforest. I examine the pivotal role of water and how it drives ecosystem patterns and processes. I discuss several aspects of these understudied but globally rare ecosystems such as water filtration, biogeochemical cycling and carbon storage. I also examine how these ecosystems may respond to future climate change scenarios. Throughout my PhD research I have become familiar with both vascular and non-vascular plants and I get a window into a very small, diverse and smelly world. My presentations showcase some of the rare and very interesting plants found in these ecosystems and how they have adapted to live in nutrient poor, acidic soils in one of the rainiest spots in North America.

Bones, Beaks and Teeth: A Comparative Look at Animal Skeletons (E M S)

Ms. Becky Wigen
Senior Lab Instructor and Co-undergraduate Advisor
Department of Anthropology

This talk is a hands-on look a different animal skulls including mammals and birds. Can be tailored for any age group.

Plant Diversity of Mt. Edziza Provincial Park ǂ (S) NEW

Ms. Kira M. Hoffman
Graduate Student
School of Environmental Studies

In 2012 I was fortunate to be part of a two-person team that traversed the extent of Mt. Edziza Provincial Park located in Northern British Columbia. The park was established in 1972 to protect the fragile landscape of the Mt. Edziza Volcano Complex and the rare flora and fauna that preside there. I completed the first baseline survey of plants in the park and I discuss the importance of understanding species richness and abundance as this area is increasingly threatened with the introduction of invasive alien plant species. I discuss the role of protected areas and how delineated boundaries don't often incorporate a changing climate. In my presentation I show images of one of the most remote and stunning parks in Canada and highlight two weeks of adventurous fieldwork along a 120-km transect that we completed on foot.

Flowers Under Glass: Greenhouse Conservatories in Western Canada, the US and Great Britain, plus the 2008 Chelsea Flower Show

Dr. David J. Ballantyne
Associate Professor Emeritus
Department of Biology

Grizzly Bears: Health, Movement, Research and Conservation ǂ (S) NEW

Mr. Mathieu Boorbonnais
Graduate Student
Department of Geography

I examine how landscape conditions influenced stress and health in Alberta grizzly bears, and my ongoing PhD research that is using telemetry data collected from grizzly bears to develop new methods for analyzing movement in landscapes heavily influenced by humans. I can speak about issues pertaining to grizzly bear research (e.g., health and telemetry data collection) and conservation in Alberta, where the grizzly bear population is currently listed as threatened, and how the field of geomatics and spatial analysis can contribute to wildlife research.

The Great Apes: An Introduction ǂ (S) NEW

Ms. Sarah-Louise Decrausaz
Graduate Student
Department of Anthropology

This biological anthropology presentation covers a basic overview of our primate cousins (gorillas, orangutans etc.).

Growing Rhododendrons and Azaleas in Victoria, BC

Dr. David J. Ballantyne
Associate Professor Emeritus
Department of Biology

This presentation surveys varieties (cultivars), discusses growing methods, and outlines recent photosynthesis research.

An Introduction to Aquaponics: Integrating Fish and Plants (E M S) NEW

Ms. Courtney D. Edwards
Project Research Coordinator
Department of Geography

Aquaponics is the combination of AQUAculture (farming fish) and hydroPONICS (growing plants without soil). When these two food production methods are combined the resulting system is biologically diverse, extremely resilient, and has many benefits over conventional agriculture and aquaculture methods.

Polar Bears: Outstanding Survivors of Climate Change (M S)

Dr. Susan Crockford
Adjunct Assistant Professor
Department of Anthropology

Polar bears are remarkably resilient to changing climate, attested to by their survival through a multitude of past climate shifts, some of inconceivable magnitude. This talk incorporates little-known biological and historical facts commonly omitted from popular polar bear accounts into a balanced overview of life and adaptation on Arctic sea ice. Skulls of a polar bear and grizzly bear provide a hands-on component

Space Dust, Bugs and Tao: Bacteria and the Origin of Life (in English or French) (M)

Dr. Real Roy
Assistant Professor
Department of Biology

Bacteria are the simplest life forms and at the origin of all the life that surrounds us. Using the ancient Chinese daoist philosophy as a guide, this presentation explore the origin of life written in the genetic material of bacteria and the dust of nebula.

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Art & Architecture

Aboriginal Art and Representation in the 2010 Vancouver Olympic Games ǂ (S) NEW

Mr. Regan Shrumm
Graduate Student
Department of History in Art

I will specifically compare how Aboriginals have been represented in the Vancouver Games, through advertising and art, to the past two Canadian Olympics of Montreal and Calgary.

Art Amongst the Books: The UVic Art Collection’s Library Displays (S) NEW

Ms. Lara Wilson
University Archivist
Library

Presentation highlights selected works from the University Art Collection, on display in the Mearns Centre for Learning/McPherson Library. Paintings and sculptures include works by members of the Royal Canadian Academy of Arts (RCA) and other noteworthy figures from the Canadian art scene.

The Artists Archives at UVic: Documenting Victoria's Influential Art Scene (S)

Ms. Lara Wilson
University Archivist (re-scheduled)
Library

UVic is strategically collecting the archives of historical and contemporary artists with strong links to the University, Victoria and Vancouver Island, and who have established a prominent reputation nationally and internationally. The archives of artists who have taught at UVic and whose works are a part of the University of Victoria Art Collections form a key part of these holdings. Artists include: Ted Harrison, Sandra Meigs, Robert Amos, and Glenn Howarth.

Belling the Cat: The Artful Subversion of Advertising (S)

Dr. Robert Dalton
Associate Professor
Department of Curriculum and Instruction

Advertisers pride themselves in knowing consumers better than we know ourselves. Perhaps this is why we accept so much advertising uncritically. This presentation looks at the work of artists within the industry who have used humour to subvert advertising, exposing its methods and assumptions.

The Coast Salish Weave Collection of the Cornett Building ǂ (S) NEW

Mr. Regan Shrumm
Graduate Student
Department of History in Art

Through studying the Russian icons from the UVic Art Collections, and working as an intern at the collections, I have developed a strong general knowledge of the university’s campus art. Of special interest is the Cornett Building’s Salish Weave Collection. For this topic, I can talk about the artists, meaning, and iconography of the artworks.

Looking at Others Looking at Us: Portraiture by Leading Photographers (S)

Dr. Robert Dalton
Associate Professor
Department of Curriculum and Instruction

Great photographs tell us more than what people look like, they “speak” about them, revealing character, commenting on human virtue or folly, and even presenting a portrait of an entire generation.

Popular Myths about Art and Artists (S)

Dr. Robert Dalton
Associate Professor
Department of Curriculum and Instruction

Portrait of the Artist: William Kurelek’s Developing Sense of Self in Painting (S) NEW

Ms. Mary Jo Hughes
Director
University of Victoria Art Collections

Decades after his death William Kurelek (1927-1977) fascinates audiences with his unique expressions of Canadian identity. Throughout his career he wrestled with his own identity as a man and artist through mental illness, family rejection, and religious enlightenment. This presentation traces Kurelek’s developing sense of self through his paintings.

Religious Significance of Russian Icons ǂ (S) NEW

Mr. Regan Shrumm
Graduate Student
Department of History in Art

This talk looks at Russian icons in terms of their religious significance, history, and iconography. This talk is expands on a paper I wrote on the Russian Icons of UVic’s Brown Collection, featured in the Arbutus Review in 2012.

Sculpture in a Digital Era

Dr. Daniel Laskarin
Associate Professor and Chair
Department of Visual Arts

Examining the importance of physical objects at a time when most of what we do is mediated by computer technology.

War and Peace: Children’s Drawings Promoting Peace (S)

Dr. Robert Dalton
Associate Professor
Department of Curriculum and Instruction

Young at Art: Elderly Artists and Their Work (S)

Dr. Robert Dalton
Associate Professor
Department of Curriculum and Instruction

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Business & Economics

Angels and Venture Capitalists: Financing “High-growth” Start-up Companies NEW

Dr. Paul Schure
Assistant Professor
Department of Economics

Cross-cultural Management (in English or Korean)

Dr. Sanghoon H. Nam
Associate Professor
Peter B. Gustavson School of Business

Discussing Niall Ferguson’s The Ascent of Money (S)

Dr. Pascal Courty
Assistant Professor
Department of Economics

Economics and Happiness (S) NEW

Dr. Pascal Courty
Assistant Professor
Department of Economics

Does the relentless pursuit of economic growth increase happiness or mire us in a rat race? This talk explores recent research on the connection between the pursuit of prosperity and happiness as revealed in social surveys.

The Euro and Financial Markets in the Eurozone

Dr. Paul Schure
Assistant Professor
Department of Economics

Financial Crises and Economic Crisis

Dr. Paul Schure
Assistant Professor
Department of Economics

Korean Management and Economy (in English or Korean)

Dr. Sanghoon H. Nam
Associate Professor
Peter B. Gustavson School of Business

Organizational Behaviour (in English or Korean)

Dr. Sanghoon H. Nam
Associate Professor
Peter B. Gustavson School of Business

Sport and Economics: Exploring Research Synergy (in English and French) (S) NEW

Dr. Richard Wolfe
Professor
Peter B. Gustavson School of Business

Strategic Planning NEW

Dr. Rhordon Wikkramatileke
Instructor and Curriculum Developer
Division of Continuing Studies

Understanding How Firms Set Prices (S) NEW

Dr. Pascal Courty
Assistant Professor
Department of Economics

This talk presents research on how popular musicians set ticket prices for concerts, how airlines and hotels sell plane tickets and hotel rooms, and why prices vary at the gas station.

Understanding Innovation in Organizations: Using Sport as a Lens (in English and French) (S) NEW

Dr. Richard Wolfe
Professor
Peter B. Gustavson School of Business

University Athletics, Academics and the Challenge of Congruence: Insights from Innovation, Organizational Trust and Institutional Theories (in English and French) (S) NEW

Dr. Richard Wolfe
Professor
Peter B. Gustavson School of Business

West Meets East: Using Sport as a Lens for Enlightening, Balancing and Transcending (in English and French) (S) NEW

Dr. Richard Wolfe
Professor
Peter B. Gustavson School of Business

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Child & Teen Development

Childhood Stress (E M)

Dr. Lily Dyson
Professor Emeritus
Educational Psychology and Leadership Studies

Addresses types and sources of childhood stress and suggests ways parents and teachers may consider to help reduce children's stress

Children and Nature: What are the Benefits of Outdoor Play? (S) NEW

Dr. Ulrich Mueller
Associate Professor
Department of Psychology

There is increasing concern about the decline of children’s outdoor play, and the potentially negative effect of this decline on children’s attention and their attitudes towards nature. In fact, it has been argued that the decline in outdoor play leads to an overall disconnection from nature, a disconnection that has been termed nature deficit disorder (Louv, 2005). In this talk, I will summarize empirical research that speaks to this issue.

Early Literacy Development of Young Children

Dr. Margie Mayfield
Professor Emeritus
Department of Curriculum and Instruction

Early Moral Development (S)

Dr. Ulrich Mueller
Associate Professor
Department of Psychology

The question of how people come to develop inner standards by means of which they judge what is right and wrong has occupied psychologists for decades. Recent research shows that the seeds for moral standards are emerging in infancy and early childhood. In this talk, I will review recent research on early moral development, and what research suggests about factors that promote or hinder moral development.

Effective Parenting (M S)

Dr. Loren Acker
Retirees Association
Department of Psychology

Empathy and Visual Literacy (S)

Dr. Robert Dalton
Associate Professor
Department of Curriculum and Instruction

Helmet Use and Brain Injury Prevention ǂ (E M) NEW

Ms. Stacey Ross
Graduate Student
Department of Psychology

For children: the presentation will focus on education about the brain, what can happen if it gets injured, and how to prevent brain injury with the use of helmets in sports and recreation including bicycling, skateboarding, skiing, snowboarding, etc. This presentation will be interactive.

The Importance of Arts Education in Child Development (S)

Dr. Robert Dalton
Associate Professor
Department of Curriculum and Instruction

Important Goals for Early Numeracy: What You Can Do with and for Preschool Children NEW

Dr. Werner Liedtke
Professor Emeritus
Department of Curriculum and Instruction

Strategies, activities, problems and game settings that contribute to key aspects of numeracy: self esteem; confidence; risk taking; ability to visualize; flexible thinking; understanding of number/number sense; a strong foundation of oral language.

Indigenous Approaches to Early Childhood (in English or Spanish) (E M S) NEW

Dr. Carmen Rodriguez de France
Assistant Professor
Department of Curriculum and Instruction

Various perspectives on the topic of Indigenous approaches to early childhood: language revitalization, child welfare, child care, and so forth.

Is Play Important for Development? (S)

Dr. Ulrich Mueller
Associate Professor
Department of Psychology

Play is a universal phenomenon that can be found in children across the world. There are different types of play, ranging from physical, rough-and-tumble play to symbolic play with others. Research has shown that different types of play promote development. I will review this research and discuss ways in which play can be used in educational and clinical practice with children.

Nursing, Pregnancy and Childbirth Information for Children (Sept-Dec) (E M S)

Dr. Karen MacKinnon
Assistant Professor
School of Nursing

Parenting Preschool Children (E M)

Dr. Lily Dyson
Professor Emeritus
Educational Psychology and Leadership Studies

Explaining young children's needs and main development and recommending how parents, teachers, and child care professionals may guide young children to help promote their social development.

STD-proofing Your Kids (M S)

Dr. Loren Acker
Retirees Association
Department of Psychology

Survivors of War: Children Draw Their Experiences (S)

Dr. Robert Dalton
Associate Professor
Department of Curriculum and Instruction

Want To Help Your Child Learn Math? There Are Apps for That!

Dr. Tim Pelton
Assistant Professor
Department of Curriculum and Instruction

iPod Touch/iPhone devices provide unique opportunities for parents to engage their children in anytime, anywhere, micro-tutoring activities. There are thousands of educational apps available on the App store – but only a fraction of them can be recommended. We examine features of educationally sound apps and suggest tutoring strategies for parents.

Why Kindergarten for 3-to-5 Year Olds?

Dr. Margie Mayfield
Professor Emeritus
Department of Curriculum and Instruction

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Co-operative Education

Biochemistry and Microbiology Co-operative Education (S)

Dr. Rozanne Poulson
Co-op Coordinator
Department of Biochemistry and Microbiology

Science Co-operative Education Programs (S)

Dr. Rozanne Poulson
Co-op Coordinator
Department of Biochemistry and Microbiology

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Computers, Engineering & Technology

Computers for Everyone? Open-source Software Opens Possibilities (M S)

Mr. Rich McCue
Systems Administrator
Law Library

Open Source software like Linux and the Linux Terminal Server Project can breathe new life into older computers for both individuals and organizations. This is both environmentally friendly–with less computers in landfills–and can give access to technology to people who may not be able to afford it otherwise. Find out how easy it is to use Open Source software on older computers.

Conserving Energy One Cubicle (or Home) at a Time (M S)

Mr. Rich McCue
Systems Administrator
Law Library

Do you know how much electricity you use in your personal office, cubicle or home? Do you know how much energy your desktop computer or laptop uses? Will you save more electricity by turning off your computer at night or shortening your daily shower by five minutes? Discover some counter-intuitive facts about saving energy, money and the environment.

How To Prepare Your Home Computer for Everything from Deleted Files to Natural Disasters (M S)

Mr. Rich McCue
Systems Administrator
Law Library

Strategies for backing up your computer so that documents and photos don’t get lost, whether by accidental deletion, hard drive failure, or natural disaster. Talk is intended for non-technical computer users.

Information Technology (E M S)

Ms. Shubha Hosalli
Electronic Technician
Department of Chemistry

Talks are related to the use of computers and telecommunications to store, retrieve and transmit information and security of information.

The iPhone and iPad: Research Tools for Students? (M S)

Mr. Rich McCue
Systems Administrator
Law Library

Can iPhones and iPads be more than just distractions, but actually help with homework and research? This session will look at different strategies and applications that can help turn your iPhone or iPad into a serious research tools. Talk is intended for non-technical users.

Social Media: Community Building with Blogs and Tweets (M S) NEW

Dr. Janni Aragon
Assistant Professor
Department of Political Science

A beginner’s introduction to learning how blogs and Twitter are useful for connecting people and building community locally and globally. This talk can also look at how to use Twitter, along with one or two blog platforms.

Youth and Electronic Media (E M S)

Ms. Shubha Hosalli
Electronic Technician
Department of Chemistry

Ways Electronic Media Harm Kids' Health and Ways They Can Help

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Cultures Around the World

Introduction to Islam (Islam 101: an Academic Perspective) (S)

Dr. Andrew Rippin
Professor Emeritus
Department of History

A discussion of what makes Islam different from and similar to Judaism and Christianity in terms of basic religious beliefs and practices.

Islam in the Modern World (S)

Dr. Andrew Rippin
Professor Emeritus
Department of History

"Islam in the modern world" addresses debates in the Muslim world about how Islam should be conceived (political, personal, activist etc). While religion certainly does not explain everything that happens in the Muslim world today, some aspects certainly are relevant, especially when seen in a historical perspective. Exploring those topics helps clarify the role of Islamic ideas in the modern world.

Mexico’s “Day of the Dead” (S)

Prof. Rosa Stewart
Senior Instructor
Department of Hispanic and Italian Studies

The fascinating celebration of the "Day of the Dead" is explored in this talk. I have slides of preparations and the beautiful altars that are created to remember those that have passed away.

The Story of an African (Women's) Farm (S)NEW

Dr. Elizabeth Vibert
Associate Professor
Department of History

The Story of an African (Women's) Farm' tells the story of an inspiring community farm in rural South Africa, where two generations of women grow food for their families, for sale, and to support the ill in their villages. For twenty years they have grown much more than food -- they have cultivated community and resilience in difficult circumstances.

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Earth & Oceans

British Columbia: A Plate-tectonic Odyssey and its Role in the Great Alaskan Terrane Wreck (S)

Dr. Stephen T. Johnston
Professor
School of Earth and Ocean Sciences

Some 250 million years ago the earth looked very much different than it does now. All the continents were grouped together in a single supercontinent - Pangea. Pangea was surrounded by a global superocean - Panthalassa. The west coast of North America, bordering the eastern margin of Panthalassa, was located near the Alberta - British Columbia provincial border. Almost all of the crust that makes up British Columbia was subsequently added to the west margin of North American during the break-up of Pangea. This begs the questions, where did all this crust come from and how did it get here? I will discuss evidence that suggests that British Columbia was assembled in a "subduction factory" located on the other side of Panthalassa, greater than 15 000 km west of North America; speculate on the long strange odyssey that subsequently brought BC to our shores; and describe the "terrane wreck" that terminated BC's wanderings and which gave rise to the Rocky Mountains and was responsible for the construction of Alaska.

Citizen Science Using the Digital Fishers Feature from Ocean Networks Canada (M S)

Mr. Bob Crosby
Software Quality Control Specialist
ONC Observatory Neptune Canada Project

See how you can contribute to ocean research from your home. Learn how to use the Digital Fishers tool to observe 15 second clips of video, then record your observations of sea life, water quality, presence of objects, and appearance of the sea floor. Learn how to use the tutorials to increase your knowledge as you move through the various levels of difficulty. Earn playing cards that contain interesting trivia about various sea creatures.

Climate Change Fore and Aft: Where on Earth Are We Going? (S)

Dr. Tom Pedersen
Director
Pacific Institute for Climate Solutions

The Coastal Regions of Alaska and the Arctic

Dr. David Atkinson
Assistant Professor
Department of Geography

An overview of the Alaskan and Arctic coastal regions, including who lives there, what the land/coast is like, how important sea ice is, how climate change is manifesting itself in these areas, and new threats/opportunities from oil/gas development or the Northwest Passage opening.

Developing Environmental Monitoring Technologies Ahead of Deep-sea Mining: Examples from the NEPTUNE Underwater Observatory Off Vancouver Island (M S)

Dr. Kim Juniper
Director
Ocean Networks Canada

Field Research in the Arctic

Dr. David Atkinson
Assistant Professor
Department of Geography

This is more of a picture tour showing what it looks like in the Canadian high Arctic–land forms, research, animals–a place most people have never seen.

Glaciers and Tree Rings: What Ancient Forests Buried by Glaciers Can Tell Us about Climate ǂ (M S)

Ms. Bethany Coulthard
Graduate Student
Department of Geograph

I have spent four field seasons in the central and Northern Coast Mountains and in Patagonia sampling wood from ancient forests that have been overrun by glaciers. I use tree ring records from these samples to reconstruct histories of climate and glacier mass balance (amount of ice). I have lots of pictures of ice environments and alpine places, and would be happy to talk about how glaciers work, how trees record climate, how trees can be used to tell us more about glaciers, and how climate change is impacting alpine ice, trees, hydrology, and microclimates. This could be in the form of a more technical talk or something directed to the layperson who just loves the outdoors!

How Storms Impact the Coasts

Dr. David Atkinson
Assistant Professor
Department of Geography

How storms affect the ocean to cause impact to the coast. How the nature of the coast–water depth, type of beach material, how the coast is shaped–affects how a storm can cause impact. How features like bars and rip-currents work. Why there are bigger waves in winter.

How Vancouver Island Came to Be: The Rock Story (E M S)

Dr. Eileen Van Der Flier-Keller
Associate Professor
School of Earth and Ocean Sciences

The geological history of Vancouver Island is explored through hands-on activities designed to discover the stories that rocks tell.

Marine Invasive Species and their Impacts on Vancouver Island ǂ (E M S)

Ms. Kylee Pawluk
Graduate Student
Department of Geography

Invasive species are thought to be a leading cause of loss of native species around the world. However, not all introduced species are bad! We just don’t hear about the species that can have positive impacts on the habitats they invade. In addition, much of our understanding of how invasive species affect native communities comes from work on terrestrial habitats–but invasive species are equally, if not more important in our marine habitats. I will discuss how marine invasive species are transferred throughout our oceans and the impact they can have on their new habitat, drawing from both classic examples as well as my own research here on Vancouver Island. The audience should leave with a more thorough understanding of the ecological importance of introduced species, the roles they can play in new environments, and gain a greater appreciation of the marine habitats around Vancouver Island.

Mother Ocean: Why Oceans Matter (E M S)

Mr. Dwight Owens
Web Content Manager
ONC Observatory Neptune Canada Project

A review of how oceans are critically important to our survival and an introduction to some of the key threats to ocean health.

Pacific Storm Types and Tracks

Dr. David Atkinson
Assistant Professor
Department of Geography

What are the types of Pacific storms? Where do they form, where do they travel, and why do they move as they do? Why do we have more storms in winter than in summer? How do El Nino/La Nina affect them?

Real-Time HD Video from the Bottom of the Sea: Acquiring, Annotating, Archiving and Analysis of Video from NEPTUNE Canada

Mr. Murray Leslie
Software Quality Control Specialist
ONC Observatory Neptune Canada Project

Talk to Daughter’s class on June 6/12

Researching our Ocean using the Ocean Networks Canada Observatory Network (M S)

Mr. Bob Crosby
Software Quality Control Specialist
ONC Observatory Neptune Canada Project

Find out what the Ocean Networks Canada observatories (including NEPTUNE and VENUS) consist of. Learn what geographical areas are being studied, and what kinds of sensors are located on the sea floor. See examples of how we are studying tsunamis, listening for whales, and tracking changes in the ocean chemistry. Watch interesting videos of octopus, squid, brittle stars, spider crabs, and hot vents releasing 300 degree water from below the sea floor into the ocean above. Learn how you can contribute to ocean research by viewing videos and recording your observations of sea life.

Sour Seas: Ocean Acidification Explained (E M S) NEW

Mr. Dwight Owens
Web Content Manager
ONC Observatory Neptune Canada Project

Why are our oceans becoming more acidic? As acidification increases, what impacts can we expect? What can be done to address this dramatic change in the chemistry of our seas? 

Spain: Rocks, Romans and Rioja in the Geological Heart of the Pangea Supercontinent (S)

Dr. Stephen T. Johnston
Professor
School of Earth and Ocean Sciences

Between 300 and 400 million years ago, Earth's continents coalesced into one supercontinent, Pangea. What is now Spain lay at the heart of that supercontinent, and the geology of Spain provides us with a record of the monumental continental collisions that give birth to Pangea, and to the faulting and oceanic inundation that attended its subsequent demise. This geological heritage shaped the history of Spain. Rome colonized Spain in order to gain access to the rich Gold deposits that formed during the continental collisions that formed Pangea. The Romans brought with them their wine culture that survives to this day, most notably in the highlands of Rioja. Mercury mined from deposits that characterized Pangea was carried to the New World to aid Spanish gold mining in the Americas. Spain is at the geological heart of Pangea, and an ongoing testament to the significance of the geological history of the crust beneath us.

What on Earth is in Our Stuff? Non-renewable Resources and Us (E M S)

Dr. Eileen Van Der Flier-Keller
Associate Professor
School of Earth and Ocean Sciences

This hands-on presentation explores the links between products (at home, school, work and outdoors) that we use every day, and the non-renewable resources that are needed to produce them.

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Education in the Schools

Changing for Good: Choices for Creating a Healthy Living School (E M S)

Dr. Patti-Jean Naylor
Assistant Professor
School of Exercise Science, Physical and Health Education

The Fraser Report on Schools: What Does it Really Mean? (M S)

Dr. Ian Cameron
Adjunct Professor
Department of Educational Psychology and Leadership Studies

How Good is My School? (M S)

Dr. Ian Cameron
Adjunct Professor
Department of Educational Psychology and Leadership Studies

The Fraser Institute rates BC secondary schools each year. Their system isn’t very good, but there are ways of measuring (and rating) schools that work. How good is your school?

How Should Schools Report to Parents? (M S)

Dr. Ian Cameron
Adjunct Professor
Department of Educational Psychology and Leadership Studies

Parents, Schools, Goals and Evaluation (M S)

Dr. Ian Cameron
Adjunct Professor
Department of Educational Psychology and Leadership Studies

The Ministry of Education has decreed that parents are now to be included in school action plans and in program evaluation. How will that work?

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Education—General

The Benefits of Humanities Education

Dr. John Archibald
Professor and Dean
Department of Linguistics

Beyond the Shadow of the Residential School: Understanding the On-reserve Day School in the History of Indigenous Education

Prof. Helen Raptis
Associate Professor
Department of Curriculum and Instruction

The history of Indian day schools has been eclipsed by the vast scholarship on residential schooling. This talk presents the experiences of students who attended Port Essington Indian Day School during the 1930s and 1940s. It illustrates how pupils successfully negotiated through two educational worlds: formal schooling where they were “Anglicized” and traditional learning taught by their elders. The day school was less benign than previously thought, contributing to the loss of ancestral language and culture.

Children's Rights Education: Empowering Children to Uphold Liberty, Equality and Dignity ǂ (E M S) NEW

Ms. Lesley Friedmann
Graduate Student
Department of Curriculum and Instruction

A paradigm-shifting proposal to reform the current education system is offered to establish a global foundation of freedom, justice and peace as proclaimed by the United Nations Charter in 1945. Based on the principles and provisions outlined in the UN Convention on the Rights of the Child (CRC), the purpose of education is suggested to empower children to become critically literate citizens so that they can shape a future that recognizes the inherent dignity and the equal and inalienable rights of all members of the human family. A comprehensive children’s rights education curriculum that incorporates Montessori pedagogical methods and principles is presented that enables signatories to the CRC to fulfill the legal and moral obligations to “make the principles and provisions of the Convention widely known, by appropriate and active means, to adults and children alike” (Article 42). The purpose of this integrated curriculum is to empower children with knowledge of their rights so that they can act as agents of change to uphold these rights for all children as they promote social progress and better standards of life in a larger freedom (UN 1945 Charter).

Constructing Understanding by Explaining Everything: One Way iPads can Enhance Education NEW

Dr. Tim Pelton
Assistant Professor
Department of Curriculum and Instruction

In this presentation we will focus on the creative potentials of iPads as tools to enhance the educational process. Teachers can create interactive learning resources to support student explorations and discussions, and generate animations to demonstrate procedures and concepts and support individualized student review (flipped classroom). Then these same resources can be used as exemplars for learners to build upon as they generate learning artifacts (interactive objects and animations) on their own iPads. By consolidating, representing and communicating their understandings they are demonstrating true mastery.

Designing Effective Posters (S)

Dr. Michelle Wiebe
Senior Instructor
Department of Curriculum and Instruction

Posters are used to advertise, promote, and instruct. Because they are used so often, it is worthwhile learning some workable procedures for creating successful poster designs

Education for Social Justice and Reconstruction (E M S) NEW

Dr. Jason M.C. Price
Assistant Professor
Department of Curriculum and Instruction

Ending the Reign of the Fraser Institute School Rankings

Prof. Helen Raptis
Associate Professor
Department of Curriculum and Instruction

The Fraser Institute's school rankings have won the hearts of parents and the press, despite the fact that they distort test scores. For over a decade, the rankings have been particularly burdensome for low-ranking (usually low socio-economic status, high-poverty) schools when parents of high achieving children move them to higher-ranking schools. This talk explores the nature of the rankings and the many factors that have ensured their long media reign.

How to Develop Your Creativity (S)

Dr. Michelle Wiebe
Senior Instructor
Department of Curriculum and Instruction

Creativity research shows that creativity involves a conscious decision to be creative. Additionally there are identifiable steps that anyone can take to enhance creative productivity.

Indigenous Arts in Education (in English or Spanish) (E M S) NEW

Dr. Carmen Rodriguez de France
Assistant Professor
Department of Curriculum and Instruction

Music, poetry, visual arts and dance are topics of this presentation.

Indigenous Education: Practices and Promises (in English or Spanish) (E M S) NEW

Dr. Carmen Rodriguez de France
Assistant Professor
Department of Curriculum and Instruction

This talk provides an overview of the current state of Indigenous education in BC and Canada in some respects.

The Interface between Bloom's Taxonomy and Roger's Innovation Diffusion Theory NEW

Dr. Richard Rush
Director
Community and Professional Programs

Businesses seek to get the most out of adopting a new technology and individuals often want to accelerate their ability to use a new process, service or product to reap the rewards sooner. Hear how an educational theory intersects with innovation in a way to make this happen easier.

Moving Forward through the Rearview Mirror: Future, Change and Indigenous Education (E M S)

Dr. Jason M.C. Price
Assistant Professor
Department of Curriculum and Instruction

Aboriginal perspectives on special education practice, including alternatives.

New Digital Technologies: Hope and Possibility in Open Education (E M S)

Dr. Jason M.C. Price
Assistant Professor
Department of Curriculum and Instruction

Planning for Effective Schools NEW

Prof. Helen Raptis
Associate Professor
Department of Curriculum and Instruction

Stage Presence and Confidence in Speaking ǂ (E M S)

Ms. Colleen Clement
Graduate Student
Department of Curriculum and Instruction

Need a boost to help you present your ideas better? To try something new? To face an interview? Or just to walk a little taller in today’s interesting economy? Has your felling of self-worth gotten a little banged up lately? Trying to find your own voice? To express yourself? To know that you’re not alone? This workshop helps to increase confidence and self-respect both on- and off-stage. Fun, non-threatening, encouraging atmosphere.

The Why, What and How of Fostering Learner Reflection NEW

Dr. Li-Shih Huang
Associate Professor
Department of Linguistics

Dr. Li-Shih Huang, Associate Professor of Applied Linguistics and Learning and Teaching Scholar at the University of Victoria, has over a decade of language-learning instructional and curriculum design experience at the undergraduate and graduate levels in Canada and overseas. She was also the recipient of TESOLs Award for Excellence in the Development of Pedagogical Materials. Her research interests include English for academic purposes, learner strategies in language-learning and language-testing contexts, needs and outcomes assessments, and corpus-aided discovery learning.

The UN Convention on the Rights of the Child: Possibilities and Promise (E M S)

Dr. Jason M.C. Price
Assistant Professor
Department of Curriculum and Instruction

Explores the power and potential of the UN Convention on the Rights of the Child for changing schooling.

Videogames and Learning (E M S)

Dr. Kathy Sanford
Associate Professor
Department of Curriculum and Instruction

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Ethics & Philosophy

The Art of Murder: Hitchcock Meets Nietzsche (S) NEW

Dr. Nina Belmonte
Senior Lecturer
Department of Philosophy

Best combined with a viewing of Hitchcock's 'Rope', this talk provides an analysis of Hitchcock's gorgeous and controversial film based on the Leopold and Lobe case, and a discussion of the moral philosophy of Nietzsche (mis)interpreted therein.

Children’s Rights (S) NEW

Dr. Colin Macleod
Associate Professor
Department of Philosophy and Law

Collective Responsibility for Wrongdoing (S)

Prof. Cindy Holder
Associate Professor
Department of Philosophy

We often talk about groups as though they act and are blameworthy for outcomes that involve them. But can groups actually be responsible for wrongdoing? One worry about holding groups responsible is that it seems to let individuals off the hook. But without group responsibility it is hard to see many socially generated wrongs, like vulnerability to violence, as wrongs rather than bad luck. In this presentation I explain how groups may be treated as actors for purposes of assigning responsibility without this giving individuals a free pass.

Contemporary Theories of Justice (S)

Dr. Colin Macleod
Associate Professor
Department of Philosophy and Law

A discussion of recent developments in political philosophy concerning the nature of a just society. Addresses issues of how basic political institutions should be structured and how the benefits and burdens of social cooperation should be shared.

Democratic Ethics (S)

Dr. Colin Macleod
Associate Professor
Department of Philosophy and Law

A discussion of the ethical responsibilities of politicians, members of the media and citizens in contemporary Canadian democracy. Focuses on the importance to democracy of reasoned debate and discussion and widespread participation in democratic processes.

Educational Equality (S)

Dr. Colin Macleod
Associate Professor
Department of Philosophy and Law

A discussion of the nature of justice in the provision of education with special attention to the interpretation of equality in the distributional of educational opportunities.

End-of-life Issues (S)

Dr. Eike Kluge
Professor
Department of Philosophy

Ethical Issues in Animal Experimentation (S)

Dr. Eike Kluge
Professor
Department of Philosophy

Existentialism: A Personal Faith (S) NEW

Dr. Nina Belmonte
Senior Lecturer
Department of Philosophy

A review of the basic ideas of Existentialism and their relevance for examining and owning our lives.

Imagining Perfection: The Importance of Utopian Ideals (S) NEW

Dr. Nina Belmonte
Senior Lecturer
Department of Philosophy

A brief history of the utopian imagination, its fundamental claims and its continuing importance in shaping our communities.

Patenting of Genes and Ethics of Patient Information (S)

Dr. Eike Kluge
Professor
Department of Philosophy

Political Correctness, Inclusivity and Freedom of Speech (M S)

Dr. Rennie Warburton
Professor Emeritus
Department of Sociology

Research and debates on the origins of “political correctness”. Focus on PC (1) as a description of measures to reform language and practices in order to reduce social injustice, notably discrimination by race, gender, sexual orientation, disability etc., and (2) as an ideological tool used by those who oppose such measures.

Reproductive Technologies: Ethical Issues (S)

Dr. Eike Kluge
Professor
Department of Philosophy

The Value of Truth in Transitions from Violence (S)

Prof. Cindy Holder
Associate Professor
Department of Philosophy

Why is it important to establish the truth about what happened when governments and other groups violate human rights? And what do we mean when we say that one description but not another is true? In this presentation I discuss what the value of truth is for societies recovering from human rights abuses and what makes a description of such abuses true or false.

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Fitness, Athletics & Healthy Lifestyles

Back Health for Sport and Daily Living

Dr. David Docherty
Professor Emeritus
School of Exercise Science, Physical and Health Education

Developing the “core” has become very popular for athletes but also those people who suffer from low back pain (LBP) or are just interested in having a healthy back. This presentation starts with a quick look at the structure of the back and why it tends to cause problems with one out of every two people. Approaches to exercise are presented that show simple progressions to improve the stability of the back or spine and how these approaches should be integrated into our daily lives.

Boosting or Maintaining your Brain Power as You Grow Older

Dr. David Docherty
Professor Emeritus
School of Exercise Science, Physical and Health Education

This presentation looks at ways to maintain or boost brain power through lifestyle choices, especially the role of physical activity which is the number one way to preserve memory and other cognitive functions.

Career-life Planning (M S)

Prof. Bryan Hiebert
Adjunct Professor
Department of Educational Psychology and Leadership Studies

Fitness, Fatness, Finances and Friends: What Makes People Healthy (S)

Dr. Joan Wharf Higgins
Professor and Canada Research Chair
School of Exercise Science, Physical and Health Education

What makes people healthy? This presentation describes the non-medical factors influencing health, including exercising and eating, but also how pet ownership and our neighbourhoods contribute to our health.

For the WELLth of It

Dr. Lara Lauzon
Assistant Professor
School of Exercise Science, Physical and Health Education

This interactive session looks at a number of current wellness models that incorporate physical activity, nutrition, stress management, environmental and self-responsibility dimensions. The session is valuable for anyone who finds themselves better at taking care of others than taking care of themselves.

Fun, Fitness and Fatness

Dr. David Docherty
Professor Emeritus
School of Exercise Science, Physical and Health Education

This presentation on fun, fitness and fatness asks the question are you eating right and getting enough physical activity to have health benefits as well as discussing the merits of different types of physical activity. The presentation examines some serious health issues in a light hearted way (no pun intended!)

Getting Stronger: You’re Never Too Old

Dr. David Docherty
Professor Emeritus
School of Exercise Science, Physical and Health Education

Strength training is important for all age groups, including the elderly. This presentation looks at the many benefits that can be derived from a strength training program and provides sample programs using theraband exercises designed for older groups as well as simple exercises to help balance.

Health and Staying Physically Active as One Grows Older

Dr. David Docherty
Professor Emeritus
School of Exercise Science, Physical and Health Education

This presentation addresses the importance of staying active as we grow older dealing with some important health issues in a lighthearted way! The presentation will cover the many aspects of health that are improved through a commitment to regular physical activity, including some of the recent research showing the value to cognitive functioning. Simple suggestions for staying active and improving strength will be addressed with time to address specific questions.

Health and Wellness: Resistance Training and Quality of Life ǂ (S)

Mr. John Buxcey
Graduate Student
Department of Exercise Science, Physical and Health Education

Quality of Life can be enhanced through resistance training for people of all ages. Speak to myths that surround resistance training and present factual information that is easy to understand and implement.

Hockey and Lacrosse: Unwritten Codes of Conduct ǂ (S)

Mr. John Buxcey
Graduate Student
Department of Exercise Science, Physical and Health Education

The problem that unwritten rules cause for athletes, coaches, referees, journalists, and fans. Introduce the concept of "Governance" and its relationship to and its responsibility for player safety.

Probiotics for Better Health: Time to Change Gears NEW

Dr. Edward E. Ishiguro
Professor Emeritus
Department of Biochemistry and Microbiology

Claims that live bacterial cultures, known as probiotics, are beneficial to human health date back over 100 years. Yogurt and similar fermented milk products, the most popular forms of probiotics, have been widely adopted as health foods. The health claims associated with these products range from improved digestive function to bolstered immune systems, and the scientific validity for these claims will be critically examined. The main focus of this presentation will be on current research on the development of more effective probiotics. The potential use of probiotics to treat various digestive tract disorders, including infections, will be discussed.

Relaxation (M S)

Prof. Bryan Hiebert
Adjunct Professor
Department of Educational Psychology and Leadership Studies

Stepping into Fitness

Dr. David Docherty
Professor Emeritus
School of Exercise Science, Physical and Health Education

This presentation looks at the many benefits of walking and the use of the pedometer in reaching and maintaining goals for physical activity. The use of Nordic poles to assist or complement walking is included as well as a demonstration on how to use them. It also looks at the relationship between stepping and caloric intake and expenditure.

Stress and Stress Control (M S)

Prof. Bryan Hiebert
Adjunct Professor
Department of Educational Psychology and Leadership Studies

Stress and Wellness (M S)

Prof. Bryan Hiebert
Adjunct Professor
Department of Educational Psychology and Leadership Studies

Taking Risks and Embracing Change

Dr. Lara Lauzon
Assistant Professor
School of Exercise Science, Physical and Health Education

This session deals with personal and career changes and outlines steps on how you can respond to change you initiate – or change you have little or no control over. A discussion of how risk-taking and change is connected to personal lifestyle is also part of the workshop. Life is a balancing act between forces for and against change and personal wellness is affected by how you adapt to change. This session can help you evaluate or re-evaluate what changes might be needed in your life or what risks you are willing to take to “be well’.

Weight Reduction through Exercise and Diet

Dr. David Docherty
Professor Emeritus
School of Exercise Science, Physical and Health Education

This presentation examines why diets work for the short term but not for the long term and the importance of including exercise in any effort to lose weight. It also addresses some of the challenges that face people trying to lose weight using diets and exercise.

When Couples Become Parents: The Joys and Challenges of Having a Baby (S) NEW

Dr. Erica Woodin
Assistant Professor
Department of Psychology

Couples often say that having a baby changes their relationship completely. For some couples, these changes can be difficult to navigate. In this presentation, I will discuss research from a study of 100 first-time parents from Victoria, BC, who have shared their experiences with us from pregnancy to preschool.

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Health Care & Medicine

Brain Health with Aging (E M S)

Dr. Brian Christie
Associate Professor
Island Medical Program

Building Upon Strengths: Supporting Community-based Research to Promote Women’s Health in Rural, Remote and Aboriginal Communities (Sept-Dec) (E M S)

Dr. Karen MacKinnon
Assistant Professor
School of Nursing

This presentation focuses on a study conducted to promote women’s health and prevent STIs in women and families living in North Vancouver Island communities. The proposal was developed and submitted by the North Island Research Team, recognizing that building upon community strengths is essential for women’s reproductive health and for promoting the health of families and communities. The main research component focused on evaluating Women’s Wellness Fairs using a program evaluation framework. The Women’s Wellness Fairs take a holistic approach to women’s health and were offered in ten rural, remote and Aboriginal communities with the goal promoting the health of women and their families.

The Canadian Health Care System (in English and Turkish) (M S) NEW

Mr. Erdem Yazganoglu
Sessional Instructor
Health and Information Science

Separation between Health and Health care delivery system and their roles in determining individuals health status. How it is established? What are the underlying values? How did it developed historically and where it is now? How is it compared to other OECD countries? Discussion of possible options, and benefits and drawbacks of these options.

Care Transitions for Seniors (S) NEW

Dr. Denise Cloutier Fisher
Associate Professor
Centre on Aging and the Department of Geography

Exploring the Challenges of Transitions in Care for Older Adults. Along with a colleague, I am studying transitions in care – moving from home care to hospital care to assisted living and residential care for example. Using quantitative data collected from assessment tools and hospitalization records, we are trying to understand the common pathways through these systems of care, and the predictors of how people move through these pathways (e.g., age, gender, marital status and income). We have just begun the second year of this study.

Compassion Fatigue: What it Looks Like and What to Do about it

Dr. Susan Tasker
Assistant Professor
Department of Educational Psychology and Leadership Studies

A presentation discussing the special case that we commonly refer to as “burnout.” The presentation will provide a working understanding of what compassion fatigue is and how to proactively guard against its development. Time will be given to the discussion to the co-existence of vicarious or secondary traumatization in some instances of compassion fatigue—especially in those working in the emergency services or in family caregivers of traumatically injured family members. While compassion fatigue is most commonly thought to be a risk factor for those in caregiver and health profession roles, the presenter will also discuss her clinical experience of working with compassion fatigue in school teachers referred to her for stress management and burnout.

The Constitution of Risk in Pregnancy: From Braxton Hicks to Preterm Labour (Sept-Dec) (E M S)

Dr. Karen MacKinnon
Assistant Professor
School of Nursing

Decision Making in Health Care (in English and Turkish) (M S) NEW

Mr. Erdem Yazganoglu
Sessional Instructor
Health and Information Science

This talk explores decision-making at a clinical level: ingredients of decision, possible errors in decision making and role of patient and information in preventing decision-making errors. Patient participation in decision-making is also addressed.

Demystifying Seasonal and Pandemic Influenza

Dr. Edward E. Ishiguro
Professor Emeritus
Department of Biochemistry and Microbiology

There are two distinct forms of human influenza, the localized seasonal epidemic form that routinely appears annually during winter months and the rare but more virulent pandemic form, such as the H1N1 virus of 2009. This talk will focus on the basic molecular biology of influenza virus (in lay language), the distinction between seasonal and pandemic flu viruses, and how pandemic flu strains evolve

Drug Policy, Harm Reduction, and Therapeutics Applications for Cannabis and Psychedelics ǂ (S) NEW

Mr. Philippe Lucas
Graduate Student
Social Dimensions of Health

Enhancing the Body through Chemistry: The Good, the Bad and the Ugly! NEW

Dr. Reginald Mitchell
Professor Emeritus
Department of Chemistry

Ethical Issues in Health Care (S)

Dr. Eike Kluge
Professor
Department of Philosophy

Ethical Issues in Medical Informatics (S)

Dr. Eike Kluge
Professor
Department of Philosophy

Herbal Medicines: Mechanisms, Efficacy and Safety (E M S)

Dr. Stan Bardal
Senior Instructor
Division of Medical Sciences

The talk will begin with a general overview of issues associated with the use of herbal medicines, followed by a review of a few specific herbals, how they work, what evidence there is (if any) that they do work, and safety issues associated with their use.

How Drugs Work and Why they Sometimes Cause Harm (E M S)

Dr. Stan Bardal
Senior Instructor
Division of Medical Sciences

A basic overview of the mechanisms by which drugs exert their effects, both beneficial and harmful. The talk will include a description of how our response to pharmaceuticals changes across different stages of life, as well as some general tips on how to medications safely.

Labouring to Nurse: The Work of Rural Nurses Who Provide Maternity Care in BC (Sept-Dec) (E M S)

Dr. Karen MacKinnon
Assistant Professor
School of Nursing

Living with Brain Injury: Inside Stories from Those Who Know

Dr. Susan Tasker
Assistant Professor
Department of Educational Psychology and Leadership Studies

A presentation of research findings describing the lived experiences of a group of adults with traumatic brain injuries. The experience and impacts of brain injury from the research participants’ point of views are discussed in terms of their felt frustrations, losses, needs, and ways of coping.

A Look into the Eye: How the Retina Functions and Recent Advances for Treating Retinal Disease (M S)

Dr. Bob Chow
Assistant Professor
Department of Biology

This talk is an introduction to the anatomy of the eye and the retina, explaining how the retina works, and the diseases that affect the retina. The role of basic research, and what kinds of therapies are being developed to treat retinal diseases, are also addressed.

Mental Health and Addictions Programs: New Services and New Coping Strategies ǂ NEW

Ms. Sheila Nyman
Graduate Student
Department of Social Work

The Microorganisms that Inhabit the Human Body: Sorting Out the Good, the Bad, and the Ugly

Dr. Edward E. Ishiguro
Professor Emeritus
Department of Biochemistry and Microbiology

Humans are host to about 100 trillion bacteria representing thousands of different species. A major objective of a new international research program, called The Human Microbiome Project, is to characterize this complex microbial community. This presentation will focus on exciting recent breakthroughs on the impact these microbes have on human health as well as disease.

New Emerging Human Infectious Diseases in a Changing World

Dr. Edward E. Ishiguro
Professor Emeritus
Department of Biochemistry and Microbiology

New human infectious diseases are evolving at an unprecedented rate in recent years. Over 40 new diseases have been recognized since 1970. This talk will focus on the impact such diseases have had on global health, with an emphasis on how and why they are apparently evolving

Obesity Prevention: Ideas for Action in Your Community, in Your School and in Your Family

Dr. Patti-Jean Naylor
Assistant Professor
School of Exercise Science, Physical and Health Education

The presentation provides an overview of current Canadian statistics about obesity, physical activity and healthy eating, then introduces strategies that schools and communities can adopt to try to tackle the issues.

Plague: Past and Present (in English or French) (M)

Dr. Real Roy
Assistant Professor
Department of Biology

Many ancient authors—Thucydides and Bocaccio for example—as well as modern ones like Camus have described and written about plagues. But what is plague? What do we know of plague today? Why has it been so important in the history of literature.

Resistance to Antimicrobial Agents: Current Trends and Future Directions

Dr. Edward E. Ishiguro
Professor Emeritus
Department of Biochemistry and Microbiology

In the beginning of the twentieth century, infectious diseases were the major cause of death. The introduction of antimicrobial drugs in the late 1940's played a major role in the virtual elimination of the infectious disease problem in developed countries. However, by the 1990's, antibiotics had lost much of their efficacy due to the evolution of drug-resistant microbes. This talk will focus on why and how microorganisms develop resistance to drugs and what scientists and policy makers are doing to respond to a crisis that may mark the end of the antibiotic era.

The Rise of Superbugs in Hospitals and in the Community

Dr. Edward E. Ishiguro
Professor Emeritus
Department of Biochemistry and Microbiology

Superbugs are drug-resistant bacterial pathogens. This presentation will focus on recent examples of superbugs that have impacted health care facilities as well as urban and rural communities.

Vaccination Refusal: Tension Between Science and Religion (in English or French) (M)

Dr. Real Roy
Assistant Professor
Department of Biology

Why are people refusing vaccination despite scientific evidence of its efficiency end safety? Is vaccination refusal always motivated by anti-scientific attitudes or scientific illiteracy? This presentation takes an historical approach to discuss this issue.

What Everyone Should Know about Listeria, Salmonella and Other Food-borne Pathogens

Dr. Edward E. Ishiguro
Professor Emeritus
Department of Biochemistry and Microbiology

Gastrointestinal infections have been among the top 4 leading causes of death worldwide for several decades. The vast majority of mortalities have been in developing countries and primarily attributable to substandard sanitary conditions. My presentation will focus on Canada and other developed nations where circumstances are quite different and yet the incidence of foodborne infections has been on the rise in recent years. Our major problems relate to the emergence of a growing list of foodborne pathogens, including Listeria, Salmonella, and E. coli O157:H7 . Using specific examples, I will discuss the apparent roots of our problems and the challenges they impose on public health organizations

What is Autism? ǂ (E M S)

Ms. Sarah Hutchison
Graduate Student
Department of Psychology

This presentation is intended to increase autism awareness through discussion and video clip examples. Specific examples on how to be a better friend to a person with autism will be provided. Recent research on autism and other specific topics (e.g. cognition, bullying, social attention) can also be presented.

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History—General

Central and Southern Spain (S)

Prof. Rosa Stewart
Senior Instructor
Department of Hispanic and Italian Studies

This is a slide show of some of the outstanding cities in central and southern Spain, starting in Madrid, visiting Avila, Salamanca, Merida, Sevilla, Cordoba, Granada and moving up the Mediterranean coast to Barcelona.

The Chinese Consolidated Benevolent Association Archives: Preserving Chinese Immigration History (S)

Ms. Lara Wilson
University Archivist
Library

Founded in 1884, the Chinese Consolidated Benevolent Association was a crucial force in Victoria's immigrant history. The oldest Association of its kind in North America, the CCBA was an active participant in Canadian life, struggling to build an inclusive society and to gain individual and group rights for people of Chinese origin.

Cleopatra, Hellenistic Queen (M) NEW

Dr. Laurel Bowman
Assistant Professor
Greek and Roman Studies

How Cleopatra tried and failed to protect her throne and Egypt.

From Victoria to Vladivostok: Canada's Siberian Expedition, 1917-19 ǂ (E M S)

Dr. Benjamin Isitt
Graduate Student
Faculty of Law

Uncover the forgotten journey of 4,200 Canadian soldiers from Victoria to Vladivostok, Russia in the wake of the Bolshevik Revolution. This thought-provoking multimedia presentation challenges how Canada's military history and foreign relations have been remembered.

Growing up in Athens and Sparta (M) NEW

Dr. Laurel Bowman
Assistant Professor
Greek and Roman Studies

What life was like for young men and women growing up in classical Athens and Sparta.

Historical Chronology: How We Date Ancient Events (S)

Dr. Florin Diacu
Professor
Department of Mathematics and Statistics

History and Impacts of HIV/AIDS (S) NEW

Dr. Elizabeth Vibert
Associate Professor
Department of History

History and Impacts of HIV/AIDS' tells the astonishing detective story of the emergence of HIV in central Africa in the early twentieth century, charts its spread globally, and examines the devastating social impacts of the disease with a focus on its epicentre in Southern Africa.

Monuments of Memory in Democratic Athens (S) NEW

Dr. Brendan Burke
Associate Professor and Chair
Department of Greek and Roman Studies

Myths of Midas and Gordion of Phrygia (Turkey) (S) NEW

Dr. Brendan Burke
Associate Professor and Chair
Department of Greek and Roman Studies

Paris: A Walk through the Ages (in English or French) (S) NEW

Dr. Helene Cazes
Associate Professor
Department of French

What is a city? How does it change through the ages and remain its self, keeps its own distinct identity? A visit to Paris highlights the permanence — through changes, revolutions, and destructions — of places, symbols, monuments and neighbourhoods which have endured, sometimes unexpectedly, through the passing of centuries.

A Tale of Three Mexican Cities: Mexico City, Oaxaca and Xalapa (S)

Prof. Rosa Stewart
Senior Instructor
Department of Hispanic and Italian Studies

Through "A Tale of Three Cities" we see sites in Mexico City, Oaxaca, in the southern part of the country, and Xalapa, in the highlands near the eastern coast. The sights of Mexico are as colourful and spicy as their food!

UVic’s I-witness Holocaust Field School: Holocaust Memorialization in Central Europe Today (in English and German) (S) NEW

Dr. Helga Thorson
Associate Professor
Department of Germanic and Slavic Studies

The I-witness Holocaust field school is a four-week course focusing on Holocaust memorialization in Central Europe today. This talk describes the program and highlights, through a variety of visuals, the different ways the Holocaust is being memorialized in Germany, Austria and Poland.

The Victoria Women's Movement Archives: Documenting Grassroots Feminism (S)

Ms. Lara Wilson
University Archivist
Library

The Victoria Women's Movement Archives opened in September 1995. It is a collaborative effort of women's groups in Victoria, the University of Victoria Archives, and the Department of Women's Studies. The Archives recognizes the important contributions that local women have made to the improvement of women's social, economic and political condition in the Victoria area. It provides a record of the events that have lead to the rich legacy of activism which has served all women in the Victoria area.

Walking to Santiago: A Modern Pilgrimage

Dr. John Tucker
Professor
Department of English

The Santiago pilgrimage has become a significant cultural phenomenon. This talk records two walks of mine, the first from Roncesvalles to Santiago, the second from Moissac to Roncesvalles. My goal is to situate the pilgrimage in its medieval context, and to bring it alive for an audience.

What Ancient Greece Can Tell Us about Economic Collapse (S) NEW

Dr. Brendan Burke
Associate Professor and Chair
Department of Greek and Roman Studies

Women Travellers Throughout the Ages

Dr. Margie Mayfield
Professor Emeritus
Department of Curriculum and Instruction

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History—Victoria & BC

The "Local Stories and Experiences of the Holocaust" Archival Project: Stories of the Shoah from our Own Community (in English and German) (S) NEW

Dr. Helga Thorson
Associate Professor
Department of Germanic and Slavic Studies

This talk discusses the UVic “Local Stories and Experiences of the Holocaust” archival project and some ways in which Holocaust survivors in our community have decided to tell their stories. These include the mediums of art, music, video and text.

Boundless Optimism: Richard McBride's British Columbia (S)

Dr. Patricia Roy
Professor Emeritus
Department of History

Richard McBride was premier of British Columbia from 1903 to 1915, a period of unprecedented growth. A native of the province, he became premier at age 32; brought some order to provincial politics, promoted the development of railways, encouraged British investment and immigration, and played a role on the national and imperial stage and even had the province purchase two submarines.

British Columbia's Ambiguous Relations with the Rest of Canada (S)

Dr. Patricia Roy
Professor Emeritus
Department of History

From the time that they first considered joining Canada, British Columbians have had an ambiguous relationship with the rest of the country. They are proud of their province and of being Canadian but they have frequently felt that the rest of the country did not appreciate them and indeed exploited them. The talk is illustrated with editorial cartoons.

British Columbia's History of Education NEW

Prof. Helen Raptis
Associate Professor
Department of Curriculum and Instruction

Fun with the Ferries (S) NEW

Dr. Patricia Roy
Professor Emeritus
Department of History

A Humorous History of Highways in BC (S)

Dr. Patricia Roy
Professor Emeritus
Department of History

With the help of several generations of editorial cartoonists, "A Humorous History of Highways" traces the development of the road system of the province and its political manifestations from 1858 to the present day.

Medieval Victoria: How the Middle Ages Shape Modern Victoria

Dr. John Tucker
Professor
Department of English

Although Victoria did not exist in the Middle Ages, it is profoundly shaped by a number of institutions that emerged in the Middle Ages and that still exhibit their medieval heritage in costume and architecture. The institutions that I consider are the university, the law, the Christian church, and commerce.

A Peoples' History of Victoria and Canada ǂ (E M S)

Dr. Benjamin Isitt
Graduate Student
Faculty of Law

This “history from below” traces the evolution of southern Vancouver Island and Canada–from contact with First Nations people, through the establishment of Fort Victoria and the colony of Vancouver Island, to BC’s entry into Confederation and interactions between First Nations and newcomers in the recent years.

The Seghers Collection: the Bishop's Books in the UVic Libraries (in English or French) (S) NEW

Dr. Helene Cazes
Associate Professor
Department of French

A presentation on the collection of ancient books initiated by the second bishop of Victoria, Charles Seghers (1839-1886), which is now on permanent loan at UVic. Some 3,500 titles attest to the Catholic culture of the first decades of Victoria Western settlement. The presentation highlights some treasures from the collection.

A Walking Tour of Victoria’s Urban History ǂ

Mr. Vincent Gornall
Graduate Student
Department of History

I have developed a couple of walking tours in the Victoria area, dealing with issues of development, redevelopment, gentrification, community planning and urban history. These tours can be easily adapted for new audiences or expanded to new neighbourhoods. With sufficient notice, I am willing and able to treat similar topics in either Vancouver or Seattle. These presentations could take the form of walking tours or photographic tours by Power Point.

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Languages & Linguistics

About the Chinese Language (in English or Chinese)

Dr. Hua Lin
Associate Professor
Department of Linguistics

Accents, Dialects and Voice Qualities (S)

Dr. John H. Esling
Professor
Department of Linguistics

All about Learning a Second Language Pronunciation (in English or Chinese)

Dr. Hua Lin
Associate Professor
Department of Linguistics

Assessing English-as-an-additional-language Students' Academic Needs and Outcomes NEW

Dr. Li-Shih Huang
Associate Professor
Department of Linguistics

The Benefits of Bilingual Education

Dr. John Archibald
Professor and Dean
Department of Linguistics

The Benefits of Multilingualism

Dr. John Archibald
Professor and Dean
Department of Linguistics

Bilingual or Tongue Tied? Heritage Language Maintenance in the Home (in English or Spanish) (E M S) NEW

Dr. Carmen Rodriguez de France
Assistant Professor
Department of Curriculum and Instruction

This presentation introduces the audience to the importance of bilingualism through sharing some research findings in my interviews with Spanish-English speaking families.

How Babies Acquire the Capacity to Speak (S)

Dr. John H. Esling
Professor
Department of Linguistics

The International Phonetic Alphabet (S)

Dr. John H. Esling
Professor
Department of Linguistics

Pronunciation Teaching in Second-language Instruction (S)

Dr. John H. Esling
Professor
Department of Linguistics

Second Language Acquisition (S)

Dr. Sandra Fotos
Adjunct Professor
Department of Linguistics

Speech Production in the Pharynx and the Larynx (S)

Dr. John H. Esling
Professor
Department of Linguistics

Speech Sounds of the Languages of the World (S)

Dr. John H. Esling
Professor
Department of Linguistics

Strategies for Teaching English as an Additional Language NEW

Dr. Li-Shih Huang
Associate Professor
Department of Linguistics

Switching Languages While Talking (S) NEW

Dr. Sandra Fotos
Adjunct Professor
Department of Linguistics

Many bilingual families wonder why and how their children switch back and forth between English and their native language so easily.

Teaching ES: EFL/Heritage Language Maintenance Issues (S)

Dr. Sandra Fotos
Adjunct Professor
Department of Linguistics

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Law & Justice Issues

Animals, Culture and the Law: Understanding the Limits of Anti-Cruelty Legislation (E M S) NEW

Prof. Maneesha Deckha
Associate Professor
Faculty of Law

Covers Canada's anti-cruelty laws and explains why the underlying legal system and cultural values renders these laws ineffective in protecting animals from exploitation.

The Art of Empathy (S) NEW

Ms. Marion Little
Sessional Instructor
Dispute Resolution, School of Public Administration

An exploration of how empathy can be effectively engaged as a skill, and as an art, to enrich and transform relationships in the workplace, in schools, or at home.

Babies, Borders and Boundaries: Canada's Legal Role in Regulating Commercial Transnational Surrogacy (E M S) NEW

Prof. Maneesha Deckha
Associate Professor
Faculty of Law

Convicting the Innocent: Wrongful Convictions in Canada (S)

Prof. Gerry Ferguson
Distinguished Professor
Faculty of Law

In recent years, an alarming number of incidents have been uncovered involving the wrongful conviction and imprisonment of innocent persons. Donald Marshall, David Milgaard and Guy Paul Morin are but a few of the better-known examples. The common causes for such miscarriages of justice and the possible remedies to reduce or eliminate these failures in our justice system will be explored.

Dispute Resolution: Total Honesty/ Total Heart (S) NEW

Ms. Marion Little
Sessional Instructor/Adjunct Professor
Dispute Resolution, School of Public Administration

A review of research assessing the impact of Nonviolent Communication (Rosenberg 1999) training for adolescents in terms of empathy development, conflict resolution skills & peer advocacy.

Emancipation of Children ǂ (E M S) NEW

Ms. Daleen Adele Thomas
Graduate Student
Faculty of Law

My lecture on the emancipation of children provides learners of all ages a brief review of history of child welfare and child rights. From this I provide an explanation of modern child emancipation, what it means domestically and internationally. I use the Convention on the Rights of the Child, including child-friendly materials for younger groups. With older learners (including academics) I provide a critical view of the current deficiencies and opportunities for positive reform. Plenty of time is saved for questions and answers.

Ethics and Reflective Practice (S) NEW

Ms. Marion Little
Sessional Instructor
Dispute Resolution, School of Public Administration

The work of a conflict specialist, public servant, law enforcement officer, or social service provider, significantly impacts people’s lives. Among other activities, this work may involve: crisis response; facilitating conversations between individuals, groups and/or organizations; mediating disagreements; designing and advising public policy decision-making forums; healing and transforming relationships; negotiating contracts and treaties; as well as developing or responding to complaints processes. Because this work has such a significant impact on people’s lives, practitioners have a responsibility to cultivate a discerning ethical conscience sensitive to, and informed by, the impact of their actions.

Follow the Yellow Brick Road: The Wizard of Oz and the Path to Nonviolent Communication (S) NEW

Ms. Marion Little
Sessional Instructor
Dispute Resolution, School of Public Administration

This workshop explores internal & external conflict resolution rooted in self-empathy practice (based on "Nonviolent Communication" Rosenberg, 1999). Components from The Wizard of Oz provide an easy map to support making a conscious shift from "stuck" thoughts/language to more creative and expansive thoughts/language. Participants will engage specific strategies for bringing practical mindfulness into moments of tension, frustration, irritation, confusion and conflict. Once we employ a practice of self-empathy, we have greater access to both honest expression and compassionate listening. These are critical capacities for avoiding "burn-out" and ensuring sustainable leadership and relationships.

Groups and States in International Law (S)

Prof. Cindy Holder
Associate Professor
Department of Philosophy

International law is state-based. This creates problems for groups who cross state borders or whose history and relationship with the state distinguishes them from other of a state's subjects; but it also opens up possibilities. In this presentation I explain both the problems that groups face in their attempts to use international law as a tool for social justice, and the potential that international law offers for groups who are subject to injustice.

Indigenous Methodologies ǂ (E M S) NEW

Ms. Daleen Adele Thomas
Graduate Student
Faculty of Law

The content for this presentation is flexible and can be customized depending on the age and interests of your group. In this presentation I typically provide an overview of the salient differences between European and Indigenous methodologies. Special attention is paid to the problems of colonization and pan-Indianism.

Juvenile Justice: Why Other Countries Do a Better Job

Dr. Jim Hackler
Adjunct Professor
Department of Sociology

The Murderous Imagination: Colonial Collisions and the Genres of Justice (S) NEW

Prof. Rebecca Johnson
Professor
Faculty of Law

In 1958, international attention turned to the arctic, for the trial of Kikkik, an Inuit woman charged with murder and the criminal abandonment of her children. In this presentation, I explore four different telling of this story: the 1958 trial transcript; Farley Mowatt’s popular 1959 non-fictional account; a set of three Inuit sculptures by Peggy Ekagina long displayed in the Yellowknife courthouse; a documentary film made 50 years after the event by Kikkik’s daughter (who had been a baby carried on her mother’s back at the time of the deaths). The case, situated at the intersection of law, art and culture, opens productive space for questions about the place of murder and the colonial encounter in the making and remaking of the Canadian National imaginary.

Occupying Deadwood: Reflections on Law, Economy and Television (S)

Prof. Rebecca Johnson
Professor
Faculty of Law

Links are drawn between the Occupy movement and the TV series Deadwood. In the pleasures it offers, and the spaces of imagination it invites us to occupy, Deadwood offers a space to explore the emotional investments that sustain colonial and capitalist relationships in our contemporary world.

One Hundred Years of Advocating for Justice: Litigating the Calder Case (A presentation on Aboriginal Title in BC, 1849-2010) (Jan-April)

Prof. Hamar Foster
Professor
Faculty of Law

Race, Gender and Species: Seeing Links Between Oppressions (E M S) NEW

Prof. Maneesha Deckha
Associate Professor
Faculty of Law

Explains how experiences of injustice are a product of multiple socially constructed differences rather than just a single axis of difference. Concentrates on showing how oppression against animals is linked to other forms of discrimination.

Restorative Justice in the Community: Accountability to Victims Works for All (S) NEW

Dr. Barb Whittington
Professor
Department of Social Work

As part of a community group, Peninsula Crossroads Community Justice, we work with situations that would normally or previously have either been ignored or would have wound their way through a lengthy court process. The police and the schools refer both youth and adult cases to our community group. Restorative justice brings the victim, those harmed, and the harm doers together whenever possible in order to determine what happened and how amends could be made. The process is both powerful and productive. This presentation will give examples of situations from the police or schools that have been dealt with in this potentially transformational way, followed by a discussion.

Restorative Justice ǂ (S)

Ms. Jessica Rourke
Graduate Student
Department of Psychology

Through my work and research on forgiveness, I have also become very involved in restorative justice (RJ); the different RJ models; and I can speak about the differences between our traditional justice system and the RJ process.

Siblings of Young Murder Victims in Canada: A Nonissue?

Dr. Susan Tasker
Assistant Professor
Department of Educational Psychology and Leadership Studies

Children and youth are murdered in Canada and siblings are left behind in difficult circumstances. Few if any studies have looked at this traumatized and vulnerable group of children. Though families are sometimes publically scrutinized by the media and investigated by the criminal justice systems, no empirical work exists on the effects on siblings. Taken together, outside of anecdotal report, there appears to be little knowledge and understanding of the long-term effects of a sibling’s murder. The matter appears to be a nonissue. Preliminary results of a Canadian study are presented and implications for practice and policy across counsellor services, the media, and criminal justice systems are discussed.

Social Welfare Law: Indigenous Dimensions of Social Welfare ǂ (E M S) NEW

Ms. Daleen Adele Thomas
Graduate Student
Faculty of Law

In this presentation, I provide an overview of why there is a disconnect between modern social welfare (and the law) and current situations of Indigenous people in BC. A brief review of the history and terms used can help new learners become familiar with the disconnect and gain comfort with explorations in this topic.

Social Movements and the Law ǂ (E M S)

Dr. Benjamin Isitt
Graduate Student
Faculty of Law

What is the relationship between social movements and the law? This multi-media presentation examines the response of judges, courts, lawyers and other legal actors to protests over labour rights, environment protection and First Nations land claims.

Young Persons and the Law ǂ (E M S)

Ms. Daleen Adele Thomas
Graduate Student
Faculty of Law

In this presentation I provide an overview of the history of the "child". In addition, I examine the legal view of things that requires each thing to be either object or subject in our society. This lecture includes a review of child rights accomplishments and introduces the learner to new terms such as: ageist, adultist and jeunist.

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Literature

Canadian Short Stories (M S) NEW

Dr. Misao Dean
Professor
Department of English

Christine of Pizan: a Life of her Own (in English or French) (S) NEW

Dr. Helene Cazes
Associate Professor
Department of French

Christine de Pizan (1364 – c.1430) became one of the most important French authors when (and because) she was widowed. An exceptional writer and fighter for women's rights, she wrote poetry and prose on burning topics of her time and of her life: love, the equality of men and women, royal justice, good government and Joan of Arc, among other subjects. She was forgotten for a long time before the relatively recent rediscovery of her works.

Climate Change and Science Fiction (S)

Dr. Richard Pickard
Senior Instructor
Department of English

Fiction has always imagined alternate realities. In this time of climate change, we can read contemporary or older science fiction for clues about how to behave both now and in the future, and about what kinds of pressures that climate change may exert on our culture.

Creativity and You (E M S) NEW

Dr. Madeline Sonik
Sessional Instructor
Department of Writing

Thoughts, theories, and practical guidance on ways to enhance creativity, presented by an award-winning writer whose fiction, poetry and creative non-fiction have appeared in literary journals internationally.

Emily Carr as a Writer (M S) NEW

Dr. Misao Dean
Professor
Department of English

Emily Carr: Was Klee Wyck censored? Learn what Carr wrote, the discrepancies between her autobiographical writing and her life.

The English Ghost Story (E M S)

Dr. Stephen Ross
Associate Professor
Department of English

I provide a brief historical overview of the English ghost story from its emergence out of the gothic tales of the early nineteenth century through its peak during World War I.

An Introduction to Literature in British Columbia (S)

Dr. Nicholas Bradley
Assistant Professor
Department of English

A discussion of some of the authors, past and present, who have made significant contributions to the literary culture of the province.

James Joyce's Ulysses: A Masterpiece of Modernism (E M S)

Dr. Stephen Ross
Associate Professor
Department of English

I introduce audiences to the mystique of Ulysses, its structure, contents, and stylistic experimentation, while emphasizing that it is a novel of everyday experience and can be read by anyone willing to tackle it.

Joseph Conrad's Life and Literature (S)

Dr. Stephen Brodsky
Associate Retiree

Joseph Conrad, unquestionably one of the "greats" of English novel literature, offers an extraordinarily rich ouevre, derived from a life as a youth from the Polish borderland (Ukraine), a Marseilles coastal pilot, and a British Merchant Service ship master. Such novels as Lord Jim, The Secret Agent, Nostromo, Under Western Eyes, and others are profound and prophetic. As valid for our time than for his in the late 19th to early 20th century, many have been made into world-class films.

Mapping the Literature of Early Modern London (S)

Prof. Janelle Jenstad
Associate Professor
Department of English

What was it like to live in Shakespeare's London? We're digitizing a map that shows houses, churches, cows, and early shopping malls, and then plotting literary texts on this map. I'll show you the map, talk about what it can tell us, and describe the process by which we put literary texts in their place.

May the Odds Be Ever in Your Favor: Young Adult Literature and its Messages (M S) NEW

Dr. Janni Aragon
Assistant Professor
Department of Political Science

This talk discusses the connections between popular culture, politics, and consumerism. What messages are "take-aways" from young adult literature today? Why is literature informative for teens and other readers?

Memoir Writing (E M S) NEW

Dr. Madeline Sonik
Sessional Instructor
Department of Writing

Memoir Writing: Teaching students how to write about personal experiences.

Modern Latin American Culture (in English or Spanish) (S)

Prof. Dan Russek
Assistant Professor
Department of Hispanic and Italian Studies

Modern Latin American Literature (in English or Spanish) (S)

Prof. Dan Russek
Assistant Professor
Department of Hispanic and Italian Studies

Modern Latin American Literature and Visual Arts (in English or Spanish) (S)

Prof. Dan Russek
Assistant Professor
Department of Hispanic and Italian Studies

Nellie McClung's Stories and Novels (M S) NEW

Dr. Misao Dean
Professor
Department of English

McClung's life and the relationship between her popular fiction and her political beliefs

Pierre-Esprit Radisson, the Man who was Red and White (in English or French) (S) NEW

Dr. Helene Cazes
Associate Professor
Department of French

Pierre-Esprit Radisson (1636–1710) was a French-Canadian fur trader and explorer. He is often linked to his brother-in-law Médard des Groseilliers but the presentation focuses on his Memoirs, a unique document where a "coureur de bois" tells his life, providing us with the most fascinating narative of his life with the Iroquois.

Tudor Queens and Other Boleyn Girls (S)

Dr. Erin E. Kelly
Assistant Professor
Department of English

Popular films about Queen Elizabeth I, television series like The Tudors, and novels about the wives of Henry VIII are evidence of our culture's fascination with sixteenth century English history and culture, especially as it relates to the lives of powerful women. This talk compares such contemporary texts to historical representations of Tudor queens and even to writings by some of these women to explore how issues of women's political power are raised whenever an author depicts individual women central to the Renaissance royal court.

Victoria's Literary History (M S) NEW

Dr. Misao Dean
Professor
Department of English

What did people read, and what did they write, in James Douglas's Victoria? How did readers get books, and how were poems and stories circulated? What was the first book published in BC, and how was it printed?

What Shakespeare Knew (S)

Dr. Erin E. Kelly
Assistant Professor
Department of English

This talk about the sorts of things Shakespeare would have learned in grammar school, in church services, and from independent reading will include discussions of how such knowledge manifests itself in the author's plays and poems. More importantly, it will suggest what aspects of sixteenth- and seventeenth-century culture and education might offer helpful models to contemporary students, teachers, and writers.

Writing Techniques (E M S) NEW

Dr. Madeline Sonik
Sessional Instructor
Department of Writing

Writing Techniques: Specific techniques and exercises students can use to improve their writing.

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Music, Film & Theatre

The Allegory of Apartheid and the Concealment of Race Relations in District 9 ǂ (E M S) NEW

Mr. David Christopher
Graduate Student
Department of History in Art

Locating any film narrative in the setting of Johannesberg immediately signifies the story in terms of apartheid. When the ‘other’ of an alien species enters the narrative, allegories of racial and class distinctions are nearly unavoidable. Neill Blomkamp’s 2009 science fiction blockbuster District 9 does both. Inverting the typical alien invasion film, in which a superior race of aliens threatens earth’s global populace, Blomkamp’s aliens arrive in a broken-down mother ship and quickly come to occupy the role of the abject, impoverished and oppressed racial inferior. Several critics observe the film’s function as an allegory for apartheid. This discussion examines the way in which the surface allegory appears to be a scathing indictment of race relations and the corruption of the industrial military complex that serve another ideological purpose. District 9 works to reproduce ideological notions of racial binaries and naturalizes a pervasive system of class and racial distinctions in which miscegenation becomes the primary threat to the bourgeois domestic myth.

Analyzing Music Using Computers

Dr. George Tzanetakis
Associate Professor
Department of Computer Science

Humans are remarkably good at extracting information from organized combinations of air pressure waves that we call music. Even toddlers are able to recognize melodies, dance in rhythm with music, and express music preferences. Computers are increasingly being used to perform similar tasks of information extraction from music signals. Accomplishing these seemingly simple tasks requires sophisticated techniques from digital signal processing and machine learning. Such systems enable new ways of interacting with the large amounts of music material available digitally.

Brad Pitt's Troy, Greek Epic and the Archeological Record (M S) NEW

Dr. Laurel Bowman
Assistant Professor
Greek and Roman Studies

How Troy uses Homer's depiction of the Trojan War, where and why it departs from it, and how the film uses the archeological evidence of the period.

Bug Songs (S)

Dr. Harald Krebs
Professor
School of Music

The Capitalist and Cultural Work of Apocalypse and Dystopia Films ǂ (E M S) NEW

Mr. David Christopher
Graduate Student
Department of History in Art

We live in a dystopia: our world is the capitalist aberration dystopia films depict. Much post-modern cinematic narrative has been preoccupied with apocalyptic, post-apocalyptic, and dystopian fantasies that closely reflect aspects of our lived reality. These three categories are closely related in their ideological underpinnings. Certainly they share certain characteristics, not the least of which is a representation of the repressed anxiety regarding the potential fall of capitalist culture. All are concerned with horrific visions of a world in which patriarchal capitalism has been either annihilated or corrupted, and all three function as warnings or harbingers, cinematic realizations in the tradition of the four horsemen of the apocalypse, of what must be changed and what must be protected in order for patriarchal capitalism to survive. This discussion focuses on the generic differences in these three categories and the ways in which they all work to reproduce the capitalist ideology they challenge.

Construction of Non-Diegetic Hope in Last Night ǂ (E M S) NEW

Mr. David Christopher
Graduate Student
Department of History in Art

The turn of the twenty-first century witnessed a deluge of American apocalypse films. Films such as Independence Day (1996), Armageddon (1998), Deep Impact (1998), The Day After Tomorrow (2004), and 2012 (2009) articulate fears regarding the demise of American culture in the face of interstellar or ecological disaster. The fundamental question these films pose is “If you found out the world was going to end, what would you do to stop it?” Canadian filmmaker Don McKellar responded with Last Night (1998) - a single representative example of a Canadian film that explores the apocalypse from a distinctly different perspective. Last Night follows the interconnected narrative trajectories of various characters as they live out their final moments on earth and concerns itself with a more open-ended question: “If you found out the world was going to end, what would you do?” Last Night ends with what seems to be the death of all life on earth. Does this mean that the Canadian apocalypse film is void of themes of hope? The question seems counter-intuitive to a film so full of folly, levity and revelation. However, if all the characters die, where can the hope be? This discussion addresses the way in which Last Night responds to the American blockbuster apocalypse film and the unique way in which it constructs hope for the audience.

Cube and the Postmodern Fear of America ǂ (E M S) NEW

Mr. David Christopher
Graduate Student
Department of History in Art

Canadian horror films are often relegated to the position of low art and ignored. Recent scholarship has recognized the significance of Canadian horror cinema ventures as both culturally and politically relevant. One of Canada’s greatest horror film successes was the 1997 psychological thriller Cube. So innovative was its premise that American producers quickly acquired the rights to produce and distribute Cube 2: Hypercube (2002) and Cube Zero (2004). This discussion explores Cube and its two sequels in light of the way the films represent a change in the horror film genre to reflect many of the characteristics of postmodernism and how they demonstrate the way in which Canadian constructions of national and cultural identity are negotiated.

Concealing Canada: Film and the Thermonuclear Cold War ǂ (E M S) NEW

Mr. David Christopher
Graduate Student
Department of History in Art

Whose fault was the holocaust that never occurred? In the early 1980s, ultra-conservative American President, Ronald Reagan amplified the industrial military complex arms race, and squared off politically against the USSR’s Leonid Brezhnev. Although their political rivalry was alarming, the cold war arms race seems to have destabilized even further following Brezhnev’s death in 1982. The tenuous political leadership of Russia that followed with Andropov, Chernenko, and later Gorbachev gave rise to heightened fears of global thermonuclear Armageddon. In 1983 the American made-for-television movie The Day After shocked television audiences with a graphic depiction of a nuclear assault against a sleepy Midwestern town in Kansas. The following year, Canada responded with Countdown to Looking Glass, another made-for-television movie that also addressed the nuclear fear. This discussion explores the way in which these two films locate responsibility and construct an ideology that displaces or effaces each nation’s own responsibility in the threat of thermonuclear holocaust.

Environmentalism and Popular Culture (S)

Dr. Richard Pickard
Senior Instructor
Department of English

You know that environmentalism is in trouble when even David Suzuki says the movement has failed. But has it failed, really, when it keeps showing up in pop culture, from movies like The Lorax or WALL-E, to novels like Margaret Atwood's Oryx & Crake?

From Puppets to Robots: Japanese Theatre and Technology in the 21st Century (in English or Japanese) (S) NEW

Dr. Cody Poulton
Professor
Department of Pacific and Asian Studies

From puppets to robots: Japanese theatre and technology in the 21st century: An illustrated lecture that looks at recent advances in robotics in Japan, and how theatre has been playing a role in creating intelligent machines that can interact with people. The lecture focusses specifically on the collaborations between Hiroshi Ishiguro, internationally renowned roboticist and creator of a number of uncannily lifelike androids, and Oriza Hirata, one of Japan's leading playwrights, directors, and cultural critics.

Hercules: Greek Myth or Disney? (M S) NEW

Dr. Laurel Bowman
Assistant Professor
Greek and Roman Studies

A comparison of the Greek myths about Hercules to the Disney version of the story.

His and Hers: Comparison of Songs Based on the Same Poem by a Woman and a Man (S)

Dr. Harald Krebs
Professor
School of Music

Invisible Witches and Media Monsters: Documentary and Simulacra in The Blair Witch Project ǂ (E M S) NEW

Mr. David Christopher
Graduate Student
Department of History in Art

What is truth and what is reality? One might do just ask well to as what the meaning of life is. In art and film, at least, the former question has received much attention in an effort to differentiate narrative fiction and documentary films. But the lines of distinction are not as clear as one might think. In 1999 an innovative film emerged that spawned a generation of documentary-styled ‘found footage’ horror films and that celebrate the documentary claim to reality and truth as powerfully horrific. In The Blair Witch Project, the documentary style of the film locates the source of repressed fear in reality itself and inverts the psychology of horror. The monster is not merely some fantastical creature inherent to a fictitious narrative; the monster is reality itself within the boundaries of a documentary record, and the monster is as elusive as the referent. This discussion explores the way in which The Blair Witch Project uses the documentary film format to construct horrific simulations of reality.

Latin American Film (in English or Spanish) (S)

Prof. Dan Russek
Assistant Professor
Department of Hispanic and Italian Studies

Life Skills Learned from Playing in a String Quartet (S) NEW

Ms. Sharon Stanis
Artist-in Residence
Department of Music

I have been playing with my colleagues in the Lafayette String Quartet for over 25 years. In addition to honing our skills in music, we have learned so much more. The life lessons that we continue to learn are what sparks our musical creativity on a daily basis. It is a journey that we are able to take together while exploring the great musical works of the string quartet repertoire.

Music and Technology: Past, Present and Future

Dr. George Tzanetakis
Associate Professor
Department of Computer Science

The way music is produced, distributed and consumed has always been influenced by technology. In this overview talk, I will highlight some interesting moments in time when particular technologies had a dramatic impact to music. Starting from the hydraulis, the first organ and keyboard instrument to the availability of thousands of songs in portable music players today we will travel through history making interesting stops along the way when technology drastically changed how music was produced, distributed and consumed and speculate about where this trend will take us in the future.

O Brother Where Art Thou and The Odyssey (M S) NEW

Dr. Laurel Bowman
Assistant Professor
Greek and Roman Studies

How the Coen brothers’ film O Brother Where Art Thou? uses Homer's Odyssey.

On the Road: A Musical Diary of a Trip to Europe (S)

Dr. Harald Krebs
Professor
School of Music

This talk describes experiences in Europe during study leave (August to December 2007), with interspersed performances of relevant classical songs (in German; translations and relevant images provided in PowerPoint).

The (Re-)Signification of the Uncanny Monstrous Simian ǂ (E M S) NEW

Mr. David Christopher
Graduate Student
Department of History in Art

The last two decades have seen an explosion in academic publication regarding the cultural politics and sexual repression at play in horror cinema. Much of this criticism has focused on what Robin Wood refers to as the construction of a monstrous Other as a return of social or sexual repression. Wood speaks in predominantly psychoanalytical terms. Early twentieth century horror and fantasy cinema, such as Murders in the Rue Morgue (1932) or King Kong (1933), has demonstrated at least one motif that depicts some sort of monstrous ape man. Authors such as Joshua Bellin and Tom Johnson make compelling arguments to locate this motif as a representation of racial fears based on a white/black binary. This reductive perspective not only reproduces the stereotype of the primitive ape-man as a representation of African ethnicity, it also fails to recognize the possibility of a more fundamental and deeply repressed fear that makes such images universally horrific. Interestingly, both Bellins and Johnson have chosen composite stills from these movies to adorn the covers of their respective surveys of horror cinema as the signifier for the entire contents of the books. This discussion interrogates the re-signification of such images from an iconographic perspective over time and the layers of significance they acquire in different visual contexts.

Spring Songs (S)

Dr. Harald Krebs
Professor
School of Music

The Star Wars Prequel Trilogy as Political Allegory ǂ (E M S) NEW

Mr. David Christopher
Graduate Student
Department of History in Art

As part of the twentieth century fin-de-siècle zeitgeist, George Lucas was prompted to revisit his most successful film franchise. In “Postmodernism and Consumer Society,” Fredric Jameson claims that the first Star Wars film is essentially a “nostalgia film” that looks back at science fiction conventions celebrated in the “afternoon serial of the Buck Rogers type.” Surely, such conventions as “alien villains, true American heroes, heroines in distress, … and the cliffhanger at the end” are present in the new trilogy as well. However, if the first trilogy is nostalgic and backward looking, the prequel trilogy is anything but. Contemporary American cultural politics are closely reflected in the film. This presentation explores how these films reflect social, economic and governmental politics in a way that betrays the film’s ideological mandate to mask America’s manifestation as a militaristic empire, providing a fantasy of redemption for the American viewing populace in the era of the Iraq war.

There's Noh Business like Slow Business: Slow Theatre as a Classical Japanese Art Form (in English or Japanese) (S) NEW

Dr. Cody Poulton
Professor
Department of Pacific and Asian Studies

There's no business like slow business: slow theatre as a classical Japanese art form. Noh is famous for being one of the world's oldest performing arts, and its texts are works of poetry that have inspired poets and composers like Ezra Pound, William Butler Yeats and Benjamin Britten. But no reading of their marvellous libretti in English can quite prepare us for the incredible tedium of a performance in which, typically for many minutes, the performers may seem not move at all. What is going on? Is anything happening? This illustrated lecture will show why slow art is good art.

A Rising Cynicism: Christianity in Modern Horror/Fantasy Film ǂ (E M S) NEW

Mr. David Christopher
Graduate Student
Department of History in Art

With the advantage of hindsight, it's easy to ask how classic movies involving monsters or the monstrous - Alfred Hitchcock's Psycho, Ridley Scott's Alien, or Stephen Spielberg's Poltergeist, for example - articulate or seem to be tied to the social anxieties of their day. Looking at movies from the last ten years, this talk looks at ways that Christian doctrine is increasingly vilified in an atmosphere of decreasing faith in traditional sites of authority, and in social anxieties around collective trauma.

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Politics

American Politics 101: Understanding Current Events (M S) NEW

Dr. Janni Aragon
Assistant Professor
Department of Political Science

This is an open talk that can speak to media, Congress or the President in the US.

Canadian Labour History: From Halcyon Days Past to Current Issues (M S)

Dr. John Fryer
Adjunct Professor
School of Public Administration

People often comment that "unions were a good thing years ago but they have outlived their usefulness and today are no longer necessary". This 30 minute talk will challenge this assertion and attempt to explain the development of unions and why they are just as necessary as ever.

How Much Should We Pay Our Politicians? Some Fundamental Principles to Guide Us (M S)

Dr. John Fryer
Adjunct Professor
School of Public Administration

The speaker will use his wide experience in the field of executive remuneration to outline---with concrete examples--how remuneration for politicians at all three levels of government are currently determined. He will outline some defining principles such as work load, cost of living and average earnings of constituents to be taken into account when setting proper and fair remuneration levels. He will outline the tax free allowances only available to elected politicians as well as some of the perks received of which the public have little or no knowledge.

J.S. Woodsworth and the Social Gospel in Canada ǂ (E M S)

Dr. Benjamin Isitt
Graduate Student
Faculty of Law

Religion and politics have shaped Canadian society, with the Social Gospel representing a faith-based commitment to build the new Jerusalem on earth. This multimedia presentation explores the Social Gospel’s impact through the life of former Methodist minister J.S. Woodsworth, founding president of the Co-operative Commonwealth Federation, forerunner to today’s NDP.

Labour in British Columbia ǂ (E M S)

Dr. Benjamin Isitt
Graduate Student
Faculty of Law

Work and relations between workers and employers have been hotly contested in BC -- from bitter coal-mining strikes in the 19th century to recent disputes involving teachers, hospital workers and other public-sector workers. This multi-media presentation explores these controversies and future directions for labour relations in BC and beyond.

Politics of Development: Canadian Aid to Africa (M S)

Dr. Marlea Clarke
Assistant Professor
Department of Political Science

Understanding Local Government ǂ (E M S)

Dr. Benjamin Isitt
Graduate Student
Faculty of Law

Drawing from his expertise in public office, Dr. Isitt examines the role of local government within Canada’s constitution, the responsibilities and procedures of municipalities and regional districts, and opportunities for reform aimed at strengthening citizen engagement and public services

Why BC Needs a Public Interest Disputes Commission (M S)

Dr. John Fryer
Adjunct Professor
School of Public Administration

Close to 60 per cent of the provincial budget is spent on wages and benefits of those working in the public sector. Our taxes pay for all of it but how can we influence outcomes and stop the disruptions in public services? Find out how a Public Interest Disputes Commission could help.

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Psychology

Autobiographical Memory (S)

Dr. Stephen D. Lindsay
Professor
Department of Psychology

Mark Twain described autobiographical memory as “...little threads that hold life’s patches of meaning together.” This talk is far short of a complete treatment of this fascinating subject; rather, it merely offers a brief review of some of the presenter's research on various aspects of autobiographical memory.

Be the Change You Want to See: Can You Make a Difference? ǂ (M S)

Mr. Reuven Sussman
Graduate Student
Department of Psychology

From climate change to waste management and over-exploitation of natural resources, environmental concerns are growing and becoming increasingly problematic. As individuals, we do our best to work against these environmental and social problems, but do our actions really make a difference? Research conducted at UVic demonstrates that, although the direct results of individuals’ actions may be small (e.g., turning off the lights), the power of seeing others engage in these actions can be dramatic! The act of using a compost bin in plain view, for example, can greatly increase the percentage of other people who will subsequently use it. This, and other research, attests to the power of the individual to make a change.

Behavior Management of Others and Self (M S)

Dr. Loren Acker
Retirees Association
Department of Psychology

Biological Aging: Predicting Age-related Cognitive Impairment ǂ

Ms. Correne DeCarlo
Graduate Student
Department of Psychology

The search for early indicators of age-related cognitive decline represents a critical avenue in aging research. Biological age, reflecting the functioning of multiple essential biological systems, may predict age-related cognitive deficits accurately and at early disease phases.

Childhood Obesity, Self-regulation and Cognition ǂ (E M S)

Ms. Sarah Hutchison
Graduate Student
Department of Psychology

The increasing prevalence of childhood obesity is a major public health concern in Canada and Many other countries. The presentation will include a review of methods to measure obesity and research related to obesity, self-regulation, and cognition.

Children’s Eyewitness Memory (S)

Dr. Stephen D. Lindsay
Professor
Department of Psychology

This lecture describes research on the factors that enhance children’s eyewitness reports and those that can compromise children’s eyewitness reports, focusing on studies conducted with Prof. D. A. Poole of Central Michigan University.

Critical Thinking in Everyday Situations ǂ (M S) NEW

Mr Garrett Richards
Graduate Student
Department of Environmental Studies

While we often talk about critical thinking as a skill that is important for everyone to have, we still tend to see it as relevant to a limited set of fairly specific circumstances (e.g. essay-writing, debates on political issues, problem-solving in mathematics). However, reflective thinking is actually applicable to a wide variety of everyday situations, where our intuition often keeps us from doing what is best. For example: wearing seatbelts or bike helmets, study habits, and maintaining relationships. This talk explores some of the basic psychology that underlies such common decisions and demonstrates how practicing critical thinking skills can help us become happier people. The basic premise of the presentation is that people need to see how critical thinking is beneficial and relevant to them, personally, before they can be asked to apply it to broader social issues.

The Dragons of Inaction: Why We Don't Do What We Should

Dr. Robert Gifford
Professor
Department of Psychology

We all have intentions to improve ourselves and the world, but we don't always act on those intentions. Why not? This talk gathers together the many "dragons of inaction" that hold us back, and suggests some ways to "slay" them. The focus is on sustainability actions, but the dragons also apply to diet, exercise, and other good works.

Eyewitness Identification Evidence (S)

Dr. Stephen D. Lindsay
Professor
Department of Psychology

This lecture reviews research on the confidence-accuracy relationship in studies of eyewitness identification evidence. Although most experts believe the relationship is weak, Prof. J. D. Read and the presenter have evidence that it can be quite strong under some conditions.

False Memory and Eyewitness Identification ǂ (S) NEW

Ms. Tanjeem Azad
Graduate Student
Department of Psychology

My research interests are in false memories. In particular, my focus is on understanding the cognitive processes involved in false memories as well as the impact such memories may have within the realm of eyewitness testimony.

False Reports: Does Memory Conformity Lead to False Reports, Memories or Beliefs? ǂ (S) NEW

Ms. Tanjeem Azad
Graduate Student
Department of Psychology

An introduction to memory research, in particular research about false memories in the context of eyewitness testimony. Faulty eyewitness memory has been shown to be the leading cause of 75 per cent of wrongful convictions, convictions that have only recently been overturned through the advent of DNA testing. From a scientific perspective, memory research helps scientists understand the way memories are formed. From a practical perspective, the malleability of memory can significantly impact society when an innocent person is misidentified as the perpetrator of a crime based on an eyewitness’s faulty recollection. Faulty recollections can occur for a number of reasons, and my talk will focus on various sources of information that can influence memory.

Forgiveness ǂ (S)

Ms. Jessica Rourke
Graduate Student
Department of Psychology

There are many responses individuals can have to feeling offended. Two responses that are often contemplated are revenge and forgiveness. This talk will explore the pros and cons of both seeking vengeance, and making the decision to forgive, with the ultimate conclusion that forgiveness is the better path to follow.

Gratitude ǂ (S)

Ms. Jessica Rourke
Graduate Student
Department of Psychology

Gratitude is a virtue studied in positive psychology. In order to better people’s lives, we need to focus on also building individual’s strengths. Individuals who express gratitude demonstrate better health (physical and mental) and an overall higher quality of life than those who do not. This talk will focus on describing the benefits of gratitude, why it has such a positive impact, and offer tips for how individuals can start incorporating more gratitude and positive thinking into their lives. This talk can be tailored for a younger or older audience.

High School Students’ Introduction to Cognitive Psychology (S)

Dr. Stephen D. Lindsay
Professor
Department of Psychology

This is an informal presentation with demonstrations, introducing high school students to the field of cognitive psychology.

How to Handle Conflict without Hurting your Relationship (S) NEW

Dr. Erica Woodin
Assistant Professor
Department of Psychology

Conflict is an inevitable part of close relationships, yet many couples struggle with how to solve problems effectively without hurting each other emotionally or physically. In this presentation I will share research on how couples can navigate the challenges of conflict resolution in ways that will increase intimacy and trust.

Hypnosis and Memory (S)

Dr. Stephen D. Lindsay
Professor
Department of Psychology

Critical review of popular ideas about the powers of hypnosis.

Know Thyself: Our Inner World (S)

Ms. Wendy Lum
Registered Clinic Counsellor
Counselling Services

Wendy will present a concept of the inner experience of a person and present process questions that will help participants to better understand themselves in relationship to themselves, another or a situation.

Modern Views of Personality

Dr. Robert Gifford
Professor
Department of Psychology

Recovered Memories of Childhood Sexual Abuse (S)

Dr. Stephen D. Lindsay
Professor
Department of Psychology

This presentation looks at cases in which adults report recovered memories of childhood abuse, and explains the cognitive psychological process that may account for essentially accurate and illusory recovered-memory experiences.

What Does My Brain Look Like? ǂ (E M S)

Ms. Sarah Hutchison
Graduate Student
Department of Psychology

This talk looks at the methods used to visualize the human brain including MRI, fMRI, PET scans, and ERP. The presentation will also include a brief overview of brain regions and a demonstration with two volunteers from the audience of how neurons communicate in the brain. Research can also be discussed in relation to a specific topic (e.g. alcohol abuse and brain damage)

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Science

Adventures in Microbiology (E M S) NEW

Dr. Edward E. Ishiguro
Professor Emeritus
Department of Biochemistry and Microbiology

Autistic Spectrum Disorders ǂ NEW

Mr. Mohamed Ghilan
Graduate Student
Department of Neuroscience

Autism Spectrum Disorders (ASDs) are the leading cause for learning and memory impairments in children, and investigating the developmental processes leading to ASD is a priority in modern neuroscience research on learning and memory. One of the most common genetic causes for ASDs is Fragile X Syndrome, which affects one in 4000 males and one in 8000 females. Children with ASD have increased anxiety and heightened response to novel environments, aberrant social behaviour, and learning and memory impairments. The past 10 years in neuroscience research have experienced great strides in ASD research and possible therapies, pharmacological and behavioral, have been implemented. They've also provided great insight into how learning and memory occurs under normal circumstances and broaden our understanding of brain cognition.

Body Shape and Birth Scarring on the Pelvis: Is there a Connection? ǂ (S) NEW

Ms. Sarah-Louise Decrausaz
Graduate Student
Department of Anthropology

This presentation details my thesis research in biological anthropology, looking at indicators of life events on the skeleton (particularly childbirth) and how these vary with the range of human body size and shape.

Becoming Batman: Is there a Superhero in You? (S)

Dr. E. Paul Zehr
Director
Centre for Biomedical Research

We admire the fictional Batman figure for all his accomplishments and abilities. Yet only through years of rigorous training has Batman approached near super-human status. This is part of what makes Batman so attractive to so many-the mythology of the character seems grounded in the reality of hard work and achievement. Is it though?

Beyond DNA: Epigenetics, Molecules and Cancer (S)

Prof. Fraser Hof
Canada Research Chair
Department of Chemistry

This talk explores the connections between modern chemical and biochemical research with current issues in human health. Cancer is a special focus. By understanding the molecules in our own cells that drive diseases like cancer, we can build new molecular approaches to the treatment of disease.

The Biology of Aging

Dr. Edward E. Ishiguro
Professor Emeritus
Department of Biochemistry and Microbiology

This presentation will summarize recent advances in our understanding of the process of aging, and how this information has led to new strategies for slowing down the process of aging. I will critically evaluate some of the major strategies, e.g., anti-aging drugs, diets and dietary supplements

The Biology of Aging Part 2: The Quest for Longevity Genes NEW

Dr. Edward E. Ishiguro
Professor Emeritus
Department of Biochemistry and Microbiology

Long lifespans are common in certain families, raising the possibility that this characteristic is inherited. Is there a longevity gene? This presentation summarizes recent attempts to identify and characterize genes that influence lifespan.

Brain Basics (E M S)

Dr. Brian Christie
Associate Professor
Island Medical Program

Chemistry and Biology of Targeted Cancer Therapeutics (S)

Prof. Fraser Hof
Canada Research Chair
Department of Chemistry

This talk explores the connections between modern chemical and biochemical research with current issues in human health. Cancer is a special focus. By understanding the molecules in our own cells that drive diseases like cancer, we can build new molecular approaches to the treatment of disease.

Chemistry and Society: Molecules Matter in Modern Medicine (S)

Prof. Fraser Hof
Canada Research Chair
Department of Chemistry

This talk explores the connections between modern chemical and biochemical research with current issues in human health. Cancer is a special focus. By understanding the molecules in our own cells that drive diseases like cancer, we can build new molecular approaches to the treatment of disease.

Childbirth and the Human Skeleton: How Much Do We Know? ǂ (S) NEW

Ms. Sarah-Louise Decrausaz
Graduate Student
Department of Anthropology

This presentation details my thesis research in biological anthropology, looking at indicators of life events on the skeleton (particularly childbirth) and how these vary with the range of human body size and shape.

Concussions and Mild Traumatic Brain Injury (E M S) NEW

Dr. Brian Christie
Associate Professor
Island Medical Program

Empowering People with Disabilities: CanAssist—A Unique Program

Dr. Nigel Livingston
Director
CanAssist

I will describe a unique program based at the university that is dedicated to promoting inclusion and to developing technology and services that will increase the quality of life of people with disabilities. The talk will start with a brief history of the program, and will then describe some of the many projects that have been undertaken.

Engineering Molecules to Control Disease (S) NEW

Prof. Jeremy Wulff
Assistant Professor
Department of Chemistry and Centre for Biomedical Research

Most of the drugs we take (whether legal or otherwise) are small organic molecules. These structures interact with larger, biological molecules (proteins, DNA or RNA) to exert a desired biological function. This presentation will focus on the design and evaluation of drug-like molecules, with examples chosen from our own group's research into novel anti-influenza compounds, as well as other notable examples from the world of pharmaceutical development.

Fetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorders: New Therapies for the Brain (E M S)

Dr. Brian Christie
Associate Professor
Island Medical Program

Genetically Modified Organisms: Frankenfood or Cornucopia?

Dr. Edward E. Ishiguro
Professor Emeritus
Department of Biochemistry and Microbiology

The introduction of genetically modified organisms (GMOs) has resulted in an unprecedented level of controversy and debate. GMOs, on one hand, come with promises of improvements in characteristics that are unattainable by traditional plant or animal breeding. On the other hand, GMOs bring specters of new human health problems, environmental disasters, and economic issues. This presentation will be an unbiased (if, in fact, complete neutrality on this topic is at all possible) and will focus on both positive and negative issues surrounding GMOs with illustrations and scientific data.

Growing and Guiding New Neurons in the Healthy and Injured Brain (S)

Dr. Leigh Anne Swayne
Assistant Professor
Division of Medical Sciences

An introduction and general overview of how the brain 'works'. A primer on neural stem cells and brain plasticity and their relevance to everyday life in health and disease.

How Exercise Benefits the Brain (E M S)

Dr. Brian Christie
Associate Professor
Island Medical Program

How Understanding Fundamental Particle Interactions Helps us Understand the Universe (S)

Dr. Justin Albert
Assistant Professor
Department of Physics and Astronomy

Instinctive Science: Will Chips Beat Brains? (S)

Dr. Hugh Cartwright
Retirees Association
Department of Chemistry

Artificial Intelligence is now widely used to solve problems in science. At present computers are just tools for scientists, but the situation is changing. Within a few decades, computers will be far better at doing science than scientists are; we will become their tools. Should we be worried? This talk introduces some simple ideas from Artificial Intelligence and explains why Artificial Intelligence has such potential in science. This talk is suitable for both scientists and non-scientists

Inventing Iron Man: Can You Connect Your Body to a Machine? (S)

Dr. E. Paul Zehr
Director
Centre for Biomedical Research

Inventing Iron Man is a scientifically sound look at brain-machine interfaces and the outer limits where neuroscience and neural plasticity meet. “Inventing Iron Man” is a fun, direct, and parallel comparison of comic book science fiction with modern science.

Keeping a Healthy Brain and Body (S) NEW

Dr. Leigh Anne Swayne
Assistant Professor
Division of Medical Sciences

Keeping a healthy brain and body: lessons learned from cellular and molecular neuroscience. An introduction and general overview of how the brain works, looking at the impact of different life factors on the brain including an introduction to how things are run at the microscopic level.

Magnetism: Its History and Implications in Technology and Health (E M S)

Prof. Natia Frank
Associate Professor
Department of Chemistry

The origin of the magnetic fields present in planetary dynamics, the earth's magnetic field and its reversals over history, the role of magnetic fields in migratory behaviour of hundreds of species, and the role of magnetism in medicine and data storage technologies are discussed.

Molecules that Changed History (S) NEW

Prof. Jeremy Wulff
Assistant Professor
Department of Chemistry and Centre for Biomedical Research

Have you ever wondered about the connection between Nazi gunpowder and modern agriculture? Or about the close molecular relationship between the mustard gas used in WWI and the early drugs used for cancer chemotherapy? What about the historical connection between the octane rating scale on gasoline and the invention of the birth control pill? Or about the molecular reason that Manhattan belongs to the United States and not to the Netherlands? This talk raises these and other examples, in an examination of history from a chemical perspective.

Neurodegenerative Disorders ǂ NEW

Mr. Mohamed Ghilan
Graduate Student
Department of Neuroscience

The leading causes of brain degeneration are Alzheimer's, Huntington's and Parkinson's diseases. These are increasingly prevalent in the aging population and current research is identifying the underlying genetic mechanisms leading to these disorders. Although a cure hasn't been developed yet, our understanding is increasingly providing important insight on the development of these disorders and identifying possible therapeutic targets. These disorders have an aging factor involved within them, which is also illuminating our understanding of brain aging.

Nutrition and the Brain (S) NEW

Ms. Anna Patten
Sessional Instructor
Department of Biology

There is no doubt that the food we consume impacts our brain. In this presentation I will start by discussing the basics of brain structure and function and then talk about various food groups (carbohydrates, proteins, fats etc) and how they can impact cognition. I will also discuss omega-3 fatty acids and antioxidants and their ability to improve cognition.

Outside the Laboratory: Connecting Science with Society ǂ (M S) NEW

Mr Garrett Richards
Graduate Student
Department of Environmental Studies

Inside the classroom or laboratory, science can often appear straight forward and methodical, as demonstrated by the step-by-step scientific method. However, the broader interactions between science, politics, the media, and the general public are highly complex and often frustrating or confusing for those who are involved. Climate change, for example, has been a controversial issue of public debate, perhaps due to conflicting conceptions of what scientists can or cannot tell us with certainty. This talk discusses such interactions, pointing out the barriers that exist to productive communication and understanding between science and other spheres of society. Most importantly, ways for individuals to overcome some of these difficulties (e.g. how to critically read media accounts of science) are a main focus

Scientific Predictions through Computer Simulations (for example in Astronomy) (in English or German)

Dr. Falk Herwig
Assistant Professor
Physics and Astronomy

In the simulations presentation I discuss the basic principles of scientific predictions through computer simulations. Although the topic of the simulations will be in astrophysics the presentation is aimed to convey fundamental aspects of the nature of predictive science and the kind of statements scientist can make based on such simulations. This presentation would enhance the public's awareness of scientific approach and can be useful on the present debate on climate change predictions based on simulations. This presentation may be very well suited in a lecture series about a corresponding topic.

Solar Cells and Alternative Energy Technologies: Challenges and Prospects (E M S)

Prof. Natia Frank
Associate Professor
Department of Chemistry

The history of the science behind photovoltaics (solar cells, both inorganic and organic), trends in new types of solar cells, energy requirements, political and economic considerations, and comparison to other alternative energy technologies is discussed.

STARCal: Precision Astrophysics and Cosmology Enabled by a Tunable Laser in Space (S)

Dr. Justin Albert
Assistant Professor
Department of Physics and Astronomy

Stress and the Human Brain ǂ NEW

Mr. Mohamed Ghilan
Graduate Student
Department of Neuroscience

According to Statistics Canada, one in four Canadians described their day-to-day lives as highly stressful. Moreover, 75 per cent of short-term disability claims are stress-related, costing approximately $20 billion annually in insurance and lost productivity. In addition to the adverse health effects associated with increased stress, it's also known to negatively affect brain cognitive function, leading to impaired learning and memory, increased depression and difficulty coping with new stressors. How does the brain respond and adapt to stress and what can this knowledge tell us about possible ways to alleviate the negative effects of stress?

The Theory of Chaos (S)

Dr. Florin Diacu
Professor
Department of Mathematics and Statistics

The mathematical theory of chaos can be explained to anybody willing to understand it. Based on the presenter's book, Celestial Encounters: the Origins of Chaos and Stability.

Tour of the Astronomical Observatory at UVic (E M S)

Mr. Russell Robb
Senior Lab Instructor
Department of Physics and Astronomy

This tour is intended for groups of 24. Approximately 20 minutes are spent in the astronomy lab answering questions, 20 minutes looking at the sun, and 20 minutes in the dome observing Venus.

Toward Nature’s Heart of Darkness: New Technologies for Precision Astrophysics and Cosmology (S)

Dr. Justin Albert
Assistant Professor
Department of Physics and Astronomy

UVic’s Discovery of a Particle Consistent with being the Higgs Boson at the ATLAS Experiment at CERN (S)

Dr. Justin Albert
Assistant Professor
Department of Physics and Astronomy

What We Have Learned From the Human Genome NEW

Dr. Edward Ishiguro
Professor Emeritus
Department of Biochemistry and Microbiology

The decoding of the human genome, first reported in February 2000, heralded the beginning of a new era in biomedical research. What has the past decade of research on our genome has taught us about ourselves and our place in the biological world? Using cancer as an example, we will look at how genomics has contributed to our understanding of the genetic basis of human disease. The prospect of applying genome information for administering personalized or tailor-made medical diagnoses and treatments has received much hype. The status of this practice and recent insights on the organization of our genome, how our genes are controlled, and how their control may be influenced by environmental cues will also be discussed. Progress, of course, is often accompanied by controversy, and the issue of genetic engineering as a means of curing human diseases will be raised.

Where Did All of this Stuff Come From? Making Lead, Gold and Carbon in Stars and Supernovae (in English or German)

Dr. Falk Herwig
Assistant Professor
Physics and Astronomy

This presentation will present in general terms our present knowledge of the origin of the elements in stars and supernovae. It will feature animations and results from both observations and simulations. The audience will get a basic idea of the variety of physical processes that come together to provide what essentially is the basis of our earthly existence.

Why Can a Shirt be Turned Inside-out? Symmetry of Flexible Objects (S) NEW

Prof. Ryan Budney
Professor
Department of Mathematics and Statistics

A simple question a child sometimes asks their parents is “why can you turn a shirt inside-out?” Can you turn it inside out through the sleeve as well as the collar, or bottom? I would describe the context for the question in mathematics and the way mathematicians can address this and similar questions, like that of knotting. The machinery mathematicians have created that makes sense of this and other similar questions is called topology, and it is increasingly useful for creating autonomous robots that can complete basic tasks like driving a car in traffic or robots that carry gear for soldiers. Topology is also being used increasingly in data mining.

Wolf to Woof: Updating Darwin on Dog Origins (A Darwin Day Lecture) (M S)

Dr. Susan Crockford
Adjunct Assistant Professor
Department of Anthropology

Charles Darwin devoted a large portion of his career to the study of domestic animals and plants. In this “Darwin Day” lecture, Dr. Susan Crockford (author of Rhythms of Life: Thyroid Hormone and the Origin of Species) will provide an easy-to-understand explanation of her theory for the role of thyroid hormone in dog domestication and breed development.

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Social Health & Wellness

An Appropriate and Cost-effective Health Care System for an Aging Society (E M S) NEW

Dr. Neena L. Chappell
Canada Research Chair in Social Gerontology
Centre on Aging and Department of Sociology

Assessing Family Involvement in Nursing Homes (E M S) NEW

Dr. Neena L. Chappell
Canada Research Chair in Social Gerontology
Centre on Aging and Department of Sociology

Bowling Alone: The Loss of Community and its Consequences NEW

Dr. Jim Hackler
Adjunct Professor
Department of Sociology

Creating Healthy Communities NEW

Mr. Trevor Hancock
Professor and Senior Scholar
School of Public Health and Social Policy

What is a healthy community, and how do we get one? In this presentation, the ways in which the natural, built, social and economic environments affect the health of people in communities and what people can do to create a healthier community will be addressed.

Family Caregiving to Older Adults (E M S) NEW

Dr. Neena L. Chappell
Canada Research Chair in Social Gerontology
Centre on Aging and Department of Sociology

Filial Responsibility in China and Canada (E M S) NEW

Dr. Neena L. Chappell
Canada Research Chair in Social Gerontology
Centre on Aging and Department of Sociology

Healthy Communities for Older Adults (S) NEW

Dr. Denise Cloutier Fisher
Associate Professor
Centre on Aging and the Department of Geography

I am able to talk about healthy aging for older adults in the context of the places in which people live and are cared for. My interest has been on the housing, transportation and services that are important for community-dwelling older adults. Some of this research comes from the Healthy Communities and Healthy Cities projects which have focussed on making communities more friendly for seniors.

HIV & AIDS in Africa (S) NEW

Dr. Nat Kobina Markin
Sessional Instructor
Department of Political Science

This lecture is about the social aspects of HIV/AIDS intervention in African countries generally and Ghana specifically under the country's National Strategic Framework for HIV/AIDS. HIV in Ghana touches many aspects of life and of public policy. Even disease transmission is shaped by social dynamics and cultural factors that play a role in the evolution of the disease and the institutional responses to it. The lecture discusses critical social topics such as poverty, religion, community, superstition and stigma as they relate to implementation of the anti-HIV program.

Learning, Memory and Aging (S) NEW

Ms. Anna Patten
Sessional Instructor
Department of Biology

As we get older, our cognition begins to decline. In this presentation I will discuss the basics of brain structure and function, the processes and learning and memory and how learning and memory are affected with age. I will then end the presentation by giving information and ideas on how to prevent age related cognitive decline using diet, exercise and lifestyle.

The Lone Ranger: A Motif for Older Men with Small Social Networks (S) NEW

Dr. Denise Cloutier Fisher
Associate Professor
Centre on Aging and the Department of Geography

Since older women outnumber older men in the senior years, there is a lot of information in the research literature on older women and less on older men. This is particularly true in the context of relationships (e.g., spouses, friends and neighbours). This talk focuses on the differences between loneliness and solitude and understanding the lessons learned from a small scale, qualitative investigation of older adults’ experiences with small social support systems.

Making Prevention a Priority NEW

Mr. Trevor Hancock
Professor and Senior Scholar
School of Public Health and Social Policy

Despite the rhetoric of successive governments throughout Canada, prevention continues to be underfunded and is not a priority. But perhaps the most important way to increase the fiscal sustainability of the health care system is to reduce the overall burden of disease and injury the system has to cope with. In this presentation, I discuss what a proper prevention strategy would look like and what it will take to implement it.

Navigating Decline: Global Ecological Change and Health NEW

Mr. Trevor Hancock
Professor and Senior Scholar
School of Public Health and Social Policy

Many of our global ecological systems are in crisis and are declining as a result of the impacts of the human population’s growth, affluence and technologies. This has profound implications for our health. We need to face up to this reality and figure out how we will navigate this decline with the minimum of harm, and how in fact we can create a healthier, more hopeful future. This presentation will explore these issues and the implications for our communities and for public policy.

The Politics of Global Health (S) NEW

Dr. Nat Kobina Markin
Sessional Instructor
Department of Political Science

In this 21st century, global disparities in health are as great as ever and getting worse. These inequalities pose an ethical challenge for the global health community including both domestic and international health and development institutions. It is estimated that over 40 per cent of deaths worldwide are avoidable given the existing stock of global knowledge, technology and resources. In the last few decades, the field of global health has seen radical transformation as a result of enormous increase in international aid to support health systems in developing countries. This coupled with growing interest in global health issues among governments, multilateral organizations, civil society groups and the private sector has brought new legitimacy to the study and practice of global health and new visibility to issues surrounding policy and practice. This talk provides an overview of the politics of contemporary global health and in-depth consideration of some critical issues in the field. It is designed as an examination of global health with emphasis on developing countries especially in sub-Saharan Africa.

Recreation, Nature and Health NEW

Mr. Trevor Hancock
Professor and Senior Scholar
School of Public Health and Social Policy

Most of the determinants of health are beyond the health care system, in the wider environmental, social and economic environments of our communities. One of those determinants that is attracting increasing attention is the recreation system, which includes parks, recreation, fitness, sports, arts and culture. There is a related interest in the importance for human wellbeing of contact with nature. This presentation will explore these issues and the implications for our communities and for public policy.

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Social Health & Wellness

Demonstrating the Value of Human Services (M S)

Prof. Bryan Hiebert
Adjunct Professor
Department of Educational Psychology and Leadership Studies

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Social Issues

Anti-Oppressive Child Protection: Defining Terms ǂ (E M S) NEW

Ms. Daleen Adele Thomas
Graduate Student
Faculty of Law

In this lecture I define what is anti-oppressive child protection. I challenge the use and context of the language currently used in current reform. The lecture allows for audience interaction and is centred around self-reflective practice.

Can Punishment Reduce Crime?

Dr. Jim Hackler
Adjunct Professor
Department of Sociology

Conflict or Cooperation: Can We Create One or the Other?

Dr. Jim Hackler
Adjunct Professor
Department of Sociology

Crime Statistics and What They Mean

Dr. Jim Hackler
Adjunct Professor
Department of Sociology

Cyber-bullying: Perceptions and Responses ǂ (M) NEW

Mr. Brett Holfeld
Graduate Student
Department of Psychology

The increasing availability and use of technology among children and adolescents raises concerns about a corresponding increase in cyber-bullying. Cyber-bullying or bullying through the use of technology can be perpetrated anonymously and reach victimized adolescents day or night, at home or at school. Many victims of cyber-bullying can be negatively impacted by their experience. To reduce the distress associated with the experience and prevent future occurrences, it is important to examine children and adolescents experiences with online bullying. My research focuses on understanding children and adolescents' perceptions of and responses to online bullying. For example, how do victims of and bystanders to cyber-bullying perceive and react in these situations? Are there risk and protective processes (i.e., social support, school clime) that affect their response to cyber bullying? Together, this research can influence the development of intervention efforts aimed at reducing the frequency and impact of bullying behavior online among children and adolescents from various backgrounds.

The Dynamics of Doing Good (or Bad)

Dr. Jim Hackler
Adjunct Professor
Department of Sociology

The conditions that lead people to do good things (or bad things) are often known to many of us. However, the dynamics that lead to that behaviour are harder to predict. If we understood those dynamics better could we influence conditions and situations so that people behave well rather than badly?

The Good Samaritan: What Makes Her Tick?

Dr. Jim Hackler
Adjunct Professor
Department of Sociology

A Grand Cure for Crime, Sin and Other Nasties

Dr. Jim Hackler
Adjunct Professor
Department of Sociology

Grandparents Raising Grandchildren: What Happens for the Families? NEW

Dr. Barb Whittington
Professor
Department of Social Work

This is a growing phenomenon in Canada. The presentation is based on 10 years of research and community work with families who are raising relatives children. The complex issues for the families, the supports available and the resources needed will be discussed. Surprisingly to many, there are more BC children in the care of grandparents than there are children in foster care. Often these children arrive in traumatic and unexpected ways and the impacts are complicated and touching.

Housing for All: The Growth of Non-market Housing in Greater Victoria ǂ (E M S)

Dr. Benjamin Isitt
Graduate Student
Faculty of Law

Homelessness and housing affordability are key social issues in Greater Victoria today. This multimedia presentation explores the evolution of non-market housing, from large-scale public-housing projects after the Second World War, to innovative co-operative housing in the 1970s, to non-profit housing for the “hard to house” in recent years.

How We Really Feel about Nature (S) NEW

Dr. Richard Pickard
Senior Instructor
Department of English

We wear leather shoes, but we protest against forestry; we eat beef and lamb, but we love our pets. This talk looks at the roots of this complicated relationship, especially over the last three centuries.

If Apes Can Learn to Be Good, Why Can’t We?

Dr. Jim Hackler
Adjunct Professor
Department of Sociology

Traditionally, the behaviour of primates has been seen as “hard-wired.” That is, genetics determined how they behave. A troop of baboons noted for aggressive behaviour changed dramatically after a crisis. Do these studies suggest ways in which society can reduce aggressive and violent behaviour?

The Impact of Alcohol and Drug Use on Families: What do We Know and How can it Help? (S) NEW

Dr. Erica Woodin
Assistant Professor
Department of Psychology

Many couples are able to use alcohol and other substances in a healthy manner, yet some couples experience problems in their relationships around substance use. In this presentation, I will discuss couples’ use of alcohol and drugs, with a focus on helping couples make healthy decisions.

Impact of Stroke/Brain Injury on Survivors and/or Family Members ǂ (E M) NEW

Ms. Stacey Ross
Graduate Student
Department of Psychology

Brain injury and stroke often have significant impact on the life of the survivor as well as the life of the survivor’s family. This presentation includes education about the brain and how it works, as well a discusses the cognitive, psychological, social impact on family members - particularly those who take on a caregiving role - as well as the implications of these effects on everyday life, based on available scientific literature. The purpose of the presentation will be to provide education about the brain and the implications of brain injury/stroke and to increase awareness regarding what may be expected after such an injury is incurred. The presentation would be primarily aimed at community-living survivors of brain injury/stroke and/or their family members; however, it could also be applicable to professionals/institutions/government agencies that work with or provide care to individuals with brain injury/stroke who have not had specific training in this area. The presentation will focus on adult brain injury.

The Impacts of the Residential School Experience Today ǂ NEW

Ms. Sheila Nyman
Graduate Student
Department of Social Work

The Many Faces of Racism and Why it is so Difficult to Eradicate (M S)

Dr. Rennie Warburton
Professor Emeritus
Department of Sociology

Examples and research findings on different kinds of racism, including white racism, racism among racialized minorities, overt/covert racism, and racism that intersects with class, gender and other types of discrimination. This diversity makes racism complex and difficult to explain without considering the historical contexts in which it occurs.

Multiculturalism and Immigration in Canada

Dr. Reeta Tremblay
Vice-President Academic and Provost
Office of the Vice-President and Provost

Multiculturalism Policy in Canada: Has it Worked? (M S)

Dr. Rennie Warburton
Professor Emeritus
Department of Sociology

Multiculturalism is considered beneficial in helping Canadians to better understand one another by encouraging ethnic communities to express, celebrate and preserve their distinct cultures. Dissidents maintain that multiculturalism prevents the assimilation of immigrants and other minorities and helps to perpetuate white racism by encouraging ethnic divisions.

The Nature of Community: Are We Expecting Too Much?

Dr. Jim Hackler
Adjunct Professor
Department of Sociology

The Philanthropist as Con Man

Dr. Jim Hackler
Adjunct Professor
Department of Sociology

Those who find themselves labeled as philanthropists are sometimes given special treatment. In fact, being viewed as a philanthropist is a “good deal.” The rewards that accrue are considerable – the giver usually gets much more than he or she gives. But the main focus of this talk is on the difficulty of being philanthropic in a wise way. Are there ways to get a better return on our social investments? Are there ways to avoid excessive amounts of money being diverted from the chosen cause?

Public Responses to Prostitution in Hamburg

Dr. Jim Hackler
Adjunct Professor
Department of Sociology

Reducing Inequalities in Health NEW

Mr. Trevor Hancock
Professor and Senior Scholar
School of Public Health and Social Policy

There are unacceptably large inequalities in health in BC, Canada and around the world. These inequalities are not only unfair and unjust, they are also to a large extent avoidable. They also result in a large additional burden of disease and costs to the health care system, and a range of other social and economic costs, as well as a massive loss of human potential. In fact, poverty may be so expensive that we cannot afford it! This presentation will discuss this issue and what it will take to address it.

Residential Schools in Canada: The Good, the Bad and the Ugly (in English or Spanish) (E M S) NEW

Dr. Carmen Rodriguez de France
Assistant Professor
Department of Curriculum and Instruction

Historical overview of Residential schools, policy, and implications.

Science and Government: A Marriage of Inconvenience (in English or French) (S)

Dr. Jack Basuk
Retirees Association

Science and Government, A Marriage of Inconvenience is book I have written (in Canada's archives).My website (Jack Basuk.com) is a guide to much of what I have written and available to speak on.

Science, Government and Society (in English or French) (S)

Dr. Jack Basuk
Retirees Association

I was the Secretary of the now defunct advisory federal government agency, the Science Council of Canada, (SCC) between 1971 and 1978. The council was mandated to offer the government advice in any area of science policy: any policy area where science and/or technology play an important role. Between 1978 and 1989 I was a regular member of the SCC's research staff with a particular interest on the impacts of science and technology on society.

Traditional Indigenous Healing: Ceremonies and the Potential for Healing Traumatic Experiences ǂ NEW

Ms. Sheila Nyman
Graduate Student
Department of Social Work

A Truly Successful Crime and Delinquency Prevention Project

Dr. Jim Hackler
Adjunct Professor
Department of Sociology

Truth and Reconciliation Hearings: Creating Balance between Positive and Negative Experiences ǂ NEW

Ms. Sheila Nyman
Graduate Student
Department of Social Work

Wise Women Speak: Changes along the Path

Dr. Lara Lauzon
Assistant Professor
School of Exercise Science, Physical and Health Education

Have you ever found yourself thrown off the path you know only to discover you are now traveling down a new path, one that has uncharted territory? This session, based on a chapter I have written in a book for the Wise Women series, is about personal and professional challenges and the opportunity to reflect on the many changes along your path. In celebration of women, let’s talk about growing wiser, pursuing dreams, and overcoming loss and fear.

The “Why?” of Homelessness and Poverty ǂ NEW

Ms. Sheila Nyman
Graduate Student
Department of Social Work

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Work & Employment

Action Research as a Professional Development Tool: Steps, Challenges, and Opportunities NEW

Dr. Li-Shih Huang
Associate Professor
Department of Linguistics

Are Unions Still Relevant Today? NEW

Dr. John Fryer
Adjunct Professor
School of Public Administration

This talk examines the widely held notion that unions and the protection that they offer workers are no longer needed today. It will demonstrate the impossibility of living on the minimum wage. It will demonstrate with current examples why protection is still needed especially for younger workers who have little knowledge of their rights.it will take a look at the Temporary Foreign Worker program and how it is being used to take jobs from Canadian workers as well as driving down wages and benefits.

Beyond Diversity and Human Rights: How to Create Inclusive Spaces for Social Change (in English or French) (M S)

Mr. Moussa Magassa
Human Rights Advisor - Education
Equity and Human Rights Office

Careers in Architecture (S) NEW

Mr. Don Lovell
Retirees Association

Curriculum Development Using a Project Management Methodology NEW

Dr. Richard Rush
Director
Community and Professional Programs

Curriculum development is both an art and a science. Crossing the often tenuous boundary between industry and education learn how one organization took a project management methodology and applied it to curriculum development with great success. Learn about potential pitfalls as well as strategic benefits of this approach.

Designing Personal Logos (S) NEW

Dr. Michelle Wiebe
Senior Instructor
Department of Curriculum and Instruction

Basic logo design is an interesting art form because it relies on an understanding of the figure - ground relationship. Learning to design a personal logo is a meaningful activity that involves thinking about personal identity and learning to communicate using visual means.

E-Learning and Learning Management Systems NEW

Dr. Richard Rush
Director
Community and Professional Programs

Using a learning management system effectively is a critical component of a successful e-learning strategy. This talk explains what actions can make this transition as successful as possible by discussing four case studies learning management system migrations in four different organizations.

Emerging Adults and Career Development in the 21st Century (S)

Dr. Janet Sheppard
Counsellor
Department of Counselling Services

This talk will address the demographic and developmental shifts evident in young adults in Canada and other post-industrial countries. I will link the influences (sociological, psychological, educational and economic) and talk about the important implications this has for young people, in terms of their life/career awareness and decision making.

Higher Education and the World of Work: Canada's “Perfect Storm” (S)

Dr. Janet Sheppard
Counsellor
Department of Counselling Services

I will discuss the impacts of globalization and technology on Canada's economic situation, with a particular focus on the shrinking labour pool, global economic instability, and how higher education is responding.

Intercultural Conflict Resolution (in English or French) (M S)

Mr. Moussa Magassa
Human Rights Advisor - Education
Equity and Human Rights Office

Project Management for Absolute Beginners (S)

Mr. Erik Fleischer
Project Manager
Learning Systems

Project management for absolute beginners What exactly is a project? How do you turn a vision, an idea, a need into a set of concrete steps? And what do you need to do to successfully accomplish those steps? This session assumes no prior knowledge of project management.

What's an Archivist? Careers in Archives and Related Fields (S)

Ms. Lara Wilson
University Archivist
Library

This talk explains how and why I chose a career in archives, and the future opportunities for work in archives and related information management fields. Can also include information on conducting research in archives.

When Talks Matter: Respectful and Welcoming Communities (in English or French) (M S)

Mr. Moussa Magassa
Human Rights Advisor - Education
Equity and Human Rights Office

Why We Still Need Unions NEW

Dr. John Fryer
Adjunct Professor
School of Public Administration

Many people today seem to believe that while unions once performed a useful role in our society they no longer do so. This talk challenges these assumptions. It demonstrates that there is still a definite 'union advantage' in both wages and working conditions. This benefit is particularly significant for women and younger workers. As such the talk will seek to demonstrate that workers are as vulnerable today as they ever were to exploitation even if today that exploitation takes on somewhat different forms.

Workplace Learning: “What? I’m Not Learning, I’m Working!” NEW

Ms. Cynthia Korpan
Program Manager
Learning and Teaching Centre

This presentation is about the field of workplace learning. The workplace is not often recognized as a site of significant learning. However, research is increasingly highlighting the important contribution that the workplace brings to a person's lifelong learning trajectory. Theories and practice surrounding this dynamic field of research will be shared.

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Work & Employment

The Good Goals Workshop: Strategies for Performing Well in Dynamic Organizational Settings

Dr. Rhordon Wikkramatileke
Instructor and Curriculum Developer
Division of Continuing Studies

This session examines the issues associated with performance management in changing public sector environments and explores several strategies and tools that one may use to manage this process for oneself and for others.

Reframing Your Organization: Are You Working Well?

Dr. Lara Lauzon
Assistant Professor
School of Exercise Science, Physical and Health Education

Multi-frame thinking and decision making can help managers, administrators, supervisors, and leaders discover how they view their organization and take steps toward a strategic planning process for sifting options and solving problems when an organization is ready for change. This workshop is of value for anyone who has a vision or plan for renewal within their organization–a plan to help their organization, department or section to “work well.”

Understanding Passion in Organizations: Using Sport as a Lens (in English and French) (S) NEW

Dr. Richard Wolfe
Professor
Peter B. Gustavson School of Business

Work / Life Balance NEW

Dr. Lara Lauzon
Assistant Professor
School of Exercise Science, Physical and Health Education

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World Affairs

Africa and International Development (M S) NEW

Dr. Marlea Clarke
Assistant Professor
Department of Political Science

Africa in the Global Economy: From Development to Trade? (M S) NEW

Dr. Marlea Clarke
Assistant Professor
Department of Political Science

The Euro Crisis: Causes and Consequences (in English, Italian, French, German and Dutch) (M S) NEW

Dr. Amy Verdun
Professor
Department of Political Science

The European Union has seen a turbulent few years around the euro area and its sovereign debt crisis in the wake of the global financial crisis. What are some of the causes of the problems and what may be the consequences? This talk is geared to a general audience that can follow the talk without having much background of the underlying technical details.

The European Union: Why Canadians Need to Keep an Interest in European Affairs (in English, Italian, French, German and Dutch) (M S) NEW

Dr. Amy Verdun
Professor
Department of Political Science

Why Canadians need to keep an interest in European affairs. Today one often hears that Canadians no longer need to focus on Europe because the motor of the global economy has moved to emerging economies and Europe is in a state of shambles. This talk clarifies why Canada and Europe have a lot in common, and why Canadians still benefit from knowing more about what is happening on the other side of the Atlantic. This talk is geared to a general audience that can follow the talk without having much background of the underlying governance structure or current affairs of the European Union.

Healthcare in Europe: Policy and Opportunities for Small Companies NEW

Dr. Terry Mughan
Associate Professor
Peter B. Gustavson School of Business

Heathcare: obstacles to market penetration. This UVic speaker taught in UK universities for more than 20 years and carried out research into small company behaviour there and throughout the world.

Higher Education in the UK: How to Study Effectively NEW

Dr. Terry Mughan
Associate Professor
Peter B. Gustavson School of Business

Higher Education - same language, cultural difference. Terry Mughan taught in UK universities for more than 20 years and carried out research into Small company behaviour there and throughout the world. He has also published in the fields of language and cross-cultural learning.

India, Pakistan, Afghanistan and Kashmir

Dr. Reeta Tremblay
Vice-President Academic and Provost

International Development (S) NEW

Dr. Nat Kobina Markin
Sessional Instructor
Department of Political Science

The politics of international development provides an overview of the theory and practice of development and the relationships between developed and developing nations (past and present). It is designed to enhance understanding of the main paradigms in development theory including neo-classical theories that focus on “diffusion of development”, neo-Marxist theories based on imperialism and dependency and environmental theories based on a concept of sustainable development. It explores the roles of some main actors in international development and their activities in development interventions around the world. It also covers the social aspects of development with special focus on such topics as poverty, health, fair trade and culture. It further considers on-going debates about relationships between developed and developing societies with special emphasis placed on power and resource distribution globally and locally within nations and the role of international assistance in development interventions in the global south.

Is it Time to Rethink Canada's Connection to the British Monarchy?(M S) NEW

Dr. John Fryer
Adjunct Professor
School of Public Administration

Just about everyone realizes that the Queen of England is our head of state. This talk will examine whether or not this is a good time to be rethinking the situation whereby a foreign hereditary monarch rather than an elected Canadian should play that largely ceremonial role. In particular, the current monarch will not live forever and if a change is desirable now may be a good time to examine this issue. The various alternatives to the British monarch will be canvassed. To do so is to be able to prepare for an orderly change rather than have King Charles III or King William V succeed to the position of Canada's head of state.

Predicting Megadisasters: Tsunamis, Volcanic Eruptions, Stock Market Crashes and Pandemics (S)

Dr. Florin Diacu
Professor
Department of Mathematics and Statistics

Revolution and Military Intervention in the Middle East ǂ (E M S)

Dr. Benjamin Isitt
Graduate Student
Faculty of Law

Recent revolutions in Egypt and across the Arab world and NATO’s military intervention in Libya and other states have highlighted long-standing social tensions in the region. This multimedia presentation provides historical context for current events, while exploring difficult questions of democracy, human rights and foreign policy.

South Africa in 2014: 20 Years After the First Democratic Election (M S) NEW

Dr. Marlea Clarke
Assistant Professor
Department of Political Science

South Africa’s Transition to Democracy (M S) NEW

Dr. Marlea Clarke
Assistant Professor
Department of Political Science

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Personal Interests

An Afternoon in Antarctica (E M S) NEW

Mr. Chris Mundigler
Instructor for Continuing Studies
Division of Continuing Studies

Antarctica – land of snow and ice, the ends of the Earth, the last frontier, the ultimate adventure. It’s different things to different people, but one thing is as clear as an ice-bound morning here:  its otherworldly magnificence has caught the minds and souls of adventurous mortals for generations now. As both the harshest environment on earth and the most photogenic, Antarctica has proved to be the dream of a lifetime for some, and the final resting place for others. In this illustrated talk, we find out what makes this place so intriguing as an inhospitable home to a handful of explorers as well as a multitude of natural wonders.

An Afternoon in Machu Picchu (E M S) NEW

Mr. Chris Mundigler
Instructor for Continuing Studies
Division of Continuing Studies

Machu Picchu – the name alone evokes hushed tones and reverent nods.  But the place is so much more – perched in the heavens, it was at once a palace for mere mortals, and a home for the gods, hidden from both native and European eyes for almost 500 years. In this stunning visual expedition we explore this enigmatic sanctuary in the clouds from its initial construction during the European Late Middle Ages to its forgotten glory, to its eventual rediscovery only a century ago, and its current status as “No.1” on many peoples’ bucket-list.

An Afternoon on an Archaeological Dig (E M S) NEW

Mr. Chris Mundigler
Instructor for Continuing Studies
Division of Continuing Studies

Archaeology, the study of remains and monuments, unearths often the only knowledge we have of vanished cultures, their lifestyles and even their very existence. In this illustrated talk, we'll see what it's like to dig into ancient cultures, bringing alive the buried past over the course of an excavation season. We'll work our way through discovering and excavating an ancient 3,500-year-old Bronze Age settlement in southern Greece - from the first tentative shovels in the ground; to the full-scale excavation of houses, industrial areas and even a palace; to the science, art, technology (and sheer fun) involved in the day-to-day adventure of digging up the past.

An Afternoon on Easter Island (E M S) NEW

Mr. Chris Mundigler
Instructor for Continuing Studies
Division of Continuing Studies

Easter Island, lovingly called Rapa Nui by the locals since the 1860s, also bears more romantic, ancient names, such as Te pito o te henua, meaning "the navel of the land" and, perhaps most fittingly, Mata-ki-Te-rangi, which means "eyes looking to the sky" – a most apt name when we consider the almost 900 moai statues left behind by the ancient islanders, carved in just 300 years during our European Late Middle Ages. In this illustrated talk, we explore this tiny island (smaller than Salt Spring Island), and look at its ancient discovery by Polynesian explorers, its more modern discovery by Europeans, and its untimely demise through civil war, environmental misuse and the greed of slavery.

Beekeeping (S)

Dr. John H. Esling
Professor
Department of Linguistics

A Bird's-eye View of Victoria and the Mystery of Annie Ross

Dr. Nick Russell
Retirees Association

A richly illustrated talk describing the history and appeal of bird's-eye views, which were hugely popular across North America in the late 19th Century, plus a close-up look at an amazing 6-foot-wide watercolour bird's-eye view painted of Victoria by a totally unknown local artist. Talk includes many "before-and-after" pictures, showing how scenes in the pictures look today.

The Black Swans of Climate Science (S)

Mr. Paul MacRae
Sessional Lecturer
Department of English

"Black swans" are facts that weaken or falsify a scientific theory. Although many climate scientists are certain that human carbon emissions will cause runaway global warming, this talk explores climate facts-the black swans-that undermine this theory. One black swan is that the planet has not warmed for more than a decade.

Botanical Gardens on the Big Island of Hawaii

Dr. David J. Ballantyne
Associate Professor Emeritus
Department of Biology

Hear about the eight botanical gardens on the Big Island of Hawaii, as well as some volcanoes and historical sites.

The Bride Stripped Bare: The Nude Throughout Art

Mr. Tom Gore
Retirees Association
Department of Biology

The Bride Stripped Bare presents the evolution of the depiction of the nude throughout the history of art and especially looks at the relationship between photography and painting of the nude. It especially considers recent trends and directions in figurative art.

A Canadian Living in Peru (M S)

Mr. John Newcomb
Retirees Association
Department of Geography

UVic retiree relives his time as a grad student working in the Canadian Embassy in Lima, Peru during the tumultuous times of 1988-1990, and personal observations on similarities and differences between our cultures.

The Changing Economics of Book Publishing in Canada (S)

Mr. Marc Christensen
Publications Officer
UVic Communications Services

This talk will introduce audiences to the hidden economics of traditional book publishing in Canada, including discussion of royalties, government supports, distribution costs, marketing, bookstore discounts and returns. We will also explore the ways that e-books and the rise of alternate distribution models (in particular Amazon) are changing the nature of publishing, in both positive and negative ways.

The Climate Crisis: Our Future, Our Choice (S) NEW

Ms. Rita Fromholt
Sustainability Coordinator
Office of Campus Planning and Sustainability

Climate change is widely acknowledged by scientists, economists, academics and the occasional political leader as the most pressing issue of our time. Extreme weather events, warming oceans and melting polar ice caps are only a few of the many consequences of a warming planet. And they are already impacting not only our natural world, but also our economy and human health. The science is clear and the solutions are at hand all we need now is the political will to make them happen.

Compassionate Communication: Four Simple Steps to Improving Connection with Self and Others (S)

Ms. Michele Favarger
Bursary Clerk
Student Awards and Financial Aid

Four simple steps to improving connection with self and others: nonviolent communication basics–a primer on the process of compassionate communication.

Costa Rica’s Environment and Development (M S)

Mr. John Newcomb
Retirees Association
Department of Geography

Cusco: Peru’s Modern City of the Ancient Incas (M S)

Mr. John Newcomb
Retirees Association
Department of Geography

A month in the ancient Andean mountain city of Cusco reveals both ancient and modern urban planning and cultures.

Digital Typography: Taking Desktop Publishing to the Next Level (S)

Mr. Erik Fleischer
Project Manager
Learning Systems

Digital typography: Taking desktop publishing to the next level How do you design an attractive yet readable document or web page? Explore some principles of page design and learn more about type ("fonts") and how to use it. This session can be adapted for different skill levels, but is intended for people who are at least comfortable using a word processor.

The Disappointments of the BC Treaty Process: A Nuu-chah-nulth Perspective (E M S)

Ms. Dawn Smith
Aboriginal Student Advisor
Community Internship Coordinator for the LE, NONET Project

For the last 12 years the Nuu-chah-nulth (NCN) have been actively involved in the BC Treaty Process with the hopes of achieving a fair and just agreement that would provide the opportunities for a brighter future. Why, after 12 years, are the NCN are only left with disappointment and a huge debt?

Discovering Peru: Machu Picchu, the Amazon Rainforest and Cuzco (in English or Cantonese) (M S)

Ms. Elsie Chan
Sessional Instructor
School of Public Administration

A Journey from the Amazon Basin to the Inca Heartland, and on to the islands of Lake Titicaca.

Don't Just Do Something, Stand There! How to Provide Support to People in Emotional Pain (S)

Ms. Michele Favarger
Bursary Clerk
Student Awards and Financial Aid

Our society focuses on 'the fix'. Here is an effective alternative which contributes to the well-being of others, and moves us out of the 'fix-it' mode.

Ethics of Police Conduct (S)

Dr. Eike Kluge
Professor
Department of Philosophy

European Vacation: London, Paris and Madrid–with Stops Along the Way (S)

Prof. Rosa Stewart
Senior Instructor
Department of Hispanic and Italian Studies

On this excursion I travelled from London to Madrid visiting some amazing places along the way: London, Paris, various castles in the Loire Valley, the Mediterranean coast of Italy, Barcelona, a bit of the northern coast of Spain and finally Madrid.

The Eye, the Heart and the Machine: An Intro to Photography (S)

Mr. Erik Fleischer
Project Manager
Learning Systems

The eye, the heart & the machine: an intro to photography. What makes a photo compelling? How do different camera components affect the final image, and how do you control them? This workshop includes a bit of art, a bit of science and a lot of experimentation. Bring your camera!

The Francophone Community of British Columbia (in English or French) (M)

Dr. Real Roy
Assistant Professor
Department of Biology

Many are surprised to discover that French has been spoken since the early years of the 19th century. Who are they? Where are they? What are their civil institutions?

From Chaucer to Chat Rooms: Why English is the Best Language in the World

Dr. Nick Russell
Retirees Association

An irreverent, illustrated history of the language.

From Jackal to Giraffe: How We Talk to Ourselves (S)

Ms. Michele Favarger
Bursary Clerk
Student Awards and Financial Aid

Identify life-affirming ways to respond to negative self-talk.

Glorious Victorians: A Celebration of Victoria's Residential Heritage

Dr. Nick Russell
Retirees Association

A new and richly illustrated talk on what makes Victoria such a wonderful place to live.

The Good, the Bad and a Few of the Ugly: Deconstructing the Portrait

Mr. Tom Gore
Retirees Association
Department of Biology

The Good, the Bad and a few of the Ugly looks at the portrait over the past two thousand years and especially considers new approaches that evolved in response to the introduction of photography. It looks at cultural and gender issues as well as evolving artistic styles.

Grammar Instruction and the War Over College Writing Skills (S)

Mr. Marc Christensen
Publications Officer
UVic Communications Services

Perceptions of the writing skills of inbound college and university students have been part of public debate (or public crisis) for more than a hundred years. This talk looks at what's at stake for the students, teachers, colleges and universities, and for the public itself in this debate, and explores the relationship between grammar instruction and composition on Canadian and American campuses.

Health and Precarious Employment (M S)

Dr. Marlea Clarke
Assistant Professor
Department of Political Science

How Come You Can't Hear Me? Removing Communication Obstacles (S)

Ms. Michele Favarger
Bursary Clerk
Student Awards and Financial Aid

Identify things we say and do that block our ability to hear and be heard. Learn some other ways of communicating.

How to Say What You Mean and Be Heard (S)

Ms. Michele Favarger
Bursary Clerk
Student Awards and Financial Aid

Using real-life scenarios, hear the four-step NVC process in action. Come prepared to share your challenging interactions in a safe environment.

I Know You Heard What I Said, But What You Don't Understand is What I Said is Not What I Meant! (S)

Ms. Michele Favarger
Bursary Clerk
Student Awards and Financial Aid

How to express your needs in a way that is more likely to get them met, and if not, to at least enjoy the dialogue.

Indigenous Leadership in the 21st Century (E M S)

Ms. Dawn Smith
Aboriginal Student Advisor
Community Internship Coordinator for the LE, NONET Project

Indigenous leadership is critical to a nation’s cultural, social, political, economical and spiritual survival. As Indigenous peoples we have a responsibility not only to our families, community and nation, but to our surrounding environment. Therefore, it is necessary to critically evaluate the success, or lack thereof within the present leadership.

Japan: The Past, the Present and the Future (in English or Cantonese) (M S)

Ms. Elsie Chan
Sessional Instructor
School of Public Administration

This presentation explores the culture, people and sceneries across Japan.

Listening to Jazz Music: A Beginner’s Primer (S)

Mr. Bert Annear
Director
Graduate Admissions and Records

A brief introduction to some of the highlights of jazz music and how to understand what you are hearing.

Making and Breaking the Narrative of Urban Decline in Detroit (S)

Mr. Marc Christensen
Publications Officer
UVic Communications Services

The decline of the City of Detroit from the "Arsenal of Democracy" in World War II, with a population of 2 million, to its current often-lamented state as home to 700,000 mostly poor, underserved residents is a story of many strands and claims, involving planning decisions, race, class and the central role played by the automobile in the city during the 20th century. This talk addresses the traditional narrative of Detroit's rise and fall, as well as the counter-narratives and other realities that are often forgotten when we focus on the city's decline.

Maximizing Team Potential (S)

Mr. Bert Annear
Director
Graduate Admissions and Records

Some key ideas and concepts to help teams work together more effectively.

The Mexican Revolution: History and Songs (in English or Spanish) (E M S) NEW

Dr. Carmen Rodriguez de France
Assistant Professor
Department of Curriculum and Instruction

An overview of this period of time in Mexico. Live music and songs are shared!

More Sewage Treatment for Victoria? (M S)

Mr. John Newcomb
Retirees Association
Department of Geography

Peru’s “Volcanic” City of Arequipa (M S)

Mr. John Newcomb
Retirees Association
Department of Geography

Powerlifting: a Sport for all Ages (S) NEW

Mr. Don Lovell
Retirees Association

The Role of Women in the Mexican Revolution (in English or Spanish) (E M S) NEW

Dr. Carmen Rodriguez de France
Assistant Professor
Department of Curriculum and Instruction

Discussion of the dichotomy in women's roles in the era of the Mexican Revolution.

Ross Bay Villa: From Bulldozer Bait to Showplace NEW

Dr. Nick Russell
Retirees Association

How The Land Conservancy rescued and restored one of Victoria’s oldest houses and discovered one of Victoria’s most interesting pioneers.” 

Se Habla Español! Words and Games (in English or Spanish) (E M S) NEW

Dr. Carmen Rodriguez de France
Assistant Professor
Department of Curriculum and Instruction

Fun and interactive presentation for all audiences who wish to learn simple phrases and simple songs in Spanish. The poetry of Pablo Neruda and Miguel Hernandez.

Sex, Love and the Mothers of Confederation (M S) NEW

Ms. Moira Dann
Public Relations and Communication Officer
Peter B. Gustavson School of Business

Do you know which Father of Confederation married his secretary’s sister? Which "father" advised his daughters to emulate his mistress, not their mother? And which of our nation's male founders impressed a crowd in Charlottetown in 1864 by showing baby pictures? These questions will be answered (and more detail revealed about Confederation's distaff history) in this talk. “Canadian history is so not boring,” explains this UVic speaker –a former CBC and Globe and Mail staffer who speaks and writes extensively about the social history of the Confederation era. “That era was full of sex and gossip and intrigue and backstabbing and drunken shenanigans."

A Summer Trip to Uganda, Africa (in English or Cantonese) (M S)

Ms. Elsie Chan
Sessional Instructor
School of Public Administration

Explore the sceneries, culture and people of Uganda, the pearl of Africa.

Tools and Ideas to Help Stimulate Creativity (S)

Mr. Bert Annear
Director
Graduate Admissions and Records

A discussion on tools and ideas to help stimulate creativity. A collection of ideas and tools to help you kick start your creative process.

Touring the Midi Canal in Southern France

Dr. Ian Cameron
Adjunct Professor
Department of Educational Psychology and Leadership Studies

Touring the Yukon and Alaska (M S) NEW

Dr. Ian Cameron
Adjunct Professor
Department of Educational Psychology and Leadership Studies

Touring through England, Scotland and Ireland (S)

Prof. Rosa Stewart
Senior Instructor
Department of Hispanic and Italian Studies

Touring through England, Scotland and Ireland - We did a bus tour of this beautiful region starting with several days in London and then visiting Edinburgh, the shores of Loch Ness, the Isle of Skye, Manchester, Dublin, Killarney, Bath, Stonehenge and several other places as well.

Travelling Lightly and Safely: Tips for Women Travellers

Dr. Margie Mayfield
Professor Emeritus
Department of Curriculum and Instruction

Triathlon Training for the Busy Person NEW

Dr. Richard Rush
Director
Community and Professional Programs

Think that doing an Ironman triathlon is beyond your ability or your time to train? You don’t need to be a superstar athlete or give up the rest of your life. Find out how a full-time working father of five, volunteer and student balanced a busy schedule with triathlon training.

A Trip along the Silk Road (Ancient Trade Routes) in China (in English or Cantonese) (M S)

Ms. Elsie Chan
Sessional Instructor
School of Public Administration

One of the world’s oldest and most important trade routes, the Silk Road was a great transcontinental path that linked the West to the East, and remains a treasure to the region. Travel in the footsteps of Marco Polo along this ancient and illustrious trade route: Beijing, Urumqi, Turpan, Dunhauang, Jiayuguang, Lanzhou, Ximing, Xian and Shanghai.

Urban Marginalization and the Birth of House and Techno Music (S)

Mr. Marc Christensen
Publications Officer
UVic Communications Services

House music, emerging from Chicago, and techno, which was born in Detroit, have intertwining narratives of cross-pollination beginning in the mid-1980s. This talk focuses on the development of these two distinct styles of music as responses to the stratification of commercial radio in the 1970s and 80s and to the increasingly narrow expectations of racialized performance during that era.

Venezuela: Beautiful Country, Unusual Politics! (M S)

Mr. John Newcomb
Retirees Association
Department of Geography

Volunteering in Africa: Making a Difference One Project at a Time

Dr. David Docherty
Professor Emeritus
School of Exercise Science, Physical and Health Education

Water Conservation for BC—and You and Me (M S)

Mr. John Newcomb
Retirees Association
Department of Geography

British Columbian’s greatest resources include water, but as our population grows, we’ll have to meet some challenging water issues. Our success depends a lot on you and me.

What are My Natural Roles for Teams? (S)

Mr. Bert Annear
Director
Graduate Admissions and Records

Understanding how we can use our natural skills to enhance our productivity and effectiveness in team settings

What's Really Going On? Dealing with Challenging Interactions (S)

Ms. Michele Favarger
Bursary Clerk
Student Awards and Financial Aid

In today's challenging workplace environment, with cutbacks and doing more with less, how can we respond in a supportive way when we feel helpless to 'do' anything.

Work / Life Balance: Managing Parental Pressures in the Workplace (in English, Italian, French, German and Dutch) (M S) NEW

Dr. Amy Verdun
Professor
Department of Political Science

In today's world it is still challenging to manage the pressures of a family with those in the workplace. This is increasingly true for both men and women. In this talk the speaker provides some insights based on her personal experience. The speaker is a professor and a mother of three children and her common-law partner has a full time job as a professional.

Yoga Psychology (E M S)

Ms. Shubha Hosalli
Electronic Technician
Department of Chemistry

Yoga psychology harnesses the powers of awareness, attunement and embodied learning to foster an inquiry into the foundation of your unique expression of self-awareness, health and wellness.

Yogic Living (E M S)

Ms. Shubha Hosalli
Electronic Technician
Department of Chemistry

Many people practice yoga but yoga is not only a soothing workout. It is also a lifestyle, helping people embrace states of wellbeing.

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